Issuu on Google+

north coast

-

thursday march 21, 2013 vol XXIV issue 12 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

A tale for beginners By Jennifer Savage

7 Nursing wounds 18 Coastal jaunts 22 This week’s Hum is crazy 28 Chubby Checker is not amused 29 Jazz it Up 30 Bennett hangs up on The Call


Hana Padilla

Mary Hana’s Flowers & Gracious Gift Baskets

From left to right: Lily, Timber & Lotus

Meet our neighbor “I have a health food bar next to my flower shop!” says Hana, who graduated

from the American River School of Floral Design. She spent many years in the floral industry and was a haute couture fashion model, too. Hana was inspired to eat healthy foods and learned a holistic approach to plants and the role flowers and essential oils play in our foods. “We grew up in southern California she says. Eventually I lived in the small surf town of Huntington Beach. A health food store there gave me the idea of the Flower Power Sandwich and the dream to someday open my own place. I have done that and have a flower shop in the greenhouse in front of my health food bar on Fourth Street in Eureka. You can order a raspberry smoothie named “Bee-dazzled,” blueberry muffins and — from one mom (with triplets!) to another — healthy food you can trust, with drive through convenience. You can pick up tacos and salads, and bring home a bouquet of flowers all in one drive-through stop!” “Murphy’s is near my house and I purchase organic products there,” says Hana. “Murphy’s carries a mix of everything I need and just about everything a health food store has. I want to do a good thing for the community and holistically tie healthy foods and beneficial flowers together.” At Mary Hana’s you can order a smoothie to go or you can pick up your favorite ingredients at Murphy’s and blend it up at home! Murphy’s has something for every body, even a household with triplets!

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem good dog

7 News Picketing for Help

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover For the Love of Bowling

14 Home & Garden Service Directory

18 Get Out! Coasting (Part 2)

20 Table Talk which came first?

22 The Hum

24 Music & More! 27 Calendar 30 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

30 Filmland Called It

32 Workshops 36 Field Notes Columbus of the Pacific, Part 2

37 Sudoku 37 Crossword 38 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 43 Real Estate This Week

crazy

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013

3


Fin-n-Feather 8th Annual

FI

R

Doggy Easter Biscuit Hunt

N-FEATHE -19792013 N PET SHOP

WHEN: Sat., March 23 10am sharp! WHERE: In our parking lot WHAT: 2000 hidden biscuits 10 specially marked winning biscuits

fin-n-feather.com

Fin-N-Feather Pet Shop • 2931 F St. Eureka • (707) 443-4914

“To read a writer is for me not merely to get an idea of what he says, but to go off with him and travel in his company.” - Andre Gide

Used Books

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

WILDCAT A/T 2 STARTING AT

INTRODUCING THE

OPEN COUNTRY A/T II

126

free

MOUNTING • AIR CHECKS • ROTATIONS

165 16

SMOOTH RIDING ALL-SEASON DESIGN

05

free

MOUNTING • AIR CHECKS • ROTATIONS

P225/75R-16

657

40 % MORE TREAD LIFE ENHANCED TRACTION

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE The Open Country A/T II has improved durability through a new wear resistant tread compound. Unique tread block shape, sipes and deep grooves provide enhanced traction in rain, mud, and snow. New stabilizing tie bars in the tread improves braking in dry conditions and reduces irregular wear.

225/75R-15

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

STARTING AT

NEW

16

STARTING AT

64 00

185/65R-14

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE

ECONOMICALLY PRICED EXCELLENT WET TRACTION

PASSENGER CAR

ECLIPSE

free

MOUNTING • AIR CHECKS • ROTATIONS

STARTING AT

66 94

P155/80R-13

YOUR SIZE IN STOCK, CALL FOR SIZE & PRICE The Eclipse is a quality all-season tire that features the latest in tire design and performance. Its advanced tread pattern provides quality handling for increased vehicle safety.

LONG LASTING TREAD 70,000 MILE WARRANTY

free

MOUNTING • AIR CHECKS • ROTATIONS

BEST BRAKE VALUE PROMISE Professionally Trained Technicians Over 30 Years Experience

Premium Quality Parts Best Brake Warranty

FREE BRAKE INSPECTIONS FREE ESTIMATES SAME DAY SERVICE (ON MOST VEHICLES)

Eureka 443-3507 Fortuna 725-1169 McKinleyville 839-8986 |

|

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

A Plea for Animals

  Editor: Adara’s mom here. I just finished the article (“Beasts and Children,” March 14), and I think it’s wonderful. I do think the issue is more complicated — animals at no-kill shelters that are kept in cages for extended periods can end up physically damaged, as my mom’s cat was. She has a hunched back and can no longer jump. Fortunately, she found a lap. I cry a little inside to think of the fate of other animals kept in cages that don’t find their lap. Either way, it’s a complex issue that we can hopefully make better every time we speak out, every time someone writes an article, every time someone digs a little deeper. Thank you for giving Adara the opportunity to speak out and participate in your article. Thank you for covering this topic. Any discussion generated on animal welfare is a good one, in my opinion. Opening people’s eyes in the smallest way can lead to profound changes. If your article inspires only one person to adopt an animal from the shelter or donate resources or time, it will have made an immeasurably positive impact. I’m sure it will be more than one. Christina Lewis, Eureka  

Cut Bosses, Not Music

  Editor: The College of the Redwoods, our community college, is not representing, at all, the will of the community at large (“CR faces the music,” Blog Jammin, March 14). It has become another topheavy institution, prostituting itself to the whims of the cronies serving on its board. To eliminate the programs which actually serve this community is against why community colleges were actually created. Yet, again, CR is cutting one of our most popular and necessary programs in the arts: its music program.   We, as community members, are the only people to voice our support for this program.  We are the tax base for this college. We can actually have a voice. As the Humboldt Light Opera stated so well, CR is the foundation for many who do go on to amazing careers in the music field and we cannot have this movement foiled.  I send out a plea to all residents here who have enjoyed our theatre and music behind our Redwood Curtain, far from San Francisco. We must, en masse, protest

this cutting at CR. The top brass needs to be trimmed, not the academic programs. Virginia Hassrick, Bayside  

Leashes, Yes! Editor: We commend Deidre Pike for discussing the damage to marine mammals by dogs running loose on beaches (“Unleashed,” March 7), and we commend the Journal for publicizing this long-standing problem. Another serious result of allowing dogs to run free is that they chase

Good Dog When she sees me Her tail wags It is the best Hello of friendship I have known She does it everyday. She likes to bury her head In my chest I like to lie my head Upon her furry warmth and quick heart We rest. She follows my lead Defends my limbs Coaxes me to play I feed her, house her Brush her snarled clothes It is a bargain. In spirit I have seen My lost and living friends Howl my loss Wag my joy Love keeps its own counsel. I know this ode Is too honey-winged for flight Too plodding to cast shadow Too Monday to be born Yet, I defend its truth as old as rock and fire. — R.J. Hodson  


birds. Birds have a very high metabolic rate and have to feed nearly continuously to get enough to stay alive. Migratory birds (sandpipers and sanderlings, ducks and geese) are close to their limits. They need to conserve energy, especially when they first arrive and must recover from long flights without food. All winter they need to spend as much time as they can resting and feeding, using as little energy as possible. In the spring they must store up reserves for both migration and breeding. They also molt then, and feathers are expensive. Birds cannot afford to waste time or energy. When dogs chase birds (or people walk too close), they obviously don’t want to fly. They run, or fly low, only far enough to feel safe. Flying from dogs wastes stored food and takes time away from feeding. We ask people not to let their dogs chase birds, but they answer, “It’s fun for the dogs, and they never can catch them.” Is it fun for the birds? Once we saw a very agitated pair of Canada geese in the surf at Trinidad trying to lead their new goslings from an offshore rock to land, while people were letting their dogs run into the water to go after them. How can people can be so insensitive to other animals? It’s not easy, being a bird. Please, please, dog owners, be considerate of other life and do not let your dogs chase birds. Jim and Virginia Waters, Trinidad

Leashes, No!

  Editor: Who wouldn’t be horrified by a dog attacking a baby seal? Deidre Pike begins and ends her article “Unleashed” with vivid stories of dog mayhem (sandwiching a close-up color shot of dog turds). The article seems meant to stoke the sentiment that dogs should be absent or on-leash everywhere. Outdoor recreation is regulated by weighing risks and rewards. Every year, people are swept off North Coast beaches by sneaker waves, yet we are not about to ban people from beaches but hope they are aware of the risks. Yes, dog misdeeds happen, but in 35 years of beach going I’ve only witnessed it once, when someone’s dog attacked mine. I’d be devastated if my dog maimed a seal pup, but I believe the chances are miniscule. I’ve never found a baby seal on a beach, maybe because I don’t frequent beaches like Indian Beach where seals are concentrated. Like all my past dogs, Lila is not an irrepressible predator. She has a solid heel and can be stopped mid-stride if she starts to chase birds. When I add up the

joy of seeing her run full-tilt, chase sticks and charge into the surf, the rewards far outweigh the risks. For Lila and me, being joined by a leash is no fun. Off-leash places are shrinking. Let’s resist that trend by engendering a culture of owner responsibility, intolerance for bad dog behavior, and celebration of the unbridled exuberance of good dogs. Come to McKinleyville’s Hiller Park and see off-leash dogs and their owners happily socializing every day. As part of our social capital, it provides a venue for erstwhile strangers to meet and enjoy something together. Sorry, Arcata and Eureka, you have to drive miles for a free-dog romp. Tom Lisle, McKinleyville  

Not Just Beach Issue

  Editor: I was so thankful for the article calling attention to the age-old problem of dogs being allowed to roam free, and the nuisance that is to the rest of us. I have noticed that many pet-owners are in denial about the troublesome behaviors of their pets. They don’t notice when their dogs are disturbing people and property, and they ignore the posted signs requiring them to keep their dogs either on a leash or under their control. I live in a rural area and visitors to our neighborhood often bring their dogs, letting them out of the car and not supervising them. The dogs run onto our property to check things out, and are never called to come back, so we are the ones who have to chase them out. The dog owners say such things as “Well, this is the countryside; dogs are allowed to run free in the country.” They’re not considering the obvious fact that we have our own private property, with a garden, and other things we want to protect from what dogs naturally do. I wish that dog owners would face the fact that most people don’t want to have a strange dog jump up onto them, sniff their private parts, bark at them, and other such things. I actually really like dogs, and I could love their dogs if  I didn’t feel that we were being mistreated through their owner’s lack of consideration. Jean Damon, McKinleyville  

Police, Press Both Crucial

  Editor: Thomas Jefferson famously wrote that he would prefer newspapers without a government to a government without newspapers. By enabling outsiders to chalcontinued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013

5


continued from previous page

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

lenge the government, freedom of the press provides a potential check against abuses from government. I’m glad your editor exercised freedom of the press by describing her recent experience with a Eureka police officer.  In last week’s Journal, letter writer Aaron Gottschalk (“Editor Just a Jerk?” Mailbox) asks “how is the public supposed to know anything but what your one-sided and subjective reporting and updates describe?” Mr. Gottschalk turns Jefferson’s thinking upside down: The police can easily publish their views or get them broadcast.  We only rarely read challenges to the police version of events. The attacks on your editor, worse online than in the letters section, remind me too of Benjamin Franklin’s words: “Those who would trade in their freedom for their protection deserve neither.”  The police have a tough job — they run toward problems the rest of us would just as soon run away from. Officers deal constantly with those who are mentally ill, addicted to alcohol or other drugs, or who have just stolen something — I imag-

ine it’s hard to avoid getting an us versus them attitude. I’m grateful to police officers for helping when we are in need of help. Still, it’s important for both police and the general public to carefully watch the boundary between authority and freedom. I think that’s what the Journal‘s editor was doing, and I’m grateful to her for playing her part in protecting our freedoms. It seems more and more Americans have forgotten the origins of the United States. We were founded by immigrants to North America who staged a revolution against the Crown, which claimed its authority came from God. It’s tempting and dangerous to forget that. Mitch Trachtenberg, Trinidad  

Be Fair on Fire

  Editor: I would like to respond to the two letters (“Show Some Remorse,” Mailbox, March 14, “Fire Wasn’t Trivial,” Mailbox, March 7) the Journal has published recently about the character of Barry Evans and Louisa Rogers and their story

dirt done cheap Royal gold mendo mix $1oo per cubic yard 6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

(“The Fireball” Feb. 21).  Barry and Louisa are friends of mine. I met with Barry shortly after the wild-land fire had occurred. He was really shaken up about what had happened but had no regrets about alerting the authorities because they had been so worried about the safety of others. Barry and Louisa could have behaved differently in how they dealt with the wildfire.  They could have run and hid, they could have lied and blamed the stove and then sued the manufacturer or they could have sued the government for “improper maintenance of a wildlife area.” Instead they did the right thing. They alerted the authorities and fully took responsibility for what had happened, and when they got the bill they paid it. What could be more honorable?  Charles Davy, Bayside

Write a letter!

Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. l

order anytime in march, deliverIES AVAILABLE NOW THROUGH june 3o

Mon-Sat: 8am-6pm // Sun: 8am-5pm

(707) 826-7435

Hwy. 101, between Eureka & Arcata in the Bracut Industrial Park


Picketing for Help St. Joe’s nurses want aides restored, other cuts reversed By Heidi Walters

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

M

ore than a hundred protesting nurses, their families and friends filled up two blocks of sidewalk in front of St. Joseph Hospital last Wednesday evening as rush-hour traffic raced by on Harrison Avenue. Most of them wore red — the color of the California Nurses Association — and hoisted red-and-white signs: “RNs picketing for patient care.” “Patients not profits.” “Safe staffing now!” “Some cuts don’t heal.” Every time a passing car honked at them, they responded with wild cheers.

That same evening, nurses picketed and held candlelight vigils outside three other St. Joseph Health System hospitals in California — in Petaluma, Apple Valley and Santa Rosa — where new union contracts are being negotiated. The CNA represents all but the nurses at Santa Rosa Memorial, who have an independent Staff Nurses Association. The unions together represent more than 2,000 nurses, according to a CNA news release. It said that at each hospital, “managers have taken a hard line in opposition to proposals made by RNs that the nurses say would significantly improve patient safety.”

Picketing outside St. Joseph Hospital in Eureka. photo by heidi walters.

The nurses say that cuts in support staff are leaving them feeling overworked and tired. They want the staff restored. In Eureka, where nurses are bargaining for their fourth contract since they unionized 10 years ago, there is also the matter of the “doc-on-a-stick.” That’s a video screen on a pole that a nurse wheels into the patient’s room, so a doctor from afar can videoconference in to consult with a

patient with the nurse’s help. The hospital is using one of these for acute and chronic kidney patients. It’s impersonal, accused another CNA news release, and takes up too much of a nurse’s time. In a statement released by the hospital, Carol Reeder, chief nursing officer, praised the hospital’s hardworking nurses and affirmed their right to picket. But continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013

7


15%

OFF

including laptop cases, covers for iPad, iPod and iPhone

ALL

PRODUCTS

IN MARCH

Are you in the food biz? Get in our 2013 Menu of Menus 442-1400 sales@northcoastjournal.com

Print + Web + Mobile

On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street, Eureka

(707) 445-9666

n e p O Now

On the Eureka Boardwalk •••

Organic Artisan Handmade Ice Cream created ON SITE! •••

Try our Shakes and Malts •••

OPEN DAILY Noon to 10pm 1 F Street #C1 407-3508 ltdicecream.com

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

March 21, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 00

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

This is not Jen Savage.

continued from previous page she accused the nurses’ unions of falsely claiming that the pickets were about patient safety in order to “apply pressure on our hospitals when negotiating a new labor contract.” The hospital would never compromise patients’ safety, she said. However, she said, the “looming implementation of changes in federal health care reform legislation, diminishing reimbursements for care and difficult economic times” had forced the hospital to cut expenses and reinvest revenues into such things as new technology and the new $145-million patient-care facility opened last year. The nurses want one nurses’ aide for every eight patients on the day shift on some floors, and one for every 10 patients on the night shift (the ratio for both now is one per 20). They want extra staffing to be determined by how sick patients are, not by budget grids. They want more nurses kept on call. They want an extra nurse on shift to admit patients to the emergency room. They want the night shift lift team — of at least two people — restored. And they want St. Joseph to talk with them, as they say the contract requires, before introducing new technology like the “doc-on-a-stick.” St. Joseph’s statement said it was eager to continue bargaining but didn’t outline any specific counterproposals. Nurses contend St. Joseph is simply offering the status quo. The current contract expired Jan. 31. Susan Johnson, a registered nurse on the union bargaining team in Eureka, said St. Joseph Health System has enough resources to put more people on each shift. “On the last tax return we can see — in 2010 — in Eureka, St. Joseph Hospital’s top five administrators made $2.5 million,” she said. “In 2010, Joe Mark, the [former] CEO, made $640,000. Why can’t they just take 10 percent off the top?” The nurses, Johnson said, aren’t asking for higher wages. They’re asking for the hospital to re-examine where it spends money. “What we’re asking for is help,” she said. Johnson has been at St. Joseph Hospital 28 years. She’s on the Professional Practice Committee at the hospital — made up of bedside nurses working to solve patient safety issues. Recent layoffs — including 62 last year — have decimated the ranks of support staff, everything from night-shift lift teams (to lift heavy patients) to nurses’ aides, housekeepers, break nurses and receptionists, said Johnson.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. JOSEPH HOSPITAL.

“If you don’t have lift teams, the nurses have to use the equipment,” she said. “It takes more than one person to use the equipment. So you have to find three or four other nurses to help you.” Nurses also have to strip beds, now that housekeeping staff have been reduced. “We’re not above stripping beds, but it just takes us away from taking care of our patients,” Johnson said. Nurses’ aides have been reduced. The hospital is placing fewer break nurses on call. And charge nurses lately are being assigned regular patients, said Johnson. The union has filed a grievance over that. “All floors have a charge nurse,” Johnson said. “The charge nurse has to know what’s happening with each patient. She’s the most senior, most experienced nurse, and is there to help the newer nurses. She’s a resource person, the go-between for the physicians, helping them get the things they need. And in a lot of units they’re also the secretary.” The nurses, who work 12 ½-hour shifts, often end up skipping lunch and breaks because there’s no one to watch their patients, said Johnson. And the doc-on-a-stick? What don’t the nurses like about that — besides, as Johnson points out, the hospital’s not clearing the new technology with the union before bringing it in? (They’ve filed a grievance over that, too.) Kathryn Donahue, an RN in the critical care areas of the hospital and the CNA shop steward, said she refuses to work with it. She’s been at the hospital 36 years.

h

t 15

CALLING ALL HUMBOLDT COUNTY ARTISTS UAL

ANN

Don’t miss this opportunity to open your creative space to art lovers!

JUNE 1-2 & JUNE 8-9 15TH ANNUAL

WITH THIS TELEHEALTH UNIT, A DOCTOR FROM AFAR CAN INTERACT WITH PATIENT AND NURSE PRIVATELY AND EVEN LISTEN TO THE PATIENT WITH A STETHOSCOPE.

“It’s like a corporate doctor in a box,” she said. “The doctor can’t touch or feel them. It’s very impersonal.” In an emailed statement, St. Joseph Hospital’s chief medical officer, Dr. Matthew Miller, said the hospital is actively recruiting for another nephrologist after two departed. The telehealth technology “ensures this specialty care remains available to our patients and our community right now and into the future,” he said. The hospital is using two nephrologists within the St. Joseph Health System — one from Santa Rosa and the other from Petaluma. A third physician from Queen of the Valley Hospital will be added soon, he said. Telehealth is quickly growing across the country, he added. On Monday, by phone, Dr. Allen Mathew of Redwood Renal Associates in Eureka agreed telemedicine is increasingly common — and he supports it. Far-flung, rural places like Humboldt County, where it’s hard to lure specialists, need it. And it offers benefits that at first might sound counterintuitive. Mathew is the lone nephrologist now from Grants Pass to Ukiah and Eureka to Redding. He had a partner, who left for Montana. Another nephrologist retired. He has 800 patients — 100 kidney transplant patients, 100 on dialysis at two clinics (in McKinleyville and Eureka), and 600 in various stages of kidney, cardio-renal and other complex illnesses. It’s not physically possible for him to also take care of the hospital’s nephrology inpatients. Yes, he said, the doc-on-a-stick might take more of the nurses’ time. But some of that time, he said, might be better quality nurse-doctor-patient time than they’ve known in recent years. “Once upon a time, the nurses and the physicians actually worked together to take care of patients,” he said. But, he said, nurses have increasingly been redirected from personal interaction with the physicians into doing computer tasks. The most they might interact with a doctor is on the phone. With the doc-ona-stick, everyone can see each other and they’re together in the room. “Telemedicine brings the nurses back into clinical medicine, makes them a valuable part of the team,” he said. “It’s a return to old-fashioned medicine.” The key, he said, at least for chronic patients, is that the teledoctors be kept consistent — not a random new doctor every day. For the patients’ sake, it’s important to have a doctor who knows their background. •

North Coast Open Studios Participation Includes:

• A full color listing in our annual guidebook and inclusion on our website • Participation in the Preview Art Show & Reception

Applications are available now, the deadline is March 26th. • Access to personal artist marketing Applications are available at the Ink People Center for assistance the Arts or online at www.northcoastopenstudios.com. • And much more for only $95! Questions? Contact Taffy Stockton, NCOS Coordinator at (707) 834-6460 or contact@northcoastopenstudios.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

9


Blog Jammin’

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

Venlo

VENLO CHOCOLATES

VENLO CHOCOLATES Snug Alley Old Town Gazebo 2nd Street

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

F Street

Old Town Eureka • 2nd & F Streets Behind the Gazebo • 445-8015 www.venlochocolates.com

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

Find Your Easter Treasures at

FISHERIES, HEALTH, RECREATION / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 15, 6:05 P.M.

Mussels Cleared for Eatin’

You’ve gotta be careful with those wily bivalve mollusks. Sometimes the tasty filter feeders are packed with enough toxins to — worst cases — make you tingle, burn, talk funny, choke, fall over and even die. That’s why the California Department of Public Health routinely sets quarantines on sport-harvested bivalve shelfish such as clams, scallops and mussels, during times when they carry heavy levels of toxins. For mussels, the quarantine generally runs May 1 through Oct. 31. (The quarantine does not apply to commercially harvested shellfish, which are subject to mandatory testing.) And when the toxin levels have decreased to non-dangerous levels, the quarantines are lifted and the public health warnings dropped. Well, it’s been a long, long wait for recreational shellfish afficionados — last year, Public Health extended the mussel quarantine and added clams and scallops to the avoid-list. Now, at long last, the quarantine has been lifted in Humboldt County and Del Norte County, says a news release from Public Health:

Recent testing shows levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins have declined to safe or undetectable levels. But note: Marin County bivalves are still not safe, and the quarantine remains in place for them there. The news release is on our website. ● LAW / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 14, 10:48 A.M.

Prison Isolation Case in Court Oral arguments begin at 2 p.m. today in U.S. District Court in Oakland in the Pelican Bay State Prison solitary confinement case. Ruiz v. Brown, filed by the Center for Constitutional Rights last year on behalf of prisoners, alleges that long-term confinement of prisoners inside “secure housing units” (SHU) “is inhumane and debilitating” and psychologically damaging. Some prisoners have been held nearly three decades in these small, windowless cells, where according to the Center they are alone about 23 hours a day — and sometimes 24 hours a day — are denied phonecalls and contact visits, and are served spoiled food and infrequent medical care. According to a previous news release from the Center: More than 500 Pelican Bay SHU prisoners have been isolated under these conditions for over 10 years, more than 200 of them for over 15 years; and 78 have been isolated in the SHU for more than 20 years. The suit also alleges the use of inadequate, unfair criteria for imposing solitary confinement upon a prisoner (gang membership seems to figure high on the list).


32ND ANNIVERSARY SALE

INMATES IN CELLS AT PELICAN BAY STATE PRISON PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF

The abuses and torture alleged by prisoners and their advocates became national news in 2011 when prisoners at Pelican Bay staged a hunger strike. Soon, prisoners elsewhere in the state and country began hunger striking. See our site for links to the second amended complaint, as well as previous Journal coverage of the strike and the lawsuit. ● CONTEST, HOLIDAYS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 13, 4:42 P.M.

Eureka SciFi Writer Wins Stephen Sottong, who lives in Eureka, will be whooping it up this April with other winners in the 29th Annual L. Ron Hubbard Writers & Illustrators Of The Future Contest’s big ceremony in Hollywood. No, he does not have to join the Scientologists to be honored, Sottong said by phone today. “They do try and create a firewall between the contest and Scientology,” he said. Whew. It is, in fact, a most prestigious contest, he said, that has made some people’s careers. The ceremony draws bigshots, according to a news release shot out today announcing the ceremony in April “at the famed Wilshire Ebell Theatre”: “Participating in the ceremony will be best-selling authors Kevin J. Anderson (Dune prequels), Larry Niven (Ringworld), Jerry Pournelle (A Mote in God’s Eye), Tim Powers (On Stranger Tides, which Pirates of the Caribbean IV was based on) and Robert Sawyer, referred to as Canada’s Dean of Science Fiction; as well as award winning artists Cliff Nielsen (Narnia book covers), Larry Elmore (Dungeons & Dragons book covers), Steven Hickman (over 400 book covers), who will all serve as presenters.” Sottong writes science fiction — has been doing so since he was a kid soaking up the tales of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. Le Guin and the like. But he was an engineer first, and then an engineering librarian at Cal State Los Angeles for 10 years. Ten years ago, he and his wife, Joy Thomas — a libriarian at Cal State Long Beach — retired and moved to Eureka. Thomas is a beekeeper. Sottong helps, and in fact was on the cover of the Times-Standard March 8 dealing with a swarm (the paper spelled his name wrong). He also has a blog.

Sottong’s stories have appeared in local publications, including Humboldt State’s Toyon. And he’s entered L. Ron’s contest before, but this is the first time he’s won. The way the contest works, each quarter three winners are chosen — first, second and third each in writing and illustration. Sottong won third place in the first quarter of 2012. The first place winners will all compete for a grand prize. But third place ain’t bad — Sottong was awarded $500 and his story will be published in the 29th volume of winners, out this April. His winning story is a 15,000-word novelette set “far, far in the future.” “It’s basically a buddy fiction story,” he said. “It’s about two guys who are doing the initial explorations of planets. It’s about the difficulties of exploring unknown planets and the problems they get into, and it goes through various planets and various scenarios.” There’s an interplanetary government system in place. The two main characters — 40-ish Aiden and 20-something Lester — explore eight unnamed planets. They work for an outfit called Planetary Scouts. Aiden’s breaking new-recruit Lester in. “It’s an adventure story,” said Sottong. For the news release, see our website. ● ECONOMY / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / MARCH 13, 3:11 P.M.

Paying More Can Pay Off Here’s one that might be of interest to Eureka voters: Costco has managed to increase profits at the very same time that its top executive is calling for a higher minimum wage, the Huffington Post is reporting. Paying good money and offering benefits like health insurance can reduce turnover and build strong businesses, CEO Craig Jelinek was quoted saying. You can follow our link online to read more on the Huffington Post website.

30% to 50% off

Over 1500 Frames to choose from WE SPECIALIZE IN FILLING YOUR DOCTOR ' S PRESCRIPTION

ECONOMY EYEWEAR P A C KA G E FRAME

&

LENSES C O M P L E T E * SINGLE

$

59

00

VISION PLASTIC . SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY

SALE ENDS MARCH 30 TH

QUALITY - SERVICE - SELECTION 2039 HARRISON AVENUE  445-2079 MON.-FRI. 9:00-5:30  SAT. 9:30-1:30 WWW.SIXRIVERSOPTICAL.COM

● CRIME / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 12, 5:14 P.M.

$5,000 to Catch Cable Vandal Suddenlink is offering a $5,000 reward to whoever brings in the loathesome creature(s) cutting fiber optic lines up and down Humboldt. It’s urging anyone with useful tips to call the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office at 707-445-7251 or that office’s crime tip line at 707-268-2539. ● northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

11


For the Love of Bowling A tale for beginners By Jennifer Savage

A BOWLING BALL AWAITS IN THE BALL RETURN AT HARBOR LANES. PHOTO BY JENNIFER SAVAGE

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

C

o-opting blue collar culture in the name of irony is nothing new. Head up to Portland or over to Brooklyn and you’ll find numerous bowling alleys brimming with floppy-haired 20-somethings striking poses in carefully wound scarves and too-small cardigans. In these parts, things are — unsurprisingly — different. We laugh without inhibition. We are sincere in our appreciation of inexpensive, all-ages entertainment. In Humboldt, it turns out, we still bowl just for fun.

E&O Bowl So the night ended around 11 p.m. with tattooed butts in the bathroom. Things started on a more conventional note, however, with drinks and a bowl of chili at the Jambalaya. We mentioned to our bartender, Colleen Terry, that we were heading out to the Blue Lake bowling alley. She lit up. “I used to bowl every week — E&O is the best!” Intrigued, we hit her up for some tips. “You have to know how to score your own card,” Terry said, as E&O doesn’t do digital, “which is awesome.” “How do you know what ball to pick?” I asked. “You should go as heavy as you can go,” she advised. “But how do you know?” Terry lifted her hands as if picking up a bowling ball. “You know,” she said. “And do some practice frames. Oh, and don’t

DATE NIGHT AT E&O WITH RAY AND ALISON PALACIOS. PHOTO BY JENNIFER SAVAGE

wear thumb rings! I did that once. It wasn’t good.” Thus informed, nine of us set out east for E&O. (People refer to the bowling alley as being in Blue Lake, but technically it’s in Glendale with a McKinleyville postal address.) E&O sits next to Murphy’s market and not much else. Walk in and to the right is the bar, to the left are the lanes, in the back stands a jukebox, an air hockey table and some arcade games. Centrally located is your shoe rental and a row of pool tables, which were dominated by kids shoulder-high to me who knocked balls into pockets like they’d been born to it. When I’d phoned to ask about coming in, the woman who answered called me “hon.” The place is timeless, which is what I think we call places that appear to be almost exactly the same as when they first opened decades prior. Important note: Somewhere in our house, despite my decluttering efforts, a 1970s-era bowling shirt full of patches and pins is taking up space. That night at the E&O, my husband relived some of his former glory days. Not that the rest of us (and by “us,” I mean the people who were “not me”) weren’t solid, too. But at some point, we decided to play teams and faced the problem of an odd number of players. The solution: Make Bobby play on both teams. “Our Bobby is better than your Bobby,” our friend Matthew Marshall crowed a few times. Bobby balanced things out, totaling


Essential e h

BUY TICKETS IN ADVANCE AT BOTH ADVENTURE'S EDGE LOCATIONS YOUTH $10, GENERAL ADVANCE $15, AT THE DOOR $20

APRIL 15 & 16 AT 7PM DOORS OPEN AT 6PM

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE

125 WEST 5TH ST. EUREKA 5TH & COMMERCIAL 445-1711 650 10TH ST. ARCATA 10TH & F ONE BLOCK NORTH OF THE PLAZA 822-4673

OPEN DAILY MON-SAT: 9-6 • SUNDAY: 10-5 ADVENTURESEDGE.COM

MATJAZ WIEGELE DESCENDING PLANJAVA IN KAMNIK-SAVINJA ALPS, SLOVENIA. © MARKO PREZELJ

way, has some good stuff (Tom Petty, ZZ Top) and some bad stuff (Mötley Crüe). It also has a high percentage of pop/hiphop/top hits compilations. I am unsure how the music was curated, but hey, when you can hear “Cheap Sunglasses” followed by “Hey, Ya,” it’s all right all right all right. “Georgia bands are dominating the jukebox!” enthused fellow bowler Claire Reynolds, and sure enough, the Deep South vibe continued as someone in the bowling alley actually paid for and picked out, “Free Bird.” So, yeah. The young and beautiful people next to us didn’t seem fazed by the music one way or another. I was surprised by them, though, since I hadn’t expected to see anyone younger than 35 unless they were dragged along by their parents. I asked Ysi Southard, 21, what was up. Did they come here often? “About once a week,” Southard said. “It’s the only thing to do as far as activities for a lot of my friends who are underage.” It’s really hard to get everyone out to E&O, she continued, “but everyone always has fun when they do.” Jeff Kinzer, 31, was more direct with his disdain for my mistaken impression that only middle-aged folks and up would populate the lanes. “Bowling is for everyone!” Not everyone so eagerly claims the game, however. When I first asked new friend Matthew if he bowled much, he hedged, but finally admitted he owned his own bowling shoes. In my book, that makes him bona fide. So I asked him for some advice. “Rule number one,” he said, “bowl straight.” “What do you mean?” I interrupted. “Like not into the gutters?” This seemed a little too dumbed-down. “Like, don’t prance around and act

s

T

131 for their team and 135 for ours. Unfortunately for him, anchoring both teams and having to keep score meant he had no time to pick out songs on the jukebox or order drinks. Instead, he had to keep tracking down his errant teammates: “Hey! It’s your turn!” Lesson learned: Sometimes it’s better to be third best. Handing out shoes — and advice when asked — was Sean Buskirk, who’s worked for E&O for eight years now. Originally from Eureka, Buskirk gave us the brief overview of the business. “We get a lot of college kids, families on the weekends. Things are pretty steady in the winter. Summers are slow. Kind of took a dive for a while, but we’ve been busier lately.” What should first-timers know before showing up? “Call ahead to make a reservation, have cash on hand because we don’t take cards and neither does the bar, and be prepared to have a good time.” “Do people make a lot of Big Lebowski references?” I asked. Buskirk sighed. “Yes.” Before this evening, my E&O experiences had been limited to the annual Arcata Eye Ball soirée, when “Arcata hippies” would take over the joint to the consternation of the bar’s regulars. It was those regulars who filled my imagination when I pictured what we would be getting ourselves into. Think crusty. Think grizzled. Think cranky. “So it’s more hickster than hipster?” my pal Jessica Hall asked when I described my view of the place. Exactly. Except ● I was wrong! Oh, sure, a fellow or two could’ve been described fairly as “rough.” But the truth was, the patrons didn’t have all that much in common on the surface other than an enjoyment of throwing balls at pins and an enthusiastic response when I put “American Girl” on the jukebox. The jukebox, by the

continued on page 15 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

13


home & garden

continued on page 17

service directory

FREE ESTIMATES

LICENSE #936225

PAINTING: INTERIOR/EXTERIOR, REPAINTS, VICTORIANS, NEW CONSTRUCTION, STAINING, DECK TREATING, POWER WASHING, WOOD FLOOR & FURNITURE FINISHING

• 90 Day Comfort Trial • Free Delivery

Crystal Springs Bottled Water

Local Family Owned & Operated Since 1967 Artesian Water Bottled On Site Delivered to Home or Office

AT THE LOWEST ALLOWABLE PRICES!

ONE MONTH FREE (for new customers)

Potting Soil AmendmentS Fencing • FArm FreSh eggS

FREE Refillable Stainless Steel Sports Bottle

see details at livingstyles.net 2ND & A • FACING THE BAY • OLD TOWN EUREKA MON-SAT 10-5:30 • SUN 11-5 • 707-443-3161

Now it’s even MORE affordable!

your humboldt county farm & garden supplies store

707.826.9537 5307 north boyd road (off giuntoli) in arcata

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Plus

707-443-7171

CrystalSpringsHumboldt.com


continued from page 13 goofy,” he clarified. “Just bowl.” Oh, OK. Got it. “Next rule?” Matthew looked square in my eyes. “Rule number two: Stop bowling stupid.” I wish I could say that my game immediately improved. It did not. But the fun times escalated unexpectedly with, er, a trip to the bathroom. I started to open the door only to have it bash into a group of giggling girls. I could neither enter nor make out what was happening, so I retreated to the bar, then bowled another frame before skipping back up to the loo. This time, the bathroom was empty, so I ducked into a stall, one which, I discovered, had no latch. This was a problem when moments later the posse of women returned and one of them pulled open the door before I could holler, “Hey!” She immediately slammed it and collapsed into her friends. “Oh my God, it’s that same girl! She must think we’re trying to assault her!” she laughed. I exited the stall, washed my hands and confronted the guffawing foursome. They explained that they were buying temporary tattoos from the vending machine and applying them to their asses, then taking photos to send their boyfriends. “This is great,” I enthused. “By the way, I’m writing a story for the North Coast Journal … “ Screams and laughter. “You cannot put us in the paper!” And then, “Hey, are you Jen Savage from Surfrider?” “Um, yes.” “I’ve been admiring what you do for years!” “Well, thanks. I am admiring what you are doing right now.” “You should totally do a tattoo and take photos with us!”

CLAIRE REYNOLDS LETS LOOSE AT E&O. PHOTO BY JENNIFER SAVAGE

Hmmm. “If I do, I have to write about it.” Screams and laughter. “You’re only 50 cents away!” And that is how Claire ended up standing on the sink of the E&O bathroom documenting four temporarily tattooed booties with one trampstamped-for-the-moment me. Lesson learned: There’s more than one way to win at the lanes.

Harbor Lanes Sunday afternoon came around like springtime, daffodils blooming, sun shining — and an icy north wind discouraging any ideas about strolling around outside. Might as well go

E&O ALSO OFFERS TEMPORARY TATTOO MACHINES. USE AT YOUR OWN DISCRETION. PHOTO BY JENNIFER SAVAGE

bowling, I thought, and called up my friend Peri Escarda. She grew up in Eureka, right across from what was then Broadway Lanes — which should have prepared me for the drubbing I was about to take. Also along, Peri’s daughter Dezi, 14, a dancer who hadn’t bowled before. My own memories of Harbor Lanes consisted of attending children’s birthday parties when my kids attended Ridgewood Elementary, of hosting a birthday party there when my son turned 6 — we still have the signed token bowling pin — and walking in shortly after 9/11 to see T-shirts for sale adorned with Osama bin Laden in crosshairs. Those are long gone, but bowling supplies can be found in the Harbor Lanes’ Pro Shop, one of the details that sets the Eureka venue apart from its Glendale cousin. Additional amenities include taking credit/debit cards, a diner and a photo booth — but no air hockey. We walked up to the “control counter” and asked for shoes. They were provided. We gathered them up and walked toward the steps leading down to the lanes. “Where are you going?” the clerk called, laughing. “We don’t know what we’re doing,” I stated the obvious. “Well, you’ll need a lane,” he drawled. “And I can give you 25 and 26 for free.” “Wow, really?” I said. He laughed again. “Yeah, but we only have 24 lanes!” Ha. Eventually we were given a “light” ball, continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

15


continued from previous page

Open Daily: 11am -9pm Wabash and Harris locations closed on Sunday.

Margaritas and Mexican Grills

427 W Harris St., Eureka • 476-8565 1111 5th St., Eureka • 443-5458 (closed Sun.) 855 8th St. (Ste. 3), Arcata • 822-1010

Taqueria and Café 107 Wabash St., Eureka • 268-0700

We do catering too!

Now booking summer & fall weddings at Humboldt County’s premier wedding venue

4241 Fieldbrook Road, Fieldbrook 707-839-4140 www.fieldbrookwinery.com

partnering with

Savory Thyme CATERING CO. (707) 444-2266

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

bright pink, and assigned to lane seven. I took charge of the monitor, which still showed scores from the previous game’s players. This is really important. Remember this: The monitor still showed scores from the previous game’s players. I cleared the screen, set us up, got going. Peri immediately knocked down nine of the 10 pins on her first roll. When her daughter stood up to take her turn, Peri walked her through the motions, advising, “Don’t look at the pins; look at the arrows [marked in the lane].” All around us, people filled the bowling alley. A mom, her daughter and their friend owned the lane next to us. A birthday party erupted behind us. A hefty man in a white T-shirt bowled strike after strike a few lanes JENNIFER SAVAGE ENVISIONS A STRIKE AT HARBOR LANES. PHOTO BY PERI ESCARDA down, to the cheers of his friends and family. A couple of women in bowling shirts shrieked every few moments, whether from appreciafirst-timers, Schlesinger recommended tion or disgust, I wasn’t sure. The smell of being patient with yourself — “and ask French fry grease wafted by. for an eight pound ball!” Following earlier advice, I’d picked a 12 Her daughter, Breann Davis, 16, added pound ball. I was hitting more pins than that the Friday night “Rock and Roll Bowl” not, but by the fifth frame the strain in usually attracted plenty of teenagers, my arm reminded me of lifting weights. one of the few options available to the I switched to a 10 pound and found under-21 crowd. myself doing much better. My strategy The only sour notes came when I was to toss that ball hard on the first go, went to find water — Styrofoam cups? counting on the velocity to keep the ball Really? — and when we went to pay for on track and demolish what pins I could, our games. Three people, two games, then on the second throw hold back a bit, three pairs of shoes, should be about counting on slightly better aim to take $22.50, I figured. At the counter, the out what remaining pins I could. I ended woman working announced the total as with an 87, which I think is not terrible, so $56. “Says you played 20 games,” she said. apparently my plan worked. Or I got lucky. Now, to play 20 games would take several With bowling, it’s hard to tell. hours at best. And who plays 20 games in But while my score made me happy, a row anyway? The fact an error existed the number wasn’t all that important. seemed clear. Solving the problem took Laughing with friends and the fun of a surprisingly long time and firm stance playing was enough. Sheri Schlesinger, the on our part, but after some back-andmom in the lane next to us, agreed. forth we worked things out. The glitch? “It’s something fun to do,” she said. We hadn’t had the staff come to clear Her friend, Vicki King, elaborated. “It’s the scores from the previous game. something you can do at any skill level, Lesson learned: Ask about everything in any age.” advance, lest you get stuck paying for 18 When asked what advice she’d give games you didn’t play. ●


continued from page 14

continued on next page

Depot Humboldt

Garden Center

(707) 825 0269 www.humdepot.com Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 10am-6:30pm 5201 Carlson Park Drive #2, Arcata GPS Address: 1264 Giuntoli Ln. (Behind McIntosh Farm Country Store)

Spring Soil Specials th through April 15 Royal Gold Soil $100 a yard Roots 707 pallet $560 Pro-Mix HP pallet $869

Receive FREE $ 100 gas card* with the purchase of any pallet of Fox Farm Soil *NO LIMIT! northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

17


GET OUT! or

OLD TOWN

TRUESDALE AVE

LIF O Coa RNIA sta l ac COA TH S ces JET s co TAL Pro T nne TR p os YR c to A I L ed OA r coa D sta l ac ces s co nne c to r SO U

CA

5000 WEST END RD. ARCATA // 826-2680 // ARCATACABINET.COM

L

HERRICK

HUM BOLDT BAY ELK RIVER WILDLIFE AREA

KING SALMON

PG&E

Finished trail

California Coastal Trail

Rees Hughes’ hike

E URE K A ARE A Elk

v er

FEET

EUREKA

Ri

SPRING

1,000 2,000

ER-HIKSHARI’ TRAI

EUREKA ELK RIVER WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Proposed trail 0

Bayshore Mall

D

SOUTH SPIT

HILFIKER LN

ER R RIV ELK

30 Years in Humboldt +

HARRIS ST

E L K RIV

LIF CA

SAMOA DUNES RECREATION AREA

U.S. Coast Guard

Free Estimates In Home Consultation Computer Design

EUREKA (PALCO) MARSH

NORTH SPIT

OR

NI

290 Briceland Rd • Redway, CA • (707) 923-2765

FAIRHAVEN

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL. SOURCES: CALIFORNIA COASTAL CONSERVANCY AND REDWOOD COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY

ec t CO AS TA L A

CA L IF

HUMBOLDT COUNTY

4TH ST 5TH ST

AIL TR

OR

EUREKA Map detail

Coa sta l ac NE W NAVY BASE ces ROAD s co nn

NIA

CO A S TA L T R AIL

continued from previous page

Coasting (Part 2)

SALE

More wandering and musing along Humboldt’s California Coastal Trail

THE MONTH OF MARCH

40%

By Rees Hughes

Save on these awesome products Bigger Roots = Bigger Plants 148 South G St., Arcata • 633-6125 • www.beneficiallivingcenter.com

northcoastjournal.com Journal • THURSDAY, Thursday, MARCH March 21, 2013 •• northcoastjournal.com NORTH Coast COAST JOURNAL 18 North

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

O

ver the years I have walked as much of the Humboldt County coast as possible. The extraordinary wild and windy Lost Coast is the equal of any coastal walk I have taken anywhere in the world. It combines solitude with stunning landscape and incredible intertidal shoreline. Not far behind is the Carruthers Cove to Skunk Cabbage Trail via Gold Bluffs Beach walk. And then there are the miles and miles of unbroken beaches past the lagoons, the more populated and recognized destinations like Clam Beach, Mad River Beach and Centerville Beach, and our forgotten gems like the South Jetty on to Table Bluff and the mouth of the Eel River. With a little planning, there are countless opportunities to enjoy a day on the California Coastal Trail. I spoke with Emily Sinkhorn, who works

for the Redwood Community Action Agency and has been involved in a number of California Coastal Trail projects, about sections that I may have bypassed or that illustrate some of the gaps in the trail going south from Arcata. I asked the same question of Aldaron Laird, a local environmental planner who has surveyed every inch of Humboldt Bay. And the Coastal Conservancy’s Peter Jarausch. They all suggested that I walk south from Old Town in Eureka to Fields Landing and explore the North Coast Railroad Authority (NCRA) railroad rightof-way north and south from the Tompkins Hill Road underpass. I added the South Jetty to the itinerary, since it has been years since my last visit. The Eureka to southern Humboldt Bay passage represents one of the more significant gaps in the Humboldt County portion of the coastal trail. Like


the primary strand of the proposed Arcata to Eureka coastal trail, it relies heavily on a deteriorating right-of-way and the cooperation and flexibility of the NCRA. In my efforts to recruit a walking partner, I felt that full disclosure was necessary. “This is uncharted territory for me,” I confessed. Protective clothing? Clippers? Machete? Beats me. We could probably get a bite to eat at the Loleta Bakery. We’ll be gone all day. At this point, there was only one hand still up; my faithful compatriot in many projects, Dennis. We planted one car in King Salmon to avoid the extra mileage required to retrace our steps. It had been a clear, crisp night, and only as we positioned the second car in Old Town was the sun beginning to lift the temperature. We passed the familiar landmarks of the small boat basin and the “balloon track” and the Schmidbauer Lumber facility. We paused to watch a river of wood chips flooding into an immense barge from a towering system of conveyors. Later we would see the laden barge crossing the bar from the vantage point of the South Jetty. As we proceeded south, we entered the netherworld of the Eureka Marsh (formerly known as the Palco Marsh). This half mile DMZ is littered with the detritus of broken dreams and the hard life on society’s margins.  But once you cross the parking area behind the Bayshore Mall, it is like you have landed in Oz. The paved 1.5 mile Elk River Hikshari’ Trail begins at a first class trailhead, complete with bathrooms and parking, at the west end of Truesdale Street. The trail, which was opened in June 2012, offers a unique view of the bay until it curves southeast along Elk River. It was gratifying to see that stretch of trail so well used, and it gives me hope that money the City of Eureka has allocated for extension of the trail through the Eureka Marsh will result in its resurrection, too. We left the shiny new trail for the more primitive NCRA railroad right-of-way as it crossed the Elk River and paralleled the bay shore all the way to the PG&E generating plant. Following a rough trail through two open gates, we were deposited in Humboldt County’s little Venice, the water-logged community of King Salmon. King Salmon, at three feet above sea level, was constructed in 1940 by dredging boat channels from a bare sand spit and the mud that was once the site of Humboldt City, the short-lived first settlement on the bay founded by H.H. Buhne in 1850. With its canals and easy access to the bay, King Salmon was touted as a haven for fishermen from all over the United States (hence the street names of Herring, Sole, Cod, Perch, Halibut, and Crab). That dream has never been fully realized. More likely, King Salmon will be among the first casualties of sea level rise. Dennis and I enjoyed the panoramic view of the bay from the short climb up Buhne Point, and drank hot chai at the Boat House Espresso

Bar before we reclaimed the car and headed on south. Our brief foray into King Salmon served as a reminder that the California Coastal Trail is routed through and around history: The lighthouses at Punta Gorda, Cape Mendocino and Trinidad, the wagon route along the beach south of Centerville, the old Hammond Railroad used to ferry redwood logs to the mills on Humboldt Bay (now the Hammond Trail), and the mining at Gold Bluffs. We investigated the railroad right-of-way that shares an underpass with Tompkins Hill Road, looking for a primitive path either direction. A few deer tracks, a derelict RV and flourishing impenetrable undergrowth were all we found. Life felt too short to take this on. We drove on south past the College of the Redwoods, trying to decipher the location of the suggested coastal trail route. There were a few hints here and there.  After a Loleta Bakery lunch and some purchases at the Loleta Meat Market (enough to make sure we remained neutral in the recent controversy), we drove over Table Bluff and down to South Spit. With its unexpected dips and holes, the drive to the jetty was not that much faster than walking. We parked. We walked along the breakwater and again turned south. What an amazing winter day. There was real warmth in the air. The seas were flat and the air calm. And the beach was amazingly desolate for being so nice. This, too, was considered a strand of the California Coastal Trail, and it continued down to the mouth of the Eel and beyond. So was Copenhagen Road to Loleta and beyond. The coastal trail in this area is not unlike the top of a frayed rope, with multiple options each with its own problems — overgrowth, excessive and dangerous traffic, impassable water crossings and private land, to note a few. As we headed home, I couldn’t help but remember Emily Sinkhorn’s assessment of the California Coastal Trail in Humboldt County. “It is really complete in the north and the south [of the county] but it is the connecting between communities that must be the focus now.”  Solutions moving forward, she continued, “will happen through collaboration.” With the exhaustion of Prop 84 (2006) bond resources, partnerships and local funding support will be key. We have a community asset that is within reach of being extraordinary.  It has been more than four decades since the people of California passed the coastal initiative ballot measure that, in the words of Coastwalk founder Bill Kortum, was “an expression of devotion to this magnificent coastline, the commons for all of California.” After taking my recent walks, I realized more than ever the importance of keeping that dream alive and well on the North Coast. l If you would like to write a Get Out! Column, please email Journal editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg at carrie@northcoastjournal.com

home & garden

service directory

Be sure to pick up the Journal’s Do It Green Guide. Available on newsstands all over Humboldt County, at your favorite green merchants and online 24/7 at northcoastjournal. com, under the Special Publications tab.

1 Dry Pound makes 6720 gallons of fertilizer 1 Tablespoon/50 gallons for full microbial effectiveness 1 Teaspoon/10 gallons for instant use

Available Online at SensationalSolutions.Com

Prepare your garden for Spring. We will customize any fertilizer blend at our local factory

Now Available at Dazey’s and Pierson’s Garden Center northcoastjournal.com North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal • THURSDAY, Thursday, MARCH March 21, 2013 northcoastjournal.com •• NORTH

19


AND

OPEN 365 DAYS phó Large $799

443-6812 2916 Central at Henderson, Eureka www.HappyDonutsAsianFood.com

tea eggs

photo by Ari LeVaux

Which Came First? On eggs and chickens By Ari LeVaux

talkofthetable@northcoastjournal.com

I Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227

once owned a T-shirt that read, “Stock up on eggs for Passover and Easter.” I bought it overseas, along with some other bits of shirt-bound poetry like “On the Road With Feeling” and “Head For These Seafood Values.” But “Stock up on eggs for Passover and Easter” was always different. It seemed both completely absurd, as one would expect from bad English T-shirt poetry, but also true. It felt like it was trying to tell me something. Eggs are, in fact, integral to both Passover and Easter, and if one wants to celebrate either, one will, in fact, want to stock up on eggs. So there is that. Of course few people celebrate both, but the shared egg hints at the fact that the two holidays are celebrating similar things. Both explore issues of birth and death and rebirth. And the egg is a powerful symbol of the transition into life. Spring is also an important season for another egg-worshipping tribe, the locavores — especially the backyard chicken farming subset. The egg symbolizes a vibrant backyard ecosystem. It is a joyous

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

morsel of cruelty-free animal protein, and a constant reminder how awesome it is to give your food waste to a chicken instead of a compost pile. But while eggs are definitely a goal in the raising of backyard chickens, the chicken comes first, according to Harvey Ussery in The Small-Scale Poultry Flock. And this is true both symbolically and literally. “Most beginning flocksters start with the chicken — either just-hatched chicks, started birds just out of the brooder up to onset of lay, or adult birds — though a few go-getters might prefer to start by hatching eggs in an incubator,” writes Ussery. Most hatcheries begin selling baby chicks in March, either as direct orders to consumers or to feed stores. Of course, chickens these days can be coaxed into laying eggs all year round. And new chicks can be incorporated into a flock at any time. But from a chick’s perspective, spring and summer is a great time to grow up. By the same token, hatcheries don’t like selling chicks in fall or winter, because too many of them die.

My first batch of mail-order chicks arrived in the mail on Easter Sunday, 2002. You might be thinking, “Wait, the mail doesn’t even come on Sunday, much less Easter Sunday.” In fact, the minute a shipment of live animals arrives at a post office, the recipient is notified, 24/7. It was about 8:30 p.m. on Easter Sunday when I got the call. I had to use the post office’s back door. Ordering chicks through the mail gives you a lot of options in terms of the many the fancy and funky breeds of chicken out there. At the same time, there’s something fun about going to the local feed store and rolling the dice on whatever they have in stock. I’ve had great luck with random feed store chicks. Of the common breeds, you can’t go wrong with the bright gold Buff Orpingtons. So while followers of biblical religions should consider stocking up on eggs for Passover and Easter, for those more inclined towards Earth Day, it’s time to stock up on baby chickens. If you are stocking up on chickens this time of year, you could do a lot worse than have Ussery’s book on your shelf. It’s an informative and entertaining read, and speaks to almost any question you could have about backyard poultry raising. Had I had his comprehensive opus when I was getting started, it would have saved me a lot of wrong turns and expanded my vision of the many ways that the personal flock can be integrated into the home ecosystem. Luckily, it’s never too late to explore the chicken and the egg. And in honor of egg season, and in service of general egg appreciation, I leave you with an egg recipe.

Tea Eggs

This is a popular Chinese New Year dish. Tea eggs are pretty, like Easter eggs. And like Passover eggs they are salty, thanks to the soy sauce. Start with some eggs in a pot of cold water. Bring it to a boil, and simmer for 10 minutes. Let the eggs cool to the point when you can handle them. Carefully crack the shellshells, either with the back of a spoon or by bonking them on the counter gently. You want to bonk hard enough to crack the shell, but you’re not peeling it, so you don’t want to smash the egg within. Return the cracked eggs to the pot. Add a cinnamon stick, two star anise pods, and several tablespoons of black tea and soy sauce, and simmer for two hours. Add more tea or soy sauce to make sure the water is really black. Turn off the heat and let it sit overnight. The next day, peel and serve. l


CAP’N ZACH’S CRAB HOUSE

Fresh from our Boat to You DUNGENESS CRAB OPEN THURS - SUN

(market and weather permitting)

11am - 6pm • 839-9059 Corner of Central & Reasor, McKinleyville

NOW OPEN 475 I STREET • ARCATA 822-2241 M O N DAY - SATU R DAY 1 1 : 3 0 AM- 9 : 3 0 PM

Ch “One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” Virginia Woolf

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

err

yB

los

som

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

Celebrate your Special Occasion! Specialties Include: Dungeness Crab King Crab Legs Australian Lobster Tails Black Angus Beef Private Dining Room Available

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 • LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

southeast asian cuisine

Thai • Lao • Vietnamese corner of 4th & L Eureka • 443-2690 ••• OPEN Mon.-Sat Lunch & Dinner • We cater, too! •

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013

21


LoCura

Crazy

LoCura at the Mateel, plus Front Country, Pimps of Joytime and The California Honeydrops By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

L

oCura is a crazy cool multiculti band based in San Francisco’s Mission District whose Spanish name has a dual meaning. “One way it means ‘madness,’ but ‘lo cura‘ also means ‘the cure,’” explains vocalist Kata Miletich (who is also Spanish). The band got its start when Kata and her guitarist partner Bob Sanders moved to Oakland. “We were starting to get into rhumba and flamenco and we met Rachael [Bouch], the original percussionist — she’d studied drums in Cuba.” They added new sounds like son to the mix. An electric bass player and a flamenco dancer came next. “It all fit so perfectly with the acoustic vibe,” said Kata. “Before you knew it we had a trumpet and a drum kit.” Rachael eventually moved on and others took her place. “It’s definitely grown,” said Kata. “Every person who comes into the band adds their own thing, maybe ska or klezmer or funk. It all plays a part in creating the vibe and the sound.” The sum of the parts sounds really good, totally vibrant — perfect for dancing. That’s the plan Saturday at the Mateel when LoCura plays a benefit for Heartwood Institute. Also on the bill: North Bay roots, rock, reggae stalwarts Sol Horizon and DJ Izzy Wise. Despite the prominent “featuring Melo-

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

dy Walker” on the poster for Front Country‘s Saturday show at the Jambalaya, Melody wants it known that it’s not really her band. “It’s a democratic deal, a collaboration,” she said, calling from her home in Martinez. Front Country got its start in Spring 2011 when Melody’s music partner Jacob Groopman assembled a pickup band, inviting the best pickers he knew in the Bay Area. All involved had some sort of bluegrass/newgrass roots. The band ended up with a once-a-month residency at the Atlas Café in San Francisco’s Mission District. “We have all the bluegrass instruments except Dobro,” said Melody, who serves as primary vocalist. “And we play a few bluegrass standards, but we also do King Crimson and Joni Mitchell tunes. It’s hard to define. I wouldn’t call it jamgrass. Sometimes we call it new acoustic folk. The band took its first real road trip last summer, to Colorado for the annual RockyGrass. Entering the band competition was almost an afterthought, but Front Country ended up winning first place. “That was kind of a mandate to keep it going,” said Melody. It led to higher profile gigs like the recent Bluegrass Cruise out of Miami and a few choice festival dates this summer. Opening for Saturday’s show at the Jam: The Blackberry Bushes, a really


good alt. folk string trio out of Portland. If you were at last year’s Blues by the Bay, you remember the Laurie Morvan Band rockin’ the blues — hard — with Laurie out front, shredding on guitar. She struts her stuff at the Riverwood Inn Friday night. “Healing In Eureka” is another worthy music/auction benefit for a friend in need due to medical expenses (breast cancer this time). The eclectic lineup Saturday at the Eureka Women’s Club includes Guilty Apples, The Compost Mountain Boys, The Bret Harte Breakers, The 51 Cards and Nashville garage rockers Useless Eaters. With the start of the Kinetic season upon us, Matt ‘n’ Adam from Missing Link are back at Humboldt Brews Friday (with Mantease) for “Enchantment Under the Sea” a benefit record party for the Velo Crab Kinetic Sculpture Team. Saturday the Kinetic Madness moves to Tempus Fugitives’ South G Thunderdome for a “Post-Apocalyptic Party” featuring metalheads Paranoid Android, the Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens (in apocalyptic outfits) and the dark, dank DJs of Phantom Wave, plus an auction (and burritos etc. from the Que Grande! food truck). On the alt. rock front: The Lost Luvs and Tweeners open for Seattle garage surf girl group La Luz Friday at the Shanty. La Luz are on a spring break tour with The Ballantynes, a seven-piece gospel-meets-garage outfit out of East Vancouver, BC. Also on Friday, an Ink Annex/Placebo show featuring mellow Portland experimental rock trio The Mercury Tree, on tour with PDX “progressive/post-hardcore alt. math” rockers Red Forman with local support from electro-cabaret queercore trio Space Biscuit. Catch Space Biscuit again next Wednesday (March 27) at the Jambalaya, for what’s billed as a “punk night” mainly because of A.M. Beers. Neo-hip hop combo Body Academics is on the bill too, as well as Pressure Anya, who may spin some punky records. Space Biscuit drummer Tamaras Abrams also plays Monday at the Speakeasy with her other band, No Covers, a jazz duo with piano-man Justin Ross. Bad Kitty takes over the Palm Lounge Tuesday hosting the return of Henchmen, a hard rockin’ guitar/standup bass/drums trio out of Whittier. Opening is one-man punk The Bored Again, aka Dave-o. Pimps of Joytime is one of those unrelentingly funky party bands. Founded in 2005 by guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Brian J, the band spirals out of Brooklyn spreading a mix of funk, Afrobeat, reggae and Latin rhythms far and wide, particularly on the festival circuit (Bonnaroo, Outside Lands, High Sierra, the Mateel’s Summer Arts Fest). A West Coast tour with San Diego electrohip hop/funk combo Vocab Kompany brings the funk to Humboldt Brews on Tuesday. The first time I heard The California Honeydrops’ update on American roots mu-

sic — a primo mix of blues, soul and gospel with a heavy dose of second line New Orleans jazz — I thought they’d be perfect for the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. I suggested it to the then-director; sadly, he retired last year. Charismatic frontman Lech Wierzynski handles vocals and plays a mean trumpet and guitar — little old ladies would swoon over him. Too bad the Honeydrops are not playing over the weekend. Instead, Lech and company jazz up the crowd at Humboldt Brews next Wednesday night. It’s the start of the band’s Like You Mean It CD Release tour, so come prepared to take home the latest tunes. If you’re looking for something more country-ish that Wednesday, Gunsafe is rocking the Mad River Brewery Taproom. Nuff said. The Eureka Symphony celebrates the coming of spring with an afternoon chamber music benefit concert on Sunday at the Eureka Women’s Club. The program has Terrie Baune on violin, John Chernoff on piano and E-Symphony Maestra Carol Jacobson on cello performing Bach’s “Sonata in F minor for violin and clavier,” Shostakovich’s “Trio No. 2, Op 67” and Schubert’s “Trio in Bb Major, Op 99.” That’s followed by a discussion about why those are some of their favorite works. Jacobson is also on the eclectic program for the Humboldt Music Academy Faculty Concert later on Sunday (7:30 p.m.) in HSU’s Fulkerson Recital Hall. The players are as varied as the academy curriculum. Among them, songwriter Joanne Rand, classical pianist Robin Miller, folk music masters Sam McNeill and Dan Chandler, violinist Holly McDonell, Katri and Larry Pitts doing showtunes, cellists Kira Weiss and Cassie Moulton, vocalist Gwen Post, pianist Jamie Howington, jazzman Bill Allison, and SquarPeg, a “strange chamber” combo that does not fit in round holes. Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy has back-to back funniness this week: The troupe’s “Liquor & Laughter” night Thursday at the Pearl Lounge is followed by “Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy Finds the Silver Lining” (at the Arcata/ Eureka Humboldt/Redwoods Regional/ Memorial Airport in McKinleyville) on Friday. Warning: It may be hard to find a seat what with the stick-it-in-your-Eye controversy swirling around Bad-Dum-Chh bad girl Sherae O’Shaughnessy. Then it’s another Savage Henry midweek laugh blast starting with the monthly “CU Last Tuesday” at the Jambalaya, this one featuring San Francisco comics Sean Keane, Kate Willett and Jules Posner joining several locals (including the Journal‘s own Kim Hodges). The Savages have figured out how to turn these visits into mini-tours by adding a pair of Wednesday shows with the visiting artists: early (6-ish) at The Works (all ages BTW), then later (9-ish) at the Angelina Inn. Yuck it up. 

Mon-Sat: 8am-6pm // Sun: 8am-5pm

(707) 826-7435

Hwy. 101, between Eureka & Arcata in the Bracut Industrial Park

Customer Appreciation Day Saturday, March 30th • 10am to 5pm •30+ Vendors with Free Samples •Leading Industry Experts On Site •Lots of Food & Music

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013

23


entertainment in bold

THE RITZ

includes paid listings

RESTAURANT & BAR

NOW OPEN

clubs • concerts • cafés

FONDUE & ASIAN STYLE HOT POTS

bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more

240 F ST. EUREKA (707) 497-6294

venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200

thur 3/21

fri 3/22

sat 3/23

Find us on Facebook

Lord Ellis (Humboldt heavy rock) Raw Nerves (PDX punk) 11pm $5

Gay Ghost (PDX dark pop) The Wild Lungs (Arcata garage) $5

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

2nd Annual Puppet Slam 8pm $10

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Future Shorts Film Festival Doors 7:30pm $5

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Thursday Madness $8 pitchers Free pool in back room 6pm-closing

www.facebook.com/LikeBarFly

3 pool tables, jukebox, 5 TV’s, 24 beers on tap and a great liquor selection.

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Jimmy Jeff and the Gypsy Band (funk/rock) no cover 9pm

Taxi (rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm

Original Simon Rose Band (rock) 9pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Fargo Brothers (blues/roots/rock) 9pm

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Open 7 days New Thai

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

707 (funk/rock) no cover 9pm

Chubby Checker 8pm $39/$49 707 (funk/rock) 9pm

Dirty Thursday Ladies Night with Presure Anya DJs 9pm

Redwood Coast Jazz Festival 2:30-10:30pm in the Ballroom

R.C. Jazz Festival 9:30am-10pm Jenni & David 9pm (Palm Lounge)

Hours Tuesday through Sunday 5pm until everyone’s gone

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Live music TBD

Kinetic Sculpture Benefit featuring Missing Links DJs 9pm $5 Les 7 Doigts de la Main Circus 7pm

Zero coming April 5! Up in the Air! 7pm $15

Moo-Got-2 (funk) DJ Piper 9pm

Front Country, Blackberry Bushes 9pm

Brian Post (jazz) 7-10pm

Lisa Baney and Co. (jazz) 7-10pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Pat Holland (songwriter)

Strix Vega (alt. rock) Patronus (aggressive female music)

Blue Grass Band

Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6-8pm

Taqueria La Barca (food truck) 5pm

Food Wednesday through Saturday nights

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093 FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights Humboldt Juggling Festival

INK ANNEX 7B W. 3rd St., Eureka

S. Biscuit, R Forman, MercuryTree 7pm

JAMBALAYA 915 H St. Arcata 822-4766

NightHawk (blues/rock) 9pm

Last Minute-men (international) 8pm

CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

DJ Marv Karaoke 9:30-12:30pm 2nd Annual Puppet Slam 8pm $10

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575

Upful! DJ Red Rasta (reggae) 9pm

LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077 LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344

3 For Jazz (jazz) 4pm

THE LOCAL 517 F St. Eureka 497-6320 LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000 MAD RIVER BREWERY TAP ROOM 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTR Redway Rebelution, J Boog & Hot Rain 7pm

LoCura, Sol Horizon 8pm

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

LOTS OF NEW GLASS JUST ARRIVED!

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Locally Blown Glass

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata Tuck N Cover Drag Show 9pm

NOCTURNUM 206 W Sixth St., Eureka OCEAN GROVE Trinidad 677-3543 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOCOLATE 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

Robert Richter Duo, Jonathan Trawick (old time) 5-8pm Ba-Dum-Chh: Liquor & Laughter DJ Lost (dance music) 10pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB 2 1 + O N LY

NEW HOURS & SCHEDULE

9pm-2:30am Monday-Thursday 9pm-4am Friday & Saturday, Closed Sundays Northern California’s #1 After Party LADIES GET IN FREE! Every Friday & Saturday Night from 2-4am 2-for-1 Dances, & TWO Dancer Stages! Beer, Wine & Bubbly

STARTING MARCH 18, 2013

Monday – 2-for-1 DD lap dances Tuesdays – $1 off all beers all night long Wednesday – Couples Night Champagne Specials Thursday – Throwback Thursdays AFTER PARTY EVERY FRI. & SAT. NIGHT 2-4am

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

RED LION HOTEL 4th & V sts. Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L Street, Arcata 616-6876 RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso DJ dance music 10pm

Northtown Books: new books noon Mike Craighead & Co. 7pm

@uDioGa$m, Grass Ga$m vid premier premiere

Nueva Illusion (ranchera) 10pm

DJ dance music 10pm Karaoke with Chris Clay 9pm

Open from 3-9 pm today

Start your weekend with Redwood Curtain!

Samba with Maria 5:30pm Blues Night w/Brian & Kimberli 8pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am Tango with Lee & Barbara 7:30pm Laurie Morvan (blues) 9pm $15

Irish Music Session 9pm

DJ Rotten (rocksteady, ska, early reggae) 9pm

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 7:30-9:30pm

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm La Luz, Ballantynes, Lost Luvs 9pm

THE SHANTY 213 Third St. Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

Open from noon to 9pm www.redwoodraks.com Truth 1, DJ Rickshaw (eclectic dance music) 9pm Come in for a great dinner!

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Bad-Dum-CHH (comedy) 8-10pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

No Covers (improv jazz) 6-9pm

Lorenza S. & Weather Machine 7-10pm

Paula Jones & the Eternally Divine 7p

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Jimi Jeff and the Gypsy Band (rock/funk) 9pm

DJ Itchie Fingaz (dance!) 9pm

Green & Lilac (alt. folk) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka THE WORKS 310 3rd St Eureka


Front Country - Saturday at the Jambalaya

sun 3/24

mon 3/25

tues 3/26

wed 3/27

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Anna Hamilton (songs) 6-9pm

Savage Henry Comedy 9pm Eco-Film Night: Catching Fire 7pm

The Incredibles (PG13) 5:30pm $5 Children of Man 8pm

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

AEDC Spotlight on Success “Small Business Saves the Day!” 5pm

Sci-Fi Pint ‘n’ Pizza Night: Destroy All Monsters (1968) Doors 6pm

Closed Sundays

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 - Free pool

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am HSU Jazz Ensemble 5-8pm

Book a room online at www.bearrivercasino.com Quiz Night 7pm

Join the Bear River Players Club and receive $10 in free play

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Mondays: $14.99 dinner special in Alice’s Steak & Sushi

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

So You Wanna Fight? coming Saturday, April 6

R.C. Jazz Festival 9:30am-2:30pm Red Rasta & friends (reggae) 9pm

Mason Matteoli (piano) 6-8pm Martini Mondays $5 house Martini

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Mondays.

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com Humboldt Juggling Festival

www.humboldtbrews.com

Bad Kitty Presents: The Henchmen, Mason Matteoli (piano) 6-8pm The Bored Again (rock) 9pm $5 Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm Pimps of Joytime (funk) Volkab Company 9:30pm $15

Family friendly dining. The California Honeydrops (soul/rock) 9:30pm $12/$15

Betty Chinn: Turning Hatred into Hope

m Deep Groove Society: Sundaze 9pm

CU Last Tue. Savage Henry Comedy 8p A.M. Beers. Space Biscuit, P/A 10pm Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

Joe Garceau (songs) 5-7pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

Sunday night potluck dinner 6pm Poeina Suddarth (subdued thrasher bluegrass) 5pm

9 Ball Tournament 6:30pm signup - play 7pm Dirty Turnips (Eugene folk) 6pm

Cribbage Tournament 6:45pm Green & Lilac (Americana) 6pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm Wednesday Open Mic 8pm Gunsafe (alt. country) 6pm

Open Mic 7-9pm Fista Cuffs, M. Shredda, Treemeista 9 Fantan Mojah w/Black Love Sound 10p

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm www.pearlloungeeureka.com Rump Shaker Wednesdays 9pm

Happy Growler Day! Fill your growler for less $$$

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Dry Hop Wednesday

Dark Tribal with Marjhani 2:30pm Breakdance with Reckless Rex 5-7pm

Live Band Swing Night 7-10pm $5

West African Dance with Dulcel 5:30pm Beginning Argentine Tango 8:15pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am West Coast Swing 7:30pm

Brian Post (jazz piano) 8pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm ShugaFoot (jazz) 5-8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Denim Wedding (acoustic singer songwriters) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free! Savage Henry Comedy 6pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

25


26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


21 thursday EVENTS

23rd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. Four fun-filled days of traditional Dixieland Jazz, swing, calypso, zydeco and more! Happening all over Eureka with food, beverages and nonstop fun everywhere! See elsewhere in this section for complete schedule. redwoodjazz.org. 445-3378. A Taste of Main Street. 5-8 p.m. Various locations throughout Old Town, Eureka. Sample food from 24 local participating restaurants and food producers. $25. 442-9054. Annual Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. West Gym, HSU. Free workshops and juggling all day. humboldtjugglingsociety.org. 826-3928.

THEATER

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 6:30 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. McKinleyville High School Drama department tackles Shakespeare remodeled to take place in the 1970s. $7/$5 students and seniors. 839-6400.

ART

It’s a Matter of Perspective. Noon-5 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. Exhibition by Humboldt County artists explores the many ways of portraying perspective. redwoodart.org. 362-0168. Local Filmmakers Night featuring Humboldt Youth Media. 6:30-9 p.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Humboldt County’s next generation of media makers showcase films, documentaries and interactive projects produced by K-12 students in Access Humboldt youth programs. $5. accesshumboldt.net. 476-1798.

The circus is in town! Well, kinda. Nouveau cirque troupe LES 7 DOIGTS DE LA MAIN — which is French for “The Seven Fingers of the Hand.” OK — presents its show CIRCUS IN TRACES on Friday, March 22. The show features how’d-they-do-that? acrobatics, high energy and a bunch of people jumpin’ through hoops. Which is cool.

Symbolically tackle your hectic life by picking up a few tips at the return of the annual HUMBOLDT JUGGLING FESTIVAL. The event features free workshops in HSU’s West Gym from 10 a.m. to midnight, Thursday to Sunday, March 21 through 24. The weekend will be highlighted by UP IN THE AIR, a benefit juggling show in the Van Duzer Theatre on Saturday at 7 p.m. featuring performances by jugglers THOM WALL, Joey Pipia, Matt Hall and more.

MEETINGS

Audubon Society Monthly Meeting. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Come discuss local and bigger-picture conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. 442-9353.

Nature laughs in flowers. Or something. Enjoy a full weekend of nature’s full on belly laughs at the 38TH ANNUAL DAFFODIL SHOW taking place at the Fortuna River Lodge on Saturday and Sunday, March 23 and 24. This year’s theme is “Daffodils by the River” and the event features displays by daffodil hybridizers and growers, plus a judged show.

ETC.

Humboldt County Science Fair. 4-7 p.m. East Gym, HSU. Features approximately 330 projects created by local 4th through 12th grade students. 442-0779. Love is in the Air. 7-9 p.m. Cher-Ae Heights Casino. Tired of the dating sites? Go back to the basics and meet people face to face. Snacks! $10. cheraeheightscasino. com. 800-684-2464. Wood Turning Demonstration. 5 p.m. Humboldt Hardware, 531 Second St., Eureka. Live wood turning by William Kauffman. Eureka Chamber Mixer. 5:30 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F St., Eureka. March meeting. Green Wheels. 6 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth St., Arcata. Regular meeting. 633-8847.

22 friday EVENTS

22nd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. See March 21 listing. Portugal Award Lecture. 10 a.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. English professor Ruth Rhodes presents “This is Crescent City: The Making of a Musical.” Her program, part reading, part sing-a-long, part discussion, explores what it takes to turn a creative idea into a full-length musical. E-mail crislyn-parker@redwoods.edu. 476-4109. Annual Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. See March 21 listing. Humboldt County Science Fair. 9 a.m. East Gym, HSU.

Features approximately 330 projects created by local 4th through 12th grade students. Awards show in the Lumberjack Arena at 7 p.m. 442-0779.

THEATER

Les 7 Doigts de la Main: Circus in Traces. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Montreal’s phenomenal nouveau cirque troupe fuses the traditions of circus with the upbeat urban energy of street performance. $55/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Professor Willikers’ Grand Puppet Slam. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Gathering of local and Bay Area puppeteers including Lush Newton, James Hildebrant, Sean Powers, Mark Dupre and Issac Bluefoot. Presented in a cabaret format with live music by Tim Gray and Jill Petricca. $10/$8 students and seniors. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 6:30 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. See March 21 listing.

MUSIC

Queer Dance Party. 10 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. Where’s Queer Bill monthly LGBTQ dance party with DJ 360. “Tuck N Cover” drag theme. $5. wheresqueerbill.com. 832-4785. Missing Links DJs. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Velo Crab kinetic sculpture benefit. $5. 826-2739.

ETC.

Bridge Club. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. Local trick-takin’ gathering. humsenior. org. 443-9747.

23 saturday EVENTS

Spring Wine Festival. 5:30-8 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Features local Humboldt and Trinity County wines, hors d’oeurves and music. Proceeds go toward new bleachers for the Arcata Ball Park and other local community projects. $40. arcatarotary.org. 826-7684. 23rd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. See March 21 listing. Annual Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. See March 21 listing. Annual Daffodil Show. 1-5 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Flower show, live floral arranging, live music, refreshments and daffodil sales. 498-3241.

Benefit for Breast Cancer. 5 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Benefit for Rosalie “Athena” Ortega, former teacher and community member at Heartwood Institute, to help with costs incurred from cancer treatment. Music by Guilty Apple. 444-8890.

THEATER

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. 6:30 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. See March 21 listing. Up in the Air!. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Benefit performance features performers from many walks of the modern circus and juggling performance communities. $15. 826-3928. Professor Willikers’ Grand Puppet Slam. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See March 22 listing.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

27


MUSIC

continued from previous page

Sorry! Chubby Checker Will Not Be Measuring Your Penis Holy wow. It’s not every week that a bonafide cultural icon just twists his way into Humboldt. But, by golly, on Saturday, March 23, musical legend Chubby Checker will take the stage at CherAe Heights Casino and, we’re guessing, perform “The Twist.” Geez, if he’s savvy, he’ll perform it three or four times. Why? Because the 1961 megahit was so huge it was named the number one song on Billboard magazine’s 2008 “Hot 100 50th Anniversary” chart, officially making it the most successful record of the American rock ‘n’ roll era. Suck on that, Santana (feat. Rob Thomas). But while Mr. Checker will undoubtedly perform for you “The Twist,” “Let’s Twist Again,” “Slow Twisting,” and other songs related to the ginchy, hip-swingin’ dance fire he ignited five decades ago, what he will not do on Saturday night is measure the length and girth of your penis. Here is how we know this: Roughly a month ago, the musical legend — born Ernest Evans — made headlines when it was announced that he

“IT’S THIS BIG.”

was filing a $500 million trademark infringement lawsuit against Hewlett Packard for “irreparable damage and harm.” The beef? A novelty app that allowed users to estimate the length of their man’s penis based on his shoe size called — do I have to say it? — “The Chubby Checker.” But here’s the twist … and it goes like this: The app is already dead, since HP stopped producing the hardware and operating system it ran on in 2011 and removed it from being downloadable in September 2012. Further, it was reported that the stupid thing was only downloaded a total of 84 times. Very few chubbies were checked. Mr. Evans’ legacy is likely secure. Everyone chill. Where were we? Oh ya! Go twist with Chubby on Saturday, folks! Doors at 7 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $39/$49 for premium. For more info, go to cheraeheightscasino.com. One more time: penis. — Andrew Goff

MOVIES

Chubby Checker and the Wildcats. 8 p.m. Cher-Ae Heights Casino, Trinidad. Twist with a music legend! $39/$49 premium. cheraeheightscasino.com. 677-3611. Heartwood Institute Benefit Concert. 6 p.m.-midnight. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Featuring Spanish Rumba ska band LoCura, reggae group Sol Horizon and DJ Izzy Wise. $25. www.heartwoodinstitute. com. 923-5005.

Bully. 6 p.m. First Congregational Church, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. PFLAG screening of the award winning documentary about bullying. Discussion follows the film. $5.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Ken Burton. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. California State Parks Restoration Day. 9 a.m.-noon. Meet at the Trinidad State Beach parking lot off of Stagecoach Road. Removal of invasive, non-native plants such as English ivy. E-mail Michelle.Forys@parks. ca.gov. 677-3109. Ma-le’l Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Meet at Ma-le’l South, off of Young Lane in Manila. Remove invasive English Ivy. friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Ma-le’l Dunes Guided Walk. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet at the Ma-le’l North parking lot accessed off of Young Lane in Manila. Join naturalist Claire Pericelli for a walk through freshwater marsh, saltwater marsh, dune forest and large moving sand dunes. friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 1-3 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Jane Wilson for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. 826-2359.

MEETINGS

Mensa Forum. Noon-1:30 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, Samoa Road, Arcata. Cheryl Seidner, former chairwoman of the Wiyot Tribe shares “History and Culture of the Wiyot Tribe.” No-host luncheon. 768-9701.

ETC.

Appraisal Faire. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Have a piece of art, an antique, or a collectable that you wonder how much it is worth? Get the lowdown from knowledgeable appraisers. www. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. Fair Wage Cafe. Noon-5 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Speakers advocate for fair wages and working conditions. Food, music and children’s activities. fairwages.org. 442-7465.

24 sunday EVENTS

23rd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival. Noon. See March 21 listing. Annual Daffodil Show. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge. See March 23 listing. Annual Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. See March 21 listing.

MUSIC

Eureka Symphony Spring Chamber Music Benefit Concert. 3 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Terrie Baune, Carol Jacobson and John Chernoff perform works by Bach, Schubert and Shostakovich followed

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

by an informative talk on the selections. $25. www. eurekasymphony.com. 839-0573.

OUTDOORS

Mud Puppies and Pollywogs. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Learn about frogs and salamanders through fun educational hands-on activity stations for all ages.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Free Storytelling Workshop. 1-3:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. For people interested in crafting an oral story around the theme of “community.” Guided by local storyteller Ali Freedlund. E-mail ali@mattole. org. 822-4477. Community Egg Hunt. 2 p.m. Grace Baptist Church, 220 Buhne, Eureka. Afternoon of egg hunting and prizes. gbceureka.org. 444-9677.

25 monday EVENTS

40 Days of Prayer and Contemplation. Noon. Gazebo in Old Town Eureka, Corner of F and Second streets. Clergy for Choice event celebrating women and reproductive rights co-hosted by reverend Eric Duff and Nancy Dye. 442-2961.

DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

MEETINGS

Low Vision Support Group. 10-11 a.m. Azalea Hall, 1620 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Meet others who are also having vision loss challenges. E-mail dougdrose@suddenlink.net. 839-0588.

26 tuesday EVENTS

AEDC Spotlight on Success. 5:30-7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Celebrate small business success in Humboldt at this networking extravaganza featuring food and beverage samples, displays and demonstrations. Music by Pressure/Anya. E-mail susans@aedc1. org. 822-4616. Betty Chinn: Turning Hatred into Hope. 5-6:30 p.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. Local heroine speaks on her personal history as a survivor of the Cultural Revolution and how it set the path for her work today trying to give hope to those who have lost it. Part of the Pan-Asian Pacific Islander Perspectives festival. E-mail apasa@humboldt.edu. 616-8663.

MUSIC

Pimps of Joytime. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Road tested and audience approved groove machine. Vokab Kompany opens. $15. 826-2739.

OUTDOORS

Slower Speed Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Meet in the Klopp Lake parking at the end of South I Street. Geared to persons with limited mobility. Led by Friends of the Arcata Marsh Jane Wilson and John McNeely. 822-3475.

continued on page 30


Jazz for Don

The 23rd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival, dedicated to Don Moehnke Eureka gets jazzy this weekend as the Redwood Coast Jazz Festival returns, bringing music and dancing to six venues around town. The festive weekend starts Thursday, March 21, at 5 p.m. with A Taste of Main Street, where you can wander Old Town sampling wares from 24 different food producers, everything from sushi and pizza to pulled pork and organic gelato. (Call Eureka Main Street at 442-9054 for tickets.) That leads right into the Festival Kick Off Dance starting at 7 p.m. at the Adorni Center with rootsy rock and blues by The Delta Nationals, followed by Oregonian neo-swing big band High Street. The official opening ceremony is Friday at 1:30 p.m., a free show at the Eureka Theater featuring Buck Creek Reunion Band plus High Sierra Jazz Band with special guest Bob Draga on clarinet. As in years past, Draga will be roving all weekend playing with various bands. There’s another free show that night in the Eureka High Auditorium with the Eureka High School Jazz Ensemble. The kids were supposed to open for The Commanders from Travis Air Force Base, but due to the federal sequester, that band had to cancel. The replacement: longtime festival favorites Blue Street Jazz Band, known as “The Bad Boys of Dixieland,” plus guests Gordon and Brandon Au from the Au Brothers, a red hot jazz band out of Sacramento.

Showtime 7 p.m. You’ll see the Aus throughout the fest: The brothers guest with other bands, the new-toHumboldt Red Skunk Band includes Justin Au on trumpet, and the family band plays on its own. Looking for a break from all that jazz? Gator Beat mixes New Orleans R&B with zydeco and Cajun tunes; fiddler Tom Rigney and his band Flambeau push the boundaries of neo-traditional Cajun music. If you’re just planning on going to one show, the Saturday night dance party at the Muni might be the ticket. The lineup includes Frisco-based jump swing band Lost Dog Found, the Au Brothers, Red Skunk (with all three of the brothers Au), as well as neo-swingers Stompy Jones, a longtime festival favorite. If you’re not too worn out from dancing the night away Saturday, Blue Street Jazz Band plays a free program of hymnals at the Adorni Center first thing Sunday morning (8:30 a.m.). Most venues close at 2:30 p.m. Sunday; the exception is the “Grand Finale” at the Muni, a showcase with half a dozen bands and guests playing short sets. This year’s fest is dedicated to the late Don Moehnke, a tireless teacher and jazz supporter, and a fine trumpet player. As usual the line-up includes a number of youth bands from local high

DON MOEHNKE TEACHES KIDS AT LINCOLN SCHOOL (2002) PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

schools and junior highs. Incidentally, you’ll find Don’s (grown) son, Bill Moehnke, all over the festival. He plays drums for local trad band The Hall Street Honkers, and for The Uptown Kings blues band; he’s also sitting in as drummer for The Au Brothers. And don’t miss the rest of the Humboldt County contingent: The Horn Band and Donna Landry and Swingset, bands that keep the dancers

dancing all year ‘round. The ticket pricing structure is complicated, with different prices for all weekend, single days, “prime time” one evening tickets, even a single venue ticket for the Eureka Theater and, of course, a good deal for youth (ages 13-23). Full details at www.redwoodjazz.org or call the Redwood Coast Music Festivals office at 445-3378. See you on the dance floor. — Bob Doran

23rd Annual Redwood Coast Jazz Festival Schedule FRIDAY, MARCH 22 DAY/TIME

RED LION HOTEL

1 pm 3-4:15 pm 4:30-5:45 pm 6-7:15 pm 7:30-8:45 pm 9-10:15 pm 10:30-11:45 pm

Red Skunk Band Horn Band w/Brandon Au High Sierra Jazz Band Buck Creek Reunion Band Donna Landry & Swing Set

DAY/TIME

RED LION HOTEL

ADORNI CENTER

EUREKA THEATER

Opening: Buck Creek FREE! Blue Street w/Gordon Au High Sierra w/Bob Draga Lost Dog Found High Street Band Tom Rigney & Flambeau Red Skunk Band High Street “Swing Through the Ages” Uptown Kings Stompy Jones Gator Beat Au Brothers w/Bob Draga Lost Dog Found

EUREKA INN

Tom Rigney & Flambeau Buck Creek Reunion Band Blue Street Jazz Band Red Skunk w/Bob Draga High Sierra Jazz Band

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM

Gator Beat Stompy Jones Lost Dog Found Tom Rigney & Flambeau High Street Band

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 EUREKA THEATER

Gator Beat Stompy Jones Zane Middle School Band Buck Creek w/Bob Draga Red Skunk Band Tom Rigney & Flambeau High Street Band Lost Dog Found

EUREKA INN

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM

Zydeco Dance Lesson Blue Renditions High Sierra Jazz Band ArMac Jazz Band Lost Dog Found Red Skunk w/Gordon Au Blue Street Jazz Band High Street Band Stompy Jones Gator Beat Venue closed 4-5 pm Donna Landry & Swing Set SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTY 5-11:15 pm: Lost Dog Found, Red High Sierra Jazz Band Buck Creek Reunion Band Skunk w/Gordon and Brandon Au, Stompy Jones, Au Brothers

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 DAY/TIME

8:30 am 10 am 11:30 am 1 pm 2:30 pm

RED LION HOTEL

ADORNI CENTER

Hymnals w/Blue Street FREE! Stompy Jones Au Brothers Hall Street Honkers w/Brandon Au Buck Creek Reunion Band High Sierra Jazz Band Tom Rigney & Flambeau

EUREKA THEATER

Doors open 11am Fortuna High Jazz Band Lost Dog Found

EUREKA INN

Horn Band Gator Beat Red Skunk Band

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM

Tom Rigney & Flambeau Blue Street Jazz Band w/Bob Draga Stompy Jones SIX BAND GRAND FINALE

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

THE

Swing Dance Lesson NPA/Freshwater Jazz Bands Red Skunk Band Hall Street Honkers w/Bob Draga Buck Creek Reunion Band Gator Beat High Sierra Jazz Band Tom Rigney & Flambeau Lost Dog Found High Sierra w/Gordon & Brandon Au Blue Street Jazz Band Buck Creek Reunion Band Stompy Jones Blue Street Jazz Band Gator Beat w/Bob Draga Donna Landry & Swing Set Tom Rigney & Flambeau w/Bob Draga High Street Band

9:10 am 10-11:15 am 11:30-12:45 pm 1-2:15 pm 2:30-3:45 pm 4-5:15 pm 5:30-6:45 pm 7-8:15 pm 8:30-9:45 pm 10-11:15 pm

ADORNI CENTER

I S ION VCENTER

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

616 H STREET • EUREKA

443-1619

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

29


Called It

continued from page 28

ETC.

Living on Shaky Ground:. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Tips on how to survive earthquakes and tsunamis. Spaghetti dinner between 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161.

27 wednesday MUSIC

The California Honeydrops. 9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Digging deep into the roots of American music and embracing the traditions of blues, gospel and second line New Orleans Jazz. $15. 826-2739.

COMEDY

Comedy in the Afternoon. 6 p.m. The Works, 210 C St., Eureka. Mixture of San Francisco-based and local comedians. $3. savagehenrymagazine.com.

ETC.

Marketing Brown Bag. Noon-1 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth St., Arcata. Emanuel Rose of Strategic eMarketing leads participants through decision-making about the best practices for distributing marketing content. the-link. us. 822-0597. Rolfing Presentation and Open House. 6-8:30 p.m. Energy Life Center, 616 Wood St., Eureka. Demonstration by professional rolfer Lee Tuley. Rolfing is a soft tissue manipulation and movement technique. 442-5433. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in gathering signatures for a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Humboldt Green Party. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Arcata Library Conference Room. Regular meeting. Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Preparing Not Worrying About One’s Future.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

28 thursday

ART

It’s a Matter of Perspective. Noon-5 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery. See March 21 listing.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Hammond Trail Hike. 8 a.m. Meet at the south end of Fischer Road. Four to five mile hike led by Ken Burton. 499-1146.

Heads Up…

Open Up. The 15th Annual North Coast Open Studios will take place over two weekends in June. NCOS showcases local artists and art businesses, drawing thousands of local and regional visitors to more than 100 studios, workshops, galleries and businesses. Contact Taffy Stockton at contact@northcoastopenstudios.com or at 834-6460 for more info. Can You Hide Eggs? The Sequoia Park Zoo is seeking volunteers for its 15th annual Great Zoo Egg-stravaganza on Saturday, March 30. Contact volunteer@sequoiaparkzoo.net or 441-4205 for more details. Apply. The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, WILPF, is seeking applications for the annual Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship which awards $300 to a project that promotes peace. For more information contact WILPF@ humboldt1.com or 822-5711. Applications will be accepted until April 1. Write. Poets & Writers, College of the Redwoods’ literary magazine, is accepting submissions of original poetry and fiction through March 27. To submit entries or for more info email david-holper@redwoods.edu or call 476-4370. Put A Bird On It! Friends of the Arcata Marsh and Redwood Region Audubon Society are co-sponsoring a Student Bird Art Contest in conjunction with Godwit Days. Complete rules and a list of suggested birds are posted at rras.org/education.html Entries must be received by Friday, March 22. Questions should be emailed to sueleskiw@suddenlink.net. ●

@ncj_of_humboldt

EVENTS

Economic Fuel Elevator Pitch Presentation. 6-8 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Cheer on Humboldt County’s aspiring entrepreneurs as they pitch their business venture in the first judged round of the 2013 Economic Fuel competition. economicfuel.org. 476-2780. Criminal Justice Dialogue. 6 p.m. Native Forum, HSU. Spotlighting the need to support inmates and families of the incarcerated. Features a discussion with district attorney Paul Gallegos and chief of probation Bill Daminao. E-mail areasontolisten@gmail.com. 530-448-9458.

For what’s current and cool with a local slant, follow us on

THEATER

The Tempest Gala Opening. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. North Coast Repertory Theatre continues its 29th Season with William Shakespeare’s classic work. $15. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

pinterest.com/ncjournal/weddings/

North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, MARCH MARCH21, 21,2013 2013 •• northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 30 NORTH 30

Halle Berry and Steve Carell phone it in with a pair of generic Hollywood duds By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE CALL. Despite a few original twists and turns, and an impressive performance by Abigail Breslin, this would-be thriller is just another mid-March waste of time. Los Angeles 911 operator Jordan Turner (Halle Berry) takes a call from a terrified young girl whose house is being broken into by an anonymous prowler. Jordan manages to help the girl outwit her assailant, but when the call is disconnected, Jordan calls back. The ringing phone reveals the girl in her hiding place. Her body is discovered in a shallow grave a short time later. Six months elapse, and Jordan has hung up her headset in favor of teaching new hires inside the call center. But when a call comes in from a just-abducted teen girl (Breslin), Jordan is called upon to take it. As the call and ensuing manhunt progress, it becomes clear that the kidnapper is the killer from that tragic earlier incident. That much of the story is taut and really pretty original. But from there the suspense evaporates and logic flies out the window. Jordan’s PTSD is depicted, in its entirety, as a few seconds of short breath, easily resolved by running her hands nervously through her hair. Her on-again, off-again patrol cop boyfriend (Morris Chestnut) inexplicably takes the lead in chasing down the kidnapper. And the kidnapper turns out to be a by-thenumbers aspiring serial killer from a whitebread suburban family who has a grisly fixation on his long-dead sister. By the time Jordan takes the investigation into her own hands (who wouldn’t, right?) The Call has spent so much time in hackneyed territory that it’s hard even to muster the energy for frustration. In spite of such low standards, Breslin gives a riveting, sometimes heartbreaking


Movie Times

performance. She moves from teen-girl snottiness to terror to anger with an alacrity that Berry could take a few notes from. Unfortunately, Breslin spends much of the movie in the trunks of cars, so a lot of her physical acting gets lost to darkness and static camera angles. The Call is just good enough to give a glimpse of what might have been. Perhaps a different director could have translated the script into a tense, efficient little thriller, but a few effective scenes notwithstanding, Brad Anderson surrenders the story to lazy exposition, superficial scene development and predictable characterization. R. 95m. THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE. Incredible it ain’t. Steve Carell could be a great big movie star if he didn’t keep getting in his own way. He’s been anointed the family friendly comedy star of the moment. All well and good: He generally turns in sturdy if unsurprising performances. The problem is that nobody seems to write funny or original family comedies these days. Carell’s most entertaining roles are in more adult-oriented movies where he gets out of the “dad next door” shadow — The 40 Year Old Virgin and Anchorman, in particular, but even the sometimes syrupy Crazy Stupid Love gave him a character with some depth. I like Carell, and I think he’s got it in him to take on more demanding roles. I look forward especially to the upcoming Foxcatcher from director Bennett Miller (Capote, Moneyball). But that’s in the future; for now we’ve got predictable, sentimental Burt. Carell’s title character is half of a Las Vegas magic act that’s getting long in the tooth, its audiences dwindling. Yet even faced with the growing success of street magician Steve Gray (Jim Carrey), a cartoonish Criss Angel/David Blaine type, Burt refuses to change his outdated act. This precipitates a falling out with his partner, Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi), and the loss of his prestigious and lucrative contract with Bally’s Casino. So Burt must start all over again, with a little help from the magician who inspired him as a boy (Alan Arkin) and a gorgeous up-andcomer (Olivia Wilde) who (unbelievably if inevitably) falls in love with him. Somewhere in here is a funny satire of modern magic. Maybe studio tampering declawed this thing. Carell and Buscemi deploy their near-perfect timing and

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 SHOWiNG 3/27 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka ^ = *NO= SAT.-SUN. ONLY Times are for 3/22-3/27 unless otherwise noted.

Halle Berry in The Call: Janet Jackson mic? Check. Whitney Houston hair? Check. Let’s do this, people.

penchant for oddness, and Carrey gets back into his ‘90s slapstick rhythm. But it’s not enough. The jokes are too tame, the resolution’s too predictable, and the characters are far too simplistic. A few funny gimmicks and asides from a reliable cast are the only minor pleasures amid dull, slapped-together Hollywood drivel. PG13. 100m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

THE CROODS. The latest from Dreamworks animation imagines the world’s first road trip, with a modern Stone Age family searching for a new cave. Voices by Nic Cage, Katherine Keener and Emma Stone (Ha ha! Stone!). PG. 92m. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. Gerard Butler tries to maintain his string of cinematic stink bombs with this action-thriller, which borrows the plot from Die Hard and puts it inside the White House. With Aaron Eckhart as the president (hmm) and Morgan Freeman as someone with gravitas. R. 100m. ADMISSION. Are Tina Fey and Paul Rudd the most charming actors in movies today? I’m gonna say “yes.” Here, Fey plays a Princeton admissions officer and Rudd’s a teacher at an alternative high school who wants her to meet a promising kid. Could he be the son she gave up for adoption? I’m gonna say “yes.” PG13. 117m. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION. Despite lousy reviews, 2009’s G.I. Joe: Rise of the Cobra earned more than $300 million worldwide. Hence: sequel. This time out, “The Rock” and Bruce Willis join Channing Tatum as enlisted men. PG13. 110m. The Future Shorts Film Festival returns to the Arcata Theatre Lounge Friday at 8 p.m. with a new selection of awardwinning short films from around the world. Looks great. Sunday, my favorite Pixar movie, The Incredibles, plays at 6 p.m. And next Wednesday, the world must defend itself from such colossal creatures as Mothra, Godzilla and Rodan as the 1968 B-movie classic Destroy All Monsters

invades Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night. 6 p.m.

Continuing

21 AND OVER. The Hangover premise (drunken morons breaking stuff) recycled with characters who are barely legal. R. 93m. IDENTITY THIEF. A long-suffering everyman (Jason Bateman) hunts down the crazed throat-puncher who stole his identity (Melissa McCarthy). R. 111m. JACK THE GIANT SLAYER. This bland, big-budget retelling of the classic fairytale warrants a “Fee-fi-HO-HUM.” Har har! PG13. 114m. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. James Franco stars as the young wizardto-be in this visually rich but ultimately hollow prequel. PG. 130m. SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN. The Academy Award winner for Best Documentary examines the strange career of Rodriguez, “the greatest ‘70s rock icon who never was.” PG13. 86m. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK. Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence deliver Oscar-nominated performances (Jen won!) with a twist of mental instability in this bipolar dramedy. R. 122m. — Ryan Burns l

Mar. 22-29 Fri Mar 22 - Future Shorts Film Festival Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Parental Guidence Sun Mar 24 - The Incredibles (2004) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed March 27 - Sci Fi Night ft. Destroy All Monsters (1968) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free Fri Mar 29 - Children of Men (2006) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:25, 3:20, 6:15, 9:10 THE CROODS 3D 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:15 THE CROODS 2D 11:45*, 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 ADMiSSiON 11:55*, 12:50, 3:30, 6:05, 8:45, 9:40 THE CALL 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 THE iNCREDiBLE BURT WONDERSTONE 1:35, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20 Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 2D 11:40, 2:35, 5:45, 8:50 Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 3D 11:50, 2:50, 5:55, 9:00 JACk THE GiANT SLAYER 3D 3:35, 9:15 JACk THE GiANT SLAYER 2D 12:45, 6:25 iDENTiTY THiEF 12:35, 3:15, 6:00, 8:40 21 AND OvER 2:25, 4:45, 7:10^, 9:35^ SiLvER LiNiNGS PLAYBOOk 12:00, 2:40, 5:30, 8:20

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 SHOWiNG 3/27 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville ^ = NO * = FRi.-SUN. ONLY Times are for 3/22-3/27 unless otherwise noted.

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN ADMiSSiON THE CROODS 3D THE CROODS 2D THE iNCREDiBLE BURT WONDERSTONE Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 2D Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 3D JACk THE GiANT SLAYER 3D JACk THE GiANT SLAYER 2D

12:25*, 3:20, 6:15, 9:10 12:35*, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30 12:20*, 2:55, 5:30, 8:00 12:00*, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40 2:00*, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 11:55*, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 11:45*, 2:45, 5:45, 8:45 3:50, 9:20^ 1:05*, 6:35^

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 3/22-3/27 unless otherwise noted.

THE CROODS Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL SEARCHiNG FOR SUGAR MAN

1:30, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30 2:50, 5:45, 8:40 2:40, 4:50, 7:00, 9:10

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SUN. ONLY 1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRi.-SAT. ONLY Times are for 3/22-3/27 unless otherwise noted.

THE CROODS 3D 12:00*, 2:15*, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10** THE CROODS 2D 1:15*, 3:40, 6:20, 8:30** THE iNCREDiBLE BURT WONDERSTONE 1:20*, 4:10, 6:35, 9:15** Oz: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 3D 1:00*, 4:00, 6:50 9:40** Oz: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 2D 12:10*, 3:20, 6:10, 9:00** OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:50*, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35**

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

TBA

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 21, 2013

31


Communication

DESIGNING A GREAT TEAM. Discover how different people approach problem-solving and how to make more efficient use of their differences, allowing more quicker and more effective group decision-making and solutions. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., April 12, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. $100 (includes materials). Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM-0404) HIDDEN WORLD OF HOARDING. Help for those who hoard—and for those who live with hoarders at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., March 24, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0321)

Computers

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Mon., and Wed., April 15-29, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0404)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, April 8-29 7-8 p.m., Pan Arts Network, 1049 Samoa Blvd, Suite C. $50, (707) 407-8998, info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT- 0401) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1226)

Arts & Crafts CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. Ongoing, weekly the first and third Mon., 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Create whimsical ceramic mugs for our fundraising events. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops and receive a final product free. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. 707-826-1445, www. fireartsarcata.com (AC-0321) INTRO TO GLASS FUSING. $35 ($15 materials). 2 workshops offered. Thurs., April 4, 6-8 p.m. or Tues., April 9, 2-4 p.m. Learn basics of glass fusing while creating a unique work of art in this introductory workshop. Create a 6” square plate or tile. No experience or cutting required. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0321) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2, UTILITARIAN FORMS. $180. Wed., 7-9 p.m., April 3–June 5. With Bob Raymond. With 40 years’ experience, Bob is an inspiration to students of all levels. For intermediate students he will assist in mastering utilitarian forms and demonstrating a variety of decorative styles and techniques. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0321) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180. Thurs, 5:30-7:30 p.m., April 4–June 6 (10 weeks). With Peggy Loudon. Complete introduction to basic wheelthrowing and glazing techniques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0321) EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. Classes and workshops in painting, drawing, creativity, art marketing, video production and more! This month’s workshop: PLEIN AIR PAINTING WITH STOCK SCHLUETER MARCH 22-24. Limited space available, sign up now! eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440-9027. (AC-0404)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-0228) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226) FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. For absolute beginners. Sat., April 13th, 7p.m., Arcata. Experience the most interesting and beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics, meet new people and have lots of fun! Partner not required but suggested. More information, www.tangodelsol.net or (858) 205-9832 (DMT-0411)

Fitness

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@ northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (F-1226)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Starting Jan. 14. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. Starting Jan. 9. $5 drop-in, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-0328) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1226) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1226) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-0328) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226)

Home & Garden

GARDENING STUDY SCHOOL. Course 3 offered by Humboldt District of California Garden Club. Topics include: How to grown outdoor flowers, How to Prune, Plant growth factors for success, Plant identification and Wildflowers. Also tour the Botanical Garden. April 5 & 6, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., in Eureka. Registration $40/1 day, $75/2 days, breakfast & lunch included. Call 442-1387 or email mgoodwin@northcoast.com for information. (HG-0328)

Kids & Teens

AERIAL DANCE CIRCUS SPRING BREAK CAMP. Ages 6-12. All levels $99/week; $35/day. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. April 1-5 or April 8-12. (773) 206-4706. www.aerialdancecircus.com (K-0328) SEQUOIA PARK ZOO PRESENTS SCHOOLS OUT! Springtime at the Zoo for 8-11 year olds April 9-12. Join us for a wild adventure at the zoo. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0328) THE G.U.L.C.H. TEEN PROGRAM. Teens ages 12-17 are invited to skateboard at the Eureka Skate Park, play disc golf, learn filmmaking & music production, or just chill and meet new friends! Tues. & Thurs., 4-6 p.m. at 1720 10th Street in Eureka! $5 drop-in fee. Teens must have a waiver on file signed by their parent/guardian. Call 441-4240 for more info. (K-0321) YOUNG WRITERS CONFERENCE Redwood Writing Project, Annual Young Writers conference, Sat. April 13, 8:30 am.-3 p.m, HSU Campus, Founders Hall Students 4th-9th graders, fee $40, scholarships available. 826-5109, www.redwoodwp.org (K-0411) SPRING BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our Spring Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Fri., April 1-5, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or halfday option. Roller Skating, Arts & Crafts, Dodge Ball and more! Register today! Download a registration form at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-0328) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1226)

Lectures

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT EVENT. Presented by 707 Cannabis & Hosted by Area 101 on April 13, at Area 101, 54895 Hwy. 101, Laytonville. Everything you ever wanted to know and about growing, breeding, CBD,therapeutics, cooking with and consuming cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educator. 10-11:30 a.m: “Grow like the Pro’s” Learn proven techniques from master cultivator Kevin Jodrey, 11:30 a.m- 1 p.m: Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids” seminar, with details on raw vs. heated cannabis & the latest in reach with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist.12p.m: “Live Cannabis Juicing Demo”, learn of the best cannabis juicing techniques with 707 Cannabis College experts. 2-3 p.m: The Endocannabinoid System”, seminar. How cannabis produces effects, eating vs. inhaling , plus reliable results using cannabis with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 3-4 p.m : “Cultivation Optimization” seminar. Learn about cannabis physiology, how to achieve rapid high-CBD isolation , plus THC & CBD potency maximization using vegetative stage testing with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 4-5 p.m: Cannabis Ingestibles”, seminar. How to calculate dosages, activate cannabinoids & produce a consistent product with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. Full-day $85 advance/$95 at door, $50 1/2 day, lunch provided. For more info or to purchase advanced tickets email info@707cannabiscollege.com or call (707) 672-9860 (L-0411)


FOOD SAFETY. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially in an emergency, when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. Wed., April 10, 6-8 p.m. at Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka. $25. Pre-registration required: www. humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU eLearning & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0328)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226) GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., April 15-May 20, 1:30-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404) IBOOK, ACCESSING THE AUTHOR WITHIN. iBook is a free app from Apple, which allows one to write books. Learn how to compose and publish your own book using iBook with Tom Gage. Thurs., April 18-May 9, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404) KING LEAR, NOTHING IS EVERYTHING. Join this class for a full discussion of this provocative Shakepearean text which explores what it means to be human. With Tom Gage. Tues., April 16-May 7, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) MOVING YOUR WORDS, A WRITING CLASS. Go from “I don’t know where to start” to developing ideas, expanding your imagination, and finally moving your words onto paper. With Suzanne Samberg. Tues., April 9-30, 2-4 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0328) SOUL COLLAGE, AN EXPLORATION OF THEMES. SoulCollage is an intuitive collage process, and course participants will create SoulCollage cards from the themes of Home, Darkness, The Hero, Animal Guides and Wealth. With Janet Patterson. Mon., April 8-May 13, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0328) THE ART & CRAFT OF LANDSCAPE DESIGN. Get introduced to the landscape design process with Donna Wildearth. Includes a field trip to local gardens. Tues., April 9-30, 6-8 p.m., and Sun., May 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) THE BERKELEY UPRISING, 1956-1970. From Panty Raid to Free Speech Movement, University of Calif. at Berkeley was the site of a Youth Quake that spread around the world. With Tom Gage. Wed., April 17-May 8, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) WATERCOLOR STILL LIFE PAINTING WITH JUDY EVENSON. Held at the Garberville Civic Club, this class explores watercolor’s expressive qualities. Tues., April 9-30, 10 a.m.-Noon. $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0328)

MAKING ART, AN ALCHEMICAL PATH TO HEALING. Explore the concept of art as an agent for healing with Bonnie Shand. Tues., March 26-April 30, 1-3 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0321) BEYOND RECOVERY? Global Economic Imbalances and the Future of the U.S. Economy. Instructor Laurent Cleenewerck provides a basic intro to relevant economic concepts, extending them to international economics, and offers an historic review of how we got there. Wed., March 27-April 10, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0321) BOOK LOVERS UNITE, JANE AUSTEN. Join a lively conversation about one of English literature’s most beloved writers at the Garberville Civic Club. Explore Jane Austen’s novels (Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice and Emma) in this class with Marie Raphael. Tues., March 26, April 23 and May 14, Noon-2 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880 (O-0321) CALIFORNIA MUTINY. Fort Humboldt in the American Civil War. Join HSU history professor Thomas Mays for a review of Humboldt County’s rich and somewhat disturbing Civil War history. A field trip to Fort Humboldt is included. Fri., March 29, 10 a.m.3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0321) CONSTITUTIONAL MYTHS. Join author Ray Raphael for a lively discussion of the ratification and interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. Choose one of two class locations. Class in Garberville: Tues., March 26, April 23 and May 7, 4-6 p.m. Class in Eureka: Wed., March 27, April 24 and May 8, 2-4 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0321) INK, BRUSH, PEN, FROM EAST TO WEST. Create a series of unique drawings using ink media with Julie McNiel. Thurs., March 21-April 11, Noon-2 p.m. $65/ OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0321)

Spiritual

WILD GRACE WISDOM SCHOOL. Exploring Nine Dimensions: 5 Tues’s 6-8, begins March 26. Reiki Jin Kei Do: Level I, 3 Sun’s 1-4, begins March 3. Reading Your Astrology Chart: 6 Wed’s, 6-7:30, begins March 27. Pre-register: astro@salinarain.com (707) 668-5408 (S-0328) WARRIOR DHARMA SERIES IN ARCATA With Frank Berliner, Professor of Contemplative Psychology at Naropa University, Boulder CO. The profound teachings of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche are presented through lively informal talks, guided meditations, and personal interaction. Introduction ~ Fri., March 22, 7-9 p.m. Warrior Dharma Program ~ Sat. & Sun., March 23 & 24, 9 a.m -5 p.m. $150. Call for location when you register (707) 822-4737 (S-0321)

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

continued on next page

April 27th, 11am to 6 pm

Learn techniques for working with dynamic color from the creative color artist behind fabulous Alchemy yarns. Find your own dazzling color palette through fun, fast and enlightening color exercises and create a gorgeous ascot scarf during class. Choose from an outrageously colorful and decadent treasure trove of Alchemy stash and create a unique palette with Gina for your future projects. Cost $115.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

watch for the

AnnuAl

Young Writers

INTRODUCTION TO YOUR ASTROLOGICAL BIRTH CHART. Workshops in Arcata, Sat., 3/9 or Sun., 3/17, 1-5 p.m. Level II workshop, Sat., 3/23. For more information: www.danaquillman.com, 822-5247. (S-0321) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www. kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502)

For the Love of Color: Gina Wilde, Alchemy Yarns

ConferenCe April 13, 8:30 am to 3 pm

special pullout section

May 9, 2013 edition

Send us your list of events by April 18! calendar@northcoastjournal.com

HSu Campus, Founders Hall for students 4th - 9th grade fee: $40, sCholarships available

826-5109

WWW . redWoodWp . org

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

33


TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming. com (S-0228) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-0606) FREE COMMUNITY POTLUCK & KIRTAN AT OM SHALA. With Shemaia Skywater Lucas. Sat., March 23, 6 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (S-0321) FROM THE BEAUTY TO THE BHAKTI. An Embodied Exploration of Devotion. With Shemaia Skywater Lucas. At Om Shala. Sat., March 23, 2-5 p.m. Link to the Divine through movement, play, mantra, art, poetry, song, meditation, breathe, ritual, and writing. $33.00. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (S-0321)

Therapy/Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Vocational

CAREER GUIDANCE FOR CREATIVE, INNOVATIVE PEOPLE. Are you a creative person having a hard time finding satisfaction in traditional, structured work environments? This seminar will help you understand yourself better and give you practical strategies for creating a more balanced and fulfilling approach to your career/life choices. With Susan Abbott. Sat., April 6, 2-5 p.m. $90, plus $10 materials. Pre-registration required. Call HSU eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (V-0328)

INTERESTED IN A SUMMER SOFTBALL LEAGUE? INFORMATIONAL MEETING APRIL 10 AT THE ADORNI CENTER. CALL 441-4245.

Sports/Recreation

ADULT PICKLEBALL. Combines elements of badminton, tennis & table tennis into a fun new sport that is enjoyed by players of all levels. Drop-in Indoor Pickleball; Tues.s & Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Free with Adorni Fitness Memberships or drop-in $2 Adult, $1.50 Senior. Call 441-4248. (SR-0321) ADULT SOFTBALL. Form a dream team with your friends, family and co-workers. $600/team plus $10 non-resident fee. Find out more on Wed., April 10 at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Women’s meeting 6 p.m., Men’s 6:30 p.m. Call 441-4245. (SR0321) SENIOR SOFTBALL. 50’s and 60’s plus league needs players. Must be at least 49 to play. www.humboldtseniorsoftball.com Call Brad Golding (707) 982-3223 (SR-0502) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226)

VOICE OVER 1. Thurs.s, April 4–25, 6-9 p.m. $115. Located at College of the Redwoods Downtown site at 333 6th St., Eureka. Explore voice over and various opportunities in the voice over industry with instructor Lisa Baney. View online at www.redwoods. edu, visit the community education link. Call (707) 2694000 to reserve your seat. (V-0321)

WRITING BOOKS FOR CHILDREN. Sat.s, April 20-May 4, 1-3 p.m. $59. Located at College of the Redwoods Downtown site at 333 6th St. Learn about basics of story structure, how to gear your story to children and young adults, and an introduction to marketing to publishers. Call (707) 269-4000 to register. (V-0321)

Wellness/Bodywork

INTRO TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? Explore basic TCM theory and tools including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., April 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0404) RADIANT BALANCE. Turn your healthcare into a daily routine. Amy Aiello works with dietary and lifestyle changes to bring about balance and vitality. Using Ayurveda and Whole food nutrition as a base for all her work. Now seeing clients at Arcata Core Pilates. Appointments, call (707) 834-9822. (W-0321)

T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). 11-week term starts the week of March 26. Begin as late as the third week. At the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Morning and evening classes. Fees for the 11-week term: $95 for 1 class per week, $155 for 2 or more classes per week. See www.margaretemerson.com or call 822-6508 for schedules. (W-0328) “ROLFING” A FREE TALK. With Lee Tuley, 6 p.m., Wed., March 27, at Energy Life Center in Henderson Center between G & H. (707) 442-5433. (W-0321) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Intermediate Herbology with Jane Bothwell, April 17- June 12, Wed. evenings, 7-9 p.m., next to Humboldt Herbals in Eureka. Delve deeper into the healing power of plants. $365. (707) 442-8157 www.dandelionherb.com (W-0411) AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 17). Group & Personal Cleansing Retreats: July 17-Aug. 11. Call for details. NCBTMB Approved CE Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: www.ayurvedicliving.com, info@ ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0411) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) FREE INTRODUCTION TO AROMATHERAPY. Incorporating Essential Oils into your Practice with Ayurveda and the Chakra System. With Suzanne Dunning & Amy Aiello. At Om Shala. Sun., March 24, 3-4 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (W-0321) ●

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE

www.northcoastjournal.com NORTH Coast COAST JourNal JOURNAL •• thursday, THURSDAY, MarCh MARCH 21, 21, 2013 2013 • •northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 34 34 North

classified@northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS – AUDIT SERVICES

The City of Ferndale is requesting proposals from qualified independent Certified Public Accounting firms to audit the financial statements for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2013, with options for extensions for the fiscal years ending June 30, 2014 and 2015. Proposals are due by 4 p.m. on April 25, 2013. Specific qualifications, scope of work and proposal requirements may be obtained by contacting City Hall, (707) 786-4224 or cityclerk@ci.ferndale. ca.us. 03/21/2013 (13-82)

BRIDGEVILLE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE 2013-01 AND CERTAIN LOCAL EXEMPTIONS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 the Board of Directors of the Bridgeville Fire Protection District, hereinafter referred to as BFPD, held a Public Hearing during their regular Board Meeting to hear input from the public regarding Ordinance 2013-01 to administer the special tax on real property located within the BFPD. Upon closing the Public Hearing, the Board convened in open session to consider amendments and adoption of Ordinance 2013-01. The Board chose to make a technical change to the Ordinance by removal of the word “draft” from the document. Motion was made and seconded and passed with a roll call vote by the following Board Members: Church, Fleek, Phillips, and Vegliano to adopt Ordinance 2013-01. Board Member Saler was absent. The purpose of the adoption of Ordinance 2013-01 is to fund ongoing fire protection services consistent with the needs of the residents of the BFPD and the Fire Protection Law of 1987, with emphasis on mandated and statutory requirement for personnel and equipment safety. Summary of Ordinance 2013-01 The Ordinance is the result of voter approval on August 28, 2012 for formation of the Bridgeville Fire Protection District and to administer the special tax on real property located within the jurisdiction of the BFPD. Section 1—Purpose and Intent: (A) to provide an annual budget to support the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Department to fund ongoing fire protection services, and (B) to provide for a Reserve Fund to be built over time to be agreed upon and set each year at a public meeting of the BFPD Board. Section 2—Tax imposed: Establishes a tax on lands located within the BPFD. The tax amount, as approved by the District voters and according to the use of the parcel


is established at $10 for unimproved parcels, $75 for improved parcels containing one family residential dwelling, and $100 for improved parcels containing commercial structures and manufactured home parks. Section 3—Exemption from Special Tax, (A) provides an exemption for parcels which are contiguous, undeveloped, held under identical ownership, and used solely for agricultural grazing may, upon approval of an application by the owners thereof to the BFPD Board annually, be treated as a single parcel for purposes of this special tax. (B) provides a partial and complete exemption from the tax for landowners who fall within the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Guidelines for “Very Low”; or “poverty level” income to apply to the BFPD Board for a partial or complete exemption annually from the tax. Section 4—Annual Adjustment: The special tax may be adjusted through Resolution by the BFPD Board at the beginning of each, fiscal year, commencing July 1, 2013, following a public hearing, by no more than the cost of living, as determined by the Consumer Price Index (CPI) prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, not to exceed five percent (5%). Section 5—Special Tax Roll: Each year, prior to the due date imposed by the Humboldt County Auditor Controller, the BFPD Board of Directors shall adopt by resolution the special tax roll specifying the special tax amount for each taxable parcel. Section 6—Method of Collection: The special tax imposed by this Ordinance is due from every person(s) who owns a parcel(s) within the BFPD and is reflected upon the rolls of the County Assessor at the same time ad valorem tax is due and is collected in the same manner. Section 7—Delinquency: To any amount of the special tax created by this Ordinance that becomes delinquent, the Humboldt County Tax Collector shall add a penalty in the amount equal to any penalty owing for delinquencies in the ad valorem property tax. The tax and penalty shall bear interest at the same rate as the rate for unpaid ad valorem property tax until paid. Section 8—Effective Date: Pursuant to California Code Section 25123(c), this Ordinance shall become effective immediately upon approval by the BFPD Board of Directors. Section 9—Annual Report: BFPD shall file an annual report regarding the use of the tax proceeds as required by Government Code Section 50075.3. Section 10—Invalidity: If any part of this ordinance is held to be invalid for any reason, such decision shall not affect the remaining portion of this Ordinance and the BFPD Board of Directors hereby declares that it would have passed the remainder of this Ordinance as if such invalid portion thereof had been deleted. Section 11—Adoption and Publication: Upon Board review and approval as a result of Board discussion and public input, the notification of adoption of this Ordinance shall be published once in the North

Coast Journal and the Bridgeville Community Newsletter, both local general circulation sources in Humboldt County, with full copies posted at the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo) Office, 3015 “H” Street, Eureka, CA and in the communities of Bridgeville at the Bridgeville Elementary School, Bridgeville Community Center, Bridgeville Post Office, and at Carlotta at the Swains Flat Store, 20300 Highway 36. The full text of the final approved Ordinance shall be posted within 15 days at the locations specified above and copies are available through the Board Secretary, BFPD, Post Office Box 51, Bridgeville, CA 95526. Section 12—Posting: The District Board Secretary shall post a certified copy of the full text of this Ordinance, as adopted by the Board, within 15 days of its passage, per California Government Code 25124, along with the names of the board members voting for and against the Ordinance. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED this 11th day of March, 2013, Brian Phillips, President Board of Directors and attested to certify compliance with the Codified Ordinances and the laws of the State of California, pertaining to Public Meetings, by David A. Vegliano, Secretary to the Board. Published Date: March 21, 2013. 3/21/13 (13-80)

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: March 5, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: HUMBOLDT BAY TOURISM CENTER The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 205 G ST EUREKA, CA 95501-0419 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine Eating Place 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-77)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00135

The following person is doing business as I AM…SOCIAL JUSTICE, I AM…SAFE ZONE, SHEBANGO at 966 Lloyd Street, Eureka, CA 95503. Jessica Pettitt 966 Lloyd Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessica K. Pettitt. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-78)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE

Notice of Request foR PRoPosals The Redwood Coast Energy Authority has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) from qualified C10 and B-General contractors to provide energy efficiency direct installation services. General instructions, proposal requirements, and other details are contained in the RFP packet. the deadline for proposals is thursday, april 25th, 2013 at 5:00 PM. Electronic submissions are preferred. a pre-proposal conference will be held on april 3rd at 9:00 aM, Redwood coast energy authority, 517 5th street, eureka ca. The pre-proposal conference will provide proposers with information regarding the scope of services and address questions related to the RFP. To request the RFP packet, please contact Lou Jacobson, Energy Specialist, at 707-269-1700 or by e-mail at ljacobson@ redwoodenergy.org.

3/14, 3/21/2013 (13-70)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00126

The following person is doing business as THE WOODEN SWING SET STOP .COM at 368 Spruce St., Eureka, CA 95503. Daniel Jacob Dixon 368 Spruce St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/25/13. /s Daniel Jacob Dixon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 25, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-86)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00147

The following person is doing business as FOREVER YOUNG BABY/ CHILDREN ESSENTIALS at 1034 Riverside Dr., Rio Dell, CA 95562. Heather R. Watkins 1034 Riverside Dr. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Heather R. Watkins. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-85)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 11-00116

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: KIDLICIOUS, 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Suite J, Fortuna, CA 95540. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 2/17/2011. Scott Keith Thomsson

118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Felicia Gabrielle Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business was conducted by Individual Husband & Wife. /s/ Scott Thomsson/Felicia Thomsson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 11, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/13 (13-79)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00115

The following person is doing business as EMBODY CALM MEDITATION CENTER at 1902 Hodgson St., #B, Eureka, CA 95503. Alex Goldenberg 1902 Hodgson St., #B Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Alex Goldenberg. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 22, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-75)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00137

The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT PC at 3562 Broadway, Ste. A, Eureka, CA 95503. Humboldt PC Repair, LLC 3562 Broadway, Ste. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to

➤ LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED May 22, 2006, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 213 488-0218. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. On April 5, 2013, at 11:00 A.M., Wade Francis, as duly appointed Substitute Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded on May 31, 2006, as lnst. No 2006-15887-5 ,in book N/A, page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, California, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH OR CASHIER’S CHECK OR OTHER INSTITUTIONAL CHECK ACCEPTABLE TO THE TRUSTEE, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) at PLACE OF SALE: Courthouse steps to Eureka County Courthouse: 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and Slate described as: Legal Description: Lot 7 of Parcel Map No. 2 (Deerfield Ranch), as per map recorded in Book 1 of Parcel Maps, pages 2, 3, and 4, Humboldt County Records Trustor: Robert M. Coleman and Lawrence W. Eye The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 28950 State Highway 36, Bridgeville, CA 95526 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the unpaid balance of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $ 141,774.42, including as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located on December 11, 2012 as lnst. No. 2012-030053-4 Trustee or party conducting sale: Wade Francis Date: March 12, 2013 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-76)

Did you know? that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at

www.northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

35


Field notes

March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-68)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00107

continued from previous page.

left Model of the type of SpaniSh galleon uSed on the Manila-to-acapulco trade route, in MuSeo hiStórico de acapulco. above typical cargo included SilkS like theSe. photoS by barry evanS

Columbus of the Pacific, Part 2 The Humboldt Connection By Barry Evans

L

3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-71)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00139

The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE LAWN CARE at 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Tony Tubiola 2208 Wisteria Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tony Tubiola. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-67)

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com ast week, we saw how the monknavigator Andrés Urdaneta was summoned back into the service of his native Spain to find an easterly route from the Philippines to New Spain, present-day Mexico. The first land sighted by Urdaneta this side of the Pacific on his groundbreaking (seabreaking?) voyage of 1565 was almost certainly Cape Mendocino, the most westerly point on the coast of California. The headland had been named 20 years earlier by its Spanish discover, Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo, to honor the first Viceroy of New Spain, Don Antonio de Mendoza. Now the landmark was to be a vital point of demarcation for trade galleons following Urdaneta’s passage en route from Manila to Acapulco. (Much later, navigators, fearful of northern California’s coastal fog and rocky shoreline, tended to turn south earlier when they were about 300 miles out to sea.) From 1565 to 1815, between two and four large Spanish galleons built of Philippine hardwood made four-to-sixmonth eastbound voyages from Manila to Acapulco each year. They brought rich cargoes of porcelain, ivory, silks, wax, chinaware and spices until the Mexican War of Independence put a stop to the trade in 1815, six years before Mexico finally seceded from Spain after a long struggle. The Manila galleons stayed at sea during the lonely voyage from the Philippines

transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Corey Edwards, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

to Acapulco, but some of the 30-odd ships that were lost without a trace may have inadvertently ended up on California’s North Coast. Which could explain the legend of King Peak. In the July 1963 issue of Western Folklore magazine, local writer Lynwood Carranco re-tells an Andrew Genzoli tale. Genzoli was a historian and Humboldt Times columnist (and, according to those who knew him, something of a storyteller). He claimed, in turn, to have heard the following when he was a youngster from Johnny Jack, a Mattole and Wiyot Native American who lived at the mouth of the Mattole River: A ship carrying a rich cargo of gold, gems and silk was wrecked on the Lost Coast; the crew either drowned or were killed by local Native Americans, who recovered the cargo and stashed it in a cave below King Peak; and an earthquake subsequently sealed up the opening of the cave, and (you have to take my word on this) the loot is there to this day. Does this tale, passed down through the years by Mattole tribal members, explain the disappearance of one of the missing Manila-Acapulco galleons? Get out there, locate the cave, and we’ll find the truth! l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) would have found the treasure by now if not for the notorious Lost Coast poison oak.

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00142

The following persons are doing business as SCHOOL COMMUNITY REUSE ACTION PROJECT HUMBOLDT at 101 H Street, Ste. D, Arcata, CA 95521. SCRAP 2915 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Portland, OR 97212. The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tibora Girczyc-Blum, Agent. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 5, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-72)

STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL FROM PARTNERSHIP OPERATING UNDER FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME R11-00406

The following person has withdrawn as a general partner from the partnership operating under the fictitious business name of: ALLIANCE LAWN AND GARDEN CARE, 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 7/1/2011. Jacob Douglas Farrell 1740 Stewart Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 /s/ Jacob Farrell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on

The following persons are doing business as REDWOOD READING SOLUTIONS at 665 F Street, Suite C, Arcata, CA 95521. Sherry Lee McCoy 2160 Lexington Court McKinleyville, CA 95519 Kirsten Leigh Hartlein Allen 2677 Elizabeth Rd. McKinelyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/19/2013. /s Sherry McCoy, Kirsten Hartlein Allen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-62)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00128

The following persons are doing business as PEACE POPS at Earth Foundations, 5425 Ericson Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Amber Mascio 2370 2nd Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Corey Mascio 2370 2nd Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Corey Mascio. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-63)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00088

The following persons are doing Business as PLANET TEAS at 100 Ericson Court Arcata, CA. 95521. PO Box 5178, Arcata,CA. 95518 Jana Ashbrook 1035 Warren Creek Rd. Arcata, CA. 95521 Dorje Kirsten 3480 Coombs Dr. Arcata, CA. 95521 Reagan Kirsten 3480 Coombs Dr. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/7/2013 /s/ Jana Ashbrook. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 7, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/28, 03/07, 3/14, 3/21 (13-56)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00103

The following persons are doing business as MCKENNY’S DO IT BEST BUILDING CENTERS at 2800 Hubbard Lane, Eureka, CA 95501. Myrtletown Lumber & Supply Inc. 2800 Hubbard Lane Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/11/13. /s Dean Kruschke, General Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/28, 3/7, 3/14, 3/21/2013 (13-58)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00104

The following persons are doing business as MYRTLETOWN DO IT BEST INSULATION SERVICES at 2800 Hubbard Lane, Eureka, CA 95501. Myrtletown Lumber & Supply Inc. 2800 Hubbard Lane Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Dean Kruschke, General Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/28, 3/7, 3/14, 3/21/2013 (13-57)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00105

The following person is doing business as ASPIRE CHANGE KLJ TRAINING & CONSULTING at 1203 Henderson St., Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 6298, Eureka, CA 95502. Karen Lofts Jarboe 1203 Henderson St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/15/13. /s Karen Lofts Jarboe. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 2/28, 3/7, 3/14, 3/21/2013 (13-59)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130166 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: XIONG YANG TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: XIONG YANG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name


3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-64)

➤ LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK aka RUSS KIRKPATRICK aka RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by NANCY YAGI KIRKPATRICK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that NANCY YAGI KIRKPATRICK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 28, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: RICHARD DALY, SBN# 041302 RICHARD DALY, INC. 123 F STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-5471 March 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-81)

3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-69)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. “Breaking Bad” network 4. This and that: Abbr. 8. Actor Johnson known in his wrestling days as “The Rock” 14. Low-cost accommodations: Abbr. 15. Regarding 16. Ashton Kutcher and Johnny Carson, by birth 17. “The Simpsons” character with an 18-letter last name 18. Cambodia neighbor 19. Doesn’t guzzle 20. Supermarket chain featured in “Driving Miss Daisy”

23. “Southern” relig. 24. Roadside bomb: Abbr. 25. Buckeyes’ sch. 28. Winner’s privilege 34. The “O” in 25-Across 35. ____ empty stomach 36. Modern diversionary political tactic 42. Crazy, in a Ricky Martin hit 43. Strong as ____ 44. 1950s wrestler with golden locks 51. Tavern order 52. ____ culpa 53. Directional suffix 54. Come-on from a telecommunications company ... or

something that includes 20-, 28-, 36- and 44-Across 60. Many New Year’s Eve broadcasts 63. Vitamin C source 64. Voyage starter? 65. Beta carotene, for one 66. “Look ____ when I’m talking to you” 67. “____ always say ...” 68. “Watch out!” 69. Breathless? 70. What flounder flounder in

DOWN 1. “This is a priority!” 2. Onetime Dr Pepper alternative 3. Slang term often applied to Demi Moore or Halle Berry 4. Shopping spree setting 5. “____, old chap!” 6. Stash 7. Mozart’s “____ Fan Tutte” 8. Home run, in baseball slang 9. Enthusiastic reply 10. Haywire 11. ____ in “yellow” 12. Opposite of SSW 13. Superman’s monogram 21. 1.0 is not a good one 22. Jazz job

25. [Gasp!] 26. One way to attend a party 27. Annapolis inits. 29. Prince in Ezekiel 30. 4, on a phone 31. “There’s no ____ ‘team’” 32. It’s the equivalent of “sold out” at a filling station 33. Word on all U.S. coins 36. It may be spun 37. Land measurement 38. [That’s awful!] 39. Capt. Picard’s series, to fans 40. Garden tool 41. Prefix with biology 42. Letters on some NYC baggage tags 45. One unlikely to win a Tony

46. Body of work 47. Former Mideast org. 48. Button with two triangles: Abbr. 49. “To Where You Are” singer Josh 50. Edith Piaf’s “La Vie ____” 54. Damage control grp. 55. Joyful 56. When the stars come out, in ads 57. 1996 Gwyneth Paltrow title role 58. Put on a peg, perhaps 59. Work with needles 60. Women’s ____ 61. Suffix with expert 62. Pledge

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MEDIUM #12

www.sudoku.com

PETITION OF: TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT for a decree changing names as follows: Present name TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT to Proposed Name TRISTAN WILHOYT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 19, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: February 25, 2013 Filed: February 26, 2013 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by STEPHEN MATTES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that STEPHEN MATTES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Solution, tips and computer program at

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130131 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK AKA RUSS KIRKPATRICK AKA RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK, CASE NO. PR130078

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-82)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN, CASE NO. PR130092

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

XIONG YANG to Proposed Name XY SONG ROYAL YAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 26, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 8, 2013 Filed: March 8, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

37


notice of petition to administer estate of tHeodore HaroLd sHeLLeY, case no. pr130082

continued from previous page. notice of petition to administer estate of JoHn a. meLLo, case no. pr130081

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN A. MELLO, JOHN ARMAS MELLO, JOHN MELLO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ANGELA MELLO in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ANGELA MELLO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 4, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE SB# 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 March 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-74)

notice of petition to administer estate of JoHn HoWard nicHoLLs, case no. pr130075

To all heirs, beneficiaries, crediTo all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and per- tors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be inter- sons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, ested in the will or estate, or both, of: THEODORE HAROLD SHELLEY of: JOHN HOWARD NICHOLLS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHERRY BEYER in the been filed by JOHN L. NICHOLLS Superior Court of California, County in the Superior Court of California, of Humboldt. County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHERRY BEYER be requests that JOHN L. NICHOLLS be appointed as personal representa- appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the tive to administer the estate of the decedent. decedent. THE PETITION requests the deTHE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be cedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authorTHE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow Estates Act. (This authority will allow NATE Certified Heating Tech the personal representative to take the personal representative to take Tempmany Executive Assistant many actions without obtaining court actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very PT approval. Before taking certain very medical clerk important actions, however, the per- important actions, however, the perPlanner sonal representative will be requiredEnvironmental sonal representative will be required to give notice to interested personsGeotechnical to give noticeEngineer to interested persons unless they have waived notice or unless they have waived notice or Sales Person consented to the proposed action.) Outside consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration Certified The independent administration Plumber authority will be granted unless an authority will be granted unless an General Manager interested person files an objection interested person-Media files an objection to the petition and shows good cause to the petition andand showspersonal good cause lines Insurance Agent Commercial why the court should not grant the why the court should not grant the 3 Tree Climbersauthority. minimum 3 years experience authority. A HEARING on the petition will ClassABHEARING on the petition will Driver/Labor be held on April 4, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. be held on March 28, 2013 at 1:50 p.m. NATE Certified Heating Tech at the Superior Court of California, at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of IF YOU OBJECT to the granting the petition, you should appear at the of the petition, you should appear hearing and state your objections or at the hearing and state your objecfile written objections with the court tions or file written objections with before the hearing. Your appearance the court before the hearing. Your may be in person or by your attorney. appearance may be in person or by IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a con- your attorney. tingent creditor of the deceased, you IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a conmust file your claim with the court tingent creditor of the deceased, you and mail a copy to the personal rep- must file your claim with the court resentative appointed by the court and mail a copy to the personal repwithin four months from the date of resentative appointed by the court first issuance of letters as provided in within four months from the date of Probate Code Section 9100. The time first issuance of letters as provided in for filing claims will not expire before Probate Code Section 9100. The time four months from the hearing date for filing claims will not expire before noticed above. four months from the hearing date YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept noticed above. by the court. If you are a person YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept interested in the estate, you may by the court. If you are a person file with the court a Request for interested in the estate, you may Special Notice (form DE-154) of the file with the court a Request for filing of an inventory and appraisal Special Notice (form DE-154) of the of estate assets or of any petition or filing of an inventory and appraisal account as provided in Probate Code of estate assets or of any petition or section 1250. A Request for Special account as provided in Probate Code Notice form is available from the section 1250. A Request for Special court clerk. Notice form is available from the ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: court clerk. JOHN R. STOKES, SB#67715 ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB NO. 69056 LLP ATTORNEY AT LAW 381 BAYSIDE ROAD 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E ARCATA, CA 95521 EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 822-1771 (707) 445-0804 March 6, 2013 March 1, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-73)

3/7, 3/14, 3/21/2013 (13-65)

MARCH 21, 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com CoastJournal JourNal• •Thursday, thursday, MarCh 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 38 North Coast

the

Employment

Police officer CiTy OF FORTunA $40,502 – 49,210 /yR (incentives available)

Law enforcement, crime prevention, traffic control, and crime investigation activities; specialized law enforcement assignments; community outreach. Must be enrolled or a graduate of POST Academy at time of application. Excellent benefits. Requires valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, (707) 725-7600. Applications deadline is 5:00 pm on Friday, April 5, 2013

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS Gift Shop (Candy Cart) Deli Worker Server/Busser/Host, 2 Cage Cashier Crown Club Rep Vault Attendant Bingo Inventory Clerk Cocktail Server Janitor Poker Room Dealer Bingo Admit Clerk

FULL-TIME POSITIONS Food & Beverage Manager Vault Attendant Line Cook Count Team

NATE Certified Heating Tech Environmental Planner Geotechnical Engineer Outside Sales Person Certified Plumber General Manager -Media Insurance Agent Commercial and personal lines Tree Climbers minimum 3 years experience Class B Driver/Labor

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

coder PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & a certified coder with 2 yrs. coding exp.

Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR. Friends of the Eel River is hiring an Administrative Director, 20hrs/wk, $15+/hr DOE. Review the complete job description at www.eelriver.org. (E-0328) AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial assistance available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-0321) GARDENING SPECIALIST (JOB #13-26). F/T position in Facilities Management. Close: 3/27/13. For more info visit: www.humboldt. edu/jobs or call (707) 826-3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE (E-0321)

Pharmacy technician PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv.; current CA Pharmacy Tech Lic.; 6 mo to 3 yrs related retail, hospital, or clinic pharmacy exp. administrative assistant PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & 1 to 4 yrs related admin assist training or exp. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. For qualifications go to www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 3/27/13 @ 5PM.

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400


Employment

Controller Staff Accountant Accounts Payable CPA Loan Officer Commercial Lines Insurance Agent Part Time Office Assistant

Redwood Community Action Agency Has the following positions available:

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Controller  Staff Accountant Accounts Payable  CPA Loan Officer Commercial Lines Insurance Agent Part Time Office Assistant

Family Services Shelter Childrens Program Staff, p/t-f/t $9.25-9.75 Teacher for childcare center, p/t & subs $10.00 Residential Staff, all shifts $9.25 Natural Resources Services Planner/Sr. Planner, f/t $14-18 DOE

Go to www.rcaa.org for full job description, requirements & application, or 904 G St., Eureka.

Open Door is seeking the following medical professionals:

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata

Parent Educator Part-time opening (22.5 hours/week) works with parents with developmental disabilities to develop or enhance parenting skills and includes making home visits and providing services in a variety of settings. Starts $14.11/hr. Ability to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance and posses a valid California driver’s license, auto insurance, and access to a vehicle. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Monday, March 25th at 5 p.m. EOE

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

dental assistant ii/iii PHV – FT – Must have 6 mos. to 2 yr. RDA/CDA/ADA exp; must have a CA RDA/CDA license; & must possess CA x-ray cert & coronal polish cert. eHr technical trainer PHV – FT – Must have AA/AS in Educ., Healthcare, Eng.; or Public Commun. or 4 yr exp dev training materials to all levels in a healthcare setting. Must have demonstated exp managing a training program; knowledge of technical training concepts & techniques in a medical setting. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. For qualifications go to www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 3/22/13 @ 5PM.

REGISTERED NURSE 1F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL ASSISTANT

1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Arcata,

2 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics)

REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 TEMP Arcata (3 months-OB Clinic) Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

ELECTRICIAN, INDUSTRIAL. Minimum 3 years industrial electrical experience required. Must know 480V 3-phase motors, PLCs and motor control circuits. Must have all necessary tools and be able to work swing shift, weekend and holidays. Excellent wage and benefit package. Accepting applications Mon. to Fri. between 8-11 a.m. and Noon-4:30 p.m. at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Rd., Arcata. We are a drug and tobacco free work place and a verifiable SS # is req’d. EOE (E-0321) MAINTENANCE TEAM MEMBER FT. Cypress Grove Chevre is looking for someone who is self motivated, detail oriented w/experience in machine/equipment maintenance and troubleshooting & w/good computer skills. For a complete job description and instructions on how to apply, visit: http://www.cypressgrovechevre. com/grovers/employment.html (E-0321) MANICURIST NEEDED! New, relaxing, and upbeat salon in need of nail tech. Megaras Beauty Salon, Eureka (707) 382-2851 (E-0321) WANTED WEEKEND COOK. Woodrose Cafe hours 7a.m- 2 p.m., 911 Redwood Drive. (707) 923-3191 (E-0321)

Journal Readers are the People You want to Hire! 442-1400 • www.northcoastjournal.com

INBOUND PHONE SALES/TECHNICAL SUPPORT. Inbound phone sales and technical support. Position requires accurate keyboarding skills, strong written and oral communication via email/phone. Interpersonal and organizational skills a must. Ability to work independently and in a professional manner. Position requires excellent attendance. Working knowledge of Excel and Word. Bilingual a plus. Benefits for full time employees include: paid vacation and holidays. After completion of waiting period, medical insurance and elective supplementary insurances available. Applications available online @ ccrane.com or C. Crane Company, Inc. 558 10th Street, Fortuna CA 95540. Deadline: 4/19/13. We are an equal opportunity employer. (E-0411) CARDIAC STENOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1st. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@ yahoo.com (E-0404) SOCIAL WORKER MSW. Adult Day Health Care of Mad River. Mon.-Fri., 30-35 hours/week. Benefits available. Experience working with elderly/disabled preferred. Application/job description can be picked up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River. Applications accepted until position filled. (707) 822-4866, adhc@madriverhospital.com (E-0321) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. 442-1400 VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com

DISCOVER THE “SUCCESS AND MONEYMAKING SECRETS”. THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1 (800) 470-7545. (AAN CAN) (E-0321) SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST-ANTICIPATED OPENING FOR 20132014. Humboldt County Office of Education, Full-time, 1.0 FTE. Reqrs. a CA credential authorizing service as a school psychologist. Must demonstrate competence in communication with children, parents, staff and representative agencies; and demonstrate knowledge of and exper. with community resources associated with special needs youth and families. Eligible for pro-rated Medical, Dental and Vision benefits and STRS retirement. App. available at HCOE or online: www. humboldt.k12.ca.us/pers/appinfo. php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eka, CA 95501. For job desc. or questions contact Kathy Atkinson at katkinson@ humboldt.k12.ca.us or call (707) 445-7039. Apply by: March 26, 2013 by 4:00 p.m. (E-0321) CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW. Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442-4500 #14, www. camentorfha.com (E-1226) DRIVERS. CAE Transport. Weekdays/Sat.s, various day shifts. 21+ & clean driving record. Print application at www.cityambulance. com, send WITH COVER LETTER to personnel@cityambulance. com or 135 W. 7th St., Eureka, CA 95501. (E-0321) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite 209, Eureka. (707) 476-9262. (E-0411) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN) (E-0425) LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN) (E-0321) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-0321)

CONTINUED ON next page

HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www. mailing-usa.com (AAN CAN) (E0418) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450, http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0321) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Rentals ARCATA 2 B D/ 1 BA TOW N HOUSE. 840 D St. Centrally located. Fireplace, private patio, off street parking. Rent $995, Vac 03/30. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0321) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2303 Summer St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Off street parking, hookups. Rent $570, Vac 03/30. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321) EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1823 California St. Garbage Pd. Sec 8 OK. Hook-ups, yard, w/c pet Rent $1000, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321) EUREKA UPSTAIRS STUDIO APARTMENT. 1507 5th St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. On-site laundry. Rent $475, Vac 03/23. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321) FORTUNA NEWER 2BD/1BA TOWNHOUSE. 2999 Rainbow Ln. Garbage Pd. Washer/Dryer included. Rent $975. Vac 03/30. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 21, 2013

39


k

the Rentals

Real Estate

ARCATA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1226 L St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Cat OK. Rent $750 Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1335 6th St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. On-site laundry. Rent $650, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0321) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0620)

EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 4434811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE-0328)

Business Rentals

Buy/Sell/Trade O

L NEW

in ION CAT

Old

Services

n Tow

Lodging/Travel

      

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

FLASHBACK 116 W. Wabash • 443-3259

Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

SALE: SELECT HATS, TIES & SCARVES

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808, www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606) TOO MANY CARS IN YOUR DRIVEWAY? Don't know what to do? List them all here. 442-1400.

Real Estate

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Vintage Clothing & Secondhand

2 METAL FUEL OR GAS TANKS. 1 tank 300 gallons with hose, second tank 600 gallons with hose and dispenser. 7 ft. wood frame for each tank. Sacrifice price $300 for both tanks. 722-4314. (BST-0328) BOHEMIAN MERMAID SHOP! Hand-dyed natural clothing. Fun styles that fit women! Kidwear, local jewelry and art. 6th & F, Eureka. www.Bohemian-Mermaid.com and Facebook. (BST-0411)

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

Check out the listings on page 43

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

 

artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

Auto

DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1226)

REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

JOURNALestate • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 40 NORTH COASTreal

BOOKS 1/2 PRICE! Check out our excellent, well organized book collection! March 19-23. Green Tagged Clothing 25¢. Dream Quest Thrift Store, in Willow Creek, Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0321) TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1226) IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1226) TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Pets SEARCHING FOR SCOOTER LOST. Jan. 29 in BlueLake. Small black fixed male with curly tail.white spot middle of tail,also white belly & lower legs Heeler mutt mix, blue collar very cute,very friendly, very missed ! 502-6534 leave message. (P-0328)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Services

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677-3364. (S-0606) STITCHES -N-BRITCHES IN MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0502) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0328) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 843-9599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com, www.redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808)


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Services

Community

Music GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

DALLAS CAPITAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE

Fees range from $30 - $80

STOP PAYING TOO MUCH TO FILE YOUR TAXES We offer: No out of pocket fees, Direct Deposit

Walk-ins Welcome 350 E St., Suite 207 (4th and E St.) Eureka • (707) 832-4292

File, and make appointment at dallascapital.net

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-0606) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1226)

Attorney

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

Music Paul Windham, M.D.

General Practice Occupational Medicine 707.497.6342 1915 Harrison Ave., Suite A • Eureka

Accepting New Clients

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0321) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226)

PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener. com (S-0606) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155. (S-1226)

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi-track recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0523) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226)

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes TOO MANY TUBAS? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Community CARSON PARK EASTER ADVENTURE. Join us March 30 at Carson Park for an Easter Adventure! FREE event filled with fun games, prizes & treats! Ages 5 & under from 10-11 a.m.; ages 6-10 from 11 a.m.-Noon. Bring your camera for a picture with the Easter Bunny! Call 441-4244 for more info. (C-0321) HIDDEN WORLD OF HOARDING. Help for those who hoard—and for those who live with hoarders at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., March 24, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0321) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472, www.CenturaOnline. com (AAN CAN) (C-0321) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1226) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226)

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

sHelter HousinG for YoutH Crisis Hotline

444-2273

service directory

home & garden

Need some help homethe& garden around house?

servic

home & garden

service directory

service directory see page 14

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

41


&Spirit

& FREE PRESENTATION

with ROLFER LEE TULEY

MARCH 27 6PM  TH

Energy Life Center

with Margy Emerson

GIT YER VALSSAGE!

Henderson Center 442-5433

616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

OPEN HOUSE

body, mind

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

SHAWNA BELL

11-Week Term Starts Week of March 25

Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage.

3 ProgrAMS: • Traditional T’ai Chi

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

• T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis • 42 Combined Forms

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP (707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

norcalrecoveryservices.com

Do it Legally

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$ 85

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI , Veterans & Students New First Tim MMJ Patie e nts S

A

VE $ 50

with men tion of this ad

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

(across from HC Court House)

LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH. From the inside out with clinical hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. (707) 845-3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0321) NEED A MASSAGE IN THE EVENING AFTER WORK? Kimberly Grabo CMT now at the Center for Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts. Mon., Tues., Wed., 5-9 p.m. Same day appointments available. Call (707) 932-5804 to book your appointment today. (MB-0404) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0523) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (MB-1226) EARTHRITE MASSAGE. CMT with excellent local references. Now practicing at home (Arcata) after working at Mendocino Hot Springs. Offering Introductory Special. $45/hour! Call Rick: (707) 499-6033. You will float away…. (MB-0404)

GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neurosciencebased tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226) FIGHT FLUS AND COLDS. doTERRA essential oils. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra.com (MB-0516)

Place your ad online! 42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

For Schedule and Fees: www.margaretemerson.com or

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

822-6508

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642

Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata

Visit any class free! www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-0606) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226)

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy. zumba.com (MB-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1226)

HAS MOVED! Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor 607 F Street in Arcata Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

(707) 822-4300

www.northcoastjournal.com


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems? Just need someone to talk to? Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW LCS # 23232

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

real e

$425,000

4 bed, 2 bath, 2,608 sq ft custom Azalea Hill home, passive solar design, south facing living room, panoramic views of bay, pasture, & ocean, and extensive garden with a variety of plantings

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

$221,900

3 bed 1 bath, 1,128 sq ft Cutten home on dead end street, bright rooms lots of windows, formal dining, fireplace w/insert in living room, lovely fenced yard with tree house and out buildings

real estate

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 1-5

this

$285,000

3 bed, 1 bath, 1,350 sq ft well maintained McKinleyville home with pump house, finished triple car garage w/attic storage, 2 bay RV shop/metal building, full fenced acre, updated kitchen

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

■ Dow’s Prairie

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

725-9627

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

739 12th St., Fortuna

707.445.8811 ext.124

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

BeautIful cuStOm hOme wIth dRamatIc entRy! Soaring ceilings in this lovely 2005 home. The cook’s kitchen adjoins a large dining area, the library/office has many built-in bookcases, and the master suite is downstairs. Includes a secondary, completely separate, home for rental or extended family. MLS#236296 $699,500

Leggett Land/ Property +/-40 acres located in northern mendocino

707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years. Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

fi d e n t i a l &

c

passionate om

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

county. this property rare boasts large year round springs, timber, open meadows, picturesque views, year round access and gently sloping topography. Call today!

$249,000

Bridgeville Land/Property

+/-40 acres on Buck mountain. enjoy panoramic views, good access, water & timber. Flat to sloping ground at the ridgetop with great exposure. elevation approx. 4600-4800’.

$135,000

Dinsmore Land/Property

neW

LISt

InG!

+/-40 gently sloping acres on Swayback Ridge featuring a spring, oak woodlands, fir timber and views. elevation approx. 4,100-4,700’. owner will carry.

$149,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

COAST northcoastjournal.com • NORTH northcoastjournal.com COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL• •THURSDAY, THURSDAY,MARCH MARCH21, 21,2013 2013 • NORTH

43 43


Celebrate Spring

SALE!

Friday • Saturday • Sunday March 22 - 24

50% Off All AllRegular RegularPriced Priced

Live Goods Gallon and 5 Gallon Sizes*

Gallon and 5 Gallon Sizes*

Buy 3 bags, get the fourth bag

HUMBOLDT’S HELPFUL HOME CENTER

FREE Miracle-Gro Garden Soil 1 cubic foot (7102692)

Entire selection of

bare root trees

2197 Central Avenue • McKinleyville 707-839-1587 • McKinleyvilleAce.com

50% Off *Discount does not apply to items already on sale or everyday low price items.


North Coast Journal 03-21-13 Edition