Issuu on Google+

6 Sorry not sorry 8 UPD brutality claim settled 9 Growing up growing 16 Crabs n’ cronuts 26 Puppets 28 Muppets 31 Martian flora


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem FORCES OF NATURE

5

Media Maven THE BIG CHILL

6 News FUMBLED APOLOGY

8 9

Blog Jammin’ Week in Weed our boys

10 On The Cover liquor run

13 Home & Garden Service Directory

15 Bobarazzi 16 Table Talk HUM PLATE ROUNDUP

18 Music & More! 22 The Setlist a doozy

24 Calendar 28 Filmland Divergent conforms

29 Workshops 31 Field Notes TREES ON MARS

35 Sudoku 35 Crossword 35 Marketplace 38 Body, Mind & Spirit 39 Real Estate This Week

touch me! iPod touch 32 or 64 GB

On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

3


Comment of the Week Life Editor: Regardless of where you stand on capital punishment, the statistics pertaining to California’s exercising of the punishment are rather sobering (“A Capital Question,” March 20). Considering that nearly 60 percent of those who have died on death row since 1978 have done so via natural causes, these individuals essentially served a “life without the possibility of parole” sentences. Given the exorbitant expenditures exhausted on the death penalty and the rather staid outcome, it seems that one can realize the ultimate objective (death) by sentencing all those convicted of capital crimes to life without the possibility of parole. Q.E.D. Michael Sanders, Arcata

Quality of Life Editor: The article by Thadeus Greenson on the county’s General Plan Update (“The GPU,” March 13) was both interesting and revealing. I found the comments of the county’s planning director, Kevin Hamblin, especially apropos. Hamblin acknowledges that “people like living here” and are very protective of our physical surroundings. But he adds that people also leave the county due to the lack of opportunity and “economic growth is always a top priority for policy makers.” From my perspective the debates surrounding the update language represent

two competing theories of economic development. The “Resource Extraction Theory of Economics” assumes that extraction and export of natural resources form the “base” of the economy and all other economic activity derives from that base. In contrast, the “Quality of Life Theory” (from a 1995 report by The Wilderness Society) assumes that job creation is driven primarily by entrepreneurial activity and entrepreneurs and residents make location decisions based, in part, on quality of life. The quality of life theory views the environment as more than a repository of raw materials. The environment also keeps existing residents and their businesses from leaving while attracting new people and businesses. People are, quite simply, seeking a pleasant environment in which to live and do business. Under the quality of life theory, the first rule of economic development is “preservation of environmental amenities.” Today, economic success depends on an increased application of human resources, of skilled professionals who add value to natural resources (e.g., furniture making, nature tourism). The key difference between low-wage and high-wage service jobs will be education. We must seek a “win-win” scenario that supports positive links between environment and development resulting in environmental improvement at the same time as positive income growth. Michael Sweeney, Ferndale

Q &A Hey, McGuinty! That Facebook creep? Outlaw inlaws? Roommate disaster?

Ask: heymcguinty@ northcoastjournal.com tHose red curls know All.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

“I could imagine a traveler from a large city who’s never been to ACV get off the plane expecting landscapes with cows and tractors, only to be surprised by this vibrant juxtaposition and contrast.”

Bees are dying by the millions (half of all honeybees died last year). Until big agribusiness is forced to reform, we, as backyard gardeners, are the last hope for bee and pollinator survival. Lots of plants at our local nurseries are pre-sprayed with insecti— “SteamDonkey,” commenting on cides (why do you think they Ken Weiderman’s article about look so perfect?) so please ask graffiti art at the airport. your retailer before you buy. Are they bee-friendly? Do they contain harmful neonicotinoids? If bees are allowed to flourish in your garden, your flowers, fruits, and vegetables will grow strong and bountiful! Not to mention you will also reduce your own exposure to cancer causing chemicals! The inert ingredients in the top Editor: selling weed killer contain substances that Like others in this county, I’ve spent are known human endocrine disrupters time reading long blocks of text in the and damage DNA. interest of my education/edification. But There are lots of safe alternatives availI’m pleading guilty right here to feelable, just Google them! ing somewhat daunted by the 5,000 or What if Eureka became the first beeso words of your March 13 GPU article, friendly city on the North Coast? printed in what, nine point type? Lorna Brown, Eureka Duuuudes! And dudettes, average reading speed is 250 words per minute — unless you haven’t had coffee yet — so you’re asking for a commitment of 20 Please try to make your letter no more minutes, post coffee. What are you? My than 300 words and include your full professor? Really. Succinct-ness? Pithname, place of residence and phone numitude? ber (we won’t print your number). Send it Anyway, I’m willing to meet you at, say, to letters@northcoastjournal.com l 3M–4M words, for a good writer on a good day. As a consumer of your um, no-charge, on-the-house, complimentary, free, that is gratis, product, I don’t think that’s too much to ask. Does this come with refills? 129 words. 131. 132. Dang, so hard to stop. 139. I can go to 300? 145. Why? What happens to my 301st word, ed? Dysfunctional Walter James Kelly, Arcata

TL;DR

Write a letter!

Forces of Nurture

Bee Friendly Editor: I was dismayed this beautiful spring morning to open the North Coast Journal (which I read cover to cover every week) to see a local hardware store flyer offering a toxic smorgasbord of gardening chemicals, just when our local bees and pollinators are emerging in all their spring glory! Weed and bug killers, soil amendments with hidden toxins, fertilizers, etc., all laced with chemicals known to kill or harm pollinators! Most of our fruits and vegetables depend on bees and other pollinators to thrive and produce.

Errant winds Screaming,

As the Golden Gate Arches defiantly: “Family Comes First!” Irascible Taunting tides Shifting, As the moon rises Unimaginably. We’ll see. — Kirk Gothier


March 27, 2014 Volume XXV No. 13

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014

The Big Chill

B

ack in April 2007, some 3,500 people peaceably gathered in Redwood Park in Arcata to celebrate weed. I wrote about it in this column, noting how amazed I was that in a county of 130,000 the two daily newspapers we had back then skipped the event. I get high on large, peaceful gatherings. It is one of the things I miss about San Francisco. In the city there’s always ginormous gatherings of people for all kinds of reasons: they celebrate this or protest that. I can’t remember the last time there was a really sizeable outdoor gathering here. Even last year’s Oyster Fest was a dud after organizers decided to charge money for it. I’m beginning to think there is a concerted movement among local political leaders and police agencies to quash our social and political outdoor gatherings. And that’s a big problem. The right to assemble is one of our most important First Amendment rights. Consider: In November 2011, Eureka police arrested 32 people when they cleared out a group of protesters, known as Occupy Eureka, that had camped out in front of the county courthouse. Last April, Arcata police closed off Redwood Park to stop the annual afternoon pot party known as 420. And in June, Arcata Main Street charged Oysterfest goers a $10 entry fee to “change the dynamic and energy of the event.” There’s an ongoing tree-sit near Strawberry Rock right now, but the last sizeable protest here was a small gathering of people in front of the courthouse in support of businesses vexed by a lawyer suing on behalf of disabled people. And the last “spontaneous” gatherings were “cash mobs” — groups of people who swoop down on a local business all at the same time to spend their money. That’s in lieu of flash mobs — instant Twitter-driven protests in countries where announcing a protest ahead of time will result in a faceoff with heavily armed police. This isn’t the same Humboldt County I found when I arrived 10 years ago. I came up here to teach, in part, because of its

history of activism. It was here that Julia Butterfly Hill sat up in a tree she called Luna for two years to keep chainsaws at bay. It was here that a group of people continued to link arms in anti-logging protests even after police pepper sprayed them, and where District Attorney Paul Gallegos had the gumption to sue logging company Pacific Lumber Co., the county’s largest private employer, for business fraud. Around the world, people risk their lives gathering in mass demonstrations for, well, the right to assemble. Here we have it but we don’t use it. Why? I think it is because of the small steps our local government leaders and police agencies have taken to reduce, prevent and punish outdoor assemblies because the type of people who tend to assemble aren’t the types of people they want hanging out. But the First Amendment doesn’t say that only some people have the right to assemble. It says government “shall make no law… abridging … the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” You can’t try to prevent a peaceful gathering of people just because they are unsightly and smell, or because when they leave there will be litter to cleanup. Two years ago I wrote about an emergency ordinance the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors enacted that made it a misdemeanor to camp out at the courthouse or stick signs on to the courthouse walls or fences. It didn’t outlaw protests but it did send a clear message to the citizens of this county: We don’t want you in front of the courthouse and we will find reasons to boot you from it. In April, I expect the Board of Supervisors to reconsider the emergency ordinance at the behest of the Humboldt County Human Rights Commission. Last year, the commission drew up a draft policy statement that says, among other things, “The Humboldt County Courthouse is the seat of county government and is centrally located one block from Eureka City Hall. It is reasonable to expect that members of the public may

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

regularly use the courthouse grounds, and other county-controlled properties, to address their elected officials and the public through public displays, protests or other expressions of free speech. This has historically been the case, usually without incident. Public expressions of free speech are particularly important for those whose resources are limited.” On April 20 people around the county will gather in various places to celebrate marijuana. Typically, the Humboldt State University campus clears out around 3:30 p.m. Redwood Park is a short walk away. If my students gather to smoke dope, I’d prefer they don’t drive home. But there’s this too: Smoking marijuana these days is a political statement. A gathering of thousands of people to smoke marijuana is a big political statement. You may not agree with that kind of politics. But the First Amendment wasn’t written to protect politics you agree with. It was intended to protect politics with which you disagree. And as for any cleanup needed after such a gathering? Well, that seems to be a perfect use for the money Arcata has raised with its recent utility tax on grow houses. Let’s be clear. I am not calling for people to set up camp outside the courthouse. Nor am I advocating for thousands of people to illegally smoke a controlled substance at 4:20 p.m. on April 20 in a city-owned park. I am saying that we should allow people to advocate for the legality of smoking a substance that the state has declared lawful for medical purposes. The Bill of Rights gave us the right to assemble. The people of Humboldt County need to start asserting that right. And, as our representatives, our local leaders need to protect that right, not work to restrict it.

– Marcy Burstiner mib3@humboldt.edu Marcy Burstiner is chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University. At 4:20 p.m. on April 20, you will likely find her tending her grow: romaine, kale, collard greens and chard.

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Kim Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager/bookkeeper Carmen England receptionist/classified assistant Michelle Wolff

MAIL/OFFICE:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover: Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

5


Fumbled Apology Was it necessary to water down Mayor Jager’s letter to the Wiyot? By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com Tuluwat, on indian island, where wiyot people were massacred 154 years ago. Photo by Terrence McNally

T

his weekend, the Wiyot Tribe is holding its first World Renewal Ceremony since the last one, in February 1860, was cut short when white settlers massacred as many as 100 tribe members as they slept on Indian Island. And so the city of Eureka has voted to send the tribe an official letter of … well, it started out as “apology” for the massacre but later morphed into simply “support” for the tribe after city staff decided an apology might expose the city to lawsuits.

Which is nonsense, said Cornell University professor of law and social psychology Jeffrey Rachlinski, who has studied the effects of apologies on legal proceedings. “Their concern with liability is unfounded,” Rachlinski said in an email, adding that the law offers no source of liability for a massacre so long ago. Furthermore, he said, taking back an apology can sometimes backfire. On Monday, March 17, after drafting a letter of apology to the Wiyot Tribe over the weekend, Eureka Mayor Frank

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Jager had the city clerk send out the draft — noting it would be voted upon at the city council meeting that coming Tuesday night — to the media, who then reported on it. Then, that Tuesday, in the hours before the council meeting, legal eyes locked onto the letter and perceived trouble. A second draft was speedily written in time for the meeting that night and also lobbed off to the media. The changes were dramatic — and the media reported on them. Some of the language that was

eviscerated from the first draft included “citizens of Eureka participated in” and “massacre of unfathomable proportions” and “formal apology” and “nothing we say or do can make up for what occurred on that night of infamy.” The second draft, though on its own nice enough, was a somewhat stranded piece of work, afloat in oddly minimalist bureaucratese with no mention of who attacked the Wiyot, nor of anyone’s being sorry for it. (Both drafts offered the tribe the city’s support.)


At the council meeting, Jager said his letter was inspired by the upcoming Wiyot World Renewal Ceremony and the fact that his two young granddaughters are members of the Wiyot Tribe. He said he’d taken them to several of the Wiyot vigils over the years memorializing their murdered ancestors. During public comment, which occurred before the council compared the merits of the two drafts, praise was plentiful for the mayor’s gesture. Bruce Kaye, a substance abuse counselor for Humboldt County and a member of the Navajo Tribe, called the city’s “taking responsibility” like this “unprecedented.” Several people offered their own personal apologies for the 154-year-old crime. Some of the commenters seemed unaware the word “apology” had been removed from the letter. After public comment, the council discussed the two letters (the second of which they’d received just before the meeting). Councilmember Mike Newman, saying he had no problem with an apology but feared financial liability, asked city attorney Cyndy Day-Wilson to clarify the danger.

“There’s always the potential when you put something in writing that someone’s going to take it and use it for purposes you did not intend,” Day-Wilson answered. That’s why, she added, she and staff rewrote the letter, taking a “different approach.” Councilmember Linda Atkins said she was drawn to the first letter, and later added, “My concern is that, as people, we are unable to take any steps in this world without a concern about liability.” Councilmember Melinda Ciarabellini, who helped Jager draft his first letter, wondered if at least the second draft could be labeled “letter of apology.” Day-Wilson didn’t like that idea. Before the council voted unanimously (some members reluctantly) for the apology-less language of the second draft, Ciarabellini said it was appropriate to read that second draft to the public, and she read it aloud. So how big a deal is this? Perhaps not very, in light of the more momentous occurrence: the revival of the Wiyot Tribe’s annual World Renewal Ceremony. And it seemed clear at the council meeting that sincere feelings of regret drove Jager

to draft his letter and caused several of the councilmembers to agonize over the changes to it. As councilmember Chet Albin explained his take on the matter, “even if [the second draft] is not the mayor’s words, the intent is still to apologize.” But this smudge on an otherwise joyous moment didn’t have to happen. “No matter how tragic the events, or egregious the conduct, no one alive today is a sufficiently close relative that they can recover for the death of a family member killed at the massacre, nor are any witnesses alive who might have directly suffered emotional distress,” said Cornell professor Rachlinski. “Furthermore, the apology identifies the wrongdoers as unnamed citizens of Eureka whose liability died with them. The apology also admits no wrongdoing on the part of the City Council (whom they represent and for whom they can speak).” He said lawsuits brought against corporations for the role they or their predecessors played in the slave trade have been uniformly rejected for similar reasons. Lawsuits by Native American tribes against states and municipalities over treaty rights

dirt done cheap Royal gold mendo mix

are common, he added, but those usually concern details of a treaty. Rachlinski called altering the apology ill-advised. “The research on apologies suggest that once an apology becomes expected, the failure to offer one makes someone seem more culpable than had no apology been considered,” he said. Day-Wilson did not return multiple Journal calls seeking clarification on her specific concerns with the first letter. Mayor Jager also did not return calls. Tribal members, preparing for the ceremony, were unavailable for comment. On Monday, Jager will present the city’s letter to the Wiyot Tribal Council where — the psychology of near-apologies notwithstanding — gracious acceptance is expected. “I think the feeling is we are going to respond to the letter that is presented to us,” said Tom Torma, the tribe’s culture director. l Go online to www.northcoastjournal.com to read the two letters, and to learn about the Wiyot Tribe’s World Renewal Ceremony.

order anytime in march, deliverIES AVAILABLE NOW THROUGH june 3o

Lab certified to ensure appropriate PPM & PH balance

$1oo per cubic yard

Mon-Sat: 9am-6pm // Sun: 9am-5pm

(707) 826-7435

Hwy. 101, between Eureka & Arcata in the Bracut Industrial Park

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

7


Blog Jammin’ COURTS

UPD Brutality Case Settled

The California State University system has settled a civil lawsuit brought by a Fieldbrook man who alleged he was the victim of a “brutal assault” by Humboldt State University police in January 2012, agreeing to pay the man $135,000. CSU spokesman Mike Uhlenkamp said the payment will come out of HSU coffers, noting that the settlement includes no admission of wrongdoing. Casey Arndt, 33, filed the federal lawsuit last year alleging that Humboldt State University Police officer Delmar Tompkins pointed a gun at Arndt’s head and Tompkins and other officers assaulted him, causing injuries to his face, back, legs, arms, feet and hands. No charges were filed against Arndt. Reached Tuesday, UPD Chief Lynne Soderberg said she was not involved in the settlement discussions and declined to comment on the outcome, other than to say “it’s good it’s over with.” Soderberg said UPD conducted an internal investigation into Arndt’s arrest and subsequent allegations but declined to say if that investigation led to any disciplinary action. Tompkins is still employed with UPD and has seen no changes to his duties or assignments. The settlement represents the second time in five years that allegations against Tompkins have resulted in a payout. The city of Oakland agreed to pay $43,000 to settle a 2009 brutality claim against Tompkins while he was employed by the Oakland Police Department. — Thadeus Greenson l BUSINESS

Distilling Gold

The Humboldt Distillery has something to toast. Humboldt County’s first micro distillery nabbed a gold medal for its organic vodka at the 2014 Denver International Spirits Competition held in early March.

The double blind competition was judged by 15 “distilled spirits industry veterans,” according to a press release. For more on the Humboldt Distillery, check out the Journal’s May 2, 2013 cover story on the Fortuna vodka company and its founder, Abe Stevens. The distillery plans release an organic spiced rum later this spring, and organic whiskey in late 2014 or early 2015. — Thadeus Greenson l AGRICULTURE

Ridding Toxic Killers

On March 18, California passed a regulation restricting retail sales of certain rat poisons, such as d-Con. Soon, only licensed, certified or county-permitted application professionals will be able to use them. The restrictions don’t go into effect until July 1. But by Friday morning, at least one local retailer was already sweeping those products from its shelves. Pierson Building Center’s garden shop manager, Lydia Rieman, said she has known for at least a year that the restriction was coming and hasn’t been carrying any backstock on d-Con. What limited supplies her shop had were pulled off the shelves today. “And we’ll no longer special order it for people,” she said. The use of these rodenticides on illegal marijuana farms has caused particular alarm, especially here in Humboldt County. According to a National Public Radio report, they’re responsible for “nearly a third of the deaths of male fishers in recent years” on the Hoopa Valley reservation. It was brodifacoum that killed a Blue Lake man’s dog in February. The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is investigating that death: Red meat laced with brodifacoum was found in the dog’s system — possibly as revenge against the dog’s owner, who is a researcher studying how the use of these poisons on pot farms affects wildlife. A legal challenge from the makers of d-Con has delayed implementation of a similar federal restriction from going into effect. — Heidi Walters l

CONTRACTOR’S SPECIAL

GOVERNMENT

Tyrone Kelley Leaving

After mid-April, we won’t be seeing the familiar helmet-clad figure of our Six Rivers National Forest Supervisor, Tyrone Kelley, riding his bicycle home through Eureka after work. Nor can we expect to see him at those sometimes contentious fire-safety meetings in our mountain communities. He’s moving to Vallejo for a new job: director of engineering at the Forest Service Pacific Southwest’s regional office, says a news release from Six Rivers National Forest. Kelley’s had a busy tenure here on the North Coast since taking the supervisor position in 2006. He’s invested much time in particular working with tribes and others to create more cooperative fire management approaches in the communities abutting forest lands. “The job has been challenging and rewarding,” he says in the news release. “I have had the great fortune to work with dedicated employees, communities and tribes as well as local governments. Looking back at the last seven plus years I have truly enjoyed my tenure as Forest Supervisor and I will miss all the relationships we have forged. I am looking forward to the new challenges ahead as Director of Engineering for the Region.” The news release notes that Kelley is returning to his roots; he spent his first 20 years with the Forest Service working as an engineer. You can read more about that in the Journal’s 2007 profile of Kelley, “The Man from Alabama.” — Heidi Walters l OUTDOORS

Bay Trail Nabs $2 Million

Dreams of a Humboldt Bay Trail connecting Eureka and Arcata got a major boost March 18, when the California Transportation Commission voted to allocate $2 million to the county for engineering design and environmental permitting for the trail’s southern portion. Humboldt County Deputy Public

KAREN ORSOLICS

Works Director Hank Seemann said the funding is expected to come online in July, and represents a major step forward. “The momentum is really building,” said Seemann. But the project still has a long path ahead, Seemann said, noting that planners still haven’t settled on an alignment for the trail. His department is preparing to release a feasibility study analyzing where to place the trail from Target to Bracut early next month. — Thadeus Greenson l CRIME

Mendocino Deputy Killed

The suspect believed to have killed a Mendocino County Sheriff’s deputy March 19 was released from an Oregon jail two weeks earlier. According to an article by the Associated Press, Oregon police arrested Ricardo Antonio Chaney after they reported finding firearms, body armor and methamphetamine in his car. But, according to the report, the Lane County District Attorney’s Office declined to press charges in the case, citing a lack of evidence, and released Chaney the day of his arrest. Two weeks later, Chaney was the prime suspect in a crime spree that ultimately left Mendocino County Sheriff’s deputy Ricky Del Fiorentino and Chaney dead of gunshot wounds. After initially reporting that Chaney’s death appeared to have been a suicide, Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman has since said its believed Chaney sustained the fatal gunshot wounds in a shootout with deputies. Chaney is alleged to have traveled through Humboldt County in black BMW he stole from Eugene, Ore., and shot at a Confusion Hill business owner before fleeing into Mendocino County. According to the Associated Press story, Chaney has also been named a suspect in the killing of 79-year-old George Bundy Wasson in Eugene. — Thadeus Greenson l

SPECTACULAR KNEELAND VIEWS

Cell: 707-834-1818 ArcataProperty.com “The best move you’ll ever make.” DRE License# 01200980

Great location for this three bedroom, two bathroom McKinleyville home that is within walking distance to shopping and restaurants. Nice open floor plan with woodstove. Just needs some TLC. $206,800

DRE License# 01438846 “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.” HumboldtCountyProperty.com Cell: 707-498-4429

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

KRIS SUNDEEN

Beautiful Kneeland home on 40 sunny acres. Three bedroom, three bathroom custom home, over 2,700 sq ft. Three stories with a viewing tower. Extensive Brazilian hardwood deck with stunning views. $599,000


the week in WEed

I S ION VCENTER

Our Boys

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

By Linda Stansberry newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

I

ogjammin

616 H STREET • EUREKA

was thrilled to run into my little cousin working at a gas station in Redway. After all, he’d been watering his meth-addled daddy’s plants from the time he could toddle. Third generation of growers, I never expected him to get out. But there he was with his wide, cheeky grin, slinging highoctane coffee and unleaded gas, talking about going to College of the Redwoods next semester. I didn’t hug him so much as tackle him to the ground. I can count on one hand the number of boys in my generation who left my small Southern Humboldt hometown and went on to college. Some moved to town, some even further away. But most took their high school diploma back to the hills with them and took up the trade they’d been taught from grade school onwards. It’s hard to blame them. A minimum wage job is poor competition for the kind of money a cash crop like illegal weed brings in. We need to start talking about what’s going to happen to our boys when the green rush ends. We need to talk about it because they are just that, our boys, our boys in flat-brimmed hats and mudcovered trucks, our boys from Alderpoint to Honeydew to Orleans and all points in between. They grow the crop that translates to money that trickles down into our local stores and our local homes. Many are like my cousin, several generations into the industry and conscripted into its culture from birth. Many have never needed bank accounts or resumes. When the great experiment that is the wink-wink, nudge-nudge, hush-hush culture of illegal agriculture croaks its death rattle, brows will furrow over faltering businesses and diving home prices. Statisticians and entrepreneurs will discuss how to fill the gap. And an entire generation that came of age in a time of fast money will in all likelihood become inheritors of systemic poverty.

Grow culture is just that — a culture — with a culture’s lore, etiquette and transitions and diffusions. The story of our boys is more complicated than a cautionary tale. For every one who ended up in jail, in prison or dead there’s another who came out on the other side with a young family and a small legal business, all funded by many seasons of patient work and savings. And for every diesel dope mega-grow blighting the view from my kitchen window, there’s a mom-andpop mini-grow whose sole intention is to finance a simpler life. But that simpler life is getting harder and harder to finance. A subtle exodus has begun — the folks who arrived on the tail end of the California green boom intent on making their nest egg are packing up. Others are falling behind on their land payments. Still others are scaling up to make ends meet, just as we face an unprecedented drought and the industry comes under greater scrutiny for environmental impact. And our boys? I see them fixing their trucks instead of just buying new ones, the way they used to when they were high school graduates earning a lawyer’s salary. I can’t help but wonder what’s going to happen to them once the bubble finally bursts. Will they go on unemployment? Will they get hired on by friends of friends and learn to punch a clock in the city? Will their skills and experience somehow transfer into the brave new world of legalized weed? My little cousin, he got out but he didn’t stay out. The last time I saw him he was climbing out of a new truck with a running board that came up to his waist. There were some gaps in his wide, cheeky grin. I still hugged him hard enough to break his ribs. I love our boys. l Linda Stansberry is a freelance journalist from Honeydew.

STAY CONNECTED www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin northcoastjournal

THE

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

443-1619

Dear HumCo, Tell us your food crush! Yours always, NCJ P.S. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

SPRING SALE! APRIL 1ST - 6TH

20% OFF

All Plants • Summer Bulbs Pottery • Statuary • Fountains

50% OFF

Bare Root Fruit and Flowering Trees

$6.95

Farmer Mac

Buy 3, Get 4th FREE

4lb G&B Tomato/ 1-Gallon Rhodies • G&B Planting Mix, Vegetable Fertilizer Harvest Supreme or Acid Planting Mix Since 1963 northcoastjournal ncj_of_humboldt ncjournal newsletters

newsletters

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 839-1571 x5 Mon-Sat 8:30-5:30 • Sun 10-4 (Nursery Only)• www.millerfarmsnursery.com northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

9


W

Liquor Run

A SERENE AND DECAYING INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE. THESE TANKS WILL BE DEMOLISHED WHEN PULPING LIQUORS ARE FINALLY REMOVED.

After an earthquake shakes Humboldt, the Harbor District continues its push to avert looming disaster

ON THE COVER BLACK LIQUOR TANKS AT THE SAMOA PULP MILL.

1960

Story and photos by Grant Scott-Goforth 1970

1964 — The pulp mill is built by Georgia-Pacific on the Samoa Peninsula.

1965 — The mill begins operation.

1989 — Environmental groups sue Louisiana-Pacific, which now runs the mill, and the Simpson Paper Company, which runs another mill nearby, alleging the mills are daily discharging tens of millions of gallons of untreated wastewater into the ocean. According to the suit, scientists found traces of a host of toxic chemical byproducts of the chlorine bleaching process, including dioxin and furan, in fish and crab samples from near the discharge sites.

hen the undulations of the March 9 earthquake rousted Jack Crider from his sleep, his first thoughts were the Samoa pulp mill; specifically, the nearly 3 million gallons of caustic fluids poised to spill out of old, failing storage tanks and into Humboldt Bay. Those liquors — remnants of the pulp mill’s production days — have been a threat to the bay for years, and even a gentle rolling earthquake like that one was enough to motivate Crider, CEO of the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District, to put on his shoes, grab a flashlight and head down to the mill to look for leaks. He was the only one poking around the old tanks that night, but half a dozen concerned community members called him the next morning. People are worried about those liquors. A couple weeks later, Crider stands on a tarpaper surface 200 feet above the sands of the Samoa Peninsula, beaming at the structures and piles of rubble below as gusts of cold ocean air ruffle his hair. He paces across the broad, flat roof of the Samoa pulp mill’s boiler, the hulking monolith unused since 2008 that once spewed stinky white steam into the air above Humboldt Bay. From the dizzying height of the county’s tallest building, Crider excitedly points out the improvements and potential of the 72-acre mill site that his agency acquired in August. In that short time, the harbor district has gotten rid of and secured hazardous chemicals around the old mill. And a steady stream of trucks is scheduled to soon begin hauling the remaining pulping liquors — millions of gallons of ultra-basic

1980

1991 — The companies settle the suit, agreeing to pay a combined $5.8 million in penalties to the Environmental Protection Agency. Following the settlement, Simpson shutters its mill and LouisianaPacific converts its mill to a chlorine-free production process. In the ensuing years, Louisiana-Pacific sells the mill to a group of investors, which then re-sell the mill several times, with it ultimately landing in the hands of Stockton Pacific.

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

1990

2005 — The Chinese-owned Lee and Man Paper Co. purchases the pulp mill under the name of a subsidiary, Evergreen Pulp. 2006 — Environmental groups again sue the mill’s owners, this time alleging significant and ongoing violations of the mills federal air quality permit. 2007 — Evergreen settles the suit by agreeing to install a $1 million, state-of-the-art emissions control system.

2008 — Lee and Man Paper Co. sells Evergreen Pulp to a new investment group as the mill announces a temporary closure with plans to re-open in three to six months. During its ownership of the mill, Evergreen pours more than $40 million into improving the facility and remains profitable. However, in 2008, the pulp market goes into steep decline and Evergreen falls delinquent on its bills, with some suppliers and contractors acquiring court liens.


FROM 200 FEET UP, HARBOR DISTRICT CEO JACK CRIDER SEES HEAPS OF POTENTIAL IN THE PULP MILL. THE DISTRICT IS IN NEGOTIATIONS TO SELL THE BOILER — BUILDING AND ALL — THAT CURRENTLY OFFERS THE HIGHEST MAN-MADE VANTAGE POINT ON HUMBOLDT BAY.

available at OPEN EVERY DAY 822-9888 76 South G. St., Arcata (Across from the Marsh) HUMBOLDT GROWN SINCE 1987

“I was out there earlier doing some work on Indian Island and the harbor district acquired the pulp mill and asked me to come over and take a look,” Calanog said. “I determined there was quite a bit of hazardous material and began to initiate an emergency response.” By that point the tanks were nearly overflowing as years of rainwater had accumulated in them. But quick action was no guarantee — the federal sequester was about to begin. “That was a time of real political turmoil,” said North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman. “When the concern about leakage arose it was at the worst possible time — it was right as we were heading into a government shutdown.” Huffman said he and his staff pressed for federal funding on the site, “but to EPA’s credit they responded immediately — they understood what

was at stake here.” The uncertainties didn’t end there. EPA began searching for a barge company that could transport the liquors — 3 million gallons, after some measurements — and a pulp mill that would accept them. One solution came from Capstone Paper in Longview, Wash., a town of about 36,000 on the Columbia River. The company will boil the liquors down and reuse them. No money will change hands over the liquors, Calanog said. But shipping the liquors has been frustrating for the agencies and will be costly. Anticipating that the liquors would be shipped by barge, the harbor district rebuilt its dock, brought in temporary tanks and laid down a large network of large black pipes. But the barge fell through. Longview’s port demanded $800,000 worth of improvements in order to offload liquors there and coast guard-approved chemical barges are scarce on the West Coast, Crider said. The EPA is still searching for a 2010 barge, but will begin shipping the liquors via truck by the beginning of April. The first 200 shipments are already scheduled — trucks will haul the liquors, about 2,500 gallons at a time up U.S. Highway 101 to Crescent City, along the twisting U.S. Highway 199 over the pristine 2013 — The Humboldt County Harbor, Smith River to Grants Pass and up Conservation and Recreation District acquires Interstate 5 to Longview. the mill site from Simpson at no cost, knowing “There’s additional risk with there are some 4 million gallons of caustic trucks, especially that many,” Crider pulping liquors on site that need to be removed. said, but it has to be done. “We’re Within months, the district has the federal just on borrowed time.” Environmental Protection Agency inspect the The hauling will be just another site and it is immediately federalized as the EPA drop in the stream of around 2,000 initiates an emergency response to secure the trucks that come in and out of pulping liquors and plan for their removal. Humboldt County daily, Crider said. Whether logs, gasoline or pulping 2014 — The EPA and the district liquors, there’s always potential for plan to begin trucking the liquors an accident. Crider said both the off site beginning in late March. continued on next page © NORTH COAST JOURNAL

chemicals — up to Washington, where they will be reused. Crider and the harbor district aren’t the only ones relieved to see the liquors going — The Environmental Protection Agency and local oyster farmers are thrilled, too. And you should be, if you recreate on the bay, enjoy local shellfish or benefit from Humboldt County’s economy. Those chemicals, housed for the last six years in failing and nearly overflowing tanks, have been threatening the economy and health of Humboldt Bay, with every tremor or rainstorm increasing the danger. But safety is nearly here, as well as a new life for the Humboldt Bay property. When the harbor district acquired the pulp mill after a year of negotiations, the district board and staff knew they were in for a large project. Concerned about the security of the estimated 4 million gallons of pulping liquors, the caustic fluid used to turn wood into pulp, the district asked EPA coordinator Steve Calanog to inspect the site.

2000

2009 — With Evergreen Pulp totally insolvent, Freshwater Pulp Co., led by Bob Simpson, purchases the mill with plans to get it up and running again. 2010 — Simpson announces he is unable to secure some $400 million in financing needed to re-open the mill and that it will be permanently closed.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

11


continued from previous page harbor district and the hauling company have insurance in case of a spill. Trucking the entire liquors supply to Longview will cost $1.6 million, Crider said. Peering over the dock as a crew worked on oyster equipment below, Taylor Mariculture Operations Manager Mitch White said getting the liquors away from Humboldt Bay is crucial. The oyster company is investing millions of dollars into the dock and warehouse facilities at the pulp mill — investments that could be ruined by a leak. White’s anxious for the cleanup. “The sooner the better — for everybody,” he said. If the tanks failed, the liquors would flow into the bay, Calanog explained, dramatically changing the pH and disrupting oyster production and the bay’s fragile ecosystem. And the longer the liquors sit on the peninsula, the greater the risk. “There’s no telling how long it would take the bay to recover,” he said. “It would both be an environmental and economic disaster up there.” As Calanog knows, a spill could prove catastrophic for one of the area’s emerging industries.

THE OLD, THE NEW, THE TEMPORARY. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: LOTS OF OFFICES DOT THE PULP MILL; THE RECOGNIZABLE SMOKESTACK WILL LIKELY BE GONE IN THE FUTURE; BRICK LIQUOR TANKS WILL BE DEMOLISHED AS PART OF THE EPA’S SUPERFUND CLEANUP; A TEMPORARY STORAGE TANK MAKES TRUCKING THE LIQUORS MORE EFFICIENT.

Though aquaculture remains a relatively small percentage of Humboldt County’s recorded economy, the county listed “fisheries, processing and aquaculture” as one of its nine industries to promote as part of its prosperity strategy. A 2010 survey reported that Humboldt Bay shellfish production totaled $9.3 million in sales, half of the bay’s total seafood value that year. Aquaculture made up 30 percent of the North Coast’s total $31.4 million in seafood landings, according to the survey. Although the March 9 earthquake, a

The Long Haul

Longview

3Gallons million of pulp liquors on site

WA

Portland

2,500 Gallons per truckload

C o lu m bia

Salem

1,200 Total truckloads 5Truckloads to 7per day

Eugene

OR

Longview, Wash.

7 hours, 46 minutes

Drive time, Samoa to Longview SOURCE: GOOGLE MAPS

9,300 hours or 387 days Total travel time

Grants Pass

e gu Ro

Sm i t

h

ath Klam

will travel (not including return trips)

Samoa

THE HARBOR DISTRICT RENOVATED THE PULP MILL DOCK IN ANTICIPATION OF A CHEMICAL BARGE THAT NEVER CAME. CRIDER SAID THE REPAIRS WOULD BE NEEDED REGARDLESS.

Natl Parks Natl Forests

CA © NORTH COAST JOURNAL

550,000 miles Total distance trucks hauling liquors

e ett m

459 miles Samoa, Calif. to

Wi lla

in 2009, the company sought to recoup costs by selling off valuable copper wire, piping, steel and other reusable materials that made up much of the water, sewer and electrical infrastructure of the mill. Still, valuable assets remain on the property, and Crider is confident they will attract businesses who will invest in and lease space from the district. Looking west, Crider pointed to a mileand-a-half pipeline into the Pacific, which could eventually discharge the entire peninsula’s wastewater. Below the boiler building sits an electrical substation and the site’s natural TAYLOR MARICULTURE IS INVESTING MILLIONS IN OYSTER gas pipeline — two important PRODUCTION AT THE SAMOA PULP MILL SITE, INCLUDING incentives for businesses, THE CONSTRUCTION OF THESE FLOATING OYSTER BEDS. Crider said. To the east sit the mill’s massive warehouse space, dozens of offices, the mill’s operational generator and the dock. Still-functioning cranes dot the pulp mill’s landscape. Taylor Mariculture has already built “flupsies,” large nursery rafts used to culture oysters in the bay. The accessibility of the dock will make for convenient “show and tell” opportunities for Taylor and others in the oyster industry, Crider said. strangely mild 6.8, caused no damage, it increased the harbor district’s urgency, Crider said. Perched above the pulp mill grounds, Crider points out that there’s a lot of work still to be done. Once the liquors are shipped away, the EPA’s superfund people will remove the sludge and solids and dismantle the liquors tanks. The Harbor District also secured EPA brownfield funding to clean up less hazardous materials around the mill. After Evergreen Pulp’s quick departure

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


How can you access the Menu of Menus?

GARDEN

10% OFF* FINAL PURCHASE PRICE

with this coupon

*Excludes power tools. Not valid with other discounts.

(707) 822-2965 884 9th Street, Arcata

+ Web

Garden Center

Mon-Fri 10am-8pm Sat 10am-6:30pm SUn Closed (707) 825-0269 www.humdepot.com 5201 Carlson Park Drive #2, arcata GPS address: 1264 Giuntoli Ln. (Behind Mcintosh Farm Country Store)

WE’RE THE SOLUTION!

RT S

SERVICE S LE

Depot Humboldt

TRINITY DIESEL, INC

SA

Even the dormant giant under Crider’s feet, the boiler that once cooked organics off of the liquors so they could be reused, may be valuable to the district. Crider said the agency is negotiating with a pulp mill in the Philippines to sell the boiler. He expects the district can get around $2 million for it, money that would be used to help pay for the cleanup. Final plans for the pulp mill are evolving, and depend on the businesses that will eventually land there. Potential uses dreamed up by the district include export of lumber and other goods, aquaculture and research, food and industrial manufacturing and a public dock. Crider thinks the district will have enough interested businesses that the most difficult part will be deciding what kind of uses are best for the mill site — and Humboldt County. For more than 40 years, the mill site has lurked as one of the area’s most prominent landmarks. Crider visited Eureka as a fish buyer in the mid-’90s and distinctly remembers the odorous mill’s effect on the city. Enamored with the area, he recalled thinking, “It really sucks about the pulp mill.” In the years to come, the boxy, sooty boiler building, one of the most recognizable parts of the Humboldt Bay skyline in combination with the 300-foot-tall crimson-topped smokestack, may be gone for good. ●

+ Print

home &

PA

A ’60S-ERA GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR IS STILL OPERATIONAL — ONE OF MANY ASSETS THE HARBOR DISTRICT HOPES WILL ATTRACT BUSINESSES TO THE PULP MILL SITE.

continued on next page

B3200

R

Rugged & Reliable

(707) 826-8400 5065 Boyd Rd Arcata Monday - Friday — 8am - 5pm

+ Mobile

Available on newsstands, in restaurants, shops and hotels and 24/7 at www.northcoastjournal.com.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

13


continued from previous page

home &

GARDEN Do the Green Thing On Thursday April 17, NCJ will take a look at all things green in Humboldt County. This practical and informative special issue will explore earth friendly topics like the environment, energy and keeping your home green.

Don’t miss out! Call to speak with your ad rep today:

442-1400

YOUR SOURCE FOR THE FINEST HARDWOODS AND WOODWORKING SUPPLIES

ALL BOOKS AND PLANS

20% OFF

THROUGH MARCH 31 Furniture, boats, musical instruments, carving, turning, workshops, design inspiration & more! 5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata • Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 825-8880 • www.almquistlumber.com

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Page Plus Cellular offers reliable nationwide coverage on one of the nation’s largest networks.

Call for Special Offer

(661) 310-8133 HSU Student

Open Mon- Sat 9am-6pm Sun 9am-5pm (707) 822-7049 3384 Janes Rd Arcata

Turn your garden into an edible landscape... • Dewberry • Elderberry • Jostaberry • • Currant • Gooseberry • Goji • Figs • • Blueberries • Hops • Filberts • • Japanese Pepper • Mulberry • Grapes • • Strawberries • Sochi Tea Seedling • • Raspberries • Boysenberries • Olive • • Nectarberries • Tayberries • Kiwi • and much more!

Treat your clothes to a day at the beach with

Eureka 442-2527 2907 ‘E’ Street Arcata 822-3570 Sunny Brae Center

Potatoes & onion transplants are in stock!

Fortuna 725-9003 743 Fortuna Blvd.


boBaraZZI

Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran northcoastjournal.com/bobarazzi

WILLOUGHBY AND ISABELLE AREVALO HOLD HANDS AND LOOK TO THE SKY AS FAMILY, FRIENDS AND A CLOWN NAMED ELLIOT JOIN THEM TO CELEBRATE THEIR WEDDING VOWS ON SATURDAY, MARCH 22 AT COLLEGE COVE BEACH.

FORMER ARCATA MAYOR "BAD" BOB ORNELAS CHATS WITH LOS BAGELS OWNER DENNIS RAEL AT A RIBBONCUTTING CEREMONY MARKING THE BUSINESS’ 30TH ANNIVERSARY ON MARCH 19.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

15


The offspring of a doughnut, a croissant and an éclair. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

The purist’s crab sandwich at Myrtle Avenue MARKET. Photo by Drew Hyland.

Hum Plate Roundup Live and eat in the now By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

Our community is committed to building relationships with God and one another while supporting the development of the competent, capable individual.

Kindergarten Round-up Thursday, April 10, 9am-12pm Lunch will be provided For more information call 822-1738. Whole Child approach to education Nurturing mind, body and spirit Small classroom size and high teacher to student ratio

Values based character development Academic Excellence with individualized attention College preparatory emphasis

70 Stephens Lane, Bayside  822-1738 Now accepting applications

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

T

he cherry blossoms drifting around town are seen in Japan as a symbol of life’s impermanence, all the more beautiful for their brevity. Just like crab sandwiches and specialty doughnuts.

Carpe Crab

When crab season opens during the holidays, we go wild, cracking and picking till our shirtfronts are flecked with meat and our bellies are full. But then we return to our busy schedules, and busting open a Dungeness on your desk is just impractical. The IT department might forgive a coffee spill on your keyboard, but trust me when I tell you techs are less forgiving of melted butter. The answer is the crab sandwich. Murphy’s Markets, beloved among aficionados, has already stopped selling them for the year. Did you miss its heavy-on-theleg-meat, tossed-with-mayo, 1/4-pound sandwich on Vellutini sourdough ($13.99) this year? Try to take it as a teaching moment and gather ye crab sandwiches while ye may. On Fridays, Hole in the Wall (1331 Broadway, Eureka) whips up a creamy crab salad with crunchy celery and mayo on sourdough ($13.99). Minimalists may scoff, but the standard order comes with slivered red onion, lettuce, tomato and black pepper. The flavor of the crab comes through plenty, and the sandwich is hefty enough to share. If you’re looking for the pure, briny sweetness of crab in to-go form, Myrtle Avenue Market (2500 Myrtle Ave., Eureka) just scoops ¼ pound of it onto mayo-swiped sourdough bread with some shredded lettuce ($8.99). Flatten the bag for a plate, peel back the paper wrapping, prop your elbows on your desk and enjoy the fruits of North Coast waters. Best of all, you won’t alienate co-workers with that pile of shells by your phone.

Doughnut Evolution Well over a year ago, the Cronut, a doughnut made from croissant pastry — let that sink in — brought New York City to its knees. It’s taken this long for the flaky phenomenon to make it to Humboldt (not a huge surprise, given the lingering mullets around town), and it popped up in the most unlikely place: Safeway. Who saw that coming? For $5, you can pick up a box of four and find out what happens when you deep fry an already buttery croissant and glaze it. The result is a delightfully chewy, puffy-layered cousin to the French cruller. While it’s still technically breakfast/office appropriate, it’s not out of the question to serve for dessert. With whipped cream. What? Like you weren’t thinking it. Then, in the most important use of social media since the Arab Spring, a reader informed us via Facebook that Cherry Blossom Bakery (2940 F St., Eureka) has had croissant doughnuts for months ($2.25). I called ahead to put a hold on the last two of the day (not a bad idea, since they run out quickly). Totally different doughnut. Instead of puffing up all springy and poofy, these are flattened and heavy. Don’t be put off — they are also buttery and rich, filled with thick, eggy custard and topped with chocolate glaze. According to the lovely woman who bagged up the pastries, the baker occasionally gets “a wild hair” and experiments. Take, for example, the Cherry Log, stuffed with cherry pie filling, glazed and dusted with cake crumbs; and a chocolate-glazed doughnut that’s fried with slightly salty peanut butter inside ($2.25 each). Pick up the latter if you have a pregnant woman in your life. But she’s going to need to grab a glass of milk and turn off her phone first — it’s a mouthful. l


The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch Bayfront Restaurant

EASTER CANDY Available Now!

One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

DINE IN 3575 Janes Rd. • Arcata

ORDERS TO-GO 707-822-4600

Mon-Sat open at 11am • Closed Sunday

· Huge Selection · Gift Baskets · Chocolate Bunnies · Lolipops & Much More !

Open Daily at 11am 215 F St. • Old Town, Eureka

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

17


ARCATA + NORTH EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

vineyard OPEN WEDNESDAY TO SUNDAY NOON-5PM

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St., Arcata 822-3731 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St.,822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220 ARCATA VETERANS HALL 1425 J St., 822-1552

(707) 943-3498 11544 DYERVILLE LOOP RD. 2 MILES SOUTH OF MYERS FLAT. FROM AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, TAKE ELK CREEK RD. 4 MILES, STAY TO RIGHT.

Dr. Thomas F Vert, D.D.S.

Caring for Your Smile for Years to Come

BLONDIES 822-3453 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville CRUSH 1101 H St. #3, Arcata 825-0390 THE FORKS (530) 629-2679 38998 Hwy 299, Willow Creek HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY 1 Harpst St., Arcata 826-3928 JAMBALAYA 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

thur 3/27

fri 3/28

Carrie Rodriguez w/Luke Jacobs (Americana) 8pm $15 The Polish Ambassador (EDM) Double Dragon (film) 9:30pm $20 7:30pm $5 Barn Dance w/Lyndsey Battle, Striped Pig Stringband 7:30pm $7, $6, Free under 12 Open Mic 7pm Free Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Decades (dance pop) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/William Barnhart 9pm Free

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

S.I.N. & Service w/Accurate Productions DJs 9pm Free

Dr. Squid (dance hits) 9pm Free

sat 3/29

Zordon (EDM) 10pm $2 Aladdin (marionettes) 7pm price TBA Random Acts Of Comedy (improv) 7:30pm $6

sun 3/30

m-t-w 3/31-4/2

Hercules (film) 5:30pm $5, All Ages

[T] Emancipator Ensemble (EDM) 9:30pm $15; [W] Sci-Fi Night w/ War of the Monsters 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev, All Ages

Jazz Night 7pm Free

[M] Quiz Night 7pm free [W] Buddy Reed (acoustic blues) 6pm Free

Decades (dance pop) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Dr. Squid (dance hits) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

[W] Blues Explosion (open jam) 8:30pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free

Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam 8:30pm

The Wild Lungs and TheBoredAgain (pop/punk) 10pm $3

Particle (rock/funk) 9:30pm $15

Zepparella (Zeppelin tribute) 9:30pm $20

Fulkerson: Linda Oh (jazz) 8pm $15, $10. Gist: HSU Opera 8pm $10, $5, $3

Gist: HSU Opera 8pm $10, $5, $3 Miracle Show (Grateful Dead covers) 9:30pm Price TBA

80’s Night with DJ Red 9pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

[T] Match Game (game show) 9pm $5 [W] Scott Pemberton Trio (rock) 9pm $10 DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[M] The Getdown (local funk) 9pm [T] Marco Benvento (rock piano) 9pm $12. [W] Whomp (EDM) 9pm $5

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

80

$

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Late Night MUNCHIES Now Serving Food until 2am

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

28 years of experience, mercury free restorations, now accepting new patients.

831 Harris St. Eureka (707)443-3005

New Patients ONLY

$

95

Lowest Price Evaluations in HumCo

Medical Cannabis (707) 407- 0527 Consultants 508 I Street, Eureka (across from HC Court House)

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Restaurant 8am -2pm


venue

LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patrick’s Point, Trinidad LIBATION 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake MAZZOTTI’S 822-1900 773 Eighth St., Arcata MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad PORTUGUESE HALL 1185 11th St., Arcata 822-9521 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave., McK 839-7580 SUSHI SPOT MCKINLEYVILLE 1552 City Center Road 839-1222 822-4198 TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

Submit your events online!

clubs, concerts and cafés

arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek thur 3/27

fri 3/28

Deadline noon Friday

sat 3/29

sun 3/30

m-t-w 3/31-4/2 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

M Notes (acoustic) 9pm Free Fred and Jr. (jazz) 6pm Free

Tom Toohey and Friends (jazz) 7pm Free Doug Fir and the 2X4’s (rock) 9pm Free The No Good Redwood Ramblers (country) 6pm Free Whiskey Whiskers Mustache Competition w/The HiLL 4pm Free

Blue Lotus Jazz 7pm Free Motherlode (funk) 9pm Free

[T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free Potluck (food) 6pm Free

[W] Open Mic 8pm Free

Bradley Dean (rock/country) 4pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5 Raising Grain (bluegrass) 8pm Free Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm Free Rude Lion Sound (DJ) 10pm $2

Hip Hop Open Mic with Electric Gravy 8pm Free DJ Matt 9pm Free DJ Music 10pm $2 Otto Knowbetter (jazz) 6pm Free

Thrusty Thursday Comedy 8pm $5. J Itchie Fingaz (EDM) 9:30pm Free

Battle of the Bass w/Salva (DJ competition) 8pm $20 The Bret Harte Breakers (bluegrass) 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free

®

[M] Open Mic with Chris Parreira 7:30pm Free. [W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5

Undone (rock) 9pm Free

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [T] Sunny Brae Jazz Collective 7:30p Free [W] Joe Garceau (acoustic) 8pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm Free

[M] Aber Miller (jazz) 5pm Free DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

[W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

Naturopathic Medicine - Helping You Be Well Naturally Bringing a Natural Medicine Approach to both Primary Care and Consultation In Association with Dr. Beverly Copeland, MD

DR. CHERE EDGAR, ND Naturopathic Doctor

3 foods cafe 835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun Check out our facebook page for new menu updates!

1727 Central Ave, McKinleyville, CA (707) 840-0556 Now Accepting New Patients www.drchereedgar.com

Treating the Underlying Causes of Illness * Prevention * Weight Loss

HAPI HOUR $2 Pints

* Homeopathy * Fewer Prescriptions

OPEN @ ENDS

HAPPY HOURS Rita’s on Harris

$2 Well Drinks Extremo Happy Hour 4-5pm

& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

RitasCafe.com

4PM

5:30PM

Sushi Discounts

Special Hapi Menu Yakitori Mini Rainbow Poke Spicy Smoked Tuna Dumplings At the Hotel Arcata 708 8th Street Arcata • ( 707 ) 822-1414 • www.tomoarcata.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

19


EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

Happy Hour 4-6pm Tues.-Sun. Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

Ear Emporium Locally Handmade Wooden Earrings, Gauges & more.

822-PLUG

thur 3/27

fri 3/28

ADORNI CENTER Jazz Festival Kick Off Dance Jazz Festival Opening 1011 Waterfront Drive., Eureka 7pm $10, $8 w/pass Ceremonies 1:30pm Free 441-4241 Bar-Fly Karaoke BAR-FLY PUB 9pm Free 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 Karaoke w/Chris Clay The Blacksage Runners (rock) BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 8pm Free 9pm Free 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta The Tumbleweeds CHAPALA CAFÉ (cowboy) 6-8pm Free 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka EUREKA HIGH AUDITORIUM 1915 J ST., Eureka 441-2508 EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093

sat 3/29

sun 3/30

Jazz Fest 9am $85 Festival Pass

Jazz Fest 9am $85 Festival Pass

The 707 (rock) 9pm Free The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

Accurate Productions DJs 8pm Free

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

Blues Night (Jazz Festival) 4:30pm $25, Free w/pass

Jazz Fest 11am $85 Festival Pass

Pappa Paul (folk) 6pm Free

Charlie Sweet (folk) 6pm Free

Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Celtic) 6pm Free

m-t-w 3/31-4/2 [W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

Community Concert w/EHS Jazz Ensemble, Commanders AF Jazz Combo (Jazz Fest) 7pm Free USGGO and Jazz Fest 3pm Jazz Fest 9am $85 Festival Pass The Jawbone Club (alt. rock) PressureAnya and Body Ben Feldman, Wownd and Space 9pm Free Academics 9pm $10 Biscuit (comedy & music) 8pm $5

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 845-8795 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART 636 F St., Eureka 442-0278

1073 H St., Arcata

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

Jazz Fest 9am $85 Festival Pass

[T] Cards Against Humboldt (game) 8pm Price TBA

Sunday Silent Movies w/ ARMACK Orchestra 1pm $5, Free w/pass

Wine and Jazz (Jazz Fest) 3pm $35, $25 w/pass

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM 1120 F St., Eureka

Jazz Fest 4:30pm $85 Festival Pass, $10 Day Pass

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Paula Jones & RLA Trio (jazz) 6:30pm Free

Dance Contest (Jazz Fest) 12:30pm $5, Free w/pass Dance Party (Jazz Fest) 5pm $25, Free w/pass

Jazz Fest 9:30am $85 Festival Pass, $10 Day Pass Grand Finale 3pm $10, Free w/pass [W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free

NCJ

COCKTAILCOMPASS

HOLD ON TO YOUR DRINK. IT’S HERE. OR

The Cocktail Compass is a FREE app, available for iPhones at the iTunes App Store & Android phones on Google Play. Search “Cocktail Compass”.

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

thur 3/27

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844 SCOTIA INN PUB 764-5338 100 Main St., Scotia Kenny Ray and The Mighty SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 Rovers (honky tonk) 7pm Free 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 3/28

Masta Shredda (DJ) 10pm Free Jazz Fest 3pm $85 Festival Pass Cheryl n’ Steve (rock) 6pm Free

sat 3/29

sun 3/30

Pressure Anya iFuego Segundo! (DJs) 10pm Free Jazz Fest 9:30am $85 Festival Pass Jazz Fest 9am $85 Festival Pass Karaoke w/Chris Clay Jazz Festival After Party w/ 9pm Free, 21+ Red Skunks 5pm Free Cory Goldman and Raising Grain (bluegrass) 6pm Free

DJ Red 8pm Price TBA

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 TIMEOUT SPORTS PUB 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna 725-9100

m-t-w 3/31-4/2

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

$2

MARTINI*

Swan Sunday (eclectic and request) 8:30pm Free

THE SHANTY 444-2053 213 Third St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Find live music and more!

The Haunt w/ Wrye DAT-1 (EDM) 8pm Free

Savage Henry’s Comedy Open Mic 9pm Free Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free

[M] Lemon Lemon Cherry (folk) 7pm Free [W] No Covers (jazz duo) 7pm Free

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

½ off Bar Menu

Comedy Showcase 9pm Free

Mon-Fri, 4-6pm TRY OUR

WHO: Space Biscuit WHEN: Saturday, March 29 at 10 p.m. WHERE: The Palm Lounge TICKETS: $3 to $5 donation

CARTER DOG - $9.00 Chicago Dog on a toasted bun with whipped cream cheese, tomato, onion, Los Bagels Slug Slime & Larrupin Sauce. HALF OFF DURING HAPPY HOUR

2013 Humboldt County Fair Results 2012 Chardonnay DOUBLE GOLD, BEST OF SHOW WHITE 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon GOLD 2009 il montaggio (Italian blend) GOLD

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET • EUREKA MONDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-9:00PM

www.carterhouse.com

From sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got you covered.

2010 Sangiovese GOLD

Award-winningwines wines since since 1976 1976 Award-winning

4241 Fieldbrook Road, Fieldbrook

839-4140

www.fieldbrookwinery.com

www.northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

21


A Doozy

So many shows make your head spin By Jennifer Savage thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

P

lease sit down. Don’t worry, you’ll be up soon enough. It’s just that I am about to spew so many your-options-in-live-music at you that if you’re standing, the sheer number might trigger a collapse. So, sit. You’re probably sitting anyway, reading the print version at a coffeehouse or the digital version on your laptop. If you happen to be standing in line, looking at this on your phone (what did we do in line before phones?) then you may remain standing, but please take a moment to get centered before going forward. Do I sound delirious? Yes. That’s what trying to encapsulate all this week’s band happenings into 1,200 words does to a person. Choice is stressful. Hopefully next week it’ll be all karaoke and lip-syncing. (Why is no one lip-syncing?! Get on that! Also, kidding.)

Choose-your-ownadventure Thursday

Let’s start in Eureka. Meskalito, a new Arcata funk ensemble, joins funk improv quintet Ultra Secret Good Guy Organization in support of Ashland’s moody alt rockers The Jawbone Club at the Palm

Feel-good Friday

on sax, Matt Stevens on guitar and Justin Brown on drums. It’s $15, $10 for students. The jazz theme continues with a Redwood Coast Jazz Festival performance by Tommy Castro And The Painkillers — okay, so it’s not exactly jazz since Castro is famed for his signature brand of modern day rocking rhythm and blues, but the gig is part of the jazz fest, so do with that what you will. This show happens in the sweet confines of the Eureka Theater at 4:30 p.m., tickets are $25 to $85 and a full lineup is available at redwoodjazz.org and in the Journal’s Calendar section.

Saturday satisfaction

Humboldt’s dark new wave darlings Space Biscuit play The Palm Lounge with Arcata’s Wownd following some stand-up comedy with Ben Feldman. The funny stuff starts at 8 p.m., theoretically, and the music kicks off around 10 p.m. Cover is $5 from 8 to 9:30 then a $3 to $5 suggested donation. Maybe you want to rock out with your flock out. “Flock” referring to the dedicated followers of Led Zeppelin and the four women who keep the passion, beauty and aggression of that band’s music alive. Yes, it’s Zepparella! at Humboldt Brews. Tickets are $20, recommended in advance. Showtime is 9:30 p.m. and, sorry kids, this one is a 21-and-over trip down memory lane. If battling bass is more your thing, never fear, Arcata has that, too. Yes, KMUD, World Famous Productions and the Northern Nights Music Festival bring you Battle of the Bass III featuring Salva at the Portuguese Hall. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Show starts at 8 p.m. and is 21-and-over. What about Germanic deep house future thizz, you ask? No problem! Take yourself on out to the Alibi where ZORDON will offer exactly that. Cover is only $2! Show is 21-and-over, of course, and will start 11 p.m.-ish.

Austin heroine Carrie Rodriguez and renowned roots fiddler Luke Jacobs perform at Arcata Playhouse in support of their new album Live At The Cactus. Tickets are $15 general and $13 students. Show starts at 8 p.m. Livetronica pioneers Particle are best known for marathon sets at Coachella, Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza and the Austin City Limits Music Festival. The band combines a full light show and multimedia production with a signature mix of highenergy dance music, rock and funk. Catch them at Humboldt Brews starting around 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 and the show is 21-and-over. If you’re in the mood for excellent and sophisticated jazz, know that anything connected to the Redwood Jazz Alliance is the real deal. RJA’s spring season continues with rising star bassist Linda Oh at 8 p.m. in HSU’s Fulkerson Recital Hall. All About Jazz calls Oh’s latest work, Sun Pictures, “an album of achingly fragile beauty.” The touring WHO: Linda Oh version of WHEN: Friday, March 28 at 8 p.m. Sun Pictures WHERE: Fulkerson Recital Hall (HSU) features Ben TICKETS: $15, $10 students and seniors Wendel (of Kneebody)

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Tuesday talent show

Pianist, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist producer Marco Benevento, a man who has never suffered from lack of talent and whom you might know from Garage A Trois, Surprise Me Mr. Davis and numerous other bands, brings his legacy of experimental jazz and rock to the Jambalaya. It’s $12, $10 advanced and The Getdown will apparently be playing, too. The show gets going

WHO: Particle WHEN: Friday, March 28 at 9:30 p.m. WHERE: Humboldt Brews TICKETS: $15

photo courtesy of the artist

Lounge. Show starts at 9 p.m., is free (tips appreciated, touring costs!) and 21-andover. Moving over to A-town, Arcata megapoppers The Wild Lungs join Eureka acoustic punks TheBoredAgain at the Jambalaya. Revel in the intangible beginning at 10 p.m. Cover’s $3, show is 21-andover. Maybe you want to experience a “beat.” Head into the Arcata Theatre Lounge, where the sexified and infectious melodies of The Polish Ambassador will emanate from the stage, along with Liminus featuring the folk songwriter-electronic music composer pairing of Wildlight (the press kit promises Wildlight will “jumpstart a party into a syncopated bounce”), classically trained composer, producer and trumpet player Saqi and loop pedal goddess Ayla Nereo. Warm up by downloading the Ambassador’s 10-album, 30-remix discography for free at thepolishambassador.com. Doors open at 9:30 p.m., tickets are $17 advanced and $20 general, available at People’s Records, Wildberries and The Works. This show is 21-and-over.

photo courtesy of the artist

WHO: Nym WHEN: Tuesday, April 1 at 9:30 p.m. WHERE: Arcata Theatre Lounge TICKETS: $15 advance

photo courtesy of the artist

THe seTlIst

around 9 p.m. It’s 21-and-over, natch. And as if to prove that Tuesdays can never be boring, Emancipator Ensemble, Slow Magic and Nym keep the groove going at Arcata Theatre Lounge. Think electronic, sampling and plenty of beats, beats, beats. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 advance and available at People’s Records, Wildberries, The Works and this show is 21-and-over.

Wednesday, yes, Wednesday

We get email. “I’m Ann from Darsombra. We are an audio-visual live performance experience (a band!), and we’ve got a show coming up in Eureka at the Ink Annex. The show is part of an eightweek cross-country tour and it marks the 20th anniversary of my bandmate Brian Daniloski’s first tour around the country with his old band Meatjack. That was so long ago that they were booking the tour during the tour from pay phones!” Daniloski alternates between searing guitar riffs, leads, loops, mammoth vocal swells and soundscapes. It’s one part metal, one part psychedelic rock, one part experimental with dashes of prog, glam and krautrock. Filmmaker Ann Everton projects her kinetic, psychotropic videos specifically composed to Daniloski’s music, engulfing the audience within the trip, as well as providing occasional accompaniment on vocals and synthesizer. Your final show features the guitar brilliance of Scott Pemberton, a musician often compared to Jimi Hendrix, Dick Dale and James Brown, who will be pleased to entertain you at Humboldt Brews for a mere $10 at the door. Show starts at 9 p.m. and is 21-and-over.

Etc.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a highres photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. l


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

23


The Redwood Coast Jazz Festival is upon us with more live blues, jazz and swing than you can slide a trombone at ($85 festival pass, event prices vary). Check the calendar for shows all weekend, starting with the dance at the Adorni Center Thursday, March 27 at 7 p.m. following the Taste of Main Street festivities all over Old Town.

ph

ot o

by M

ar k

ph

ot o

by D

r ew

H yl a n d

M c Ke n na

27 thursday Dance

Jazz Festival Kickoff Dance. 7 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cut a rug to the music of Donna Landry and Swing Set, followed by High Street. $10, $8 w/festival pass.

Lecture

Sustainability. 5:30 p.m. Science Building B, Room 135, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Yvonne Everett presents “Collaborative Cross-boundary Stewardship” as part of the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. Free. pjs26@humboldt.edu. 826-3653. Wildlife. 4 p.m. Behavioral and Social Sciences Building, room 162, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Rod Coronado presents ideas on how members of the public can become involved in their own bio-regions to protect large apex predators and other wildlife. $10, $5 students. natalynne@wildcalifornia.org. wildcalifornia. org. 822-7711.

Music

The Polish Ambassador, Liminus and more. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Featuring opening sets by Wildlight, Saqi and Ayla Nereo. $17 limited advanced, $20 general. worldfamousparty.com

Theater

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised]. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. A hilarious version of all 37 of Shakespeare’s plays. $15 general, $12 students and seniors. Spamalot. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. The Monty Python musical based on the legend of King Arthur. $18 general, $16 students and seniors.

Events

Enjoy a free performance of Aladdin … with strings attached. On Saturday, March 29 the Fratello Marionettes bring a puppet show full of magic lamps and flying carpets to the Arcata Library at 11 a.m. and the Eureka Library at 2 p.m.

Give the floorboards of the Arcata Veterans Hall a good stomping to the music of Striped Pig Stringband at the barn dance on Friday, March 28 at 7:30 p.m. ($7, $6 students and seniors, free to kids under 12) Lyndsey Battle is calling. No partner? No problem.

CASA Open House. 5:30 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Enjoy veggie burgers, burgers and refreshments while you learn about CASA services and how you can help on a one-time or ongoing basis.

Free. info@humboldtcasa.org. www.humboldtcasa. org. 443-3197. Taste of Main Street. 5-8 p.m. Eureka. Sample food from 26 restaurants throughout downtown and Old Town. Live music at many venues and free shuttle service provided by Eureka Transit Service. $25.

Comedy Showcase. 9 p.m. Timeout Sports Pub and Wine Bar, 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna. Local comedians Ivy Vasquez, Ray Hazmatt McMillin, John McClurg, Nathan Davis-Floyd, Nando Molina and more are going to make sure at least one person shoots beer out of his or her nose. Free. 725-9100.

Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Stories, crafts, songs and dance for children ages 3 to 5. Space is limited, so call ahead. $2. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum. org. 443-9694.

Barn Dance. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J Street. Kick up your heels with caller Lyndsey Battle and the Striped Pig Stringband. All dances will be taught with no partner or experience needed. $7 general, $6 students and seniors, Free kids under 12. humboldtfolklife.org. World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Avenue, Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and request dancing. $3.

For Kids

Garden

American Rhododendron Society. 7 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Dennis McKiver provides a photo tour of the rhododendron collection of the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens. Free. egayner@hotmail.com. www.eurekaheritage.org. 443-8049.

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

28 friday Books

Reception for Jim Dodge. 7 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. College of the Redwoods and Humboldt State University present a celebration for the author of the book of the year. Free.

Comedy

Whiskey Whiskers Mustache Competition. 9:30 p.m. Mazzotti’s on the Plaza, 773 Eighth St., Arcata. A comedy show, followed by a mustache competition, followed by the music of local scumbag country band, The HiLL! $5. whiskeywhiskerswax@gmail.com. 822-1900.

24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Dance

Lecture

“How to Perform at Your Best.” 12:30 p.m. Gist Hall 218, Humboldt State University, Arcata. A presentation on peak performance based on Dave Gluck’s best-selling book Rhythms of the Game: The Link Between Musical and Athletic Performance. Free. ras2@humboldt. edu. 499-7009.

Movies

Double Dragon. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Scott Wolf and Alyssa Milano star in the film adaptation of the classic video game. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com. Mid-Day Matinee. Noon. Humboldt State University Library Fishbowl, Arcata. Screening of archival gems from the library’s special collections. Free.

Music

Blues Night. 4:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Tommy Castro and The Painkillers, Twice As Good 2XG, Tom Rigney and Flambeau and Dave Bennett and The Memphis Boys perform as part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. $25 general, Free w/ festival pass. www. theeurekatheater.org. Carrie Rodriguez with Luke Jacobs. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Soulful Americana. $15. Community Concert. 7 p.m. Eureka High School Audi-

torium, 1915 J St. The Eureka High School Jazz Ensemble and The Commanders Air Force Jazz combo perform as part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Free. HSU Opera Workshop Concert. 8 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Experience recently rediscovered music from Portugal, including excerpts from a satirical opera never before heard on the West Coast. $10, $5 seniors and kids, $3 HSU students. Jazz Festival Opening Ceremonies. 1:30 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Celebrate the official start of the festival with music by The Au Brothers with special guests John Cocuzzi and Otis Mourning, followed by Gator Nation. Free. Linda Oh. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Critically-acclaimed bassist from Malaysia by way of Australia. $15 general, $10 students and seniors. Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. 1:30 p.m. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. Jazz, swing, zydeco and blues all weekend long, all over town. Loads of exclusive shows for festival pass holders. $85 festival pass, $10 Friday or Sunday Muni pass. info@redwoodjazz.org. www. redwoodjazz.org. 707 445-3378.

Theater

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised]. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See March 27 listing. Spamalot. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See March 27 listing.

Events

CASA Open House. Noon. CASA of Humboldt. See March 27 listing.

Sports

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion,


9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5. Special Olympics Basketball Tournament. 10 a.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Watch local high school special education students compete in a tournament. Free.

29 saturday Dance

Dance Contest. 12:30 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. Compete in multiple categories as part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Registration at 11 a.m. $5 general, free w/festival pass. Dance Party. 5 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. Gator Beat, Dave Bennett and The Memphis Boys, Tom Rigney and Flambeau, Mitch Woods and His Rocket 88’s and High Street provide live music as part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. $25, free with festival pass.

Lecture

“Rhythms of the Game.” 4:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. A multimedia presentation by author and musician Dave Gluck exploring common ground between sports and music. With dinner and a performance by the Garberville town band. Free. www.mateel.org.

Music

Battle of the Bass ft. Salva. 8 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. DJs and producers from the tri-county

area battle for a spot at this years Northern Nights Music Festival. $15 advanced, $20 general. bob@kmud. org. 923-2513. HSU Opera Workshop Concert. 8 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre. See March 28 listing. Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. 9 a.m. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. Jazz, swing, zydeco and blues all weekend long, all over town. Loads of exclusive shows for festival pass holders. $85 festival pass, $10 Friday or Sunday Muni pass. info@redwoodjazz.org. www. redwoodjazz.org. 707 445-3378. Wine and Jazz. 3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Enjoy local wine, hors d’oeuvres and music from John Cocuzzi and Kristy Reed Cocuzzi as part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Benefits youth art and music programs. $35, $25 w/festival pass. www. humboldtarts.org.

Theater

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised]. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See March 27 listing.

COMEDY

Savage Henry Comedy Open Mic. Last Saturday of every month, 9 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Joe “Whiskey-Whiskers” Deschaine provides the hosting, you provide the funnies. Joe might also be funny. Free. www.thesirenssongtavern.com.

Events

Agstravaganza. 5 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. A fundraiser for the Arcata and McKinleyville FFA programs featuring door prizes, dinner, games, dutch, silent and live auctions and much more.

$20. www.baysidegrange.org. 845-8254. Luau. 6 p.m. Eureka Veterans Memorial Hall, 1018 H St. Umbrella drinks, Hawaiian luau, Hawaiian and Tahitian hula and music. A benefit for the Veterans Memorial building. $17.50 , free for kids under 6. www.eurekavetshall.info. 499-6290 or 443-6942. Trinidad School Big Spring Fundraiser. 5:30 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. The evening features music by Blue Rhythm Revue, dinner by Ms. M’s catering and silent and live auctions. $50. ogcstudio@gmail. com. 677-3631.

For Kids

Aladdin. 11 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St., 2 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. The Fratello Marionettes present a puppet rendition of the classic tale. Free.

Food

Arcata Winter Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. humfarm. org. 441-9999.

Garden

Seed and Plant Exchange. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. In addition to the exchange, participants can enjoy workshops, live music and hot food. Free.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata

Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. The tour guide this week is Cedric Duhalde. Free. rras.org/calendar. Low Tide Sunset Walk. 6 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Learn to identify beach wash-ups found at low tide. After the walk, enjoy some light snacks and a sip of wine or a soft drink back at the center. Free. 444-1397.

Sports

Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion. See March 28 listing.

30 sunday Lecture

“Are We Doomed?” Noon. Founders Hall Room 232, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Quantum physicist and author Dr. Austin maps out the possibilities for the miracle point. Free. proliar18@gmail.com. 503-929-8128.

Movies

Sunday Silent Movies. 1 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. As part of the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival, enjoy Laurel and Hardy’s Two Tars and Buster Keaton’s Sherlock Jr.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

25


continued from previous page with live accompaniment by the ARMACK orchestra. $5 general, free w/festival pass. www.theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156. Jazz Festival After Party. 5 p.m. Red Lion Hotel, 1929 Fourth St., Eureka. Celebrate the end of the festival with music from the Red Skunks. Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. 9 a.m. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See March 29 listing.

THEATER

Coventry and Kaluza. 6:30 p.m. Goodwin Forum, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The graduates of the Clown Conservatory at the San Francisco Circus Center bring a variety of skills and thrills, including knife juggling, extreme acrobatics and more. Proceeds benefit the Humboldt Juggling Festival. Free. humboldtjugglingsociety@gmail.com. 714-801-4574. Spamalot. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See March 27 listing.

EVENTS

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242. Zumbathon. 11:30 a.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. A nonstop zumba extravaganza as a benefit for Humboldt Domestic Violence Services and the graduating CR Nursing class of 2014. $10. hrude078@ mycr.redwoods.edu. 496-2730.

FOOD

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. 503-828-7421. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

31 monday DANCE

HEY, BANDS.

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older with live music featuring tunes from the 1930’s, 40s and 50s. Refreshments are served during break. $4. 725-5323.

EVENTS

Cesar Chavez Day with Youth Alive! 4 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. An evening of presentations and a screening of Real Women Have Curves, which focuses on the empowerment of cultural diversity and higher education. Free. www.mateel.org.

ETC

Submit your gigs online at

www.northcoast journal.com and/or email with high-res photo to

music@northcoastjournal.com

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

1

tuesday

MUSIC

Emancipator Ensemble. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. An evening with a four-piece band,

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Slow Magic and Nym. $15. www.arcatatheatre.com. Special Lent Organ Concert. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Organist James Welch will be joined by his children, Jameson and Nicholas, for several pieces on Lenten themes. Free. 442-1797. Ukulele Play and Sing Group. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Hound Dog.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party with us. We have extra songbooks. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

SPOKEN WORD

All Fools’ Day Poetry Writing. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. A presentation by Susan Wooldridge, author of Poemcrazy: Free Your Life With Words. Free. humlib.org. 269-1905.

ETC

District Attorney Forum. 5:30 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Learn about the intentions and goals of Arnie Klein, Elan Firpo, Maggie Fleming and Allan Dollison. Free. Exploring Hands-on Learning Opportunities. 5-7:30 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, Humboldt State University, Arcata. A demonstration of hands-on activities such as children’s book making, online classroom lesson plans, counseling interest inventories and more. Free.

Aloooo-ha! Thank you, Winter, that will be all. We’re done here. We are tossing the wool socks and sweaters. In fact, some of us are even jumping the gun and going straight into summer — a flash of sun and suddenly people are in cut-offs and flip-flops. Daylight savings? Pfft. We are on island time. If you can’t wait for beach weather, cruise over to the Eureka Veterans Memorial Hall on Saturday, March 29 at 6 p.m. for the luau ($17.50, free for kids under 6). Will there be tiny umbrellas in the drinks? Will there be hula dancing? You bet your hibiscus there will. Make like midcareer Elvis and sip a Blue Hawaii while the Polynesian Dance Group sways to live music. When you get peckish, there’ll be authentic Hawaiian Kahlua pig with coconut pudding and pineapple upside-down cake for dessert. Too decadent? No need to feel guilty — proceeds from the festivities and the raffle go toward maintaining the building. So stuff a few bills in the 50/50 bucket and hang loose. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

2 wednesday LECTURE

Social Work. 12-2 p.m. Goodwin Forum, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Professor Cesar Abarca and students examine the evolution of social work and its commitment to serving marginalized communities. Professor Michael Yellowbird gives closing remarks. Free.

COMEDY

Comedy Open Mikey. 9 p.m. Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. First Wednesday of every month. Hosted by Nando Molina with beats by Gabe Pressure. Free. 497-6093.

EVENTS

GMO Free Humboldt. 6 p.m. Arcata Co-op Community Kitchen, 971 Eighth St. Volunteers are needed to help pass an initiative during the Nov. 2014 election. Free. humboldtgmofree@gmail.com.

FOR KIDS

Playgroup. 10 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Playtime in the museum that provides children and families with great resources. Free. info@discoverymuseum.org. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

MEETINGS

Kindergarten and Transitional Kindergarten Orientation. 2 p.m. Pine Hill Elementary School, 5230 Vance Ave, Eureka. Meet the teachers, see the classrooms and learn about the programs and curricula. Childcare and Spanish interpretation services are provided. Free. monajara82@gmail.com. 445-5933. Science of Mind. 5:45 p.m. Ramone’s Bakery & Café, Harrison, 2297 Harrison St., Eureka. Casual gathering over coffee or tea for discussion with Diane Decker. Free. www.ramonesbakery.com. 502-9217.

OUTDOORS

Guided Nature Walk. First Wednesday of every month, 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. This 2-mile walk is open to the public and is a great way to familiarize yourself with local flora and fauna. Binoculars are available at the visitor’s center. Free. www.fws.gov/ refuge/humboldt_bay. 733-5406.

3 thursday DANCE

Physical Reality. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. More than 40 dancers perform 10 colorful new dances ranging from ballet to modern, traditional Middle Eastern to hip-hop. $10, $8 seniors and children, free for HSU students. 826-3928.

LECTURE

Anthropology Symposium. 6-9 p.m. Native American Forum, Humboldt State University, Arcata. This year’s event highlights undergraduate applied research from the four subfields of anthropology. Free. em159@ humboldt.edu. humboldt.edu/anthropology. 826-4327. “Natural Dams and the River Dis-Continuum.” 5:30 p.m. Science Building B, Room 135, Humboldt State


It’s a Toss Up Leave your jokes about clown college at the door — Jamie Coventry and Natasha Kaluza have the sort of hand-eye coordination usually reserved for surgeons and super heroes. They take clowning to a level so high you almost don’t want to be afraid of clowns. The San Francisco Circus Center Clown Conservatory graduates are about more than just pratfalls and seltzer bottles (though, they aren’t above that sort of ridiculousness). They’re acrobats, jugglers and theatrical comedians. On Sunday, March 30 at 6:30 p.m., the crafty and capable Coventry and Kaluza are performing in the Goodwin Forum at Humboldt State University (free). The two-hour, family friendly show is chockablock with spectacle, hilarity and entertainment for all ages. In addition to slapstick vignettes with a modern twist, they have some razzledazzle tricks up their sleeves: knife juggling, extreme hula hooping and bizarre acrobatics. Sure, they’ll toss some conventional clowning into the mix for the sake of tradition, but don’t expect tiny cars or squirting flowers. These clowns aren’t of the birthday party variety. Their skills and thrills have made them two-time winners of the Best Comedy/Clown Act at the American Circus Festival and (in case you missed it) they juggle knives. Coventry and Kaluza wont hog all of the fun, though. The audience can contribute by donning a costume or at least a silly hat. The night’s merriment breeds more tomfoolery with all of the proceeds from concessions going to the Humboldt Juggling Festival, which takes place April 11-13. Because clowning is the gift that keeps on giving. — Dev Richards

University, Arcata. Dr. Denise Burchsted presents as part of the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. Free. envcomm1@humboldt.edu. 826-3653.

Theater

Spamalot. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See March 27 listing.

Events

Small Business is a Wild Ride. 5-7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The Arcata Economic Development Corporation’s Spotlight on Success honors local businesses with an evening of networking, trivia and more. Free. www.aedc1.org.

For Kids

Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m. Discovery Museum. See March 27 listing.

Meetings

Human Rights Commission. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes the use of public property and prison conditions. Free. 668-4095. Humboldt County Beekeepers Association. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Agriculture Center, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Jamie Bucklin discusses Langstroth hives and Les Crowder describes the increasingly popular top-bar hives. Free. 845-3362.

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery. See March 27 listing.

Heads Up... The Six Rivers National Forest is looking for volunteers to spend the summer as a volunteer campground hosts at one of the four Ranger Districts. www.volunteer.gov. SCRAP Humboldt invites you to “Think Outside the Box.” Swing by SCRAP to pick up a gift box and transform it into a small art piece. Return the gift box by Thursday, April 10 for exhibition during April Arts! Arcata. Artists are invited to submit their original artwork

Redwood Aesthetic Medicine SPRING SPECIAL Pairs Get Free Consultation and 1st 30 u. of Botox for Price of 20 u.

THRU 3/31/14

Botox J uvederm fi ller Photofac i al T herm age Fract ion al R e surfac i ng L aser H ai r R e mo val Mic roderm abrasion C he mic al Peels Fac i als

Gift Certificates Available 442-2088 • 2451 Buhne St., Eureka • www.redwoodaestheticmedicine.com

to the 2014-2015 California Duck Stamp Art Contest. Submissions are accepted between April 25 and May 23. dfg.ca.gov/duckstamp. North coast high school students are welcome to enter the Congressional Art Competition. Submissions are due April 4. 407-3585. Dream Quest is now accepting applications for college scholarships. Applications are due May 1. 530-629-3564. The National Park Service welcomes public comments on a proposal to restore salmon habitat in Strawberry Creek. Comments are due by March 30. 465-7703. The Humboldt Arts Council is accepting grant applications for the Beverly Faben Artist Fund for Humboldt residents with scheduled solo exhibitions. For details, visit www.humboldtarts.org McKinleyville Parks and Recreation is now accepting registration for Pee Wee basketball and Humboldt Hoops Youth basketball. Deadlines are April 4 and March 28, respectively. Humboldt Area Foundation is now accepting applications for the 2014 Summer Youth Mini-Grant Program. Applications are due April 15. 442-2993. The Clarke Museum is accepting applications for the Redwood Coast Beer and BBQ Cook-Off. Deadline is April 18. www.clarkemuseum.org. Redwood Empire Quilters Guild and Humboldt Area Foundation are offering grants of up to $1,000 for Humboldt County quilters for charitable work or education. 442-2993. Applications are now available for the Humboldt Association of Realtors’ annual scholarships. Apply by April 4. 442-2978. www.harealtors.com. College of the Redwoods’ literary magazine is accepting submissions of original poetry and fiction from community members, as well as staff, faculty and students. Deadline is March 26. 476-4370. Friends of the Arcata Marsh and Redwood Region Audubon Society is sponsoring a Student Bird Art Contest for Godwit Days. The contest is open to kids in kindergarten through high school. Entries due March 28. www.godwitdays.org. l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

27


MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 3 Days to Kill Fri-Thu: 6:50, 9:30 300: Rise of an Empire Fri-Thu: (1:15), 6:45, 8:50 300: Rise of an Empire 3D Fri-Thu: (3:15) Divergent Fri-Thu: (11:45a.m., 1:25, 2:50, 4:40), 6, 7:55, 9:10 The Monuments Men Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m.), 5:40 Mr. Peabody & Sherman 3D Fri-Wed: (12, 2:30, 4:55), 7:25; Thu: (12, 2:30, 4:55) Muppets Most Wanted Fri-Thu: (11:50a.m., 1:20, 2:35, 4:05), 5:25, 8:10 Need for Speed Fri-Thu: (3:50), 9:20 Need for Speed 3D Fri-Thu: (12:20), 5:50 Noah Fri-Thu: (11:35a.m., 1:10, 2:40, 4:30), 5:45, 7:45, 8:55 Non-Stop Fri-Thu: (12:45, 3:25), 6:05, 8:45 Sabotage Fri-Thu: (1, 3:40), 6:20, 9 The Wind Rises Fri-Thu: (2:45), 8:35



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 300: Rise of an Empire Fri-Sun: (1:15), 6:55, 9:30; Mon-Thu: 6:55, 9:30 Divergent Fri-Sun: (11:45a.m., 2:50), 6, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (2:50), 6, 9:10 The Lego Movie Fri-Thu: 5:10 Mr. Peabody & Sherman Fri-Sun: (12:40, 3:10), 5:30, 7:55; Mon-Wed: (3:10), 5:30, 7:55; Thu: (3:10), 5:30 Muppets Most Wanted Fri-Sun: (12:10, 12:55, 3), 5:40, 8:20; Mon-Thu: (3), 5:40, 8:20 Need for Speed Fri-Thu: (3:35), 6:25, 9:15 Noah Fri-Sun: (11:40a.m., 1:55, 2:40, 3:50), 5:50, 7:50, 9; Mon-Thu: (2:40, 3:50), 5:50, 7:50, 9 Sabotage Fri-Sun: (1:25, 4:05), 6:45, 9:25; Mon-Thu: (4:05), 6:45, 9:25

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Divergent Fri: 5:40, 8:50; Sat-Sun: (2:35), 5:40, 8:50; Mon-Thu: 5:40, 8:50 The Grand Budapest Hotel Fri: (4:10), 6:40, 9:10; Sat-Sun: (1:40, 4:10), 6:40, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (4:10), 6:40, 9:10 Noah Fri: 5:25, 8:30; Sat-Sun: (2:20), 5:25, 8:30; Mon-Thu: 5:25, 8:30

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Divergent Fri: (3:30), 6:35, 9:35; Sat: (12:20, 3:30), 6:35, 9:35; Sun: (12:20, 3:30), 6:35; Mon-Thu: (3:30), 6:35 Mr. Peabody & Sherman Fri: (3:40), 6:15, 8:30; Sat: (1:15, 3:40), 6:15, 8:30; Sun: (1:15, 3:40), 6:15; Mon-Thu: (3:40), 6:15 Muppets Most Wanted Fri: (4), 6:45, 9:15; Sat: (12:35, 4), 6:45, 9:15; Sun: (12:35, 4), 6:45; Mon-Thu: (4), 6:45 Noah Fri: (3:15, 4:15), 6:30, 7:30, 9:30; Sat: (12, 1, 3:15, 4:15), 6:30, 7:30, 9:30; Sun: (12, 1, 3:15, 4:15), 6:30, 7:30; Mon-Thu: (3:15, 4:15), 6:30, 7:30 Sabotage Fri: (3:50), 6:55, 9:40; Sat: (12:40, 3:50), 6:55, 9:40; Sun: (12:40, 3:50), 6:55; Mon-Thu: (3:50), 6:55

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Call theater for schedule.

Divergent Conforms Muppets keep it muppety By John J. Bennett

Katniss who? I’m fabulous.

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

DIVERGENT. The need for yet another dystopian near-future, teen-centric melodrama is dubious at best. Not only has the theme been covered exhaustively in recent years, but it reeks of millennial pandering and uninspired adaptation. It’s as if studios that missed the brass ring, failing to acquire the rights to Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games juggernaut, were left sucking their teeth. Apparently, the only way to market movies to young adults these days is to adapt a new, successful novel (series!), as faithfully (read: literally) as possible. Hollywood dodged a bullet when Veronica Roth’s Divergent saga became a mega-seller. The rusty gears of production creaked once more into motion for one more obvious cash grab. But I digress. In a post-apocalyptic Chicago, society struggles on, divided into five distinct factions. Each is responsible for the administration of some vital sphere: farming, soldiering, arbitration, etc. When children come of age, they take a chemical test to help them decide on their path in adulthood. Some, like our heroine Beatrice, (Shailene Woodley) have mental faculties March 28 April 2

Fri Mar 28 - Double Dragon (1994) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 PG-13 Sat Mar 29 - Random Acts Of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 10yr + Sun Mar 30 - Hercules (1997) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated G Wed Apr 2 - Sci Fi Night ft. War of the Monsters (1966) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free w/food & Bev Purchase arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

outside the restrictions of the test. They are called divergent, and must hide their true identities and toe the line, lest they be caught up in a nebulous totalitarian witchhunt. Beatrice, born into a family dedicated to selflessness and service, elects the soldier’s life. It’s not easy going at first, but Beatrice proves herself the better woman, rising above the taunts of classmates with social and genetic advantages — and her own shortcomings — to move up through the ranks. Along the way, she uncovers some sinister plans for cross-factional genocide, young love and the measure of her own strength. Divergent relies almost entirely on its production design and cinematography — both striking — for its storytelling momentum. Unfortunately, this means that a rather straightforward narrative plays out predictably against an attractive backdrop. Woodley is a capable, appealing actor (her turn in The Spectacular Now absolutely gutted me) but she’s still pretty new to this. With that earlier movie as counterpoint, it seems she needs the help of an insightful, involved director: someone who can help her get to the emotional center of a character and dig out the real person in there. She’s got the talent to do it, but in the case of Divergent, no one is pitching in to make it happen. PG13. 139m. MUPPETS MOST WANTED. I love the Muppets — who doesn’t? They are a part of the fabric of my childhood security blanket. So I can’t quite make up my mind when it comes to these new Muppet movies. On one hand, the thought that they will bring joy to new generations of movie lovers, and maybe warm the hearts of their rapidly aging parents makes me feel pretty good. And I think co-writer/director James Bobin (Flight of the Conchords) has pure intentions: His love and respect for these puppet oddballs is evident in every frame. But Disney owns the Muppets now, Jim Henson is long dead, and my cynical side

conjures up images of a cartoon mouse with dollar signs in his eyes trying to reanimate a corpse. Maybe that’s just me. Picking up immediately after the triumphant closing number from The Muppets (2011), Most Wanted finds our heroes contemplating a break to write and rehearse new material. Into their midst swaggers “talent agent” Dominic Badguy (Ricky Gervais), with a convincing pitch for a European tour and an ulterior motive. Having busted out of the Gulag, Badguy’s partner Constantine — the world’s most dangerous frog and a dead-ringer for Kermit — plans to get the band back together for a series of heists, culminating in the theft of the British crown jewels. The Muppets touring show provides the perfect cover and a fall-group. Because it’s faithful to the characters and spirit of Muppetry, I can’t fault Most Wanted. It lacks some of the transcendence, the all-encompassing feeling of the original movies, but then again, I’ve done some aging and skin thickening in the intervening decades. At any rate, this is undeniably fun, funny and charming. It delivers some satisfying cameos, particularly by Ty Burrell as a dim-witted French inspector and Tina Fey as a weirdly obsessed Russian prison guard. The ending won’t surprise anyone, but that won’t stop you from having a good time. PG. 112m. 2014 OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORT FILMS. With my luck, these will have vanished from the Minor by the time anyone reads this. But, on the off chance I’m wrong, they’re worth a look. I didn’t find them as compelling as the live action shorts (although the in-between material is a lot funnier), but they are another testament to the refusal of the imagination to submit in the Roman coliseum that is the movie industry. Two of the shorts, which couldn’t be more different in form or narrative, tied for my vote. Feral, an American entry,


uses impressionistic black and white art naïf to tell the scary, lyrical story of a boy raised in the wild, adopted by a hunter and brought into human society: ambiguous, pretty and vaguely disturbing. Possessions, from Japan, is reminiscent of Miyazaki’s most magical realism, telling the story of a traveling handyman in the Edo period. He takes shelter in an abandoned shrine and is haunted all night by the colorful ghosts of inanimate objects: humorous, pretty and distinctly Japanese in its tone and technique. NR. 102m.

Computer

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Previews

NOAH. Russell Crowe as the pre-FEMA hero of the biblical flood. Jennifer Connelly, Emma Watson and Anthony Hopkins join the floating CG menagerie. PG13. 138m. SABOTAGE. Arnold Schwarzenegger flexes his trigger finger as a DEA task force leader besieged by dirty agents and cartel hitmen. With a worried Terrence Howard. R. 109m. GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL. Wes Anderson’s deadpan, Instagram-toned tale of hotel intrigue with Ralph Fiennes as a concierge Romeo. PG13. 138m.

Continuing

3 DAYS TO KILL. A bored Kevin Costner as a CIA tough guy on one final assignment to save his own life and spend quality time with his daughter. Not the Luc Besson action movie you hoped for. PG13. 113m. 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE. Xerxes returns in his golden booty shorts to battle a legion of Greek abs. The convoluted 300 sequel has a few good action sequences, but the comic writing is tragic. R. 102m. LEGO MOVIE. Underdog, villain, evil plan, destiny, heroism, jokes — the usual stuff, but with Legos! PG. 100m. MONUMENTS MEN. Clooney’s squad of artists and curators liberate art from the Nazis. A rousing and impressive detective story. PG13. 118m. MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN. Charming and fun animated adventure about a brainy cartoon pooch named Mr. Peabody (Ty Burrell), his adopted human son and a time rift. PG. 92m. NEED FOR SPEED. Framed street racer Aaron Paul is out of jail and out for vengeance via stunts and chases that make up for a forgettable plot. Cue explosion. PG13. 130m. NON-STOP. Neeson on a plane! Fine performances from Julianne Moore and Liam Neeson take action/suspense to higher altitudes for a smart, entertaining movie. PG13. 106m. WIND RISES. Hayao Miyazaki’s newest animated feature imagines the life of a WWII fighter plane engineer. PG13. 113m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Trillium Dance Studios

Arts & Crafts

DIY WEDDING PLANNING WORKSHOP SERIES: STATIONERY & STAMPS. Learn about Wedding Stationery w Just My Type Letterpress & Illustra− tion. Get hands−on exp, and carve your own stamp. 6−8 p.m, Tue, April 8,. $35/adv, $40/day−of. 10 seats. Register at http://diystationery.bpt.me/. Contact: galaeventsandweddings@gmail.com MORE ABOUT GLAZES. $100. Tues’s., April 1−May 6, 10:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Learn more glazing tech− niques. Learn to use Fire Arts’ high fire glazes in a variety of applications. Some experience required. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata (707) 826− 1445. (AC−0327) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $185. Thurs’s 5:30 p.m.− 7:30 p.m., April 3−June 5, (10 weeks). For beginning and returning students. Class will put you on the road to developing your own personal style. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0327) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $185. Tues’s, 7 p.m.−9 p.m., Apr 1−Jun 3. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel−throwing technique. Ideal for both new and continuing students. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0327)

Communication

ADBOE CS6 PROJECT WORKSHOP. Get individual− ized instruction as you create a project of your choice, from start to finish, using one or more of the Adobe applications Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign or Dreamweaver. Create that newsletter, logo, website or digital art projects with guidance from an experienced designer. With Annie Reid. Wednesdays, April 16, 23 and 30, 6:30−9 p.m. and Saturdays, April 19 and 26, 9 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Fee: $160. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (CMP−0403) MICROSOFT ACCESS BASICS. Explore Access database options for managing your data. Learn about information storage, queries and reports with Joan Dvorak. Mondays, April 28−May 19, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $75. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826− 3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMP−0410)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

NEW LOCATION & NEW CLASSES

Ballet, Pointe, Contemporary, Modern & Latin Dance New Adult Classes, Creative Dance for Toddlers ages 2-4 & Dance Workshops! • COME SEE OUR NEW HOME •

855 8th St., Suite #1, Arcata Next to Arcata Post Office 822-8408

info@TrilliumDance.com See full schedule at www.TrilliumDance.com default

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, Apr. 7− 28, 7−8 p.m. & Fri. mornings, Apr. 4−25, 11:30 a.m− 12:30 p.m. Fee: $50. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. (707) 407−8998. info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0327) DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Holding your partner in your arms & moving to music is very romantic. Join us as we focus on two amorous dances in April; Nightclub two−step & Rumba. April is also customer appreciation month, students receive five classes for the price of four. Group classes at North Coast Dance Annex & Fortuna Monday Club. No partner required. (707) 464−3638 debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0410) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0529) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0327)

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

MEETINGS THAT GET RESULTS. Learn facilitation techniques that ensure much shorter meetings that deliver powerful results. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., April 25, 8:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Fee: $85 (includes materials). Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826− 3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMM−0410)

THE WA: AN ECSTATIC DANCE JOURNEY. At Om Shala Yoga. Every 4th Fri. Monthly! 8−9:30 p.m. No experience or "dancing grace" necessary. Move with your own authentic expression of the moment. $10 admission. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (DMT−0327)

A complete resource for kids of all ages!

SECRETS OF FRIENDSHIP CONSIDERED AT LIFE− TREE CAFÉ. The secrets of lasting friendships will be explored at Lifetree Café on Sun., March 30, 7 p.m. Corner of 13th & Union, Arcata. Lifetree is a Conversation Cafe. Free. (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0327)

Fitness

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0327)

April 3 & 10 Editions WOYC Event Calendar

STORYTELLING SEMINAR: Speaking with Art & Imagination. Learn to deliver the brief effective story to highlight a public speech. With Jesse Austin. Saturdays, April 5−19, 11 a.m.−2 p.m. Fee: $45. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826− 3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM−0327)

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−0417) continued on next page

May 15 Edition Special Pullout Section Reserve for all three: Thursday, March 27 at 5 p.m.

442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

29


continued from previous page PILATES: BUILD A SOLID FOUNDATION AT THE DANCE SCENE STUDIO. New class starting March 7. All levels welcome but focus for Spring is Funda− mentals & Beginning level exercises. Fri. 11:30 a.m.− 12:30 p.m., Studio A at newly renovated The Dance Scene Studio (see DanceEureka.com), 1011 H St., Eureka. $10 class, $25 for 5 class pass. Call (707) 616− 7091 or email krenekluu@yahoo.com for questions. (F−0508) PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THROUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website:arcatacorepilatesstudio.com. (F−0327) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 0327) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0410) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Dance fitness to Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks World Dance Center, Old Creamery Building, Arcata. $5 class or $50 for 11 class pass. First class free! (F−0327)

Home & Garden

KLAMATH KNOT PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE. Earn a Permaculture Design Certificate and learn ecological design, natural building, forest farming, mushroom production, greywater design, rainwater catchment and more in this extended course. (530) 627−3379 mail@sandybar.com, www.KlamathKnot.com (HG−0417)

Kids & Teens

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF THE REDWOODS JUNIOR GIANTS SUMMER BASEBALL. FREE program for boys and girls ages 5−10. Combines health, educa− tion and violence prevention with the fundamen− tals of baseball. 8 week program, players will learn the four bases of character development: confi− dence, integrity, leadership and teamwork while developing healthy habits like good nutrition, reading and striking out bullying. Rewards are given throughout the summer to incentivize players to meet the goals of the program from rulers, note− books, baseball gloves and even a team trip to AT&T Park as guests of the San Francisco Giants. Kickoff day & FREE baseball clinic for program Sun., April 6, 10 a.m.−2 p.m., Winship Middle School. For more info. calling (707) 633−8784 or e−mail juniorgiants@bgcredwoods.org., or on−line at bgcredwoods.org (K−0403)

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 4−7. $75. Sat’s, 9:30 a.m.−11 a.m. (5 week classes); May 3−May 31, Jun 7−July 5, July 26−Aug 23. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Make one to two pieces per week. Each project is designed to bring out their creativity. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (K−0327) SPRING BREAK CIRCUS THEATER FOR KIDS: Arcata Playhouse presents 4 fun theater workshops April 21−25. For kids ages 7−10: Clowning for Kids, 9 a.m.− noon and Mask Making & Performance, 12:30 − 3:30 p.m. For kids ages 11 −14: Mask Making & Performance, 9:00 a.m. − 12:30 p.m., and Circus Theater & Comedy from 12:30 p.m. − 3:30 p.m. $100 per class $75 for a second class. (707) 822−1575 www.arcataplayhouse.org (K−0417)

50 and Better

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1225) AN INTRODUCTION TO SOULCOLLAGE® SoulCol− lage® is a creative process for accessing your intu− ition & creating cards with deep, personal meaning that will help you with life’s questions & transi− tions. With Marilyn Montgomery. Class is held in Garberville. Sat., April 5, 1−4 p.m., $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403) BEYOND TOURS. Freewheeling Independent Travel for all Ages. Learn how today’s travel can be freer, lighter & more open than ever with world travelers Louisa Rogers & Barry Evans. Thurs’s, April 3−17, 2−4 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327) BHUTAN AND TIBET. The Tour Without The Airfare. Compare and contrast these two countries: Bhutan is clinging to ancient customs while Tibet is rapidly developing toward first world status. With Roland Lamberson & Rick Vrem. Tues., April 22, 6−8 p.m., $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0410)

EAST IS EAST & WEST IS WEST. Afghans & British on India’s Northwestern Frontier. Discover how an examination of history & consequences may inform current policies & activities in the region. With Bob Service. Sat’s, March 29−April 12, 1−3 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327)

REDWOOD PARKS COAST HISTORY TOUR. Gyon Bluffs, Gold Bluffs, & False Klamath Cove. Join Ranger Jim Wheeler to hear Yurok stories about the last huge tsunami, an account of the gold rush & more. Wed. & Thurs., April 2−3, 2−4 p.m., $45/ OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327)

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS. Offered by Area 1 Agency on Aging’s trained HICAP counselors the second Thurs. of every month through Aug. Hour− long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, 4−5 p.m., April 10. On deck: Medicare Basics for Boomers, May 15, 4−5 p.m. (O−0403)

TEXTBOOK MYTHOLOGIES. Explore how the 18th Century is depicted in American textbooks & how textbooks develop narratives as representations of the past. With Ray Raphael. In Eureka Thurs’s, April 3−17, 4−6 p.m. In Garberville Wed’s, April 2−16, 4−6 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327)

GENTLE YOGA. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Please bring a blanket, mat, and water bottle. Mon’s., April 7−21, 1:30−3 p.m., $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880 (O−0403) HISTORY HOTSPOTS: FRESHWATER & BAYSIDE. Discover the history & uncover logging railroads, quarries, & various roadside attractions that once lay between Arcata & Eureka. With Jerry & Gisela Rohde. Sat., April 5, 1−3 p.m., $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880 (O−0403) INTRODUCTION TO STEEL DRUMS. Learn to play the steel drums with Kate Lang−Salazar in this fun & enriching class! New classes begin each month for students of all levels. No previous musical training required. Fri’s., April 4−25, 11:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m., $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403) MOVING YOUR WORDS: A WRITING CLASS. Go from "I don’t know where to start" to developing ideas, expanding your imagination, & finally moving your words onto paper. With Suzanne Samberg. Tues’s., in Eureka, April 8−29, 2−4 p.m. or Wed’s., in Garberville, April 23−May 14 4−6 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403)

BORN TO MOVE. Rediscovering your inner exer− ciser. Join Louisa Rogers to rediscover the joy of being physical & the unexpected benefits that exercise will bring. Tues’s, April 1−8, 2−4 p.m., $45/ OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327)

OUR SOLAR SYSTEM: AN EXPLORER’S GUIDE. Join space tour guide Mark Bailey as he shares the latest spacecraft and space probe information, including the rewards and hazards of space travel. Tues’s., April 8−May 13, 4−6 p.m., $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403)

COAST GUARD: A TOUR OF THE PAST & PRESENT. Explore the history of the Coast Guard, tour both the Humboldt Bay Station & the Helicopter Air Station for a behind−the−scenes look at the work of the dedicated service men & women. With Maggy Herbelin. Tues’s, April 1−15, 10 a.m.−noon, $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli

THE BEAUTIFUL GAME. History and Mystery of World Cup Soccer. This class will look at the history and highlights of soccer and the road to the World Cup, the biggest single−event sporting competition in the world with Tim Laney. Thurs’s., April 17−May 1, 6−8 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826− 5880 (O−0410)

COLUMBIA IS MAGICAL REALISM. Explore Colombia through the genre of Magical Realism, the land where magical elements are a part of the culture, art and literature. With Christopher Calonje. Thurs., April 17, 2−4 p.m., $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0410)

PEACE CORPS BOOMERS & BEYOND. Learn about the origins and purpose of the Peace Corps, the application process, preparing for service & experi− ences of being a volunteer. With Maggie Kraft. Sat’s., April 5−15, 10 a.m.−noon, $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O_0403)

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

THE ABC’S OF PEAK AGING. A Primer for Living Long and Well. Look at ways to consciously age with grace, intelligence, wisdom and gratitude. Explore practical issues including health care direc− tives and writing your obituary. With Sharon Ferrett. Wed’s., April 23−May 14, 4−6 p.m., $65/OLLI members only, OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826− 5880 (O−0410) THE POET’S PATH. Extend your poetic vision, strengthen your unique voice & write straight to the emotional center of things. With Pat McCutcheon. Thurs’s, April 3−24, 2−4 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327) THREE ANCIENT MYSTERIES. Explore King Arthur, the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World & the demise of the dinosaurs with Barry Evans. Wed’s, April 2−16, 2−4 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826− 5880. (O−0327) TRAVELING IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. Join Barry Evans and Louisa Rogers as they share the challenges of traveling − language, money, visas, meeting people, health and safety. Tues., April 8, 6−8:30 p.m., $15/ OLLI members, $35/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403) WRITING FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS. Learn to write & publish fiction & non−fiction books for children & young adults. With Pam Service. Sat’s, March 29−April 12, 1−3 p.m., $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327) YOGA FOR EVERY BODY. Come enjoy classes adapted for all bodies and levels. Gentle Yoga with Deborah Terrell. Wed’s 9−10:15 a.m. & Sun’s 10−11:15 a.m. Slow Flow Yoga Nidra with Anna O’Gorman, Tues’s 5−6:30 p.m. And Relax Deeply with Jodie DiMinno Sun’s 6:30−8 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (O−0327) YOGA IN FORTUNA. Join Laurie Birdsall to increase health, strengthen and stretch your muscles, improve your posture, and flexibility in body and mind. Tues’s., April 1−29, 10−11 a.m., $40/ OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403) DO YOU WANT TO BE A WINE JUDGE? Learn about evaluating wines in a competitive setting, "how the pros do it" & participate in tasting exer− cises to evaluate competency. Tues., April 1, 10 a.m. −noon, $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0327)


Field notes WHO’S YOUR POET? This class offers different ways to discover those U.S. poets who speak to/ for you. Perhaps, we will even find our own inner poet. With Suzanne Samberg. This class is held in Garberville. Wed’s., April 9−30, 10:30 a.m.−noon, $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0403) WRITING YOUR LIFE. Using a variety of user− friendly approaches, we will write about what makes us who we are: the moments, events, people, comedies, & tragedies. With Suzanne Samberg. Class is held in Garberville. Wed’s., April 9 −30, 1:30−3:30 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826− 5880, (O−0403)

Pets & Animals

DOG TRAINING. Basic Obedience starts Wed., April 16, 6−7 p.m. Puppy class starts Wed., April 16, 7 −8 p.m. Rally Obedience starts Tues., April 22 6−7 p.m. Call Mette Bryans for info (707) 443−1183. (P−0403)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 10. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com for more information. (S−0327) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0327) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0327) YOGA JOURNEY FREE SPEAKER SERIES. This Sun., March 30, 3−4 p.m. "The Power of Transformation" with Christine Fiorentino and T Proctor. Living with courage and grace through being in contact with what is most real and important. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (S−0327) YOU’RE INVITED TO A HU CHANT! Would you like to feel real peace? Heal your heart? Cope with change? HU (hue) is a sound vibration that connects you to the Divine. Tues. April 1st, 7 −7:30 p.m., (and every first Tues. of the month) Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. All are welcome for free. 444−2536, miraclesinyourlife.org

From sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got you covered. www.northcoastjournal.com

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844−442−0711. (T−0327) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon’s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0327) NICOTINE ADDICTION RECOVERY MEETINGS. Mon’s, 7−8 p.m, at American Cancer Society Conference Rm., 2942 F St., Eureka, for details call local Nicotine Anonymous affiliate (707) 499−0224. (T−0410) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0327) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0731)

Vocational

FUNDRAISING FOR NONPROFITS: THE PEOPLE. A comprehensive overview of volunteer identifica− tion & recruitment, & best practices for developing & maintaining strong boards, the relation between board & staff, & inspired team building. Tues’s., April 29−May 20, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $195. Discount avail− able to members of NorCAN. To enroll, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education: 826− 3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/fundraisingcertifi− cate (V−0410)

Wellness & Bodywork

AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE & COOKING IMMERSION. With Traci Webb, Enjoy Daily Meditation, Breath− work, Yoga, Chanting, Ayurvedic Self−Care, Cook− ing Lessons & Delicious Lunch, March 28−30, $250, REGISTER: 601−9025, or www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0327) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Intermediate Herbology, April 16 − June 11 2014, 8 Wed. evenings. Delve deeper into herbal therapeutics from a holistic perspective. High Country Herb Weekend with Jane & Allison Poklemba. June 5−6. Come join us on the top of the world with majestic mountains, lakes and wild− flowers at this special botanical preserve. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442− 8157. (W−0410) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Evening classes begin March 10, 2014 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0327) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. At 1049 C Samoa Blvd., Arcata (K St. & Samoa). Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Tradi− tional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). Daytime and evening classes. 11−week term starts March 24. Begin as late as the third week. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. See www.margaretemerson.com or call 822−6508 for details. (W−0327)

HIRISE 2009 IMAGE TAKEN NEAR THE MARTIAN NORTH POLE. THE DARK STREAKS ARE LANDSLIDES OF BASALT SAND OVERLYING DUNES COVERED WITH WHITE FROZEN CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY ICE). NASA PHOTO

Trees on Mars By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

hat looks like a face!” What started out as a bit of whimsy based on a 1976 photo from a NASA Mars orbiter quickly morphed into a full-blooded new-age/extraterrestrial phenomenon. The “Face on Mars” became the centerpiece of theories about an ancient Martian civilization. Only with the release of 100-timeshigher resolution photographs in 2006, which showed the face to be simply an eroded hill, did the hoax finally die away. All of which should be a giveaway that this week’s headline comes under the “bait-and-switch” category. Much as I would love to report otherwise, there are no trees on Mars. Nary a one, not even in the accompanying photograph taken in 2009 by the same camera that put to rest the “face” malarkey, NASA’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since 2006, this camera has added immeasurably to our knowledge of Mars. HiRISE is the most powerful camera ever launched to another planet. From its nominal orbit of about 500 miles above Mars, it captures the surface at a resolution of about 1 foot, three times finer than Google Maps’ 1-meter resolution images of Earth. In addition, stereo pairs of HiRISE photos allow the Martian topography to be mapped at better than 1-foot elevation, which is hugely useful for planning landing sites for ground explorers. Incidentally, HiRISE showed off its capabilities last year when it captured Curiosity’s landing. Curiosity — by far the

most capable Mars rover to date — spent part of its “Seven Minutes of Terror” landing sequence dangling under a huge parachute. Check out HiRISE’s extraordinary image via the link in this article at northcoastjournal.com. This HiRISE photograph, released in Jan. 2010, shows sand dunes coated with a thin layer of frozen carbon dioxide, or dry ice, near Mars’ North Pole. The “trees” are actually seasonal 100-foot-long landslides composed of dark basaltic sand sliding down the dunes. Every spring, this pattern repeats as sublimating carbon dioxide ice (transitioning from solid to gas without an intermediate liquid phase) dislodges surrounding dust and sand particles. The dunes in the photo are part of a nearly complete ring of sand around Mars’ north pole. In most places, the sand is covered by a thin layer of reddish Martian dust and patches of dry ice. Sadly, at this point, we have zero evidence of any type of biology on Mars, living or dead, past or present. As for the future, forests feature in all the “dream big” plans to eventually terraform Mars (i.e. transform it into an Earth-like planet). Trees, of course, naturally convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, offering a biological solution to the challenge of creating a breathable atmosphere on the planet. So for now, no trees on Mars. For the future ... oh yeah. I promise. ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) will be taking along a sack of seeds when he’s selected for a one-way mission to Mars.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

31


to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 27, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola, C.S.B. # 69056 Attorney At Law 732 Fifth Street, Suite E Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 445−0804 March 03, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT IS HOLDING PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN AND THE FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012−2013 The public hearing for the FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012/13 will be on Thursday, March 27, 2014 from 5−6 p.m., at the Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third Street, Eureka. The report can be viewed at http:// www.ccfc.ca.gov/pdf/annual_repo rt_pdfs/Annual_Report_12−13.pdf The public hearing for FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT’s Strategic Plan will be on Thursday, March 27, 2014 from 6− 7 p.m. at the Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third Street, Eureka. The Strategic Plan can be viewed at www.humkids.org The public is invited to attend. For more information about FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT, visit our website at www.humkids.org or call our office at (707) 445−7389. 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−97)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ADELE EDNA KRAMER CASE NO. PR140071

admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 24, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jason M. Garlick, SBN# 193725 1805 Central Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 (707) 840−0909 March 20, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, ADELE EDNA KRAMER aka, ADELE E. KRAMER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by PATRICIA DAMASSA In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−87) requests that PATRICIA DAMASSA Be appointed as personal represen− NOTICE OF PETITION TO tative to administer the estate of ADMINISTER ESTATE OF the decedent. DONALD LEO GALLACCI, THE PETITION requests the dece− AKA DONALD L. GALLACCI, dent’s will and codicils, if any, be AKA DONALD GALLACCI admitted to probate. The will and CASE NO. PR140088 any codicils are available for exami− To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, nation in the file kept by court. contingent creditors and persons THE PETITION requests authority to who may otherwise be interested in administer the estate under the the will or estate, or both, DONALD Independent Administration of LEO GALLACCI, aka DONALD L. Estates Act. (This authority will GALLACCI, aka DONALD GALLACCI allow the personal representative to A PETITION FOR PROBATE has take many actions without been filed by WILDA GALLACCI obtaining court approval. Before In the Superior Court of California, taking certain very important County of Humboldt. actions, however, the personal 3/27, 4/3, 4/10/2014 (14−103) THE PETITION FOR PROBATE representative will be required to requests that WILDA GALLACCI give notice to interested persons Be appointed as personal represen− PUBLIC SALE unless they have waived notice or tative to administer the estate of NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the consented to the proposed action.) the decedent. personal property described below The independent administration THE PETITION requests the dece− to enforce a lien imposed on said authority will be granted unless an dent’s will and codicils, if any, be property pursuant to Sections 21700 interested person files an objection admitted to probate. The will and −21716 of the Penal Code and provi− to the petition and shows good any codicils are available for exami− sions of the civil Code. cause why the court should not nation in the file kept by court. The undersigned will sell at public grant the authority. THE PETITION requests authority to sale by competitive bidding on the A HEARING on the petition will be administer the estate under the 5th of April 2014 at 10:00 a.m. om held on March 27, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. Independent Administration of the premises where said property at the Superior Court of California, Estates Act. (This authority will has been stored and which are County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth allow the personal representative to located at Four Star Mini Storage at Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. take many actions without 271 N. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna Cali− IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of obtaining court approval. Before fornia County of Humboldt the the petition, you should appear at taking certain very important following: the hearing and state your objec− actions, however, the personal Coast Journal March 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com Marcia Heglie, Unit 19 tions North or file written objections with • Thursday, representative will be required to Randy Weems & Paula Dias, Unit the court before the hearing. Your give notice to interested persons 20 appearance may be in person or by unless they have waived notice or David & Kathy Hendershot, Unit your attorney. consented to the proposed action.)

32

−21716 of the Penal Code and provi− sions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 5th of April 2014 at 10:00 a.m. om the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Four Star Mini Storage at 271 N. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna Cali− fornia County of Humboldt the following: Marcia Heglie, Unit 19 Randy Weems & Paula Dias, Unit 20 David & Kathy Hendershot, Unit 58 Items to be sold include but are not limited to : Household furniture, sporting equipment, motor scooters, generator, wood chipper, clothing, gun cases and miscella− neous household items and boxes and bags of unknown contents. Purchases must be paid in cash at the time of the sale plus a $100.00 deposit to be returned when the unit is cleaned out. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed on the day of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Four Star Mini Storage, (707) 725−0702. Dated this 21st. day of March 2014 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−108)

NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Fortuna ("Owner"), will accept sealed bids for its Holman Tank Deconstruction Project ("Project"), by or before April, 25th, 2014, at 2:00 p.m., at the Fortuna City Hall, located at 621 11th Street, Fortuna, California, 95540, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any non− substantive irregularities. This Project requires a valid Cali− fornia contractor’s license for the following classification(s): Class A, and as required for specialty work. Reduced plans, specifications, and contract documents for the Project ("Contract Documents") may be obtained from the Owner, City of Fortuna, at the Fortuna City Hall, located at 621 11th Street, Fortuna, California, 95540, for a charge of Fifteen Dollars ($15.00) per set. Full− sized plan sheets are available on request for an additional charge of Seven Dollars ($7.00) per sheet. Each bid must be submitted using the Bid Proposal Form provided with the Contract Documents. Each Bid Proposal must be accompanied by bid security of ten percent (10%) of the maximum bid amount, in the form of a cashier’s or certified check made payable to Owner, or a bid bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California on the Bid Bond form included with the Contract Docu− ments. The bid security shall guar− antee that upon award of the bid, the bidder shall execute the contract and submit payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates as required by the Contract Documents within ten (10) days following notice of award of the Contract. Pursuant to Section 400 of the Fortuna City Charter and Section 2.50.090.A of the Fortuna Municipal Code, this Project is exempt from State of California prevailing wage requirements, and is instead subject to the City of Fortuna’s local prevailing wage requirements. Pursuant to City of Fortuna Munic− ipal Code Section 2.50.90, the City

contract and submit payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates as required by the Contract Documents within ten (10) days following notice of award of the Contract. Pursuant to Section 400 of the Fortuna City Charter and Section 2.50.090.A of the Fortuna Municipal Code, this Project is exempt from State of California prevailing wage requirements, and is instead subject to the City of Fortuna’s local prevailing wage requirements. Pursuant to City of Fortuna Munic− ipal Code Section 2.50.90, the City of Fortuna acting in is sole discre− tion may from time to time, exer− cise the right granted under its Charter to establish a mechanism for determining wages to be paid on locally funded public works projects. The wages proposed by the bidder awarded the Contract for this locally−funded Project shall be considered the City of Fortuna’s prevailing wages for this Project. Performance and payment bonds will be required of the successful bidder. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments is permitted in accordance with Public Contract Code Section 22300. Pursuant to Public Contract Code Section 4104 each Bid Proposal must include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the prime contractor in excess of one−half of one percent (½ of 1%) of the bid price, using the Subcontractor List form included with the Contract Documents. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the opening for bids except as provided pursuant to Public Contract Code Sections 5100 et seq. Additional information is provided in the Instructions and Information for Bidders, which should be care− fully reviewed by all bidders prior to submitting a Bid Proposal. A bidders’ conference will be held on April 16th, 2014 at 2:00p.m., at the Fortuna City Hall, located at 621 11th Street, Fortuna, California, 95540, for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the bid documents and the Worksite. The bidders’ conference is not mandatory. By: Linda Jensen, City Clerk Date: 3/20/2014 Publication Dates: 3/27/2014 & 3/ 10/2014 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−105)

PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien in said property pursuant to section 21700−21716 of the Business and Professions Code, section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 29th day of March, 2014 at 9:30 AM on the premises where the said property has been stored and which is located at Mad River Storage Center, 1400 Glendale Drive, Arcata, CA. County of Humboldt the following: #8 Sid Ward #43 Jackson Kirscher

the Business and Professions Code, section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 29th day of March, 2014 at 9:30 AM on the premises where the said property has been stored and which is located at Mad River Storage Center, 1400 Glendale Drive, Arcata, CA. County of Humboldt the following: #8 Sid Ward #43 Jackson Kirscher #46 SL Stachel #88 Rebecca Carroll #143 Joshua David #207 Autumn Murrish #211 Megan Johnson #224 Unknown #252 Colette Aitken #263 Rayannen Bentley #273 Jeremy Evanston #287 Cameron Kessler #330 Camella Allen #340 Jaycee Holland Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in prior to 9:30 AM on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as−is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in event of settlement between the owner and the obligated party. Auctioneer: Don Johnson, bond #9044453 Dated this 20th day of March and 27th day of March 2014 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−91)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 9th of April, 2014, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Matthew Moser, Unit #5037 (Motor− cycle Held in Co. Unit) Walter Spain, Unit # 5244 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Linda Stewart, Unit # 1112 Heather Asbury, Unit # 1393 Melissa Shea, Unit # 1569 Casey Bushell, Unit # 1617 Sabrina Cagle, Unit # 1745 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Homer Dollar, Unit # 151 John Ryan, Unit # 305 Paul Aragon, Unit # 411 Paul Aragon, Unit # 437 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Felisha Escareno, Unit # 4124 Alejandro Fuentez, Unit # 4135 Grant C. McKee, Unit # 4227 Matthew Johnson, Unit # 4350 Loren Millsap, Unit # 4620 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of


John Ryan, Unit # 305 Paul Aragon, Unit # 411 Paul Aragon, Unit # 437 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Felisha Escareno, Unit # 4124 Alejandro Fuentez, Unit # 4135 Grant C. McKee, Unit # 4227 Matthew Johnson, Unit # 4350 Loren Millsap, Unit # 4620 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Derrick Robertson, Unit # 6314 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Gary McCollister, Unit # 9402 Teresa Cengia, Unit # 9533 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Darcie Seal, Unit # 1126 Chauncey Arkfeld, Unit # 3152 Darcie Seal, Unit # 4132 Carole Taveras, Unit # 5107 Gabriel Smith, Unit # 5124 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: 1996 XR400R Honda VIN JH2NEO308TM002988, License 48B19W CA. Engine # NE08E 2003 009. This motorcycle will be sold at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA on April 9th, 2014 at 9:00 am Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self− Storage, (707) 443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 27th day of March 2014 and 3rd day of April 2014 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−100)

SUMMONS UNIFORM PARENTAGE PETITION FOR CUSTODY AND SUPPORT NOTICE TO JONATHAN SELLS CASE NUMBER # 124006 YOU ARE BEING SUED PETITIONER’S NAME IS : MONIQUE PARKER You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response to Petition to Establish Parental Rela− tionship (form FL−220) OR Response to Petition for Custody and Support of Minor Children (form FL−270) AT THE COURT AND SERVE A COPY ON THE PETITIONER. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders

YOU ARE BEING SUED PETITIONER’S NAME IS : MONIQUE PARKER You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response to Petition to Establish Parental Rela− tionship (form FL−220) OR Response to Petition for Custody and Support of Minor Children (form FL−270) AT THE COURT AND SERVE A COPY ON THE PETITIONER. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. NOTICE The restraining order on the back is effective against both mother and father until the peti− tion is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. This order is enforceable anywhere in California by law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of it. The name and address of the court is: SAN MATEO, 400 COUNTY CENTER, REDWOOD CITY, CA. 94063, SOUTHERN BRANCH Petitioner is: MONIQUE PARKER, PO BOX 4319, ARCATA, CA. 95521 Date: Jan. 09, 2014 /s/ John C. Fitton, Clerk, by Jessenia Martinez, Deputy NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: Your are served as an Individual. 3/20, 3/27, 4/3, 4/10/2014 (14−96)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00137 The following person is doing Busi− ness as J & M BUILDER’S at 1141 Ridgewood Dr., Eureka, CA. 95503 Jason Shawn Sefton 1141 Ridgewood Dr. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Jason Sefton, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 24, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−73)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00203 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOVE 2 LIVE at 1765 I Street, Eureka, CA. 95501 Katie Berrey 1765 I Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 4/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant

Eureka, CA. 95501 Katie Berrey 1765 I Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 4/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Katie Berrey, Founder This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−110)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00144 The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDTS BEST, ROBERTS DISRIBUTING at 1984 Tompkins Hill Rd., Loleta, CA. 95551 Steven Roberts 1984 Tompkins Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 Cynthia Vera Roberts 1984 Tompkins Hill Rd. Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by a General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Steven Roberts, Owner/ Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 26, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−75)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00156 The following persons are doing Business as HEART HUMBOLDT at 8553 #A Fickle Hill Rd., Arcata, CA. 95521 James Brian Muir, Jr. 8583 #A Fickle Hill Rd. Arcata, CA. 95521 Claire Thomson Noonan 8553 #A Fickle Hill Rd. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by a General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 3, 2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ James Brian Muir, Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County

tious business name or name listed above on March 3, 2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ James Brian Muir, Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 3, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−83)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00134 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RAINDROP VALLEY PRODUCTIONS, at 1524 Hilfiker Drive, Arcata, CA. 95521, PO Box 816, Arcata, CA. 95518 Jenney May Hall 1524 Hilfiker Drive Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 10/13/2013 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Jenney May Hall This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−74)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00146 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HEARTH− STONES at 241 F St. Blue Lake, CA. 95525, PO Box 101, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 Ryan McCutchan 241 F St. Blue Lake, CA. 95525 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Ryan McCutchan, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 27, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00151 The following persons are doing Business as SEQUOIA ORCHIDS AND TREES at 2855 Demello Road, Fortuna, CA. 95540, PO Box 129, Fortuna, CA. 95540 DSCL2014, Inc. 2855 Demello Road Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 1/01/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ David A. Somerville, DSCL2014, Inc., Organizer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 27, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−78)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00152 The following person is doing Busi− ness as VAN DUZEN GROUP at 2598 Cooper Dr., Hydesville, CA. 95547, PO Box 114, Hydesville, CA. 95547 Mark Hill 2598 Cooper Dr. Hydesville, CA. 95547 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Mark Hill, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Feb. 28, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as LAUNDERLAND at 420 N Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, 3829 D St., Eureka, CA. 95503 Jackie Christensen ➤ 3829 D St.legal NOTICES Eureka, CA. 95503on next page continued Amy Christensen 3829 D St. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by a Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Amy Christensen, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−102)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00158 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAND−ME−DOWN LAND− SCAPING at 297 Church St., Loleta, CA. 95555 Richard Tice 297 Church St. Loleta CA. 95555 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Richard Tice, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 3, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−84)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00209

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BOUNTIFUL BOOTS FAMILY FARM at 2235 J Street, Eureka, CA. 95501 Amy Polito 2235 J Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−79) Individual FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The date registrant commenced to STATEMENT 14−00204 transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed The following persons are doing above on 3/21/2014 Business as LAUNDERLAND at 420 I declare the all information in this N Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, 3829 D statement is true and correct. St., Eureka, CA. 95503 (A registrant who declares as true Jackie Christensen any material matter pursuant to 3829 D St. Section 17913 of the Business and Eureka, CA. 95503 3/6, 3/13, 3/20, 3/27/2014 (14−80) Professions Code that the registrant Amy Christensen knows to be false is guilty of a 3829 D St. FBN statements: $55 442-1400 Eureka, CA. 95503 misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars The business is conducted by a ($1,000)). March 27, 2014 • North Married Couple Coast Journal • Thursday, northcoastjournal.com /s/ Amy Polito The date registrant commenced to This statement was filed with the transact business under the ficti− County Clerk of Humboldt County tious business name or name listed

33


tious business name or name listed above on 3/21/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Amy Polito This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

legal notices

3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−107)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00160 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FORTUNA WHEEL & BRAKE SERVICE at 440 S. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna, CA. 95540 Ryan A. Walters 2026 Smith Ln. Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Ryan A. Walters, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/20, 3/27, 4/3, 4/10/2014 (14−94)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00171 The following persons are doing Business as METROPOLIS/WILDER− NESS DESIGN HOUSE at 510 Third St., Suite 5, Eureka, CA. 95501 Sarah Lesher 500 Quail Valley Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 Michael Kahan 500 Quail Valley Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Sarah Lesher, Owner/ Art Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

34

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00175 The following persons are doing Business as K2 WEBSITE DESIGN at 8130 West End Road, Arcata, CA. 95521 Brian Matthew Wallace 8130 West End Road Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Brian Wallace, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−88)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00187 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HOME FOOT− CARE at 1626 L Street., Eureka, CA. 95501, PO Box 3702, Eureka, CA. 95502 Abigail Dagmar Pyeatt 1626 L Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 4/2/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Abigail D. Pyeatt, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 12, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/20, 3/27, 4/3, 4/10/2014 (14−95)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00205

ness as YARN at 418 2nd St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Sunni Lynn Scrivner 2926 Lowell St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 6/2008 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Sunni Scrivner Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−99)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00188 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LAMER TRUCKING at PO Box 738, Arcata CA. 95521 Ross C. Lamer 2616 Bolier Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Lamer Trucking, Ross Lamer, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 12, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−106)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 13−00251 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name TRIPOD TALES/ SUSAN C. PADGETT, PO Box 301, Loleta, CA. 95551−0301, The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 04/ 23/2013 Susan Carol Padgett 70 Shadowbrook St. Loleta, CA. 95551 This business was conducted by: Individual /s/ Susan C. Padgett This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date March. 06, 2014 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as YARN at 418 2nd St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Sunni Lynn Scrivner 2926 Lowell St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−84) 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−85) tious business name or name listed above on 6/2008 North Coast Journal • Thursday, 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com I declare the March all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00206 The following person is doing Busi− ness as KRISTA’S NATR HEALTH 2251 Fieldbrook Rd., Mckinleyville, CA. 95519 Krista Laszczewski 2251 Fieldbrook Rd. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Krista Laszczewski This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−101)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00163 The following persons are doing Business as CANTER BIOLOGICAL AND GIS SERVICES, AZALEA ANGORA at 1463 Anderson Ave., McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Adam Nelson Canter Ana Louise Canter 1463 Anderson Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by a Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Adam N. Canter, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/20, 3/27, 4/3, 4/10/2014 (14−93)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00207 The following person is doing Business as POSITIVIBES HYNOTHERAPY at 908 Samoa, Suite 223, Arcata, CA. 95521 Kyle David Wannigman 2909 Highland Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct.

The following person is doing Business as POSITIVIBES HYNOTHERAPY at 908 Samoa, Suite 223, Arcata, CA. 95521 Kyle David Wannigman 2909 Highland Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Kyle D. Wannigman, This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/27, 4/3, 4/10, 4/17/2014 (14−104)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME WYLL RIVER PEACEFUL−SOLL CORY SEQUOIA PEACEFUL− SOLL CASE NO. CV140135 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: JOY P. SOLL & LAWRENCE SOLL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JOY P. SOLL For a decree changing names as follows: Present name WYLL RIVER PEACEFUL− SOLL To Proposed Name WYLL RIVER PEACEFUL SOLL For a decree changing names as follows: Present name CORY SEQUOIA PEACEFUL−SOLL To Proposed Name CORY SEQUOIA SOLL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 15, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: March 04, 2014 Filed: March 04, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−77)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME NANCY WHELAN−STEVENS CASE NO. CV140148 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: NANCY WHELAN− STEVENS TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: NANCY WHELAN− STEVENS For a decree changing names as follows: Present name NANCY WHELAN− STEVENS To Proposed Name GEORGE INOTOWOK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 21, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: March 03, 2014 Filed: March 03, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3/2014 (14−90)

FBN statements: $55 442-1400 default


CONTINUED ON next page

©2014 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

URANUS

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

ACROSS 1. Good name for an investment advisor? 4. Flavor-enhancing additive 7. Kind of priest 13. Snoopy, to Charlie 14. Capt.’s guess 15. Capital of Sicily 16. One of the Titans 18. Deceiving 19. Creations in Word, for short 20. Pained cries 21. Seemingly forever 22. One way for people to be out 25. Yellowfin tuna, on menus 27. Napoleonic law 28. Shakespeare character played by Ralph Fiennes in a 2011 film 33. Wife of Augustus 35. Sitcom planet 36. Paisley or Pitt 38. Midmonth date 39. God for whom a month is named

DOWN 41. Rain gutter site 42. Radio host Boortz 43. Ocean State sch. 44. ____ Edibles (food shop on “The Facts of Life”) 45. Ursus ____ (black bear) 49. Sturm ____ Drang 50. Jiffy 51. With class 53. Zookeeper’s main squeeze? 56. Two-time loser to DDE 58. Fargo’s home: Abbr. 59. Passed effortlessly 61. What some vaccinations prevent 65. Country singer Blake 66. Own, to Burns 67. Carpenter ____ 68. Get the better of 69. Radical org. of the ‘60s 70. “Holy cow!”

1. 2012 Facebook event, in brief 2. DVR button 3. Took off the table? 4. One of the Islas Baleares 5. Plaster finish 6. Knee-slapper 7. Crosses dangerously 8. “24” actress Cuthbert 9. Pres. Obama, once 10. Prod 11. “If ____ believe ...” 12. Bugs, e.g. 15. West Bank grp. 17. Hubbub 22. Run-D.M.C.’s “You Be ____” 23. “Haven’t a clue” 24. Early morning hr. 26. Not up 29. Ancient land SE of Lesbos 30. Sch. named for an evangelist 31. Giggle-producing celestial name ... even though it ends just as many other

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO STAIRCASE

words do, including 16-, 28-, 39-, 45- and 61-Across 32. Idiot ____ 34. Key chain? 37. Since: Sp. 39. Part of a kid’s lunch from home 40. Path of a pop-up 44. Ritzy residences 46. Lecture, in a way 47. Last innings 48. Like Dracula 52. Rap sheet abbr. 53. Don Juan’s kiss 54. Obama’s birthplace 55. “I’d hate to break up ____” 57. Roget entry: Abbr. 60. Dobby, e.g., in the Harry Potter books 62. Catch 63. Colorful card game 64. Hog’s home

www.sudoku.com

EASY #31

Clubs/Orgs

Opportunities

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS OFFERED BY AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING’S Trained HICAP counselors the second Thursday of every month through August. Hour−long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Next class: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, 4−5 p.m., April 10. On deck: Basics for Boomers, May 15, 4−5 p.m.

default

 



 



 



 

Opportunities $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) (E−0403) AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call Avia− tion Institute of Maintenance 888−242−3214 (E−0327)

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

classified employment



 

 .]TT\QUM_Q\PJMVMÅ\[7XMV]V\QTÅTTML

 .]TT\QUM_Q\PJMVMÅ\[



.]TT\QUM_Q\PJMVMÅ\[   default

ASSOCIATE TRIBAL ATTORNEY The Hoopa Valley Tribe, a federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Hoopa, CA, seeks an attorney to fill the position of Associate Tribal Attorney.

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportuni− ties. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039. (E−0410) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−0327) SIGNATURE GATHERERS WANTED. Are you a self starter? Are you a people person? Make the money you want. Cash paid weekly. Call (707) 726−3898

The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney and will provide a broad range of legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council, Chairperson, tribal departments and entities, including consultation, research, drafting, lobbying, civil litigation, representation in administrative proceedings, and other duties as assigned. Contractual, salary, DOE. QUALIFICATIONS: UÊCalifornia Bar membership. UÊTwo plus years’ experience in Indian law, academic excellence, leadership, qualities, significant writing, and communications skills, required. UÊExperience in civil litigation, self-governance, employment law, water law, and environmental law, is preferred. Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants. This position classified safetysensitive. POSITION IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to: Human Resources/Insurance Dept., Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218. Hoopa, CA 95546. Or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 13 or 17. Or email submission: hr3@hoopainsurance.com The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 27, 2014

35


the MARKETPLACE Opportunities

Opportunities

CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442−4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (E−0327) default

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Laborer ƒ Carpenter Bookkeeper ƒ Medical Biller Graphic Design & Production Retail Assistant Manager Plumber ƒ Receptionist

default



 J\YYLU[S`ZLLRPUNHX\HSPÄLKJHUKPKH[L  +\[PLZPUJS\KLYLJLP]PUNTH[LYPHSZ\ZPUNHMVYRSPM[]LYPM`PUN HJJ\YHJ`HUKTHPU[HPUPUNYLJVYKZVUPUJVTPUNZOPWTLU[Z *VTW\[LYSP[LYHJ`IHZPJHYP[OTL[PJL_[YLTLH[[LU[PVU[V KL[HPSHUKL_JLSSLU[JVTT\UPJH[PVUHUKPU[LYWLYZVUHS  )YPUN`V\YYLZ\TLHUKJVTWSL[LHU(WWSPJH[PVUMVY ,TWSV`TLU[PUWLYZVUH[ )LUKP_ZLU:[YLL[:HTVH *(H[[OL5VY[O.H[LLU[YHUJL[V[OL-HPYOH]LU)\ZPULZZ 7HYRVY]PZP[^^^MV_MHYTMLY[PSPaLYJVTMVYHU(WWSPJH[PVU MVY,TWSV`TLU[+Y\NZJYLLUYLX\PYLK,6, default

JOURNEYMAN, UTILITY POWER DISTRIBUTION /DQGVFDSLQJ÷,QVLGH6DOHV .LWFKHQ:RUNHU÷)RUNOLIW0HFKDQLF $SSOLDQFH5HSDLU÷5HWDLO6XSHUYLVRU &RQVWUXFWLRQ(VWLPDWRU÷%RRNNHHSHU 2SHUDWLRQV$GPLQ$VVLVWDQW÷&3$ $GPLQ$VVW÷51&OLQLF&RRUGLQDWRU 707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

The North Coast Journal is seeking

distribution drivers Wednesday afternoon/Thursday morning routes. Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

default

Submit résumé to 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 or email carmen@northcoastjournal.com DENTAL HYGIENIST 1 F/T Crescent City

Art & Collectibles

AIRLINE CAREERS. BEGIN HERE. Get trained as FAA certified Avia− tion Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assis− tance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800−725−1563 (AAN CAN) (E−0327)

default

ATTENTION HAIRDRESSERS! COME JOIN Rosalie’s Hair Styling 2 booths available for rent $300 each. Call 443−0780 Ask for Rosalie.

default

$36–$48/hr. with benefits. Full-time, 40 hrs/week. Minimum qualifications: Must have completed high school or its equivalent. Must have completed an accredited 4 year apprenticeship program and have 3 years Journeyman line experience. Under general supervision, perform experienced level work in the construction and maintenance of overhead and underground electrical lines and electrical distribution system, and perform related duties. Must reside within an hour of the Shelter Cove area within six months. Job application and description available on the District’s website: www.sheltercove-ca.gov. Open until filled. Apply at: Resort Improvement District, 9126 Shelter Cove Rd., Whitethorn, CA 95589. (707) 986-7447.

Opportunities

default



     ���  POTTERY & FUSED GLASS SALE 3 days only

Fri. April 11 Noon-9pm Sat.- Sun. 9am- 4pm

default

(707) 826-1445

HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Job Opportunity

Court Technology Specialist Yearly Salary $46,425.60-$56,680.00 DOQ plus benefits Education & experience in computer science/ technology, information systems, networking systems. FBI/DOJ/Background check required. App due by 5PM 04/07/14 For app & info 707-269-1245 or email HR@humboldtcourt.ca.gov

520 South G Street across from the marsh Arcata, CA 95521 www.fireartsarcata.com

Community BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

default

DENTIST 1 F/T Crescent City

MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Crescent City. 1 F/T Arcata (Pediatrics)

REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T Arcata, 1 Temp P/T Willow Creek

REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Crescent City

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH DIRECTOR 1 F/T Arcata

INTEGRATED BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COUNSELOR 1 F/T Eureka

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PROVIDER (LCP, LCSW) 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T McKinleyville

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka

Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application.

**Arcata Main Office**

ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN Performs clerical & technical tasks involving processing payroll w/ an emphasis on accounts payable. Req High School grad or equivalent, 3 yrs bookkeeping exp & exp using Excel. Related college course work desirable. F/T (yr rd): $13.67 - $15.07/hr. Incl benefits. Review Date: April 2, 2014 Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

The North Coast Journal is looking for a hardworking, forward thinking,

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE to be part of our display sales team. Print and digital sales experience a plus. Please email your resume to melissa@northcoastjournal.com


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Merchandise ALL MOVIES 1/2 PRICE (DVD/VCR) MARCH 25−29. Dream Quest Thrift Store: Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams, Willow Creek (530) 629−3006. (M−0327) KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Tablets. Eliminate Roaches−Guar− anteed. No Mess, Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at Ace Hard− ware, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) (M−0424) default

$

20.99

Miscellaneous

Cleaning

Garden & Landscape

Home Repair

Musicians & Instructors

default

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0327)

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−0403)

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0327)

HANDYMAN. Carpentry, fencing, and repair. Affordable prices, senior discounts. Call Rodney (415) 215−9278 (S−0327)

default

Come on in!

      

Home Repair

default

default

Must be 21 and over.

IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

JEANNIE’S CLEANING SERVICE. "Maid for the day" References available Call (707) 921−9424 or (707) 445−2644 jbates5931@att.net $20/hour or by the job (negotiable)

Reasonable pricing.

707-840-0600

default

    





default

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

(707) 267-0496 sagehomerepair@gmail.com



Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog.

QUALITY WORKSMANSHIP

default



We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt.

**BEST GUITAR LESSONS** Music College Grad. Begin/Int. Beth Isbell Eureka (405) 693−9892

Computer & Internet

Art & Design

Auto Service

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1−888−420−3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A−0410)

Financial

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−0327)

PROBLEMS WITH THE IRS OR STATE TAXES? Settle for a frac− tion of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888−608−3016 (AAN CAN) (F−0327)

707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−0501)

Musicians & Instructors

Retired Contractor, Honest, Reliable & Experienced

    

What’s your food crush?

PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0327)

Pets & Livestock

20 words and a photo,

  

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded, #3860. (707) 444−2001 or (707) 502−1600. Top Rated Cleaning Service on Angie’s List in the State. First Time Cleaning 2 hours or more $10 off. (S−0731)

  $@QKNSS@g

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

default

classified SERVICES

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087, 845−3132 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−0327)

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0508)

@ncj_of_humboldt default

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0327) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0327)

northcoastjournal

RESTAURANTS, MUSIC, EVENTS, MOVIE TIMES, ARTS LISTINGS, BLOGS

m.northcoast journal.com Bookmark the URL and it’s ready to go, right on your phone.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

37


body, mind Other Professionals

default

AFRICA, BRAZIL WORK/STUDY! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591−0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) (E−0515)











Other Professionals



CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−0327)

 

HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/SCENIC TOURS. $245 per hour (707) 843−9599 www.redwoodcoast helicopters.com PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency special− izing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866− 413−6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) (S−0417) default

A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0327)

default

      





Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

Sewing & Alterations

  default

FD1963

        

EARTH RITE MASSAGE. Intuitive deep tissue massage from Orr Hotsprings CMT. 1 hour $50, 1 1/2 Hours $75. More information on facebook. Call Rick: (707) 499− 6033. Treat yourself or a loved one to healing touch. (MB−0515) HEAL YOUR HEART. Resolve undue trauma, PTSD, phobia, or emotional distress. Find the YOU that’s beneath the triggers. Call Clinical Hypnother− apist Kyle Wannigman CMSCHt. http://bit.ly/kylehypno or (505) 231−2202 *Veteran discounts available. (MB−0327)

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems?

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

Just need someone to talk to?

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

LCS # 23232

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

839-1244

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

Diana Nunes Mizer

SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

default

707.445.4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com

default





1049 Samoa Blvd. #C Arcata (K St. & Samoa) 11-Week Term Starts March 24 3 PROGRAMS: UÊTraditional T’ai Chi UÊT’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis UÊ{ÓÊ œ“Lˆ˜i`ÊœÀ“à œÀÊ-V…i`Տiʘ`ÊiiÃ\ www.margaretemerson.com or 822-6508 Visit any class free! default

YOGA CLASS Eureka Instructor Sara Bane

1-800-273-TALK

Parent Educator

NEW CLIENTS $20 OFF EACH SESSION FOR UP TO THREE SESSIONS!! MYRTLETOWNE HEALING CENTER 1480 MYRTLE AVE. A hidden gem on Myrtle in Eureka. Specializing in thera− peutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery, help you work through that chronic pain issue, or give you that full body support with wellness massage. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflex− ology, acupressure, abdom− inal massage, lymph drainage, lomi−lomi and more! You are worth it, call today! 441−9175. Now offering Deeksha − free community meditation. Sundays at 5.

with Margy Emerson

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

default

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

default

ROLFING SPRING SPECIAL 50% off first session plus free body analysis! (541) 251− 1885. (MB−0327)

default

IN-HOME SERVICES

insured & bonded



LOVE PSYCHIC PATTYANN. Are you tired of false promises & ready to hear the truth regarding love, relationships, marriage, time to move on or hold on? Call now (561) 427−8677 (AAN CAN) (MB−0410)

default

 

northcoastjournal

&Spirit

F r Marny E Friedman E ~energy work~ d o M 707-839-5910

Hatha Yoga Friday, 9-10:15 AM A deep & flowing practice that connects your body, breath, & mind $12/drop in, or 5/$50 525 E St., Eureka sacredbodiespilates.com default

iamalso@hotmail.com default

Est. 1979

Spring Rolfing Special  VMMÄYZ[ZLZZPVU

default

        



 



  3LL;\SL`*LY[PÄLK 








classified HOUSING Apartments for Rent

Houses for Rent

default

3656 G ST. 3/2 Home w/Sun Rm, Wood Stove, Yard w/large deck Rent $1325 Vac Now. Rental hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com. (R−0327)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

3120 UNION 3/1 Home, Detached Garage, Fenced Yard, Pet OK Rent $1150 Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0327)

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

4101 WILLIAMS 3/2 Home, W/D Hookups, Yard w/Deck, Sm Pet OK. Rent $1250. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0327)

2610 FAIRFIELD #6 2/1.5 TwnHouse, W/D Hookups, Carport, Small Pets Rent $950. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com. (R−0327) GASSOWAY APTS, MCK. 2/1 Apts, Laundry, Carport, Small Pets, Rent $765, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0327)

Roommates ALL AREAS − ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online list− ings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R−0717)

Acreage for Sale

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

269-2400

707

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

839-9093

707

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

$1,399,000

three separate 4-plexes, two 3 bed units, two 2 bed units in each 4-plex, one of the units is brand new, new exteriors on older units to match the new one, new paved driveway and landscaping.

$359,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 2,600 sq ft classic Eureka home close to Henderson Center, well maintained vintage features, excellent floor plan, rooms flow together, attached garage w/ unfinished MIL unit.

Housing/Properties

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

Park-like setting for this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on one-half acre. This lovely home, built in 1960, is in a good location in the excellent Azalea Hill area. The home features a sandstone fireplace with an insert for those cozy winter evenings. New roof and newer furnace and all appliances included. MLS#239255 $285,900

!

ISTING

NEW L

NEW PR

ICE!

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

707.834.7979

classified.northcoastjournal.com ■ McKinleyville

www.communityrealty.net

Trinidad Land/Property ±30 beautiful Redwood forest acres located towards the end of Fox Farm Road. This pristine property features a 1000 sq. foot 1 bedroom craftsman home, developed off the grid power system including a hydroelectric and 2000 watt solar system, 4 car detached garage with large loft area, gardens, ocean views and more! Enjoy leisure forest walks along Luffenholtz Creek which runs through the property while only 5 minutes from the quaint town of Trinidad.

$759,000

Redwood Creek Land/Property ±34 acres only 30 minutes from Arcata on Chezem

NEW L

ISTING

!

Road. Become part of the Redwood Valley community with this amazing property. Enjoy your summers on over ¼ mile Redwood Creek frontage, perfect for fishing and a fantastic swimming hole. Private road access, low elevation, and power to the property make this a dream.

$324,000

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

2120 CAMPTON RD. STE #C – EUREKA, CA 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

39


Left to right: (Back) Luke Vegnani, Sonny Wong, Shari Hullings “Locked Up,” Luis “Nando” Molina, Thomas Carter, Luci Ramirez and Mark Harlan. (Front) David Jenkins, Rex Atienza and Jamie Bazan. The roasting process at Humboldt Bay Coffee.

Murphy’s Salutes Humboldt Bay Coffee Every Tuesday a group of creative, happy people sit at a big round table in the middle of their office to enjoy a homemade lunch together while the magnificent aroma of roasting Humboldt Bay Coffee wafts out into the salty sea air of Old Town Eureka. Now that’s a corporate lunch! At the table is Luci Ramirez, who was a bookkeeper for HB Coffee. In 2013 she had the opportunity to buy the company. That’s when she and her husband Thomas Carter decided to go into the coffee business. Thomas, not pictured, was raised in Carlotta. His grand and great-grandparents were loggers. Luci spoke on his behalf saying that he is an artist at heart but his pride and joy is his grandfather’s 1927 Willy’s Knight sedan, a car with wooden wheels, no less. Later in the year, Mark Harlan, a sailor hailing from Indiana, came in as a partner. He teaches youth sailing through the Humboldt Yacht Club and is in charge of sales for the company. But, if you need a shed built, somehow, he is your go to guy. Thomas owns HumSheds and Mark works there, too. Shari Hullings moved here in 1999 to

attend HSU where received her English degree. She skates with the awesome Humboldt Roller Derby team and her moniker is Locked Up! Jaime Bazan moved to Humboldt in 1996 and with his many years in the food industry, restaurants and grocery markets, he with his big perpetual grin, is a natural fit at Humboldt Bay Coffee. Rex Atienza has been in town since 2003 and is recognizable to many as the Humboldt Rockers guy. He teaches all-age break dancing and is known, sometimes, as Reckless Rex. Then there is David Jenkins, who also came here for HSU. He is so well versed in roasting that he seems to speak Coffee! He speaks about green coffee buyers, Sumatran beans, how Humboldt Bay Coffee does the roast and cup ritual to decide what beans fit their “mellow not aggressive” compatible blends and speaks of coffee profiles. Whew! Is everyone at Humboldt Bay Coffee just outrageously colorful? Nando Molina is such a comedian that the company has told him he has to stop

telling jokes when he answers the phone! He has a few stand-up comedy shows, including at Cher-Ae Heights, on his resume and even with his HSU journalism degree, he says, “I swore off newspaper work and now… I’m just a coffee guy.” “Beyond our love of coffee roasting, we have chosen to work with other Humboldt Made businesses to make collaborative products,” says Luci. “The first joint product was Mud Pie with Dick Taylor Chocolate and Natural Decadence. Yummy! The next was Sour Mash Coffee Porter brewed with Humboldt Bay Coffee by Regeneration Brewery in McKinleyville. We also roast for private specialty labels. We will also be launching our Artist series labels that will change every three months. We’re looking for entries!” “Our business,” says Mark, “includes restaurants, corporate accounts and grocery stores. So now when you do your grocery shopping you can pick up a bag of Humboldt Bay Coffee at all Murphy’s Markets. Thanks Murphy’s!”

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

By Colleen Hole, Advertising, North Coast Journal


North Coast Journal 03-27-14 Edition