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thursday feb. 6, 2014 vol XXV issue 6 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

6 Whatever happened to short sea shipping? 8 Labor’s love lost 16 Tipping tips 19 Sizzle and pop 24 The Setlist 27 Zom Prom

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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Feb. 6, 2014 Volume XXV No. 6

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014

Rethink Jail Releases

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Kim Hodges

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on the cover: Eureka police at a 2010 standoff. Photo by Mark McKenna

Editor: It really insults my intelligence to read that people are being released from jail late at night, far from home, because of the dictates of the law (“Dead of Night,” Jan. 30). The law that is chosen is the one meant to uphold and protect a citizen’s civil and constitutional rights. Really? I believe people are turned out like that as a form of cruelty. And we must not allow it. The man accused of killing Pastor Eric Freed was arrested and transported 65 miles to Eureka. He attempted to kick out Editor: the windows of the patrol car along the If the outstanding care I received from way. He was clearly erratic during booking. this team is any indication, Humboldt So what is going to cancer patients will happen when a crazed find great comfort in individual is put out in staying home to rethe street late at night, ceive world-class care 65 miles from home? in the jeans and T-shirt Who is going to suffer environment we enjoy here? The ripple effect imagines (“The Cancer Collabois now clear. We will all ration,” Jan. 23). gravity suffer. At my first meetsideways. We can see that ing with Dr. Allen he now, can’t we? gave me a card with his There is no doubt Lifting its hem, email address. Yeah, in my mind and heart right, this guy with the toes of its shoes that all antisocial, hundreds of patients tap addicted, crazed beis going to answer my havior is coming from along the outstretched palms emails. Some evenings wounded souls. You later I was fretting and of the trees. can’t punish people emailed a question. into good behavior. Within 20 minutes a We can only hope to — Catherine Munsee friendly reply appeared help through methods in my inbox. stemming from love Dr. Mahoney’s and understanding. warmth, humor and Have you ever rescued an abused earthiness are perfect for Humboldt. Now animal? With love and consistency that that I have read her own medical history animal can begin to trust the person who it’s hard not to wonder if the terrible ac-

In Good Hands

general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

cares for it. I have seen animals finally begin to have the lives they should have had from the beginning. Lives in which they are cared about by someone. Loved by someone. So that they too can have someone to love. I say that all public policies should be open to review. About each one let the question be asked: Does it do more harm than good? I ask you, what good does it do to release a person from jail late at night? Maureen Kane, Arcata

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cidents she suffered were part of some grand conspiracy to bring her to this present work so dear to her heart and so vital to Humboldt’s. From the moment I met her I gained confidence in my treatment. She hates cancer, and as a fellow athlete I saw a game face on her that I knew was a winner. I didn’t see much of Dr. Harmon until near the end of treatment when we had a longer chat and he mentioned the importance of exercise. I replied that learning to surf was on my bucket list. He told me about a program he participates in doing surf camps for cancer survivors. He encouraged me to apply and helped me do so. Not enough can be said of the brilliant staffs of these docs and of St. Joseph. The Humboldt Breast Health Project was also there every step of the way and a tome could be written on what their presence has meant to local cancer care. Thank you, Dr. Mahoney and dinner companions, and congratulations to all of Humboldt on this partnership. Ann Constantino, Garberville

Debating Singleton Editor: The title “Defending Singleton” grabbed my attention a couple of weeks ago, causing me to read a column I generally make it a practice to skip over. Initially, I considered composing a response to it, but realizing I couldn’t really do justice to its shortcomings within your 300 word limit, I didn’t try. So I was pleased that the letters by Tim Gray and Todd Larsen in your Jan. 30 issue dealt quite nicely with the non-sequiturial reasoning and tortured contrarianism that had so vexed me in the column, leaving just one remaining item I felt required

public attention. That was Singleton’s foray into employing the email spam problem as another wedge for extortion. I recalled that the NCJ’s cover story (by Ryan Burns) in the Sept. 30, 2010 issue described the effective destruction of another Cartoon by joel mielke business — the small Garberville internet service provider which Singleton had apparently persuaded he could assist by employing the federal CAN-SPAM Act in order to deter the spam-scum who were tormenting it. I thought this additional example of his practice of dredging up plaintiffs to front for his racket would provide a helpful perspective to fill out the picture. So I looked up that article and re-read it. What an eyeful that was! Besides refreshing my recall on that particular gratuitous disaster, it contained offhand references to Bob Doran’s article “Access and Dollars” way back in the March 8, 2001 issue (also a cover story) and Heidi Walters’ “Jason Singleton Strikes Again” in the May 8, 2008 NCJ. All three are required reading (if you think you can bear to know what’s actually going on), and all are available in the NCJ’s website archive. Read ‘em and weep... or gnash your teeth. Mark Drake, Fortuna Editor: Good on you, Marcy, for spelling out in real and clear terms why aggressive attorneys are needed to bring about recognition of the rights of the majority, those who are not powerful — because it doesn’t happen otherwise. I think it was

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Frederick Douglass who said, “Power conRemember, kids, the rights you save cedes nothing without a demand, never may be your own. has, and never will.” Michael Golden, Bayside Differently abled folks, like people of color, women, seniors, First Nations people, workers, LGBT folk, sometimes students, have had to struggle to get their rights recognized. Courageous and Please try to make your letter no more sometimes noisy attorneys have been than 300 words and include your full part of those struggles. Of course they’re name, place of residence and phone numunpopular with some and labeled in the ber (we won’t print your number). Send it media as outsiders, pinkos, and ambuto letters@northcoastjournal.com l lance-chasers. It’s so much easier to trash them then it is to listen. The Americans With Disabilities Act is Congress’ free market response to the challenge of protecting the “Laws that send people into the night need to right of access for all. Rather be looked into. They are a danger to society as than creating an elaborate bureaucracy to enforce the well as to the inmates. I had a childhood friend act, Congress provided a in Fort Bragg arrested for public intoxication who private right of action allowwas released in the middle of the night. He was a ing lawsuits to be brought to enforce the right, and an good guy, just an alcoholic, and he froze to death attorney’s fees provision so in a telephone booth that night.” that private attorneys could — Linda Stanton, commenting on “Dead of Night” afford to take the cases, which are time consuming, on the Journal’s Facebook page. and involve clients who can rarely afford attorneys themselves.

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Short Sea Doldrums STEPHEN PEPPER WANTED TO LAUNCH SHORT SEA SHIPPING FROM THE SCHNEIDER DOCK IN EUREKA. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

R

emember short sea shipping, that siren who lured us into a maritime reverie some years ago — a fortune-filled dream in which Humboldt Bay once again had a bustling port, helping to reduce transportation costs, air pollution and highway wear-and-tear? Where goods-laden barges — carrying more than just fuel and wood chips — made regular stops between the Port of Humboldt and other West Coast ports, taking thousands of trucks off the highways and using less fuel to move the same amount of goods? It seemed a fine idea, a positively Humboldtian, green idea. But what ever happened to it? Last week, seeking just such an update, the citizen-driven Humboldt Bay Harbor Working Group gathered a panel to talk about short sea shipping. The upshot? While short sea shipping is showing signs of life elsewhere — between Stockton and Oakland, for instance — it’s comatose here in Humboldt, and it could remain so indefinitely. “I don’t really see a near term — a tangible — opportunity right now,” panelist Stephen Pepper, of Humboldt Marine Logistics in Arcata, told the group. Pepper’s the tug-boat operatorturned-entrepreneur who, in 2008, pitched the idea of a short sea shipping route between five ports — Longview, Wash.; Coos Bay, Ore.; Humboldt; Oakland and Long Beach. The route would be serviced by a barge that could haul containers carrying anything from bottled water to potting soil to lumber — just nothing requiring quick delivery; it would stop in Humboldt once a week. Pepper predicted this barge service, in addition to relieving truck traffic congestion on the Interstate 5 corridor and reducing truck emissions, would run 20 percent cheaper than trucking. The Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District agreed to sponsor the endeavor,

named it the West Coast Hub-Feeder Project and submitted a proposal for market research assistance to the newly established Marine Highway Program, which was seeking projects to help finance. In the end, the feds diverted a paltry sum — $275,000, about a quarter of what Pepper and the district needed — to a broader analysis of various marine highway opportunities along the M-5 corridor (M-5 stands for Marine Highway 5 and corresponds with Interstate 5). Pepper had planned to get by with the Schneider Dock in Eureka, at first. Each port needed a modern crane, however, and the private barge services needed to be employed. But without the funds to identify specific freight and seduce enough willing shippers, Pepper said, it wouldn’t be possible to secure yet more public and private dollars to foot the actual $82 million it would take to get the project up and running. So it was over. “That was enough for us to say, ‘We’re done, we’re moving on,’” Pepper said by phone after the meeting last week. The district explored other short sea shipping ideas, and hired Pepper to write TIGER (Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery) grants to buy key equipment, such as a large, mobile marine crane for loading containers on barges, and a barge. The efforts were unsuccessful. The district couldn’t prove that it would be able to drum up enough freight volume to make the costs of shipping by barge competitive with trucking. At last week’s meeting, panelist Richard Marks, a harbor district commissioner, passed around a cost analysis specifically for barging lumber to Redwood City to re-load for shipping to points beyond. It showed that barging lumber, at best, would only match current trucking rates in the same freight corridor. In addition, it would be hard to guarantee a weekly schedule, because barges are not good in heavy seas and rough weather slows them down. The third panelist at the meeting, Stas Margaronis, from Santa Rosa, for

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt’s entry onto America’s marine highways has stalled years tried to get a small, fast, fuelefficient container ship built specifically for short sea shipping — similar to ships used in Europe where short sea shipping now moves at least 40 percent of the freight, according to the trade magazine Seatrade Global. This smaller ship would have an on-board crane, and it would be able to move between ports more quickly and reliably than barges. Margaronis dreamed of a route between Humboldt and Stockton that could take several hundred truckloads a week off U.S. Highway 101. In 2009, he proposed building an enclosed shipyard and dock at Fields Landing for his small ships. He couldn’t get the investors. Margaronis dropped the idea and now devotes his time to writing for the American Journal of Transportation. But he’s still hot and heavy for short sea shipping, and points to Marine Highway 580 for inspiration. The M-580 launched last May, is where containerized goods, once destined to travel by trucks on clogged freeways, are now moving by barge via ship channel and the San Joaquin River between Stockton, Sacramento and the Port of Oakland. At the meeting last week, Margaronis seemed outraged that nothing’s happening here in Humboldt. “There’s a big attitude problem that we’re facing,” Margaronis said. “So many institutional obstacles.” If Humboldt wants short sea shipping, Margaronis said after the meeting, then Humboldt has got to go to Washington in person and demand it. Pepper said there’s no doubt that all eyes are on Stockton, and that if it continues to succeed that could entice investors to similar projects. But Humboldt’s a small, outdated port in need of major infrastructure — namely a large, mobile marine crane and a solid bulkhead dock that goes into deep water, or at least a dock wide enough to have multiple causeways for loading and unloading barges. And Humboldt’s producers, including timber companies and sawmills, need a reason to step out of their comfort zone and

away from traditional shipping. It will take federal investment to get them excited about trying something different, Pepper and others say. And maybe a massive hike in fuel prices — something harbor commissioner Patrick Higgins says is inevitable. “If the U.S. government were forward looking, funding would be available for compatible infrastructure in all West Coast Ports so that goods and commodities could be handled efficiently at all locations,” Higgins said. “This would help to cushion the shock of fuel price increases that we all know are coming and help improve air quality that has fallen to abysmal levels in the Central Valley and Willamette Valley (along I-5).” But market forces, Pepper told the group last week, “are dictating that [short sea shipping] is not necessary at this time.” Pepper said it would be better, right now, for the harbor district and Humboldt to allocate their time and energy to more attainable opportunities, such as the aquaculture park and other projects proposed for the old pulp mill site out on the Samoa Peninsula. And it should find a way to build that modern dock. Then, maybe, the bigger bucks will come. That is exactly what the harbor district is doing, says district CEO Jack Crider. Next Monday, in fact, the district and Humboldt State University are hosting an open house to show off some of the proposals for the recently purchased mill site, including an aquaculture innovation park. In the meantime, Crider said, the district is planning to design a dock and get the permitting process underway, which might better set it up to snag a federal grant to pay for construction. (Typically, federal grants obligate the funds for a maximum of two years, said Crider. But permitting, alone, can take that long.) “Hopefully,” Crider said by email last week, “in the next couple of years we will be in a position of having a shovel-ready project that can compete for TIGER grant funds.” The dock’s construction could cost as much as $30 million. l

the week in WEed

Hardball

“Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.” ~James Russell Lowell

By Grant Scott-Goforth

Used Books

grant@northcoastjournal.com

Here’s a question of local perception about pot, which simply doesn’t engender the same vitriol as other drugs around here: Do “upstanding” locals grow and use marijuana because it’s less serious, or do we consider it less serious because more “upstanding” locals grow and use it? A prominent community member arrested last year on cultivation charges was back in the news recently. Matt Nutter, who managed the successful Humboldt Crabs for 6 years (and was involved with them in other capacities for more than 20), was charged with growing marijuana, possessing marijuana for sale and “allowing a place for preparing or storing a controlled substance.” He was arrested at his Blue Lake home in August (see “Blog Jammin’,” page 8 for more details) and was subsequently put on paid administrative leave from the Crabs. This week, the team’s board of directors announced a new manager to replace Nutter — who left the team to focus on his family, according to a press release. Nutter’s case is particularly interesting because of the deal worked out with prosecutors. While Nutter was charged with cultivation for the 265-plant grow sheriff’s deputies allegedly found on his property, prosecutors were convinced enough that he was growing for personal use to agree to a diversion program. If he were growing pot to sell, he wouldn’t have qualified. Now, if a marijuana plant grown outdoors conservatively yields a pound of processed pot, that makes Nutter’s presumed personal use three quarters of a pound a day (or a pound a day, if he quits for baseball season). It sounds like a neighborhood play. Now he must complete a judgeordered treatment program (details still to be determined) and not get arrested for the next 18 months, and the arrest and the charges will disappear. It’s as though it never happened, his attorney explained

(aside from the public archive that will exist in newspapers like this one). Nutter’s attorney makes a good point: How can someone lose their job over a crime that never legally happened? Ostensibly, the personnel shift was Nutter’s choice and it’s all good cheer. Nutter was well-liked and successful. The team won more than 75 percent of its games with him as its skipper. It also makes sense that the Crabs board has not only the welfare of the team to look after, but the reputation of its collegiate athletes, many of whom are trying to work their way into the majors. The tarnish of a marijuana arrest is weightier outside the Emerald Triangle, no doubt, but so what? People erupted from their seats to debate the physics and ethics of a Crab-thrown bat during last season’s playoffs, but there were virtual crickets when cops said the team manager was growing dope. If Nutter was good for the Crabs, and the Crabs are good for the community, why the stigma? Well, it’s done now. Hopefully the team will come out from under the semi-scandal and will continue to thrive without Nutter’s leadership. And, hopefully Nutter will make the most of some additional time with his family. But, let’s not let baseball become yet another victim of dubious criminalization. Legalize it. And play ball.

The tarnish of a marijuana arrest is weightier outside the Emerald Triangle, no doubt, but so what?

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• Is this the ticket? A new legalization initiative got greenlit this week, meaning pot-friendly signature gatherers may soon be standing outside a natural food store near you. Half a million signatures and this one’s on the 2014 ballot: legal possession and cultivation; Alcohol Beverage Control regulation of retail sales; and a 25 percent sales tax on pot sales. ●

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Blog Jammin’ FISHSTELLATION AT SCRAPPER’S EDGE. PHOTOS BY HEIDI WALTERS.

BUSINESS / ECONOMY / BY THADEUS GREENSON / TUESDAY, FEB. 4 AT 1:17 P.M.

Caltrans’ Woes

Caltrans recently had what amounted to a very bad day. Specifically, Jan. 30, when Caltrans lost a major appellate court ruling on perhaps its highest profile North Coast project and was the subject of a scathing state report. First, the California Court of Appeals overturned a trial court decision and ruled that Caltrans must re-evaluate the environmental impact report for its proposed project to widen U.S. Highway 101 through Richardson Grove State Park. Specifically, the ruling found Caltrans violated the California Environmental Quality Act, and that its environmental impact report did not do enough to calculate the project’s potential impacts on old growth redwood trees in Richardson Grove. The Environmental Protection Information Center — one of six plaintiffs in the case — hailed the court’s decision as a victory. “The significance of this ruling cannot be overstated,” said EPIC Executive Director Gary Graham Hughes in a press release. “Our ancient redwoods are invaluable, and we hope Caltrans gets the message that their survival cannot be put at risk by a careless highway development proposal.” Caltrans spokesman Scott Burger said the agency could not provide an estimate as to how long it will take to revise the project’s EIR, but the agency released a brief statement. “Caltrans remains committed to delivering this important interregional transportation project in a sustainable way and will work to comply with the court’s ruling,” it said. “This project is planned and

designed not to remove any old growth redwood trees. Measures are in place to protect the surrounding redwoods in the area.” While many local businesses have clamored for the widening project — which they believe would decrease their costs by allowing larger shipping trucks to pass through the park — the ruling didn’t seem to cause much of a stir. Officials at both the Greater Eureka Area Chamber of Commerce and the Humboldt Small Business Development Center said they were unaware of it until contacted by the Journal. Caltrans’ day got worse when results of an independent review of the agency ordered by Gov. Jerry Brown were released and detailed a host of “long-standing problems.” Specifically, the review found that the agency’s mission, vision and goals are not aligned with the state’s current needs. The review also sharply criticized the agency for prioritizing new projects over the upkeep and maintenance of the state’s highway system. ● GOVERNMENT / BY THADEUS GREENSON / FRIDAY, FEB. 4

Eureka Zeroing in on a City Manager

The City Council met Feb. 3 to interview six candidates, according to Mayor Frank Jager, with the hopes of naming a finalist or two by the end of the day. While the city wouldn’t release its list of finalists, Jager said it included two local candidates, three from elsewhere in California and one from out of state. The city’s search firm, Peckham and McKenney, put forward nine candidates for the posi-

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

tion, Jager said, and the council identified six favorites to be interviewed. The city has been searching for a city manager since Bill Panos abruptly resigned his post in September to take a job in the Wyoming governor’s office after a nine-month stint in Eureka. Assistant City Manager Mike Knight has stepped into the city manager’s role on an interim basis, and former City Manager David Tyson has been brought on part time to help out. Because some folks expressed dissatisfaction with Peckham and McKenney’s background checks during the process that led to Panos’ hiring, Jager said the city plans to do some of its own vetting this time, which could slow the process. “I think we’re going to do a much more thorough, in-depth background check,” Jager said. Jager said Feb. 4 that the interviews went well, and that the council plans on bringing back three finalists — including one local — for a pair of panel-style interviews at the end of the month. From there, he said the council will choose its top candidate for the job and begin an extensive background investigation process. ● FRIVOLITY / BY THADEUS GREENSON / MONDAY, FEB. 3 AT 10:45 P.M.

Humboldt’s ‘Swingin’ Senior’ Mecca

Single Eureka elders rejoice, your city has been named one of the nation’s 13 best for swingin’ seniors! Estately, an online real estate search site, released its list Feb. 3, including Eureka as one of its prime destinations for retirees for whom “school districts no longer matter,” and who want somewhere

to live that’s “fun and exciting, while also remaining clean, safe and relatively affordable.” And just what, you might ask, warranted Eureka’s inclusion among the likes of Portland, San Francisco, Yuma, Ariz. and Cape Coral, Fla.? We’ll let the fine folks at Estately fill you in: “Move to the largest West Coast city between San Francisco and Portland and you’ll be in good company; nearly half of the population is over the age of 55, with ladies outnumbering gents by several thousand. Hit up Eureka’s Bayshore Mall for all of your retail needs, and do your shopping at the region’s only Costco.” Apparently, weather, crime rates, services and public transportation no longer sway the senior crowd. ● COURTS / CRIME / SPORTS / BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH / MONDAY, FEB. 3 AT 3:17 P.M.

Crabs Manager Out, Deal Struck in Marijuana Case

Crabs Manager Matt Nutter has been replaced. Tyson Fisher — a former Crabs assistant coach and current Fortuna High baseball coach — has been chosen by the team’s board of directors to take over the manager position. According to a Crabs press release, Nutter had been considering leaving the team for several years. There was no mention of his legal woes being part of the decision to leave the team. “My daughters are nearing the time when they will go off to college and I haven’t had a summer with the family in a very long time,” Nutter said in the release.

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pending the resolution of his criminal case, according to the Times-Standard. Crabs management did not return calls seeking comment. ● ART / BY JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL / SATURDAY, FEB. 1 AT 9:50 A.M.

Done Fishing

Nutter was arrested shortly after the end of last year’s baseball season on suspicion of growing and possessing marijuana for sale — though he appears to have reached a deal with prosecutors that could see the arrest and charges wiped from his record. The deal, a diversion possible through section 1000 of the California Penal Code, is awaiting approval from a judge. Nutter had no prior convictions for drug offenses involving violence, or threatened violence, according to his attorney, Patrik Griego. And while police reported finding 265 marijuana plants at Nutter’s rural Blue Lake home in August, Griego said diversion was allowed if the plants were being cultivated for personal use. “If you’re growing for purposes of selling you don’t qualify for PC 1000 diversion,” Griego said. If Nutter completes a court ordered treatment — most likely drug education courses — and doesn’t get arrested again for 18 months, “it’s as if, legally, it never happened,” Griego said. It’s an opportunity for those who “really don’t belong” in the criminal justice system, he said, “something that can be dealt with more informally.” Nutter — the popular and winning former manager — was with the Crabs for 21 seasons as a player, board member and manager. Griego said it’s unlikely for an employer to fire someone if a diversion is completed successfully — after all, in 18 months Nutter’s record of legal woes could, essentially, cease to exist. “It’s very clear you’re not convicted,” Griego said of the diversion. “Most employers don’t use something like this against [an employee] because there’s nothing to use.” Nutter was placed on paid administrative leave by the team following his arrest,

Next time you’re on Fourth and I streets in Eureka, look up. Turns out those Escher-esque fish on the side of Scrapper’s Edge weren’t all there before. Kati Texas, director of the Rural Burl Mural Bureau (like a mouthful of marshmallows) and her team of teen artists have completed the “Fishstellation” on the side of Scrapper’s Edge. The dozen or so students cut out each of the 50 wooden fish, painted them and slapped them on the building at 728 Fourth St. Texas thinks projects like this one reduce graffiti, “sometimes because vandals are less likely to tag artwork, and sometimes because it is the taggers themselves who are helping paint our murals.” The more easily enunciated Ink People’s DreamMaker program is behind the project, which was formerly funded by the defunct Eureka Redevelopment Agency. Now it depends on donations, grants and money from businesses, like US Bank, which ponied up for the fish. Take a tour of the (deep breath) Rural Burl Mural Bureau’s greatest hits around Old Town, including “Attack of the Humboldt Squid” (First and F streets), “Inharmonious,” (520 F St.) and “Animals Are People, Too” (905 Fourth St.).

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Pedestrian Killed

Eighty-year-old Eureka resident Robert Mitchell died Jan. 28 after being struck by a truck while trying to cross Broadway on foot. Coroner Dave Parris said it appears that Mitchell was at fault in the accident, and was crossing outside of a crosswalk, though the crash is still under investigation. EPD Traffic Officer Gary Whitmer said he doesn’t anticipate charges will be filed against the 60-year-old Arcata resident who was driving the College of the Redwoods truck that hit Mitchell. The accident was the second of two that morning, which saw the first rain in some-time on the North Coast. Drive careful out there, folks. ●

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

9

Conflicting S Reports

hortly after Sandra Lingle moved to Eureka from San Diego 32 years ago, something made an impression. “I saw somebody walking their dog at 11 o’clock at night — a woman — and I was thrilled,” she recalled last week. To Lingle, the sight reinforced that she’d moved to a safe place, a community where she could walk down the block at night without looking over her shoulder. Over the ensuing decades, Lingle walked all over Eureka from her little home tucked off H Street, paying little heed to the time of day or night. That’s changed in recent months. “I think it’s just too crazy,” she said. “I don’t go out late, or at like 5 a.m., like I used to. I think crime has really gotten bad. It’s increasing.” It’s a claim you hear everywhere — at barbershops, coffee houses and huddled around water coolers — and one you see splashed across social media outlets: Humboldt County, and Eureka especially, is growing more violent, more crime ridden. It seems to be reinforced with every headline: a priest brutally killed in Eureka; a man stabbed to death in Trinidad; three people violently slain in Arcata last year. But criminologists and data tell us crime is on the decline across the nation and the state. In fact, stats from the California Department of Justice indicate that in 2012 — the last year for which statistics are available — Humboldt County recorded the fewest number of reported violent crimes in more than a decade. So, what can we make of these statistics that so clearly fly in the face of what many on the North Coast are feeling? Is there a disconnect between perception and reality? If so, how do we feel safe again?

California’s violent crime rate hit a 45-year low in

People seem to think violence is on the rise in Humboldt, but is it?

2011, the result of a couple of decades of steady decline since 1992, when the state peaked out at 11.2 reported violent crimes per 1,000 residents. Despite a slight uptick in 2012, the state violent crime rate remained at a near-historic low, with just 4.22 reported violent crimes for every 1,000 residents, just a skosh above the national rate of 3.87. According to the California Department of Justice, Humboldt County’s violent crime rate came in at 2.89 per 1,000 residents, far below the state and even national averages. For the most part, cities around the county enjoyed similarly low numbers in 2012 — 3.82 in Fortuna, 2.17 in Ferndale, 2.35 in Rio Dell, 3.1 in Arcata. Overall, in 2012, Humboldt County seemed a fairly safe place for people to live, according to the data. There is, however, a notable exception. Eureka, the county seat and Humboldt’s social and economic epicenter, far outpaced the national and state averages, recording 5.79 reported violent crimes per 1,000 residents. That’s a violent crime rate that outpaces cities like Long Beach, Fresno and Los Angeles, according to the FBI, but one that pales in comparison to the state’s worst, Oakland and Stockton, which recorded 19.93 and 15.48 violent crimes per 1,000 residents, respectively. But violent crime — homicides, rapes, robberies and assaults — is

By Thadeus Greenson SANDRA LINGLE, A 32-YEAR EUREKA RESIDENT, HAS TAKEN TO WALKING HER DOG, LOU, ONLY DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS BECAUSE SHE FEELS CRIME HAS GOTTEN OUT OF HAND IN THE CITY. PHOTO BY THADEUS GREENSON

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

only one component to community safety, and the statistics clearly show that while you may be comparatively safe in Humboldt County, your car stereo is not. In 2012, the state recorded a reported property crime rate of 27.59 per 1,000 residents, a more than 7.5 percent increase from 2011. If Humboldt County’s rate was comparatively high, coming in at 35.97, Eureka’s were astronomical at 71.21, according to figures from the FBI. But Eureka’s property crime numbers have always been staggeringly high, and the rate of 71.21 recorded in 2012 was less than half that recorded in 1994. From 1985 through 1995, Eureka’s property crime rate topped 100 eight times, according to the FBI data, which also indicates the city’s property crime rates were at a historic sixyear low until ticking up 17.5 percent from 2011 to 2012. Similarly, Eureka’s violent crime rates have seen a modest and gradual — if somewhat inconsistent — downward trend since a record high of 19.23 in 1987. Since then, the city has seen five-year averages of 6.17, 9.23, 7.02, 7.33 and 6.39 over the last 25 years. So, yes, Eureka’s violent crime rate is alarmingly high for a city its size, but it has been for a long, long time.

If you talk to

sociologists and criminologists, many will tell you that gauging the safety of a community purely by crime data is a fool’s errand. First and foremost, it’s important to note that the largest databases on California Crime — the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports and the California Department of Justice — only include crimes that were reported to the police. Gary Sokolow, a criminologist who teaches at College of the Redwoods’ Police Academy, said studies indicate that only about half of all crimes committed wind up being reported to authorities. “Due to victims’ apathy, shame, fear, etc., for every 1,000 actual crimes anywhere, only about 500 get reported,” Sokolow said. “Right away, 50 percent of crime comes off the charts.” Then, others point out, there’s the fact that the two databases rely on law enforcement agencies to self-report their data, which is problematic on a number of levels. First of all, Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills points out, there can be huge discrepancies between how agencies report. For example, a small agency that has a volunteer compiling and reporting its data might not report as comprehensively as a larger agency with a full records division. In some cases, sinister motives can also sway statistics. For example, a police de-

partment under pressure to get a handle on crime might underreport, classifying rapes as assaults, robberies as thefts and violent assaults as disorderly conduct calls. The phenomenon was famously summed up as “juking the stats” by Roland Pryzbylewski, a character on HBO’s crime drama “The Wire.” “Making robberies into larcenies. Making rapes disappear. You juke the stats, and majors become colonels,” he said. Statistics can also get juked in the other direction by agencies pushing for larger budgets to tackle crime problems. Sokolow pointed to the infamous quotas enacted by the New York Police Department in an effort to show the public it was cracking down on crime. “Statistics can lie and be manipulated,” Sokolow said. “It’s like the accountant who is asked, ‘How much is two plus two’ and answers, ‘How much do you want it to be?’ (Crime statistics) are kind of a mixed bag. The best I can tell you is it’s just a very rough indicator.” Even in situations without nefarious intentions and where reporting is uniform and spot on, crime data doesn’t travel in real time. Consequently, we’re talking about crime problems today while looking at statistics from more than a year ago. This is especially problematic at this particular moment in time, when California prison realignment is a new reality. While studies by Stanford University and the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice have found there to be no evidence that realignment has caused a spike in violent crime, there’s no data we can turn to on a local level. Instead, we’re left to anecdotal evidence (law enforcement officials say there’s been a spike in property crime since realignment but violent crime has remained fairly steady). Meredith Williams, an assistant professor of sociology at Humboldt State University, also cautions that crime data can, in essence, become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Sometimes, data will indicate that a certain city or neighborhood has a high crime rate, which will cause police to focus extra attention there to address the problem, resulting in more arrests and more crime reports, which will drive the crime rate up even further. On the national level, Williams said the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Crime Victimization Survey may be the best gauge of crime rates. For the survey, the bureau collects data from a sample of about 90,000 households, questioning all residents over the age of 12 about the frequency, characterization and consequences of crime in the United States. The bureau uses the continued on next page

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11

continued from previous page

Crime Rates

Eureka Crime Trends

survey results to measure Crimes reported per 1,000 residents in 2012 SOURCE: FBI UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS the amount of crime that goes unreported in ARCATA 150 Violent (3.1) the country, as well as to Property (43.31 ) correlate victimization Property Crimes rates with demographic EUREKA Reported per 1,000 residents Violent (5.79) information. Gener120 Property (71.21 ) ally, the survey estimates higher crime rates than FORTUNA law enforcement agencies Violent (3.82) Property (36.68) report. In 2012, the bureau 90 estimated that 22.6 people FERNDALE per 1,000 U.S. residents fell Violent (2.17) victim to violent crime. Property (12.27) The problem with the surRIO DELL 60 vey, however, is it doesn’t Violent (2.35) reach enough households Property (27.92) to come up with regional UNINCORPORATED* data, so it’s of little use in Violent Crimes Violent (1.57) 30 estimating crime rates in Property (15.46) Reported per 1,000 residents Humboldt County. So, with all these flaws, CALIFORNIA Violent (4.23) does crime data even help Property (27.59) inform the discussion? Is it 0 0 10 20 worth paying attention to? 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Humboldt County District Attorney Paul Gallegos that rate the quality of life in various there’s been the huge spike in violent point to meth as the primary factor causthinks so. cities. Eureka never seems to score well crime that’s being talked about around ing crime, but Mills sees the answer to Eu“It has to be,” he says. “It’s the only way when it comes to safety. The website town. But he gets why people are frustratreka’s high crime rates as being a lot more we have to measure.” neighborhoodscout.com, for instance, ed. “I think people are generally just tired nuanced and a lot more complicated. claims Eureka is safer than only 2 percent of crime, and I understand it,” he said. “It’s Mills said it’s important to recognize to accept of United States cities. To make this claim, not something we can just excuse and shy that while Eureka’s population sits around the flaws and use crime data as the startthe site simply adds violent and property away from. We have some crime prob28,000 — and its per-capita crime statising point for a discussion about local crime together and figures out how many lems. I don’t know how else to put it.” tics are calculated accordingly — the city public safety, two questions immediately crimes are committed per 1,000 residents. Back from one of her walks through has a daytime population that’s probably come to the forefront: What is going on Speaking from Eureka Police headtown, speaking in her home off H Street, closer to 60,000. Humboldt County Sherin Eureka? And, why is my car stereo less quarters, Mills said he’s aware of Eureka’s Lingle said she sees a clear culprit in iff Mike Downey agreed, saying Eureka’s safe in Humboldt County than in other low rankings on these sites, but said he Eureka. “It’s the meth that’s doing it,” she per-capita numbers are skewed. “You parts of the state? doesn’t see the city as some lawless said. “All the screaming and yelling, it’s just have to remember Eureka is the heartbeat There’s a number of websites out there wasteland. Mills also doesn’t believe making people crazy.” Many in town also of Humboldt County,” he said. “All of

If one is willing

Humboldt County Sheriff’s deputies search for a suspect after a robbery in 2010.

Eureka Police officers search for a wanted parolee.

Photo by Mark McKenna

Photo by Mark McKenna

12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

30

SOURCE: FBI UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS

40

50

60

70

the county services come out of Eureka. People come here to trade, to buy, to sell — everything happens in Eureka.” While he believes the per-capita numbers can be deceiving, Mills said he thinks crime data is a very important tool, but one that only tells part of the story. Mills said he likes to “drill down on the data,” peeling back the layers by looking at specific cases and by using the data to map crime intensity in specific neighborhoods. When Mills spoke to the Journal, he said he’d just finished paging through last quarter’s crime reports.

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“It was astounding how many of those (crime victims) were people engaging in risky behaviors,” he said. “When you look at it overall, many of Eureka’s violent crimes involve people who engage in those types of behaviors. In other words, if you sell dope, you have to understand your chances of having a home invasion robbery go up. If you pick up a prostitute, not only do your risks of venereal disease go up, but your risk of becoming a robbery victim goes up as well.” But that’s clearly only part of the problem, Mills said, noting that 45 percent of Eureka’s violent crimes in 2012 were aggravated assaults, many of which he said were situations where an argument turned violent. “We seem to have a lot of people who don’t have the capacity to deal with interpersonal conflict, for whatever reason,” he said. Mills, a relative newcomer to Humboldt, having taken over EPD just a couple of months ago, said he’s also struck by an “underground, outlaw” culture in Humboldt that he thinks may contribute to Eureka’s crime problems. When it comes to property crime, local law enforcement officials pointed to a host of contributing factors. “The research would suggest that with drug addiction comes property crime,” Mills said. “We certainly have plenty of addiction here.” Downey pointed to the economy. “Especially with the crimes of convenience, I think we’re looking at a population that’s depressed economically,” he said, adding that the depressed economy also leaves cash-strapped local governments with fewer officers on the streets. “I think there’s a correlation between the two.” continued on next page

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13

2012 Reported Crimes

continued from previous page

In Humboldt County and Eureka

Arson 1%

coverage of court hearings. It seems clear that these Forcible EUREKA sociology professor at HSU, crimes, and coverage of Rape Burglary moved to Arcata about six them, do feed public 10% 17% months ago from Vancouver, perception, though Wash. She was a bit shocked it’s unclear whether Auto Aggravated when her landlord showed they simply serve to Theft 9% Assault Robbery her the security system he’d reinforce a view that’s Larceny 45% 45% installed in her rental. already there or actuand Theft “I kind of started from ally change peoples’ 73% this place of fear,” Williams opinions. Many — said. “Even as someone who including Lingle — point studies crime and knows how to Freed’s slaying as overinflated public fears can evidence that violent crime is Violent Crimes Property Crimes be, I still haven’t figured out on the rise locally. Total: 159 Total: 1,956 how safe this area is yet.” WilBut it’s not just the media, Gal— College of the Redwoods liams said she sees conflicting legos said, that shapes the public’s criminology professor Gary Sokolow information on the ground perceptions of safety, it’s politiHomicide <1% Arson <1% in Humboldt. First, there are cians running for office, local the numbers, which seem to police agencies lobbying HUMBOLDT Forcible indicate there’s a problem here. for funding and local Rape COUNTY But Williams doesn’t necessarily see crime officials opining about view of public safety. One Burglary 10% 23% rates and data as the best gauges for a state policies, like rehorrific case can really community’s safety. alignment. “I think we put people on edge.” Aggravated “Areas that have high levels of collecall have to take some The county has Robbery Auto Larceny Assault tive efficacy seem to have lower crime responsibility for that certainly had a string of 33% Theft 10% and Theft 56% rates and greater feeling of public safety,” as community leaders,” shockingly violent, high66% Williams said. “Here, you still have that. Gallegos said, addprofile crimes in the last You still have neighbors looking out for ing that people all too couple years. In late 2012, one another and talking to each other. often use fear as a tool police believe a Hoopa So, generally, I’d say [Humboldt] is doing to get votes, lobby for or woman was tortured to death really well.” against a specific policy or to in her home by a man who then Violent Crimes Property Crimes But if Humboldt still has that neighbring funds to their agencies. drove to Eureka and intentionally SOURCE: CALIFORNIA Total: 389 Total: 4,850 DEPTARTMENT OF JUSTICE borhood unity Williams referred to, and But, this is also a larger societal ran down three women runners. In May, there doesn’t seem to a large spike in issue, according to Williams, who two young people where shot and killed local violent crime rates, then why don’t says she feels that nationally there’s a a beloved local priest, Eric Freed, on New at a home in Arcata. In September, a man people feel safer? “It’s hugely a matter of disconnect between people’s perceptions Year’s Day in Eureka. These cases have was shot and killed with a crossbow out perception,” says Sokolow down at CR. of community safety and reality. “We feel drawn loads of local — and sometimes on the Samoa Peninsula. Two months lat“The media drives this furiously… And, national — media attention, with some we need to be afraid, but we don’t,” she er, a man was stabbed to death in downone big case can really distort people’s said. “We’re fortunate to be living at a regularly reappearing in headlines with town Arcata. Then there was the slaying of

Williams, the assistant

“One big case can really distort people’s view of public safety. One horrific case can really put people on edge.”

Eureka Police officers investigate the scene of a shooting on H Street in 2011. Photo by Mark McKenna

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

A Eureka Police officer arrests a suspect after a short foot pursuit on the outskirts of town. Photo by Mark McKenna

tion and mental illness as key components extra caution and awareness — basics to making Humboldt County a safer like not leaving homes and cars unlocked, place. Other people say more neighboravoiding risky behavior and taking valuhood watch groups are in order. While she ables off your car seat — would go a long agrees with all those endeavors, Lingle way toward lowering crime rates simply also sees a simpler by taking away lowapproach. hanging fruit. From “I think more there, the answers people getting out grow more complex. and walking would Gallegos said he help a lot — that’s thinks investing in what we used to do and reforming the in the ’50s,” she said. education system has “Because I walk, I to be part of the consee a lot of things. versation. The district It’s not just because attorney said studies I’m a nosy old lady. have shown very Just getting more strong correlations people out and between a lack of about — riding their education and crimibikes, walking and nality — so strong, skateboarding — if in fact, that he says we could get more Texas has begun planhow of that, I think the ning the construction to feel and become safer as a community whole town would be of new prisons based — Humboldt State University — regardless of whether crime is spiking safer because most on high school graduassistant professor of sociology or holding steady — there are no easy people who are up ation rates. Meredith Williams answers, no one-size-fits-all approach, to no good don’t No only does Gallegos said. want you to see what dropping out of For one thing, Humboldt’s safety probthey’re doing.” school leave a person lems extend well beyond crime. AccordTo stress her point, with fewer profesing to a report from the county DepartLingle pointed to the Hikshari’ Trail that sional prospects, Gallegos said school is ment of Health and Human Services, local runs along Eureka’s waterfront. Go down also where most people learn effective deaths due to unintentional injuries, alcothere on a weekday, when few people are interpersonal communication, life skills hol and drug overdoses, car accidents and out walking and running, and Lingle says and “ways to express anger and frustration suicide all far outpace state averages. But you’ll see all kinds of unsavory activity, without violence.” Finding ways to keep even if we look solely at crime, most agree from drug deals to fights. But, return on kids in school, Gallegos said, will result in a more police on the streets and larger jails a weekend when the trail is bustling with safer county. by themselves won’t solve the problem. recreation, Lingle said, and those unseemSome officials also point to better Law enforcement officials say some ly elements are nowhere to be found. systems to treat and care for drug addicTo hear Lingle tell it, a more active community would also result in a more connected community, as neighbors would run into each other on the streets, share stories and talk about problems in the area. If folks don’t feel safe doing it, Lingle said, they should start by taking after-dinner walks with small groups of neighbors or in twos and threes. “I think that would help a lot,” she said. If you believe Williams’ theory that community togetherness is the best gauge of community safety, then Lingle’s idea seems to have some merit. If nothing else, it might make people feel safer. And, ultimately, Williams believes perception might be just as important as reality. “Maybe that’s what matters more than the actual crime rate,” she said. “Do you feel safe walking to the corner market? In the end, that matters Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey talks with members of the SWAT team near the scene more than whatever the FBI says the of a fatal 2011 shooting at a marijuana growing operation in Kneeland. Photo by Mark McKenna crime rate is in your neighborhood.” l time when crime rates are really low.” Still, people feel unsettled, she said, pointing to media in the digital age as a huge reason. “If you consume any media at all, we’re constantly being fed this stream of mass killings, school shootings and violent crimes,” she said. “It happens, and it becomes so pervasive — cameras are there instantly and you’re seeing people crying, big graphics and gory images. It’s just so intense. It’s relentless and we’re surrounded by it.” There may be other factors locally too. “When people look at their environment and see disorder, that causes fear,” Mills said. More closed businesses, dilapidated buildings, trash in the streets, homeless people and transients milling about and drug addicts roaming downtown can all impact a person’s feeling of safety. “That can make things feel worse than they are,” Mills said.

When talking about

“We feel we need to be afraid, but we don’t. We’re fortunate to be living at a time when crime rates are really low.”

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Before You Stiff Your Server By Jennifer Savage

1

Are you in America? You should tip. At least 15 percent, 20 percent if you’re civilized and financially comfortable enough. Can’t do math? There’s an app for that. 2. Did your server a.) spit in your food in front of you? b.) use a racist term in addressing you? c.) lean over and grab your breast? d.) something equally heinous? e.) all the above? No? Then you should tip. If any of the above did happen, not only should you not tip, you should immediately stand up and demand to see the manager. You should also utilize social media to bring the motherfucker down. 3. Are you considering stiffing due to the quality of the food or the amount of time it took to arrive? That’s likely not the server’s fault. If the food isn’t to your satisfaction, don’t go back. If you walk into a crowded restaurant or bar, understand you have agreed to wait — if you don’t want to wait, Humboldt has no lack of other restaurants and bars that would love your business. If the service is definitively and truly mediocre, you may reduce the tip to 10 percent — but you should still tip. (Your bad mood is not an excuse. The waiter is not your jerk boyfriend or smarmy boss.) As a former cocktail waitress, food server, bartender and barista, I would also like to offer this bit of advice to everyone in those fields who doesn’t already know it: No matter how busy you are, try to make eye contact, preferably with a smile, with the individuals waiting. Often, when overwhelmed, bartenders in particular will ignore new customers until they can fully turn their attention to them. But a little acknowledgment goes a long way — if people feel noticed, they’re much happier to wait around. They can see you’re busy, after all. But if your potential customers feel invisible, that means they also feel slighted, and will likely leave and not return.

4. Are you planning to stiff your server as a statement against the practice of tipping, which, one could argue, is an unfair and inconsistent way to reward people for doing their job? You should still tip. Sure, it doesn’t make much sense, a system in which opening a bottle of beer equals the same dollar on the bar as making a perfect Manhattan. Nor does a waiter serving overpriced fine dining meals necessarily work harder than a waitress slinging hash, but the former makes more money due to the percentage system. Understood. But, for anything less than gross misconduct, failure to tip is akin to stealing money from your server’s paycheck — the federal government allows servers to be paid less than minimum wage on the assumption that they make up the difference in tips. Until our whole system changes, make your stand elsewhere — and tip. 5. Are you ever going back to that restaurant, coffee house or bar? Because once you establish yourself as a cheapskate, the service isn’t going to improve. You may think you’re teaching someone a lesson, but what you’re doing is encouraging staff to care less about you at best and sabotage your experience at worst. Even when the experience is truly bad, angering the people who are making and serving your food is never a good idea, at least if you want to eat it. Just be a decent human and tip. BONUS: What if you failed to bring enough to tip? Oh, this is awkward and best avoided. But if you find yourself stuck in this situation, prevent adding insult to injury by being honest. Tell the server you underestimated the bill and don’t have enough to tip properly. Promise to return and take better care of him or her next time. Then do so. If this happens when you’re traveling or otherwise unable to return, tip big the next time, wherever you are, in hopes that karma is real and your attempt to balance wrongs and rights pays off. ●

boBaraZZI Winstrong, a reggae singer from Suriname, shows the peace sign while performing with the Berel Alexander Ensemble at Increase the Peace.

Shutterbug Rick St. Charles turns the tables on the paparazzi at an Arts Alive! opening at MikkiMoves. That’s Michelle “Mikki” Cardoza photobombing the shot.

Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran The mandolinist for The Hill, Burly Dent, and his hair cutting partner Nikki Mock prepare to cut the ribbon at their new hair salon in Arcata.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

17

continued from previous page

northcoastjournal.com

PRESENTS

DEMO DAY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21 INCLUDING A TOOL GIVEAWAY!

“Faster Easier Smarter” A Festool representative will be on hand to answer all your questions. HGG-P-9289 HP2S Dealer Ads

7/14/08

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Portable Home Back-up Power With A Brain. Introducing HP2S, Honda Portable Power Systems. Now you can have programmable home back-up power AND portable power for camping, tailgating, home projects and more. Systems Include: • Portable Honda Generator • “Smart” Universal Transfer Switch • 25’ Power Cable • Home Inlet Box* • Home Hardwire Kit* • Optional Back-up Battery *optional on P2SEM38X System

Come in to see the exciting new Honda Portable Power Systems now!

Dealer Name City, State 000.000.0000

SYSTEMSSYSTEMS STARTING $000 AT ATSTARTING

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Please read the owner’s manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment. Connection of a generator to house power requires a transfer device to avoid possible injury to power company personnel. Consult a qualified electrician. ©2008 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Specifications subject to change without notice.

18

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

FortUna

First FRiDAy First Friday Fortuna Arts Night Friday, Feb. 7, 5-8 p.m.

Art, music, fun and great deals from local merchants is all happening in Fortuna the first Friday of every month. Fortuna’s First Friday, features amazing artist from Humboldt County, including oil, acrylic, water color painter, air brushing, pottery and modern day sculptures. Local musicians will play great music in a number of locations around downtown. You will find music and art that is good for all ages; there truly is something for everyone. Some businesses are staying open late and offering specials and discounts. BODY WORKS FITNESS CENTER, 1156 Main St. The first Friday of everyone month we will have FREE fitness day! FERNDALE JEWELERS, 1020 Main St. Art by local high school artist Robyn Darleen. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS, 1026 Main St. “Shimmery Stuff,” Sam and Andra Stringer, jewelry; “Tripod Tales,” Sue Padgett photography and note cards; Fred Padgett, pointillist folk art. HOPPY’S FROYO, 1551 Main St. Jan Carter, mural; Toddy Thomas School fifth grade art with book summary; Natalya Drew, paintings.

ABBIE PERROT’S “THE THREE AMIGOS” WILL BE ON DISPLAY AT STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES, ALONG WITH WATERCOLOR AND PAPIER-MACHE PIECES.

MAIN STREET ART GALLERY & SCHOOL, 1006 Main St. Chuck Bowden, miniature photorealistic portrait drawings; Seely photography 1920-1945. MARIAN’S BEAUTY SALON, 741 11th St. Josephine Brazil hair art; Ashley Bones, jewelry. PRECISION INTERMEDIA, 1012 Main St. Live music. RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS, 1136 Main St. Fortuna Arts Council artist. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES, 1155 Main St. Abbie Perrot, oil pastels, water colors and papier-mache. THE HUMBOLDT CORNER, 899 Main St. Glassblowing demonstrations by Jed Stoll and Matt Cascio. ●

Join us for the organic music of

Jacob Green

the One Man Green Band THIS FRIDAY Feb. 7, 6-9 p.m.

Eel River Brewery, 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna Energetic rhythms and captivating melody, Jacob Green brews bona fide homegrown music. Blues singer/songwriter with a twist, Jacob Green becomes “One Man Green Band,” stompbox under foot, harmonica upon neck, strumming instruments tirelessly touring the country. — reverbnation.com

CAP’N ZACH’S CRAB HOUSE good heart surgeon. In the end, I left my chulo before I could poison him off with other dishes. I hope he has found a nice girl who can cook by now. As for me, whenever I’m in the mood, I make a run to the refrigerator case at WinCo. There, next to the soft Casero cheese and below the cheap dollar burritos, it sits waiting, bulging in its plastic casing, begging for release. “It’s been a while,” I say. And so the dance begins again.

GIVE YOUR VALENTINE CRABS!

Fresh from our Boat to You DUNGENESS CRAB

OPEN THURSDAY-SATURDAY • 11AM-6PM (market and weather permitting)

Closed Sunday-Wednesday • 839-9059 Corner of Central & Reasor, McKinleyville

Chorizo con papas Chorizo fried with potatoes. Serves two. CHORIZO, LIKE LOVE, IS FILLED WITH MYSTERY. AND LARD. PHOTO CREDIT LINDA STANDSBERRY

Chorizo: A Love Story By Linda Stansberry tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

T

o set the record straight, I wasn’t trying to murder my ex per se. But he deserved it for cracking a joke with his Poblano buddies that American women only know how to take food out of the freezer and stick it in the microwave. What did he think he was getting when he chose a gringa who only owned one frying pan? Pendejo. “Give up, chula, please give up,” he moaned, clutching his stomach. It was after that second failed attempt at making carnitas from scratch that I turned the cooking over to him. Sucker. Handmade tamales for me? Yes, please. But then I discovered chorizo. Oh, chorizo, every time I think I’m out, you suck me back in. The burnt sienna color stuffed into a blunt, little plastic tube with dots of pure lard winking out from the packaging, your ingredient list at once sincere and disturbing — pork salivary glands, lymph nodes and cheeks, ground with a handful of seasonings and a dash of sodium nitrate. That’s what’s in it, say the unconverted with a shudder, but what is it? Is it a sausage or a condiment or a slurry of byproducts? To which I say: yes.

It’s hard to describe the sound that chorizo makes when you slide it out of its packaging onto a hot frying pan. It sounds something like, sloooomph, followed by a sizzle and a dizzying sensation in your olfactory glands. All senses ignited, you watch the fat become molten and roll over each added ingredient in a tsunami of greasy flavor. All you do is stir and watch the heat. The grease and spices saturate everything in their path, a force of nature. Chorizo is the Chuck Norris of meat products. Chorizo does not “mix.” Chorizo happens. My mastery of chorizo didn’t tie me to la raza, but when my baby got home and sniffed the air, his eyes filled with a strange glimmer — a mixture of hope and homesickness. I filled his plate twice and he ate every bite. The next night I cooked up the same, and the night after. A week later, the bloom was off the rose, and I got to put my feet up again while he cooked arroz con pollo. Chorizo, as it turns out, tastes of shame to some people. Delicious shame. It’s an end-of-the-month-goingto-get-paid-in-a-few-days kind of food. Some of the best foods are (menudo, anyone?). If you’re eating it every day, it means you need to find a job and/or a

Ingredients and method: 4-5 small red-skinned potatoes, chopped into quarters 1 tube chorizo 1 bunch green onions, chopped into 1-inch pieces 1/2 cup chopped mushrooms 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup grated cheese (cheddar or jack) 1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped 4 corn or flour tortillas

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Optional: 2 eggs avocado sour cream Quarter the potatoes and steam them until slightly tender. This increases their absorbency. Add olive oil to the frying pan on low heat. Sautee the chopped green onions for 1-2 minutes. Cut open the chorizo and squeeeeeeeze it into the pan. Immediately use a fork to mash the chorizo into something resembling food, for aesthetics and even heat distribution. As the chorizo begins to cook, slap it often with flat of a spatula. When it begins to bubble and pop, add the potatoes and mushrooms. Do not worry about overcooking chorizo! Worry about undercooking it! As long as the heat is low and you keep stirring it, the chorizo will not burn. Let its flavor insinuate itself into all added ingredients. When it’s gone crunchy around the edges of the pan, turn the heat off and sprinkle the mixture with cheese. Serve in tortillas garnished with cilantro, avocados and sour cream. For a breakfast version, add a couple of eggs into the mixture right after the potatoes, stir and fry well. l

The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

19

Fine Wines Fine Wines

Spirits

Beer

Soda

Spirits

Beer

Premium Tobacco

DOWNTOWN PLAZA 786 9TH STREET ARCATA

Soda

(right over the footbridge)

1644 G STREET • ARCATA • 822-1865

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St., Arcata 822-3731 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St.,822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220

thur 2/6

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville CRUSH 1101 H St. #3, Arcata 825-0390 THE FORKS (530) 629-2679 38998 Hwy 299, Willow Creek

2099

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

$

1.75 Liter

2 1 + O N LY

fri 2/7

sat 2/8

Strix Vega and Muncie (rock and soul) 11pm $5 Corinne West Band (acoustic) 8pm $15 Ocean Night featuring The Bob Marley: The Making of a Liquid Stranger, Psy Fi, Island President (film) 7pm $3 Legend (film) 7:30pm $5 Jsun (DJs) 9:30pm $15

BLONDIES 822-3453 420 E. California Ave., Arcata

The Kraken RUM

EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

NORTHTOWN

ARCATA + NORTH

Premium Tobacco

Open Mic 7pm Free Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

sun 2/9

m-t-w 2/10-12

Gnomeo & Juliet 5:30pm $5, All Ages

[W] Dry Branch Fire Squad (bluegrass) 8pm $18 [W] Sci-Fi Night w/Fugitive Alien 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev, All Ages [M] Quiz Night 7pm Free [W] Buddy Reed (acoustic blues) 6pm Free

Jazz Night 7pm Free Sexytime Trivia (Sapphire Palace) 7:30pm $15, $20 Simple Creation (reggae) 9pm Free

Dr. Squid (dance) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Mojo Child (Doors covers) 9pm Free

Mojo Child (Doors covers) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm Free S.I.N. & Service w/Accurate Productions DJs 9pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

Kindred Spirits (gypsygrass) 10pm Free [M] Buddy Reed (blues/rock) 7pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam 8:30pm Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys (bluegrass) 9pm $10

Secret Chiefs 3 (instrumental rock) 9:30pm $15

Miracle Show (Grateful Dead covers) 9:30pm $8

Sound Culture (DJs) 9pm $TBA

Conor Kellicutt (comedy) 7:30pm $5 Liquid Kactus (funk) 9pm $8

Soulsapiens and Scuber Mountain (soul) 9pm $TBA

JAMBALAYA 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766 LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad

DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[M] Gangstagrass (hip-hop bluegrass) 9pm $10 [W] Lukas Nelson and P.O.T.R. (rock) 9:30pm $15 [M] The Getdown (funk) 9pm [T] Savage Henry Open Mic (comedy) 9pm $3 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

®

vineyard OPEN WEDNESDAY TO SUNDAY NOON-5PM

HAPPY HOURS Rita’s on Harris

$2 Well Drinks Extremo Happy Hour 4-5pm

& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm

(707) 943-3498 11544 DYERVILLE LOOP RD. 2 MILES SOUTH OF MYERS FLAT. FROM AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, TAKE ELK CREEK RD. 4 MILES, STAY TO RIGHT.

Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

RitasCafe.com

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

3 foods cafe 835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun Check out our facebook page for new menu updates!

arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek venue

thur 2/6

LIBATION 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 677-0077 355 Main St., Trinidad Logger Olympic Games LOGGER BAR 668-5000 8pm Free 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake Adventure Tribe (DJs) MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-5680 w/Dr. Foxmeat 6pm Free MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad Jacob Green (folk) REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 8pm Free 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 Blues Night (Lesson) REDWOOD RAKS DANCE 8pm $5 824 L St., Arcata 616-6876 Roots and Culture (reggae) ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 9pm Free 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE Rude Lion Sound (DJ) SIDELINES 10pm $2 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville Speed Dating 7pm $25 SIX RIVERS BREWERY Aisle of View (reggae) 9pm Free Central Ave., McK 839-7580 VAN DUZER THEATRE, HSU 1 Harpst St., Arcata 826-3928 SUSHI SPOT 839-1222 1552 City Center Road, McK TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

Tao: The Art of Taiko! (Japanese drumming) 8pm $45, $25 HSU students

clubs, concerts and cafés fri 2/7

Claire Bent (jazz) 7pm Free Wild Otis (rock) 9pm Free Muncie (sould twang) 6pm Free

Submit your events online! Deadline noon Friday

sat 2/8

sun 2/9

Fickle Hillbillies (jam rock) 9pm Free

Tim Breed (singer/songwriter) 5pm Free Potluck (food) 6pm Free Kaptain Kirk (rock) 7pm Free

Randles, Labolle & Amirkhan (jazz) 7pm Free

m-t-w 2/10-12 [T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free

[W] Jeff Landen (guitar) 8pm Free [T] Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm Free [W] Piet Dalmolen (jazz) 6pm Free

Bradley Dean (rock/country) Ian Swanner (acoustic) 4pm Free 2pm Free, Open Mic 7pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5

Daily Drink Specials

Restaurant 8am -11pm

Live music every Saturday night

Anna Hamilton (folk) 8pm Free Salsa at 6 6pm $5 DJ Benjamin Andres 9pm Free DJ Music 10pm $2 Dogbone (feral jazz) 9pm Free Spike and Mike’s: Classic 8pm $8, $4 HSU students Sick and Twisted 10pm $8, $4 HSU students DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free

[M] Swing Night 7pm $5 [T] Argentine Tango 8:15pm $5 DJ Rotten 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free Don’s Neighbors (rock) 9pm Free

Bryan McPherson (folk) 9pm Free

[W] Salsa! (lessons, dance) 9pm $5

Trivia Night 8pm Free

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

Venice Baroque Orchestra 8pm $55, $25 HSU students

[W] California’s Changing Places (film) 7pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

[M]Aber Miller (jazz) 5pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Food that one would find in an Italian home... simple, handmade and honest. A seasonal Italian menu with an extensive use of the local and organic. Also featuring regional Italian wines.

latrattoriaarcata.com • 822-6101

Dinners Thursday-Sunday, 5:30-9:00 p.m. • 30 Sunny Brae Center • Arcata northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

21

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G ENTLEMEN ’ S C L U B

Nightly 6pm-3am

2 1 + O N LY

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

Complimentary Champagne 1 per guest while supplies last

EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

thur 2/6

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

fri 2/7

sat 2/8

sun 2/9

Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514

[W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

Dr. Squid (rock) 9pm Free

Swingin’ Country 9pm Free

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

Accurate Productions (DJs) 9pm Free

CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093

Shugafoot (jazz) 9pm Free

EUREKA TEEN CENTER 442-8413 3015 J St., Eureka GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

Valentine’s Day

Ladies free 9pm

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Pressure Anya (DJs) 9pm Free

[M] Electric Gravy (improv. synth) 8:30pm Free [W] Comedy Open Mikey 9pm Free

Make Me Laugh (comedy) 9pm $5

Pre-Valentine Day Massacre w/Maniac (hip-hop) 6:30pm $7 Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish duo) 6pm Free

MATEEL COMMUNITY CTR. 59 Rusk Lane, Redway 923-3368

Papa Paul (folk) 6:30pm Free

Michael David (acoustic) 6:30pm Free

Seabury Gould Open Irish Session 3pm Free

Comedy Cabaret w/Connor Black Spirits (African roots) Kellicut and guests (stand up) 7pm $25 8:30pm $10

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844

[W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

$2

Don’t be broken -hearted. May your Blessings be met by our special Valentine’s Day Menu! Complimentary glass of wine with entrée.

MARTINI* 2013 Humboldt County Fair Results 2012 Chardonnay DOUBLE GOLD, BEST OF SHOW WHITE *LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

½ off Bar Menu Mon-Fri, 4-6pm

2010 Cabernet Sauvignon GOLD 2009 il montaggio (Italian blend) GOLD

Make your reservations today, call 443-1090 5th & B Streets ≥ Eureka Finally a RED LIGHT District in Ferndale... Fire &

2010 Sangiovese GOLD

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CARTER DOG - $9.00 Chicago Dog on a toasted bun with whipped cream cheese, tomato, onion, Los Bagels Slug Slime & Larrupin Sauce. HALF OFF DURING HAPPY HOUR

www.carterhouse.com

Award-winningwines wines since since 1976 1976 Award-winning

4241 Fieldbrook Road, Fieldbrook

We have a limited supply of Red heads.

www.fieldbrookwinery.com

Main Street in the Victorian Village of Ferndale  786-4216

839-4140

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

m-t-w 2/10-12

eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

clubs, concerts and cafés

thur 2/6

fri 2/7

sat 2/8

SCOTIA INN 764-5338 100 Main St., Scotia

Chuck Mayfield (rock/soul) 6pm Free

Soulful Sidekicks (standards) 6pm Free

Joe Garceau (folk) 6pm Free

SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Falling Rocks (country/swing) 7pm Free

THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Hi-Life Wedding and Medicine Baul (indie) 9pm Free

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Find live music and more!

Happy Hour

sun 2/9

4-6pm Tues.-Sun. with Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

m-t-w 2/10-12

Call Today for Valentine’s Day Reservations

[M]T-Bone Shuffle Open Mic Jam w/ Jim Lahman Band 7pm Free The Crux (folk/punk) 9pm Free

James The Giant with The Breaking Yard (indie) 8pm Free

Jazz TBA 9pm Free

Cliff Dallas & the Death Valley Troubadours (rowdy country) 9pm Free

[M] Anna Hamilton (folk) 7pm Free [T] Jazz TBA 7:30pm Free [W] No Covers (jazz duo) 7pm Free

WHO: Oliver Mtukudzi WHEN: Friday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. WHERE: Mateel Community Center TICKETS: $25, $22 advance

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com N O R T H

C O A S T

J O U R N A L

COCKTAIL COMPASS IT’S HERE. OR

The Cocktail Compass is a FREE app, available for iPhones at the iTunes App Store & Android phones on Google Play.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

23

THe seTlIst

Pictures of Lily

Judging a band by the looks of it By Jennifer Savage

You can tell by the photo that Humboldt County will love Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys. She’s adorable, like the girl you had a crush on in grade school. The guys are attractive and sincere-looking in that way that only young people wearing natural fibers can be. The beards probably do not keep them from being carded when they’re trying to buy a post-gig beer. Stringed instruments. Also, they’re playing at Hum Brews, a venue with a well-deserved reputation for booking only excellent acts. Soundwise, as expected, Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys serve up traditional American music that brings forth such adjectives as “distinct, tight, expert and creative.” Lindsay Lou Rilko’s tunes include truelife tales of bank-robbing aunties and moonshinin’ grandpas, plus references to dancing in the kitchen, daffodils and dreams. Tickets are $10 at the door, which opens around 9 p.m. Show’s 21-and-over.

Film Friday

Quick note for reggae (and music history) fans — Bob Marley: The Making

of a Legend screens at Arcata Theatre Lounge. See elsewhere in the Journal for more details.

Freaky Friday

We get emails. Sometimes they look like this: “Hi, I’m Trey from Secret Chiefs 3. … It’s not the most famous band in the world, but we do sell out the Great American Music Hall in SF and similar venues across the USA, Europe, Australia and Latin America. We’ve never played Humboldt, but I grew up there. There’s actually a long, deep history of the roots there (I was in a band called Mr. Bungle that began life in Eureka). Anyway, SC3

WHO: Secret Chiefs 3 WHEN: Friday, Feb. 7 at 9:30 p.m. WHERE: Humboldt Brews TICKETS: $15

Join us!

WHO: Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys WHEN: Thursday, Feb. 6 at 9 p.m. WHERE: Humboldt Brews TICKETS: $10

tours internationally a LOT, in a lot of off-the-beaten-track places — it’s a very unusual niche, but works across many borders. I visit Eureka often and it occurred to me that that’s a border we’ve never crossed!  Well, it’s happening. … Maybe it could be something. Thanks!” Mr. Bungle … Mr. Bungle … Oh, right! I think I’ve heard of them. Ahem. For those who haven’t followed Trey Spruance’s post-Bungle career, Secret Chiefs 3 is an instrumental concept project that has earned rave reviews in Pitchfork, among others, and prompted descriptions such as “goes into uncharted musical territory.” In their photo, the all-male, sevenmember band is dressed all in PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

T

wee Thursday

black and boasting a variety of facial hair styles. The presumed leader sports a black beanie. Only his eyes are visible, all furrowed-brow and looking into the distance — into those uncharted territories, we imagine. The image screams experimental. Gig starts at Hum Brews around 9:30 p.m., tickets are $15.

Friendly Friday

Meanwhile, the Mateel Community Center presents an evening of African folk by Zimbabwe’s Oliver Mtukudzi & The Black Spirits. A member of the Kore Kore tribe, Mtukudzi sings in the nation’s dominant Shona language in addition to Ndebele and English. He also incorporates elements of different musical traditions resulting in a personal style known as “Tuku Music.” In the press photo, he’s seated, a look on his face like he’s listening, but his posture clearly indicates he’s willing to tell you a story. Friendly. You can tell he’s a man who smiles a lot and whom you should take seriously. To illustrate that point, Mtudkudzi not only sings about social issues, but his own social activism has

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earned him many awards at home and internationally. One highlight occurred when, in 2010, the University of Zimbabwe and The International Council of Africana Womanism recognized him for his luminary role in uplifting African women through his artistic work. Bonnie Raitt fans may have heard her cover “Hear me Lord.” Raitt also credits Mtukudzi as the inspiration for the song “One Belief Away” on her album Fundamental. Tickets are available at the usual outlets and online, and are $22 in advance and $25 at the door. Show at 7 p.m. Oh, Strix Vega. One of Humboldt County’s most enduring bands and for good reasons. They’re talented, they’re attractive and the trio’s repertoire has grown to contain both long-form instrumental intricacies for music nerds and lush sing-alongables for those of us more hook-inclined. Joining them is Oakland’s Muncie, who comes advertised as purveyors of “soul twang.” They look real nice in the stunningly smiley photo adorning the top of their Soundcloud page and the songs served up do have some twang, that is true. This gig is at the Alibi, so it’ll start after 11 p.m. Cover’s $5 and yes, you must be of legal drinking age or older.

Serious Saturday

One more highlight before we leave you: Corinne West with Jeri Jones and Pam Delgado of Blame Sally land in the Arcata Playhouse. Known as “The Siren of the Sierras,” West’s voice invokes angels, if angels had a dangerous side. With her long, dark tresses and unsmiling visage, you know she’s serious about taking you

WHO: Corinne West WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. WHERE: Arcata Playhouse TICKETS: $15, $13 members

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Suave Saturday

somewhere — it’s not a surprise to learn she started her career tearing it up in hard rock bands before finding her niche in the global acoustic scene. Music’s at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 general and $13 members. Pick them up at Wildberries, Wildwood Music or through brownpapertickets.com.

Etc.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. l

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

25

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6 thursday Art

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. A chance to hone your skills with a live model. $5. 442-0309.

Lecture

Speed Dating. 7 p.m. Six Rivers Brewery, 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville. This week’s age group is 45-55. Have six dates in one hour. $25. 6rbmusicbooking@gmail. com. 839-7580. Valentine’s Girls Night. 5:30 p.m. Turf Club, Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, Eureka. A night of food, fun, friends and shopping with local, home-based and direct sales businesses.

Adam Browning. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Eureka. HSU’s Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents “Solar Market Development in the US: Theory, Practice, and Prognostications” by the co-founder and executive director of the Vote Solar Initiative. Free. serc@humboldt.edu. 826-4345.

For Kids

Ocean Night featuring The Island President. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. In addition to the documentary about the president of the Maldives, a screening of the Portuguese surfing documentary The North Canyon. $3. www.arcatatheater.com. When I Came Home. 6:30 p.m. College of the Redwoods Theatre, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. The film about homeless veterans will be followed by a discussion panel led by veterans and service providers. Free. danamaher@redwoods.edu. www.redwoods.edu. 476-4539.

Human Rights Commission. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes the use of public property and prison conditions. Free. 668-4095. Planning Commission. 6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This is a special meeting to review the General Plan update.

Movies

Music

Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews 856 10th St., Arcata. Hailing from all corners of Michigan, Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys are giving a nod to American traditional music, while boldly taking their own songs in new directions. $10. 826-2739. Tao: The Art of Taiko!. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU, Arcata. A modern take on traditional Japanese drumming with the “samurai percussionists” of Tao. Adult $45; Child $25; HSU Student $10. carts@humboldt. edu. 826-3928.

Theater

Charivari! 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The students of Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre present a cornucopia of mayhem, acrobatics, improvised madness and music. RSVP. Donations accepted. info@dellarte.com. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663 ext. 5.

Events

Martinis by the Bay. 5 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. A Rotary of Southwest Eureka event to benefit Zoe Barnum High School and rotary community projects. Martinis provided by local businesses. $25. denbo@sbcglobal.net. www.swrotary.org. 443-4682.

Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Stories, crafts, songs and dance for children ages 3-5. Space is limited, so call ahead. $2. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

Meetings

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

7

friday

Art

Arcata Arts Institute Family Art Night. 5 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. Students will teach you to make masks, musical instruments, prints, haiku poetry and more. Free. arcataartsinstitute@gmail.com. artsinstitute. net. 825-2400. Arts Fortuna. First Friday of every month. Fortuna Main Street. Free. 845-2038.

Dance

World Dance Party. First Friday of every month, 8 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. A night of easy dance lessons and international dance music played by Chubritza and other musicians. All ages and dance levels are welcome. $5. ckurumada@aol.com. www.humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045.

MOVIES

Spike and Mike’s Festival of Animation: Classics. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU, Arcata. Animated shorts from all over the world. All ages. $8 general, $4 students. Spike and Mike’s Sick and Twisted Festival of Animation. 10 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU, Arcata. A screening of delightfully tasteless animated shorts from all over the globe. 18 and over. $8 general, $4 students. Bob Marley: The Making of a Legend. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St., Arcata. A documentary about the life of the reggae legend. Parental guidance suggested. $5. 822-1220.

MUSIC

Secret Chiefs. Humboldt Brews 856 10th St., Arcata. An ever-changing line-up performing experimental and instrumental rock. $15. 826-2739.

THEATER

Charivari! 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, Blue Lake. See Feb. 6 listing. Oedipus The King and Women in Congress. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. A tragedy from Sophocles and a comedy by Aristophanes. $15, $12 students and seniors. www.ncrt.net. 442-6278.

EVENTS

Jeff DeMark and the LaPatinas. 7:30 p.m. Sewell Gallery of Fine Art, 423 F St., Eureka. Stories with musical backing along with cover songs and originals, all to benefit the Humboldt Library Foundation. $10. jeffdemark@gmail. com. www.jeffdemark.com. 269-0617.

Smart Is Sexy Ready to test the hypothesis? Slink over to Blue Lake Casino on Friday, Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. and find out how much game you’ve got at Sexytime Trivia ($15 advance, $20 at the door). Demonstrate your expertise on the birds and the bees in a sassy trivia quiz for points and prizes. Into group stuff? Form a team and spank the competition. Or play solo (it’s not like it’ll make you blind) and maybe impress a new friend with your naughty knowledge. You might even learn a thing or two, since the night is a fundraiser for Six Rivers Planned Parenthood. How much do you really know? Wouldn’t be a bad idea to bone up beforehand so you don’t get caught with your pants down. Besides the sex-ed battle royale, there’ll be a silent auction and a raffle for a casino prize package. (Choose your own double entendre for that one — this is exhausting.) Pick up tickets at Six Rivers Planned Parenthood, Wildberries, Good Relations and Blue Lake Casino. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Drag a leg over to the River Lodge on Friday, Feb. 7 at 8 p.m. for the extended “Thriller” remix that is Zombie Prom ($25 stag, $40 couple). Dress up and get down with your undead self while raising money for HSU student Taylor Lyon’s cancer treatment. It’s got to be livelier than your real prom.

Pre-Valentines Day Massacre. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Teen Center, 3015 J St. Maniac headlines an all ages hip-hop and rap show as a benefit for the MARZ Project. $7. marzers@gmail.com. facebook.com/superstu. 442-8413. Sexytime Trivia Night. 7:30 p.m. Blue Lake Casino, 777 Casino Way. Play solo or round up a team to answer questions on a wide range of sex-ed topics. The night includes prizes, silent auction and a raffle. All proceeds benefit Six Rivers Planned Parenthood. $15 presale, $20 at the door. natalie@srpp.org. 442-2961. Zombie Prom. 8 p.m.-midnight. River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. A costume dance party to raise funds for Taylor Lyon, who is battling cancer. $25 single, $40 couples. pattifortuna@suddenlink.net. 726-9090.

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SPORTS

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5. Roller Skating. 6 p.m. Eureka Muni, 1120 F St. A fun way to stay healthy with friends and family. $4.00 youth, $4.75 adults (includes skate rental). 441-9181.

8 saturday ART

Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans and music all along the avenue. Free. www.facebook.com/info.epad/info.

BOOKS

Book Sale. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. and 1-4 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Most of the books are one dollar or less. The sale will include fiction, nonfiction, children’s books, records, audiobooks and much more. eurekafrl.org.

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Chubritza. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. The international folk band performs traditional dance music and songs from all over the world. $10 general. fortunaconcert@live.com. 682-6092.

continued on next page

only through february Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm, Sun. 10am-5pm Hwy. 101 between Eureka & Arcata in the Bracut Industrial Park (707) 826-7435

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

27

continued from previous page Ted Piltzecker. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU, Arcata. Renowned jazz vibraphonist and composer. $10 general, $5 students and seniors. 826-3928. Venice Baroque Orchestra. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU, Arcata. Devoted to recapturing the Italian style that flourished in 18th century Venice, this is the only Venetian orchestra specializing in music with original instruments. $55, $25 kids, $15 HSU students. carts@ humboldt.edu. 826-3928.

Theater

Charivari! 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See Feb. 6 listing. Oedipus The King and Women in Congress. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 7 listing.

Events

Are You Feeling Saucy? 5-7 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Pasta sauce contest and spaghetti feed fundraiser, featuring a silent auction and a beer and wine bar. All proceeds benefit the students of Redwood Coast Montessori School. $15 adults, $10 children. www. redwoodcoastmontessori.org. 832-4194.

Baroque’s Back Ah, Venice. The canals, the art, the history, the music. Haven’t got the Euros to pop over to the Bridge of Sighs? Sigh. Lucky for you, the Venice Baroque Orchestra will be making beautiful music at the Van Duzer Theatre on Saturday, Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. ($55, $25 kids, $15 HSU students). The orchestra, led by founding conductor Andrea Marcon, has been playing 18th century music as it was meant to be played — on the period instruments for which the pieces were composed — since 1997. Marcon also plays a small and gorgeous harpsichord on stage, just one of the works of art the orchestra totes around the globe to performances in Paris, Rome, London, Amsterdam, Tokyo and Brooklyn. (What? Brooklyn’s come up.)

Take your MoM to

GO!

The group plays the opulent works of Handel, Monteverdi and Vivaldi (minus the castrati) and records with luminaries like Cecilia Bartoli and Patricia Petibon. And you get to leave your passport behind and enjoy the music of the doges right here at home. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

It’s always available at www.northcoastjournal.com Keep a copy at home, in your car, at work or check out the online version.

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Crab Fest. 5-8 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall, 1426 Main St. The Fortuna Sunrise Rotary Club presents an evening of local crab, music by The Delta Nationals and a silent auction. $35 adults, $15 kids 6-12 years old, Free kids 5 and younger. 725-1394. Fiesta Ball. 6 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. This fundraiser for Fuente Nueva Charter School features dinner, live entertainment from The Getdown and more. $40. Learn Bridge in a Day. 12:30-5 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., Eureka. Frederica Aalto leads the class, which includes refreshments, handbooks and coupons for continuing play. RSVP. Free. faalto@northcoast.com. 677-0639. Redwood Region Audubon Society Banquet. 5:30 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Enjoy a buffet dinner by Uniquely Yours Catering, a silent auction and a presentation by speaker Anna Weinstein. RSVP. $35 -$50 sliding scale. 826-7031. Rummage Sale. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. Fundraiser for exchange trip to Germany. Items for sale include books, clothing, toys, baked goods, crafts, etc. Valentine’s Day Bazaar. 10 a.m. Shelter Cove R.V. Campground and Deli, 492 Machi Road. Arts, gifts, music and food. Free. 986-7474.

For Kids

Duck Days. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Kids can learn about waterfowl via arts and crafts, hands-on stations and guided walks. All children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. Free. 510-648-9050.

Food

Arcata Winter Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. humfarm. org. 441-9999. Valentine’s Bake Sale. 7:30 a.m. North Coast Co-op, Arcata, 811 I St. Purchase a sweet treat that will help support Northcoast Preparatory Academy and The Roshni Centre. Prices vary. info@roshnicentre.org. www. northcoastco-op.com. 623-7374.

Meetings

Creating an Advanced Directive. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Hospice of Humboldt, 2010 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Get help creating a legal document that establishes someone to speak for a patient’s wishes when they are no longer able. Free. 497-6260 ext. 102.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. Led by Richard Wilson. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding! Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. The tour guide this week is Jude Power. Free. rras. org/calendar. Restoration Day. 9:30 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help remove invasive plants and promote native plant and animal life in the dunes. Tools and gloves provided, but bring water. Free. info@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397.

How many rubbery stuffed chicken breasts have you eaten in the name of community? Put all that behind you and tuck into the Sunrise Rotary Club’s Crab Fest at the Fortuna Veteran’s Hall on Saturday, Feb. 8 at 5 p.m. ($35, $15 kids 6-12, free for kids 5 and under). A silent auction, The Delta Nationals and crab, crab, crab.

Restoration Work Day. 9 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Head, Trinidad State Beach. Removing invasive plants is a moderate activity and participants should wear sturdy shoes. Gloves and tools are provided, but feel free to bring your own. michelle.Forys@parks.ca.gov. 677-3109. Volunteer Trail Work Day. 9 a.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Truesdale Street (West end), Eureka. Join us to pick up litter, pull invasive plants and plant native plants. Rain or shine. Free. 444-2357.

Sports

Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion. See Feb. 7 listing. Roller Skating. 6 p.m. Eureka Muni. See Feb. 7 listing.

Etc

Women’s Peace Vigil. Second Saturday of every month, 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044.

9 sunday MOVIES

Gnomeo & Juliet. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St., Arcata. Like the classic play, but with gnomes the way Shakespeare intended it. $5. 822-1220.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156. Chamber Players of the Redwoods. 2 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. The ensemble will perform music by Mendelssohn, Haydn and more. A reception follows. Donations accepted. www.eurekaheritage. org. 839-1452.

Theater

Oedipus The King and Women in Congress. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 7 listing.

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Meetings

Father Eric Freed Memorial. 2 p.m. Native American Forum, HSU, Arcata. The Humboldt State religious studies department will honor Father Freed, who was a member of the religious studies faculty. wh1@humboldt.edu. Historical Society Luncheon. 12:30 p.m. Ingomar Club, 143 M St, Eureka. A banquet with guest speakers Chuck Petty and Michael Logan presenting “A History of the Eureka Theater on its 75th Anniversary.” RSVP. $38. 445-4342. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242.

FAFSA Application Day. 5:30-8 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Graduating high school seniors and their families are welcome to come for assistance filling out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Meet in the Louis Bucher Teacher Resource Center. Free. sbenzinger@humboldt.k12. ca.us. 441-3927.

Duck Days. 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. See Feb. 8 listing.

Lecture

For Kids

Food

Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. The breakfast consists of orange juice, choice of eggs, ham or sausage, toast or pancakes, and coffee or a variety of teas $4 adults,$2 children. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

Garden

Silk Tassles and Pussy Willows. 2 p.m. Ma-le’l Dunes Parking Area, Young Lane, Manila. Early signs of spring are abundant along the trails in the dunes. Join a naturalist for a guided walk in search of these and other signs of the changing seasons. Free. info@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397.

Etc

Reiki Clinic. 1-3 p.m. Sun Yi’s Academy of Tae Kwon Do, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, Arcata. Drop-in communitystyle reiki treatments $25 suggested donation. www. humboldtreikilady.com. 845-0238.

10 monday Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older, with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

Music

Gangstagrass. Humboldt Brews 856 10th St., Arcata. Banjos and rap. There are only three bands that can tame a mountain lion just by playing. Gangstagrass is one of them. Gangstagrass is also the other two of them. $10. 826-2739. Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Monday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of ukulele strummers who have fun and play together for a couple of hours. Beginners welcome and you won’t remain one long! $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816.

Spoken Word

Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

Theater

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

11 tuesday “What Does the Death of the Voting Rights Act Mean for Local Politics?” 5:30 p.m. Humboldt State BSS 162, Arcata. HSU’s politics department will host the 10th annual Victor T. Schaub Memorial Lecture on Local Politics. Free. politics@humboldt.edu. 826-4494.

Music

Ukulele Play and Sing Group. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Hound Dog.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party with us. We have extra songbooks. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

Events

HUMbucks Monthly Exchange. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Event to exchange goods and services using HUMbucks, a non-monetary, local exchange system. jugglerseth@gmail.com. www.baysidegrange. org. 834-9019. Savage Henry’s Comedy Open Mic Night. Second Tuesday of every month, 9 p.m. The Jambalaya, 915 H St., Arcata. Join us for an evening of hilarity from local comics, newbies and maybe even you. $3. joe@ savagehenrymagazine.com.

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Meetings

General Plan Update. 6 p.m. Supervisors Chambers, 825 Fifth St., Room 111, Eureka. Public hearing to review the open space and conservation elements in the Humboldt County General Plan Update. PFLAG. 6:30 p.m. Ferguson House, 568 16th St., Fortuna. Parents, Friends and Family of Lesbians & Gays, the largest national organization for allies and advocacy. Free.

Etc

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

12 wednesday Movies

California’s Changing Places. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU, Arcata. Documentaries narrated by award-winning actress Jane Fonda with an original score by legendary musician Pat Metheny. Free, but tickets required. carts@ humboldt.edu. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Fugitive Alien. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A Japanese sci-fi film from 1986 about an intergalactic war. Free with $5 food or beverage purchase. www. arcatatheater.com.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

29

continued from previous page

Events

Art of Living. Noon. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Conversations on creative aging with John McFarland. Free. OLLI@humboldt.edu. 826-5880. Kirtan. 8 p.m. Arcata Core Pilates Studio, 901 Eighth St. Inner joy through chanting sacred sound. Free. oceanmistredwood@gmail.com. arcatacorepilates@ gmail.com. 499-1910.

For Kids

Kindergarten Readiness. 6 p.m. Pine Hill Elementary School, 5230 Vance Ave., Eureka. A night for the families of children entering kindergarten or transitional kindergarten to get information and meet teachers. Dinner, childcare and Spanish interpretation are available. Free. monajara82@gmail.com. 445-5933 ext.16. Playgroup. 10 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Playtime in the museum that provides children and families with great resources. Free. info@discoverymuseum.org. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

Meetings

Greater Eureka Municipal Advisory Committee. 3 p.m. HCSD Headquarters, 5550 Walnut Drive, Eureka. The Committee will review elements of the housing element of the General Plan and discuss the upcoming HCSD Sphere of Influence process. Free.

Outdoors

Sea Scouts. Second Wednesday of every month. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. Learn to sail! The Humboldt Bay Sea Scouts is recruiting 14 to 20-year-olds for its sailing program. $5 a month. 633-8572.

13 thursday Art

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Feb. 6 listing.

Events

The Humboldt Hookup. 8 p.m. Six Rivers Brewery, Tasting Room & Restaurant 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville. A very special Valentine’s Day installment of Humboldt’s first dating game. Free. 839-7580. Peet Guercio. 6 p.m. New Theater, College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. A standup comedian from Los Angeles who has hosted a game show for MTV, written for Comedy Central and performed with Louis CK, Dane Cook, Sarah Silverman and Daniel Tosh. $3.

Lecture

“Natural Dams and the River Dis-Continuum”. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt State University, HSU, Eureka. Dr. Denise Burchsted will present as part of the Sustainable Futures speaker series. Free. pjs26@humboldt.edu. 826-3653.

Theater

Making God Laugh Preview. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A sneak peak at Sean Grennan’s family comedy about the plans and outcomes of siblings over the span of four decades, in four scenes. $10. Oedipus The King and Women in Congress. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Feb. 7 listing.

For Kids

Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m. Discovery Museum. See Feb. 6 listing.

Meetings

Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild. 6:45 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Laura Doyle-Wilder will present a program titled “Making a Twined Basket.” Participants will weave a small twine weave basket with materials and instruction provided. Free. prog@hhsguild.org. 599-2729.

Etc

Humboldt Grange 501 Potluck. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Grange Women’s Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m., potluck at 6:30 p.m., Grange meeting 7:30 p.m. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery. See Feb. 6 listing. What respoNsible mother Would piCk up a hitChhikiNg sox FaN?

Heads Up… Applications are now available for the Humboldt Association of Realtors annual scholarships. Apply by April 4. 442-2978. www.harealtors.com. The Redwood Region Audubon Society presents the Great Backyard Bird County on Feb. 14-17. Count the birds in your yard and enter your data online. www. birdcount.org. College of the Redwoods’ literary magazine is accepting submissions of original poetry and fiction from community members, as well as staff, faculty, and students. Deadline March 26. 476-4370. From Feb. 1-13, SCRAP Humboldt is accepting entries for Reuse: Redesign, a reusable shopping bag design contest. www.scraphumboldt.org. The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is accepting applications for its annual Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship for projects that promote peace or social justice. Deadline is Feb. 28. 822-5711. Friends of the Arcata Marsh and Redwood Region Audubon Society are sponsoring a Student Bird Art Contest for Godwit Days. The contest is open to kids in kindergarten through high school. Entries due March 28. www.godwitdays.org. The City of Arcata Recreation Division presents a photo contest. Submissions due on Feb. 25. For submission details, visit www.cityofarcata.org. Vendor and talent applications are now available for the Mateel Community Center’s 38th annual Summer Arts and Music Festival. Applications are due March 11. l

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JourNal • Thursday, thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 •• northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 30 North Coast Journal

Growing Boys

Labor misses, Awkward aims low By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

LABOR DAY. At first it seemed odd that a movie by Jason Reitman (Young Adult, Up in the Air) would be relegated to the dumping ground of mid-winter release. Reitman’s become something of a prestige director in recent years, gathering up commercial success, critical accolades and major award nominations along the way. But as I watched Labor Day, the apparent lack of confidence on the part of its distributors started to make sense: this uneasy blend of period-melodrama and psychological realism is definitely not for everyone. I admire the intention here, and it would appear to be something of a passion project for Reitman — he adapted the screenplay from the novel by Joyce Maynard — but the movie never rises to the level of its ambition. Adele (Kate Winslet), single mother of young Henry (Gattlin Griffith), has become so cripplingly depressed that she rarely leaves the house. Her depression— or rather his inability to cope with it—we learn later on, is what led to the dissolution of her marriage to Gerald (Clark Gregg). On one of their monthly shopping trips, Henry is approached by an agitated, bleeding man asking for help. Adele tries to politely refuse, but ultimately she’s powerless in the situation and agrees to first give the stranger a ride, and then hide him in her house. He, Frank (Josh Brolin), turns out to be a convicted murderer who

has escaped from a nearby penitentiary by jumping from a second-story window while recovering from surgery. Despite, or perhaps because of, the circumstances, Frank, Adele and Henry soon develop a rapport. Frank keeps house, changes the oil in the station wagon and teaches Henry how to hit a baseball. Through elliptical flash-backs, we learn a little of his backstory, and it becomes clear that the reserved mother and son are not only harboring him from the law, but filling a pronounced, long-standing void in his life. Soon enough, he and Adele have fallen in love and begun forming a plan to flee to Canada. Caught in the maelstrom of all this craziness, Henry is faced with the frightening, looming prospect of puberty, his strained relationship with his father and a burgeoning relationship with a darkly precocious new girl in town. Again, I admire the intentions of Labor Day, but the novelistic explorations of absence, sadness and fulfillment it attempts don’t pay off in the end. Winslet is convincing in her portrait of Adele as constantly rattled and afraid of the world, but the construction of her character is notably stronger than any of the others. Brolin does fine work as Frank, but there isn’t enough to the character to build a real relationship with the audience. And he speaks in a strange, overly mannered way that borders on distracting.

MovieTimes Henry is ostensibly the center of the narrative, and it’s primarily from his perspective that we watch it unfold. That is the movie’s greatest, most unfortunate shortcoming. Griffith is a talented young actor, and Reitman directs him to an authentic, open performance. But there just isn’t enough for him to do. The voice-over intones that he is preoccupied by the new specter of sex in his life, and he lies awake at night, listening to Adele and Frank’s voices ebb into lovemaking. But Henry’s perspective is never fully elucidated — despite his presence as an adult narrator — and the script fails to let him show us what it feels like to be a sensitive boy in the midst of such trying circumstances. Despite its failures in character development and perspective, Labor Day is still pretty to look at, emotionally involving and replete with mid-late 1980s production design. The cast is excellent across the board, and the storytelling seems to come from a perspective of genuine sensitivity and care. But by the end, as it slides completely into saccharine resolution, it is distinguished more by its failures than its successes. PG13. 111m. THAT AWKWARD MOMENT. They keep trying to reinvent the 20-something relationship comedy and I’m not sure why. This, like so many similar attempts, only comes off as derivative, pandering and simplistic. That Awkward Moment is also an unsexy sex comedy, which is beyond pointless. To its credit, That Awkward Moment does boast a talented, likeable primary cast. Zac Efron is the cute cad who may have finally found love and doesn’t know how to handle it. Michael B. Jordan is the successful doctor whose “perfect” marriage is on the outs. Miles Teller is the goofball/unlikely Lothario falling for his longtime wing-woman. They live in New York City and it’s all very romantic and they drink a lot. The result plays more like a long-form commercial for J. Crew and Tecate than a movie. R. 94m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

LEGO MOVIE. Lego pulls out all the blocks for an all-character adventure that looks like a plastic version of Comic Con. PG. 100m. MONUMENTS MEN. George Clooney heads a singularly classy platoon of art experts on a mission to rescue priceless works from the Nazis. PG13. 118m. VAMPIRE ACADEMY. Oh, good. More teen vampires. Comedy/action movie about a vampire and her BFF protector with cliques, bloodsucking and formals. PG13. 104m.

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Continuing

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY. Julia Roberts scraps with her pill-popping mother, Meryl Streep, in the screen adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play about a dysfunctional Midwestern family. R. 121m. FROZEN. Kristen Bell in some standard Disney Princess fun with Josh Gad as a slapsticky snowman. Disney-oke showings available for those who need to burst into song. PG. 108m HER. What if HAL crossed with Siri and sounded, you know, hot? Joaquin Phoenix is an introverted writer who falls in love with his upgrade. Like the relationship, it feels surprisingly real. R. 126m. I, FRANKENSTEIN. Schlocky comic book adaptation with Aaron Eckhart as an immortal battling the undead. Not bad enough to be fun, not good enough to deserve Bill Nighy as its villain. PG13. 93m. JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT. Chris Pine takes up Tom Clancy’s evergreen hero Jack Ryan, who counters financial terrorism with fun car chases and fistfights. Kenneth Branagh doubles as director and post-Soviet-chic villain. PG13. 105m. LONE SURVIVOR. A Navy SEAL team mission in Afghanistan goes sideways leaving Mark Wahlberg and Emile Hirsch between the rocks and the Taliban. Gripping and heartbreaking. R. 121m. THE NUT JOB. An urban squirrel voiced by Will Arnett attempts to rip off a nut store. With Brendan Fraser, Liam Neeson and Katherine Heigl. PG. 86m. RIDE ALONG. Ice Cube is a scowling cop with plans to terrify his sister’s mouthy fiancé, Kevin Hart, by taking him on patrol. R. 89m. THE WOLF OF WALL STREET. A raucous cautionary tale of greed, girls and schadenfreude with Leonardo DiCaprio as double-breasted douchebag Jordan Belfort, a self-made ‘80s stock tycoon who runs afoul of the Feds. R. 180m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Feb. 6Feb. 12

Thurs Feb 6 - Ocean Night ft. The Island President (2011) Doors at 6:30 p.m., $3, All ages Fri Feb 7 - Bob Marley: Making of a Legend

(2011) Doors 7:30 p.m., $5, Parental Guidance Sun Feb 9 - Gnomeo & Juliet (2011) Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated G

Wed Feb 12 - Sci Fi Night ft. Fugitive Alien (1986) Doors at 6 p.m., All ages, Free

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 August: Osage County Fri-Tue: (12:10, 3:05), 6, 8:55 Frozen Fri-Tue: (1:30) Frozen Sing Along Fri-Tue: (4:05) I, Frankenstein Fri-Tue: (4:55), 9:40 I, Frankenstein 3D Fri-Tue: (2:35), 7:20 Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit Fri-Tue: 6:40, 9:15 Labor Day Fri-Tue: (12:35, 3:15), 5:55, 8:35 The Lego Movie 3D Fri-Tue: (12, 3:30), 8:40 The Lego Movie Fri-Tue: (11:55a.m., 12:55, 2:30), 5:05, 6:05, 7:40 Lone Survivor Fri-Tue: (12:20, 3:10), 6:10, 9 The Monuments Men Fri-Tue: (12:05, 3), 5:55, 8:50 The Nut Job Fri-Tue: (12:30, 2:50), 5:15 Ride Along Fri-Tue: (1:55, 4:25), 6:55, 9:25 That Awkward Moment Fri-Tue: (2:15, 4:40), 7:05, 9:30 Vampire Academy Fri-Tue: (1:10, 3:50), 6:30, 9:10 The Wolf of Wall Street Fri-Tue: 7:30

ARE YOU IN? THE COMPLETE RESTAURANT GUIDE Print + Web + Mobile



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Frozen Fri-Tue: (3:15) Frozen Sing Along Fri-Sun: (12:35) Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit Fri-Tue: 5:50, 8:30 The Lego Movie 3D Fri-Sun: (12:20), 8; Mon-Tue: 8 The Lego Movie Fri-Sun: (12, 2:55), 5:30; Mon-Tue: (2:55), 5:30 Lone Survivor Fri-Sun: (12:15, 3:05), 6, 8:50; Mon-Tue: (3:05), 6, 8:50 The Monuments Men Fri-Sun: (12:10, 3:10), 6:05, 9; Mon-Tue: (3:10), 6:05, 9 The Nut Job Fri-Sun: (1:15, 3:30), 5:45; Mon-Tue: (3:30), 5:45 Ride Along Fri-Sun: (1:45, 4:15), 6:45, 9:15; Mon-Tue: (4:15), 6:45, 9:15 That Awkward Moment Fri-Sun: (2:30, 4:45), 7:10, 9:30; Mon-Tue: (4:45), 7:10, 9:30 Vampire Academy Fri-Sun: (1:10, 3:50), 6:30, 9:10; Mon-Tue: (3:50), 6:30, 9:10 The Wolf of Wall Street Fri-Tue: 8

 

2014 edition hits newsstands in April.

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Her Fri: (3:10), 6, 8:50; Sat-Sun: (12:20, 3:10), 6, 8:50; Mon-Thu: (3:10), 6, 8:50 Labor Day Fri: (3:50), 6:30, 9:10; Sat-Sun: (1:10, 3:50), 6:30, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (3:50), 6:30, 9:10 Philomena Fri: (3:25), 5:50, 8:15; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:25), 5:50, 8:15; Mon-Thu: (3:25), 5:50, 8:15

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 The Lego Movie Fri: (3:55), 6:20, 8:35; Sat: (1:20, 3:55), 6:20, 8:35; Sun: (1:20, 3:55), 6:20; Mon-Tue: (3:55), 6:20 Lone Survivor Fri: (3:50), 6:40, 9:30; Sat: (12:30, 3:50), 6:40, 9:30; Sun: (12:30, 3:50), 6:40; Mon-Tue: (3:50), 6:40 The Monuments Men Fri: (4), 7, 9:50; Sat: (1, 4), 7, 9:50; Sun: (1, 4), 7; Mon-Tue: (4), 7 The Nut Job Fri: (4:50), 7, 9:05; Sat: (12:30, 2:40, 4:50), 7, 9:05; Sun: (12:30, 2:40, 4:50), 7; Mon-Tue: (4:50), 7 That Awkward Moment Fri: (4), 6:50, 9:25; Sat: (1:15, 4), 6:50, 9:25; Sun: (1:15, 4), 6:50; Mon-Tue: (4), 6:50 Vampire Academy Fri: (4:10), 6:55, 9:35; Sat: (1:10, 4:10), 6:55, 9:35; Sun: (1:10, 4:10), 6:55; Mon-Tue: (4:10), 6:55

Call to speak to a rep today.

(707) 442-1400

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Call theater for schedule.

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St. northcoastjournal.com •• North Coast Journal JourNal • Thursday, thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 northcoastjournal.com

31

STRANGER DANGER AND BULLY SMART. Teaching children & adults to be street smart & bully safe. $15/student, proceeds go to Mission Trip. Little Tigers 10 a.m.−10:45 a.m. Junior ages (7−12), 11 a.m.− 12:30 p.m. Women & female Teens, 1 p.m. Men & Male Teens, 3 p.m.−4:40 p.m., upstairs in the Camp− bell Creek Connexion Church Fellowship Hall, corner of 13 St. & Union, Arcata, (707) 826−1000 or (707) 672−2919 or www.campbellcreek.org to register or for more information. (CMM−0206) TOOLS FOR ANNUAL GIVING. An overview of all the tools and techniques used to raise annual funds for annual operations of a nonprofit organi− zation. Tuesdays, Feb. 25−March 18, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $195. Discount available to members of NorCAN. To enroll, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/fundraisingcertificate (CMP−0213)

Computer List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING WITH JULIE MCNIEL, MFA. New Sat. classes begin March 7 at Eureka Studio Arts. Study with an experienced teacher & award−winning artist at this new studio school in downtown Eureka. Register now at: www.eurekastudioarts.com (AC−0206) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATES. Sun., Feb 9 and 16, 5:30−7:30pm. In this two day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants and earrings. With the use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, and decals, Joele Williams will guide you through the process of cutting, designing, and wire wrap− ping. For intermediate students Hand etching dicrohic glass will also be introduced. Fee $50, $35 members, ($15 materials fee). 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0206)

Communication

ADOPTION ISSUES CONSIDERED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. Adoption & the search for birth parents will be explored at Lifetree Café on Sun., Feb. 9, 7 p.m. corner of 13th and Union, Arcata. Lifetree is a Conversation Cafe. Free. (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0206) BUILDING A GREAT TEAM. Discover how different people approach problem−solving and how to make more efficient use of their differences, allowing quicker and more effective group deci− sion−making and solutions. With Janet Ruprecht. Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Fee: $100 (includes materials). To register, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM−0220)

INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Intro to Adobe Illus− trator CS5. Learn the drawing program used to create logos, technical & free−form illustrations, banners, posters, web graphics & more. With Annie Reid. Mon./Wed., Feb. 17−March 3, 6:30−9 p.m. Fee: $135. Pre−registration required. To register, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826− 3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMP−0206) MICROSOFT EXCEL BASICS. Get the basics of Excel: worksheet design formulas & functions, charts, saving & printing worksheets & workbooks. With Joan Dvorak. Mon., Feb. 24−March 17, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $75. Pre−registration required. To register, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (CMP−0213)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, Feb. 3− 24, 7−8 p.m. and Fri. mornings, Feb. 7−28, 11:30 a.m− 12:30 p.m. Fee: $50. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. (707) 407−8998. info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0206) DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Learn to dance with a partner & have fun doing it! Group classes at North Coast Dance Annex: $40/person on Tues or Thurs. 7:00−8:00 beginners, 8:00−9:00 Intermediate. Drop −ins please call first. Private lessons are also avail− able. (707) 464−3638 debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0227) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0130) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0327) TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIOS, ARCATA. Ballet (all levels), Pointe, Latin, Modern Dance for kids. Chil− dren, ages 4 and up, teens and adults. New Creative Dance for toddlers, plus new adult level classes. 1925 Alliance Rd & 180 Westwood Center. (707) 822−8408, info@trilliumdance.com, www.TrilliumDance.com (DMT−0220)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Fitness

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0227) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−0417) PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THROUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website:arcatacorepilatesstudio.com. (F−0227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 0327) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0130) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Dance fitness to Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks World Dance Center, Old Creamery Building, Arcata. $5 class or $50 for 11 class pass. First class free! (F− 0227)

Home & Garden

KLAMATH KNOT PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE. Earn a Permaculture Design Certificate and learn ecological design, natural building, forest farming, mushroom production, greywater design, rainwater catchment and more in this extended course. (530) 627−3379 mail@sandybar.com, www.KlamathKnot.com (HG−0417) PRACTICAL BEEKEEPING. Learn how to keep and manage honeybees for pollination and honey. Learn bee biology, life cycle & social organization. With Garrett Brinton. Session 1 at HSU: Tues., Feb. 25−May 6, 6:30−8:30 p.m. and Sat., March 15, 29 and May 10, 2−4 p.m. Session 2 in Southern Humboldt: Wed., Feb. 26−May 7, 6:30−8:30 p.m., and Sat., March 22, April 5 and May 3, 2−4 p.m. Fee for either session: $140. $50/unit additional for up to 2 units of optional academic credit in ZOOL X315. Pre− registration required. To register, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/beekeeping (G−0213)

ADVANCED PRACTICAL BEEKEEPING. For those who already keep bees and/or have taken the Practical Beekeeping class. Gain more knowledge to maximize beekeeping success, with an emphasis on dealing effectively with some of the more complicated beekeeping problems. Sat., March 1, 15, 29; April 12, 26 (10 a.m.−1 p.m.); UIHS Potowat Farm, Arcata. Fee: $140. $50 additional for 1 unit optional academic credit in ZOOL X315. Pre−regis− tration required. To register, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/beekeeping (G−0220)

50 and Better

CHADO, THE JAPANESE WAY OF TEA. Join Harvey II to learn guest etiquette, how to receive tea and how to interact with other guests and the host in a formal tea setting. Sunday, Feb. 23, 9 a.m.−5 p.m., $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0220) CREATIVE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY. Experience a lively blend of lectures, discussions, and assign− ments in this class as we tackle the challenges of photographing with creative intent while on the move with a digital camera. With Lorraine Miller− Wolf. Tuesdays, Feb. 25− March 18, 3−5 p.m., $65/ OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0220) EMBRACING OURSELVES− An Introduction to SoulCollage®. Explore the world of soul images in a fun, relaxed, and supportive environment with SoulCollage.® With Marilyn Montgomery. Thurs− days, Feb. 20− March 13, 3−5 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0213) GROSS STEEL: Carnegie, Jones, and Frick and the 19th American Industry. Explore production, management, and financing of gross steel − the material that bridged chasms, changed city skylines and precipitated world wars. With Tom Gage. Tuesdays, Feb. 18−March 11, 1−3 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0206) LIVING WELL: MANAGING NUTRITION, MEDICA− TIONS AND STRESS. Learn how to read nutrition labels, combine foods to reduce chronic disease, navigate medicines & medical choices & the bene− fits of stress reduction, sleep & exercise. With Maria Spetzler, PA. Mondays, Feb. 24− March 10, noon−2 p.m., $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0220) LOCAL WALKS FOR EXERCISE AND PLEASURE. Share ideas for keeping exercise fresh and fun − from clothing and footwear choices to locations and scenery. Get a brief introduction to HSU’s Gait Analysis Program at the Biometrics Lab. With Janette Heartwood.Tuesdays, Feb. 18−25, 10 a.m.− noon, $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0213) LOCATING UTOPIA: Utopian Thinking and its Evolution Through History. Explore multiple dimensions of utopia as complex historical, philo− sophical, cultural and social phenomenon. With Anna Lipnik. Thursdays, Feb. 27− March 20, 2−4 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0220)

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MEMOIR: WRITING YOUR LIFE STORY. Explore and write about pivotal experiences that shaped your life through review, reflection and assess− ment. Choose one of two sessions taught by Sharon Ferrett. In McKinleyville on Tuesdays, Feb. 11 −March 4 from 10−11 a.m. or in Eureka, Thursdays, Feb. 13−March 6 from 10−11 a.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli 826−5880, (O−0206) ONE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE NORTH− WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. Explore the hopes, heartaches and high points in the history of this railroad from construction to near abandonment, concentrating on the line between Willits and Trinidad. With Ray Hillman. Tuesdays, Feb. 18−25, 10 a.m.−12:30 p.m. and Sat., March 1, 10 a.m.−3 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0213) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0130) QUEENS MARRYING NORTH: Blanche of Castile. Join Tom Gage as he investigates the influences of historical women whose heritage contributed to modernizing northern Europe. Thursdays, Feb. 20− March 13, 3:30−5:30 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880 (O−0213) SHIFTING SANDS: THE DYNAMICS OF HUMBOLDT BAY DUNES AND BEACHES. Explore the geologic processes that have shaped the land− scape, where the sand comes from, how it moves, and how it influences patterns of vegetation. With Mary Ann Madej and Carol Vander Meer. Tuesdays Feb. 11−18, 1−3 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli 826−5880, (O−0206) TAKE IT SLOW, TAKE THE TRAIN. Learn the ins and outs of preparing for train trips including secrets of packing, ordering tickets, sleeping and dining. With Louise Bacon−Ogden and Dave Ogden. Thursday, Feb. 13, 2−4:30 p.m. or Thursday, Feb. 20, 5:30−8 p.m., $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0206) THE ART OF MINDFULNESS. Discover how learning the art of mindfulness awareness brings a greater capacity for equanimity, joy & well−being in your life. With Marilyn Montgomery. Wednesdays, Feb. 26− March 19, 6−8 p.m., $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880 (O−0220) THE GRAND JURY, DEMOCRACY’S WATCHDOG. Learn how jurors are selected, how investigations are conducted, and how public reports are devel− oped, with emphasis on Humboldt County. With Diane Lehman. Thursdays, Feb. 13−20, 10 a.m.−noon, $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0206) THE HOME MUSEUM: CARING FOR YOUR HEIR− LOOMS. Discover simple, low−tech and inexpen− sive ways to repair and preserve your treasured items. With Pam Service. Saturdays, Feb. 15−22, 1−3 p.m., $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0213)

YOGA IN FERNDALE. Join Laurie Birdsall to increase health, strengthen and stretch your muscles, improve your posture, and flexibility in body and mind. Tuesdays, Feb. 11−March 4, 10−11 a.m., $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0206)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 10. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com for more information. (S−0327) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0227) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0227)

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0227) NICOTINE ADDICTION RECOVERY MEETINGS. Mon’s, 7−8 p.m, at American Cancer Society Conference Rm., 2942 F St., Eureka, for details call local Nicotine Anonymous affiliate (707) 499−0224. (T−0410) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. 825−0920 or 845−8973, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0227) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0731)

AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE & COOKING IMMERSION. with Traci Webb, Enjoy Daily Meditation, Breath− work, Yoga, Chanting, Ayurvedic Self−Care & Cooking Lessons & Delicious Lunch, Feb. 28−March 2, $250, Serves as prereq. to "Ayurvedic Practitioner Program" starting March 14. REGISTER: (707) 601− 9025, or www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0227) CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Artemisia Shine. Every 1st & 3rd Fri. monthly (Feb. 7 & Feb. 21). 7:30−9:30 p.m. $20 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825 −YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0206) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Visiting Teachers Series with Mindy Green. March 1−2. In this weekend class, Mindy reminds us to love the skin we’re in with Botanicals & the Integumentary System. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program, Feb.−Nov. 2014, meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identifica− tion, flower essences, wild foods, formulations & harvesting. Call (707) 442−8157 or register online www.dandelionherb.com. (W−0213) NEW YEAR, NEW BODY ROLFING SPECIAL. 50% off first session and free body analysis! (541) 251−1885 (W−0227) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Evening classes begin March 10, 2014 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0227) VALENTINE’S DAY PARTNER YOGA. At Om Shala Yoga. With Allison Pals & Alex Backman. Celebrate with your sweetheart! Sat., Feb. 15. 3.−5 p.m., $35 per pair by Feb 14, $45 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0213) YOGA FOR ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS. At Om Shala Yoga. With Christine Fiorentino. 4 Class Series, Tues & Thurs Feb. 18−27. 7:30−8:30 p.m. Learn the basics of yoga in a safe and supportive environment. No experience or flexibility required! $55 if paid by Feb 11, $70 after. Must pre−register by Feb 17. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0213)

Vocational

PILOT CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR MASSAGE PRACTITIONERS. 30 hr Integrative Reflexology Course for LMT/CMP. Learn the tech− niques and benefits of adding reflexology to your massage practice. Starts Sat. Feb 22. For more info and to register call Alexandra at the Center for Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts (707) 822−5395 www.reflexology instruction.com (V−0220)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC PRACTITIONER TRAINING. At North− west Institute of Ayurveda, Learn: Nutrition, Herbs, Yoga, Meditation, Aromatherapy, Massage, Colors, Spiritual Philosophy, Patient Assessment & Coun− seling Skills. Starts March 14, 1 weekend/month, Payment Plan Option, REGISTER: (707) 601−9025, online www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0313)

Go nuts. One for home, one in the car & one at the office... and don’t forget, it’s online and on your smartphone, too.

N O RT H COA STJ O U R N A L .CO M / C O C K TA I L C O M PA S S

www.northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

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any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 20, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CHRIS JOHNSON HAMER, SBN: 102752 STOCKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLC 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA. 95521 (707) 822−1771 January 22, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JAMES K. LOUIE CASE NO. CV140022 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: JAMES K. LOUIE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JAMES K. LOUIE For a decree changing names as follows: Present name LOUIE C. KOWK YU To Proposed Name JAMES KOWK YU LOUIE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 11, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: January 13, 2014 Filed: January 14, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court

IRENE PIRES SILVA CASE NO. PR140027 This notice does not require you to appear in court, but you may attend the hearing if you wish. NOTICE is given that DEBORAH SILVA AND GERALD SILVA, Co− Administrators has filed PETITION FOR PROBATE. You may refer to the filed docu− ments for more information. (Some documents filed with the court are confidential.) A HEARING ON THIS MATTER WILL BE HELD AS FOLLOWS: February 20, 2014, 2:00 p.m., dept. 8, Superior Court of California of Humboldt, 825 Fifth St., Eureka, CA. 95501Filed Filed January 24, 2014 ATTORNEY FOR DEBORAH SILVA AND GERALD SILVA KENNETH M. BAREILLES, NO: 44816 ATTORNEY AT LAW 533 E STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 443−9338 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−35)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PABLO AUGUSTINE CASIMER ROTTER CASE NO. PR140029

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PABLO AUGUSTINE CASIMER ROTTER, aka PABLO ROTTER, aka PABLO A. ROTTER, aka PABLO A.C. ROTTER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JOHN ROTTER and CYNTHIA GRAEBNER In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JOHN ROTTER and CYNTHIA GRAEBNER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece− dent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. 1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−20) THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the AMENDED Independent Administration of NOTICE OF PETITION TO Estates Act. (This authority will ADMINISTER ESTATE OF allow the personal representative to ANNA ELIZABETH WEBB take many actions without CASE NO. PR140024 obtaining court approval. Before To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, taking certain very important contingent creditors and persons actions, however, the personal who may otherwise be interested in representative will be required to the will or estate, or both, of ANNA give notice to interested persons ELIZABETH WEBB unless they have waived notice or A PETITION FOR PROBATE has consented to the proposed action.) been filed by JUDITH ANN BILLINGS The independent administration In the Superior Court of California, authority will be granted unless an County of Humboldt. interested person files an objection THE PETITION FOR PROBATE to the petition and shows good requests that JUDITH ANN BILLINGS cause why the court should not be appointed as personal represen− 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−15) grant the authority. tative to administer the estate of A HEARING on the petition will be the decedent. NOTICE OF HEARING held on February 27, 2014 at 2:00 THE PETITION requests the dece− DECEDENT’S ESTATE OR TRUST p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be ESTATE OF fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 admitted to probate. The will and IRENE PIRES SILVA Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. any codicils are available for exami− CASE NO. PR140027 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of nation in the file kept by court. This notice does not require you to the petition, you should appear at THE PETITION requests authority appear in court, but you may attend the hearing and state your objec− to administer the estate under the the hearing if you wish. tions or file written objections with Independent Administration of NOTICE is given that DEBORAH the court before the hearing. Your Estates Act. (This authority will SILVA AND GERALD SILVA, Co− appearance may be in person or by allow the personal representative to Administrators has filed PETITION your attorney. take many actions without FOR PROBATE. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a obtaining court approval. Before You may refer to the filed docu− contingent creditor of the dece− taking certain very important ments for more information. (Some dent, you must file your claim with actions, however, the personal documents filed the court are the court and mail a copy to the NORTH will COAST JOURNAL FEB.with 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com representative be required to • THURSDAY, confidential.) personal representative appointed give notice to interested persons A HEARING ON THIS MATTER by the court within the later of unless they have waived notice or WILL BE HELD AS FOLLOWS: either (1) four months from the date consented to the proposed action.) February 20, 2014, 2:00 p.m., dept. of first issuance of letters to a

34

Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: J. BRYCE KENNY CSB# 208626 J. BRYCE KENNY ATTORNEY AT LAW 369 8TH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 442−4431 January 31, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 2/6, 2/13, 2/20/2014 (14−43)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC LIEN SALE Pursuant to the California self− service Storage Facility Act,(B&P Code 21700et. seq.), notice is hereby given that a Lien Sale will be held by the undersigned on Wed, Feb 19, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., to satisfy the lien on personal property including but not limited to electronics, furniture, clothing, large appliances, and/ or other miscellaneous items located at: SEAWOOD TERRACE STORAGE FACILITY, 700 SEA AVE., EUREKA, CA 95503, (707) 444−3835 STORED BY THE FOLLOWING PERSONS: #7 John Gutkosky #17 Constance Kooiman. All sales are subject to prior cancel− lation. All items must be paid for at the time of sale by cash only. All purchased goods are sold "as is" and must be removed the day of sale. Published 1/30/14 and 2/6/14 by Professional Property Management Co., (707) 444−3835. 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−37)

APPLICATION AND ORDER FOR REISSUANCE OF REQUEST FOR ORDER DOROTHY TAGGART FL070248 PETITIONER; JENNA WEBB RESPONDENT/ DEFENDANT: REUBEN PEREZ OTHER PARENT/ PARTY: DOROTHY TAGGART Name of Applicant JENNA WEBB Application requests to court to reissue the Request for Order The order were originally issues on 9/3/2012 The last hearing date was 12/30/ 2013 Number of times the order have been reissued Three (3)

ORDER DOROTHY TAGGART FL070248 PETITIONER; JENNA WEBB RESPONDENT/ DEFENDANT: REUBEN PEREZ OTHER PARENT/ PARTY: DOROTHY TAGGART Name of Applicant JENNA WEBB Application requests to court to reissue the Request for Order The order were originally issues on 9/3/2012 The last hearing date was 12/30/ 2013 Number of times the order have been reissued Three (3) Applicant requests reissuance of the order because Other Party DOROTHY TAGGART could not be served as required before the hearing date I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Cali− fornia that the foregoing is true and correct Dated 12/20/2013 /s/ JENNA WEBB. IT IS ORDERED that the Request for order and THE HEARING is reset as followed: Date: February 24, 2014, Time: 1:30 p.m, Dept. six (6) at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, California 95501 All orders will end on the date and time shown above unless the court extends the time. Date: December 30, 2013 /s/ Joyce D. Hinrichs Judicial Officer 1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−18)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 12th of February, 2014, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Ciuleandra Smith, Unit # 5125 (Held in Co. Unit) Patricia Spencer, Unit # 5253 (Held in Co. Unit) Arthur Machado, Unit # 5503 Rhonda Oeth, Unit # 5522 (Held in Co. Unit) The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Travis Johnson, Unit # 1622 Kelly McVay, Unit # 1779 Rebecca Hamline, Unit # 1785 Mathew Pruitt, Unit # 1806 Mathew Pruitt, Unit # 1807 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Janet Arnot, Unit # 114 Ian Richardson, Unit # 278 Rick Alton, Unit # 357 Lori Sawyer, Unit # 449 The following units are located at 180 F Street, Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Kristina Crummett, Unit # 4316 Jason Janahi, Unit # 4378 Oliver Wallace, Unit # 4405

Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Janet Arnot, Unit # 114 Ian Richardson, Unit # 278 Rick Alton, Unit # 357 Lori Sawyer, Unit # 449 The following units are located at 180 F Street, Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Kristina Crummett, Unit # 4316 Jason Janahi, Unit # 4378 Oliver Wallace, Unit # 4405 Cody Sides, Unit # 4627 Alexander Bellus, Unit # 6109 Grace Miller, Unit # 6155 Jeremy Bolton, Unit # 7014 Andrew Lively, Unit # 7029 (Held in Co. Unit) The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Jonathan Mathews, Unit # 6320 Jared Morgart, Unit # 6334 David Blackburn, Unit # 6369 Donald Naylor, Unit # 6421 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ana Gomez, Unit # 9216 (Held in Co. Unit) Melbourne Morgan, Unit # 9274 Dacia Wightman, Unit # 9321 Sally Boone, Unit # 9523 Amy Dees, Unit # 9562 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ryan Clair, Unit # 1114 (Held in Co. Unit) Michael Powell, Unit # 1116 Juan Monino, Unit # 4108 Reid Bolton, Unit # 6211 Tawney Ervin, Unit # 9111 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appli− ances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self−Storage, (707) 443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 30th day of January 2014 and 6th day of February 2014 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−32)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00022

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00024

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00041

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00073

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HOUSE LODGE at 4041 F Street, Eureka, CA. 95503 Susan Powell 4041 F St. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Susan Powell, Administrator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as BRIO BREADWORKS at 1309 11th St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Brio Baking Inc. 791 G St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Brio Baking Inc, Serge Scherbatskoy, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BECAUSE COFFEE at 300 F Street., Eureka, CA. 95501 Olive L. Hennessy 1035 Bay Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Olive L. Hennessy This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 06, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THREE PIECE SUIT GRAPHIC DESIGN at 1965 Wavecrest Ave., McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Isaac Vidura Runyan 1965 Wavecrest Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Isaac Vidura Runyan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 15, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ADRIANNA’S RESTAURANT at 850 Crescent Way, Arcata, CA. 95521 Adriana M. Dixon 1154 Poplar Dr. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Adriana M. Dixon, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 30 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−17

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−24)

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−25)

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−40)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00003

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00023

The following person is doing Busi− ness as OPEN LOTUS LOVE HERBALS at 2978 Janes Creek Dr., Arcata, CA. 95521 Michelle Lynn Mayo 2978 Janes Creek Dr. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Michelle Mayo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 02, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−11)

Q

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−44)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−14−00018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00045

The following persons are doing Business as CAFÉ BRIO at 791 G St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Brio Baking Inc. 791 G St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 01/01/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Brio Baking Inc, Serge Scherbatskoy, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REVERIE SKATEBOARDS at 1582 Freshwater Rd., Eureka, CA. 95503 Corey Venema 1582 Freshwater Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Phillip W. Smith, Managing Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 06, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as CUSTOM CRAB POTS at 601 Bay St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Griggs & Associates, Inc. 601 Bay St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above in 1998 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Elona Griggs, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 08, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT GRUB RUB at 2275 School St., Fortuna, CA. 95540, P O Box 571, Fortuna, CA. 95540 Katie Jean Edgmon 2275 School St. Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Katie Jean Edgmon, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−23)

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−41)

1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−02)

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−26)

A

&

Hey, McGuinty!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−14−00025 The following persons are doing Business as CANNATOOLZ at 125 Kingston Rd., McKinleyville, CA. 95519, CANNATOOLZ.COM at 125 Kingston Rd., McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Tyler Roberts 125 Kinston Rd. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 1/9/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Tyler Roberts This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−14−00019 The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT CIDER COMPANY at 3750 Harris Street., Eureka, CA. 95503 C. Ashdon Cider, Inc. 3750 Harris Street Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ C. Ashdon Cider, Inc. Michelle Morales, CFO/Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 08, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−13)

That Facebook creep? Outlaw inlaws? Roommate disaster?

Ask: heymcguinty@northcoastjournal.com

Those red curls know all.

legal NOTICES continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

35

legal notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00069

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00044

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00040

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00036

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00080

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00664

The following persons are doing Business as BLUFF CREEK RESORT at 27475 Hwy. 96, Hoopa, CA. 95546, HC67 Box 710, Hoopa, CA. 95546 Phillip W. Smith HC 67 Box 620 Hoopa, CA. 95546 Barbara L. Smith 14219 Reis Whittier, CA. 90604 Terry Saunders 3524 Peck Ave. San Pedro, CA. 90731 Richard Saunders 3524 Peck Ave. San Pedro, CA. 90731 The business is conducted by a General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 8/1964 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Phillip W. Smith, Managing Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 28 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BARE FEET AND BEER at 412 Church St., Scotia, CA. 95565, PO Box 422, Scotia, CA. 95565 Alexis LaCelia Squire 412 Church St. Scotia, CA. 95565 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Alexia LaCelia Squire This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as RN. M MARKETING at 1338 Muncie St., Eureka, CA. 95503 Natalie Rist 1338 Muncie St. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Natalie Rist, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 15, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT at 509 J Street, Suite 9, Eureka, CA. 95501 Ronald Glenn Gilliland 1275 Fox Creek Rd. PO Box 238 Carlotta, CA. 95528−0328 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Ronald G. Gilliland This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 14, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LUNCHTIME ENTERTAIN− MENT & PRODUCTION at 1615 G St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Richard Emery Chase 1615 G St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Richard E. Chase This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 03, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUE SOUTHEAST ASIAN CUISINE at 1039 4th St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Viengkeo Rattanavong 2966 Pigeon Pt. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Viengkeo Rattanavong This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Dec. 10, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−39)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00055 The following persons are doing Business as MICKEY’S QUALITY CARS at 1901 Central Ave, McKine− lyville, CA. 95519 V & J Express, Inc. 1901 Central Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Michael K. Jones, Owner/ Presi− dent This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−22)

1/30, 2/6, 2/13, 2/20 (14−29)

1/9, 1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014(14−10)

northcoastjournal

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−42)

1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2014 (14−19)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00053

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−14−00021

The following person is doing Busi− ness as DASHI at 737 G St., Arcata, CA. 95521, PO Box 146, Cutten, CA. 95534 Jeremy Means 4044 V St., #3 Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Jeremy Means This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as DICK TAYLOR CRAFT CHOCOLATE at 5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata, CA. 95521 Dick Taylor, Inc. 5301 Boyd Rd. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Dustin Taylor, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TEA LAB at 16 South G Street, Unit A, Arcata, CA. 95521 Luke Andrew Besmer 16 South G St., Unit A Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000)). /s/ Luke Besmer, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Jan. 28, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

1/30, 2/6, 2/13. 2/20/2014 (14−33)

1/16, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/2014 (14−14)

2/6, 2/13. 2/20, 2/27/2014 (14−38)

1/30, 2/6, 2/13. 2/20/2014 (14−34)

hiring?

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00065

Boom.

Movie Times. Trailers. Reviews. Right here. m.northcoastjournal.com

What’s your food crush? What’s your We’re looking for the best kept food crush? food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? We’re looking for pickle?) the bestand kept A cookie? A fried food secretsit in Humboldt. we’ll check out for the Email your blog. tip (Is it a burger? Hum Plate A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Hum Plate blog.

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION ON FEBRUARY 22nd – 25TH, 2014 OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT TAXES

Made pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3702

On, December 10, 2013, I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, was directed to conduct a public auction sale by the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, California. The tax-defaulted properties listed below are subject to the Tax Collector’s power of sale and have been approved for sale by a resolution dated December 10, 2013 of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors. The sale will be conducted at www.bid4assets.com, from February 22nd through February 25th, 2014 as a public auction to the highest bidder for not less than the minimum bid as shown on this notice. All property is sold as is. Research the item prior to bidding. Due diligence is incumbent on the bidder. The winning bidder is legally obligated to purchase the item. Only bids submitted via the Internet will be accepted. Pre-registration is required. Register on-line at Bid4Assets.com by February 18, 2014. Bidders must submit a refundable deposit of $2,500.00 electronically, or by certified check or money order at www.bid4assets.com. The deposit will be applied to the successful bidder’s purchase price. Full payment and deed information indicating how title should be vested is required within 48 hours after the end of the sale. Terms of payment are limited to wire transfers, certified checks or money orders. A California transfer tax will be added to and collected with the purchase price and is calculated at $.55 per each $500 or fraction thereof. The county and its employees are not liable for the failure of any electronic equipment that may prevent a person from participating in the sale. The right of redemption will cease on Friday, February 21st, 2014, at 5 p.m. and properties not redeemed will be offered for sale. If the parcel is not sold, the right of redemption will revive and continue up to the close of business on the last business day prior to the next scheduled sale. If the properties are sold, parties of interest, as defined in California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 4675, have a right to file a claim with the county for any excess proceeds from the sale. Excess proceeds are the amount of the highest bid in excess of the liens and costs of the sale that are paid from the sale proceeds. More information may be obtained by contacting the Tax Collector at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/taxcollt/ or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free at 877-448-6829.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Assessment Number (Parcel No.), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and an explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s Office. The properties subject to this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows: *Some item numbers may be missing due to redemption of taxes or withdrawals. Item No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Assessor’s Assessment No. 001-066-001-000 001-066-007-000 009-122-005-000 010-042-014-000 040-091-009-000 053-221-003-000 095-011-003-000 109-061-024-000 109-071-012-000 109-071-018-000 109-071-033-000 109-081-033-000 109-081-048-000 109-091-003-000 109-101-008-000 109-101-030-000

Assessee’s Name FB Squires Family Trust Squires, Floyd E III & Betty J Squires, Floyd E III & Betty J Geier, Kimberly J Meyers, Eric Shields, Eddie L Haven, Daniel M Kelly, Elizabeth Shah, Dinesh Haisten, Miles S & Vicky J Acorn Mortgage & Financial Services Inc Mendez, Marisol White, Gary S Trappen, Kenneth J Lyday, Michael A & Aaron-Lyday T K Trent, Christopher

Minimum Bid $91,000.00 $16,500.00 $11,400.00 $10,700.00 $10,300.00 $43,000.00 $11,300.00 $6,200.00 $5,400.00 $5,000.00 $5,300.00 $3,400.00 $5,000.00 $6,300.00 $6,200.00 $8,100.00

Item No. 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

Assessor’s Assessment No. 109-121-006-000 109-131-013-000 109-131-057-000 109-131-065-000 109-141-014-000 109-141-015-000 109-182-018-000 109-182-019-000 109-182-052-000 109-182-064-000 109-191-026-000 109-193-015-000 109-202-049-000 109-211-003-000 109-221-010-000 109-221-022-000 109-231-031-000 109-241-004-000

35

109-241-005-000

36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71

109-291-006-000 109-291-023-000 109-292-047-000 109-301-005-000 109-302-047-000 109-311-030-000 109-321-022-000 109-341-017-000 109-362-005-000 110-021-022-000 110-071-037-000 110-071-038-000 110-081-031-000 110-091-024-000 110-121-014-000 110-121-022-000 110-131-026-000 110-131-043-000 110-131-046-000 110-141-030-000 110-151-011-000 110-181-007-000 110-191-048-000 110-191-050-000 110-201-019-000 110-201-021-000 110-211-041-000 110-211-046-000 110-251-043-000 110-291-026-000 110-291-030-000 110-301-042-000 111-022-004-000 111-022-032-000 111-031-021-000 111-071-039-000

Assessee’s Name Phillips, John A & Eleanor Dellabruna, Arthur & Veronique Jacobsen, Michael M Hamidi, Usmar M Gunkel, Philip M Gunkel, Philip M McCrady, Michael W & Elizabeth H McCrady, Michael W & Elizabeth H Elder Development Inc Etter, Cassidy & Bettye P Oquinn, Gary Cone Jr, Merrill M Elder Development Inc Rebello, Tony W & Silva, Rosemary A Onishchenko, Vitaly & Irina Dervin, Kathleen A Jacobs, Lea D & Casper II Ken Equity Trust Company Cust Christopher M Weston Sr FBO Equity Trust Company Cust Christopher M Weston Sr FBO May, Charles H & Patricia L Lincoln Trust Company/Jeff Ryan FBO Pham, Chau N Deocampo, Ana E Keathley, Irma Pham, Chau N White, Steven H & Millie L Kanaly, Don J & Miller, Mildred E Foxy Avenue Clips, Inc Soriano, Armando York, Tommy A & Pauline N York, Tommy A & Pauline N Allen, Susan Weaver, Renee M Sediqe, Ajmal / Salhi, Maryam / Sediqe, Wahid Senecal, Karen M Moody, Sandra Chu, Danny & Samantha C Jom, Hosam J Weaver, Renee M Hakimzadeh, Debora Chamber, Christopher Perez, Jose L Fraijo IV, Gregory Johnson, Jack Holub, Suzanne L Ford, Ernest E & Marguriette M Weaver, Renee M Finance All LLC Balao Jr, Carlos P & Barin-Balao Marylou Goehring, Dennis Dyer, Richard K York, Tommy A & Pauline York, Tommy A & Pauline Dervin, Kathleen A Lai, Richard & Antony

Minimum Bid $4,600.00 $4,300.00 $7,600.00 $5,300.00 $4,700.00 $4,700.00 $8,400.00 $9,000.00 $9,600.00 $10,300.00 $13,900.00 $4,600.00 $11,700.00 $5,300.00 $4,900.00 $2,800.00 $8,000.00 $5,700.00 $5,900.00 $11,300.00 $11,600.00 $8,500.00 $9,100.00 $5,500.00 $5,100.00 $4,200.00 $5,500.00 $27,600.00 $5,800.00 $5,600.00 $4,800.00 $4,700.00 $4,400.00 $6,000.00 $5,400.00 $5,700.00 $5,500.00 $5,200.00 $4,500.00 $4,700.00 $5,800.00 $5,900.00 $7,500.00 $5,500.00 $5,200.00 $4,900.00 $4,500.00 $4,900.00 $5,100.00 $4,500.00 $4,800.00 $12,900.00 $36,700.00 $3,300.00 $5,900.00

Item No. 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95

Assessor’s Assessment No. 111-081-010-000 111-111-058-000 111-142-001-000 111-142-002-000 111-142-003-000 111-151-024-000 111-152-013-000 111-202-008-000 111-211-041-000 111-241-030-000 202-142-010-000 203-302-026-000 211-363-008-000 216-261-057-000 217-241-003-000 217-242-003-000 217-246-002-000 218-091-001-000 316-191-016-000 505-284-005-000 505-284-008-000 509-076-001-000 509-112-014-000 509-162-022-000

Assessee’s Name Comparetto, Juan R & Maia E Schafer, Frederick C Livin The Cove LLC Livin The Cove LLC Livin The Cove LLC Barbati, Carmine J Inea, Laurie Sorenson, Michael C Entezari, Elie Anber, Khaled Freeman, Allan T Tiner, Ken J & Preece, Elizabeth I Salmon Creek Resources Inc Wyatt, Dale L Silva Jr, George F Silva Jr, George F Silva Jr, George F Morse III, Charles F Wenstrom, Cassady A Slater, Karen Kowan, Matthew & Roxanna Humphrey, Kenneth W & Anetta D Rhodes, Joseph L & Julie A Phillips, Melissa E

Minimum Bid $7,000.00 $6,200.00 $17,700.00 $16,400.00 $18,400.00 $51,700.00 $5,600.00 $26,600.00 $7,200.00 $13,800.00 $10,900.00 $20,800.00 $5,700.00 $70,300.00 $8,700.00 $2,300.00 $8,600.00 $22,700.00 $28,400.00 $7,500.00 $20,500.00 $3,800.00 $26,400.00 $1,900.00

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on January 15th, 2014. Published in the North Coast Journal on January 23rd, January 30st, and February 6th, 2014. 1/23, 1/30, 2/6/14 (14-21)

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

ACROSS

DOWN 38. Junior who played in 12 consecutive Pro Bowls 39. It may be bitter 40. Bible ____ 41. Moves a muscle 42. Prohibited a way of thinking about a sizable sandwich? 46. Prefix with dynamic 47. “Before ____ you go ...” 48. It has the word “wholesale” in its logo 51. James who died before winning a Pulitzer 52. Tebow and others: Abbr. 55. Style, behavior and interest of young people who enjoy a sizable sandwich? 58. Shopper’s indulgence 59. It’s often a single-sex house 60. Outlook 61. Despots until 1917 62. It’s taken in court 63. Fax cover sheet abbr.

1. Jack’s partner in rhyme 2. Melodramatic cry 3. Be bothered 4. River bottom 5. Practice pieces at a music conservatory 6. Maker of the Outback 7. Senators Kennedy and Stevens 8. “Just ____ suspected!” 9. “Indeed” 10. Evaluate 11. “We wear short shorts” brand 12. “My Heart Will Go On” singer 13. Obama education secretary Duncan 18. Riyadh native 19. Realism 23. Hathaway or Heche 24. Radio’s “____ in the Morning” 25. One way to get to the airport 26. She’s “got me on my knees” in a 1972 hit 27. “I usually make up my mind about a man ____ seconds”: Margaret Thatcher 28. African language group

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO SLEEP H A R E B A C A R A T S A T I D E A A V O C E T I A D O U G H R A T T L E R N E S B U N I L E B A R J A F E S T I V A L R N L E M O N O I L U G Y E A R U S E S L E E P D E P R I V E D H E T V E E R N I L C O R L E O N E T E A O Y O S B O U R N E F I F I D O N V O X N O M A D O K T H E N D I Y S P E L L R E H I R E O L A F N C O S L E E T Y S L O W T O W

29. Trap, as at a ski lodge 30. 1948 Ingrid Bergman film “Joan ____” 31. Pointless 36. Filmmaker Almodovar and others 37. To boot 38. Assists, e.g. 40. Smooth-barked trees 41. “Stainless” metal 43. Go on and on 44. Lion, for one 45. TV’s Monk, e.g. 48. Dermatological concern on Rush Limbaugh’s rear end that caused him to be classified 1-Y during the Vietnam War 49. “My bad!” 50. Koran chapter 51. ____ Kadabra (DC Comics character) 52. Give out 53. Novelist ____ Easton Ellis 54. Put in stiches 56. Alien craft 57. Fed. electricity provider since 1933

MEDIUM #24

S T P E T E R

Announcements

Send your Valentine a loving message in the North Coast Journal's Announcements section for Valentine's Day.

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1. Either side of a doorway 5. Garth Brooks’ “My Baby No ____ Aqui” 9. Post-lecture session 14. “Would ____ to you?” 15. One “T” of SMTWTFS 16. Carrier name of 1979-97 17. Get your hands on part of a sizable sandwich? 20. The U.S. banned it in 1968 21. Entry-level legal jobs: Abbr. 22. Ageless, in an earlier age 23. Violinist Leopold 24. Infuriates 25. All-out, unquestioning effort to get a sizable sandwich? 32. Greek New Age musician 33. It’s chopped in a chop shop 34. Corp. money manager 35. Cell: Suffix 36. It becomes the name of another flower when its first letter is changed to a “t”

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©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

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$10 for six lines $20 for six lines and an image Call (707) 442-1400 or place it online at classified.northcoast journal.com

G, HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY There’s no one else I’d rather spend this annual obligation with. Love Max.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY! to my beautiful, loving wife Jerusha and my pretty little princess Harper. I love you both so much!

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Flowers! Chocolate s!

Valentunes!

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY SWEETIE. I can’t think of anyone better or more special to share all of my hobbies with. I am glad you enjoy them too. Love you.

Schedule your heartfelt token! Thursday, Feb. 13, 4-8pm Friday, Feb. 14, 8am-10pm Saturday, Feb. 15, 9am-10pm   

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY to the stinkiest boys in the world: Brent and Cheeba! I love you both...STILL!!!

www.sudoku.com

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38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

15 Valentune & Valentine card $ 5 each add'l song $ 5 bouquet $ 1 Sjaak's heart-shaped chocolate

   

WITH YOU, DARLING KEN, "storming, enjoying, planning, loving, cautioning, backing and filling, appearing and disap− pearing, I tread day and night such roads." (Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass) Heidi

CONTINUED ON next page

Announcements

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EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportuniâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ties. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7039. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0213) ELITE CAREGIVERS Now hiring FT/PT Eureka area. CNA preferred, but not necessary. Apply online at https://elitecg.clearcareonlin e.com/apply/. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0206) HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular home mailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immeâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; diately! Genuine! 1â&#x2C6;&#x2019;888â&#x2C6;&#x2019;292â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1120 www.easyworkâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;fromhome.com (AAN CAN) (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0306)

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HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8045. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0227)

**Arcata Main Office** Application Deadline: February 19

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Radiology Tech Â&#x192; Receptionist HVAC Tech Â&#x192; Laborers Â&#x192; Bookkeeper Office Assistant Â&#x192; Medical Biller Medical Assistant Â&#x192; Carpenters Painters Â&#x192; Outside Sales default

Assist Exec/Head Start Director & Mgmt Team in day-to-day operation of NCS. BA in related field w/ 2 yrs exp or AA in related field w/ 4 yrs exp. F/T exempt Mgmt position (11 mo/yr) $667.12-$735.50/Wkly. Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org default

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MENTAL HEALTH COOK AIDE Humboldt County Department of Health & Human Services is accepting extra help applications to work in an acute 24 hour in-patient hospital facility. Must be available to work variable hours including days/evenings/week-ends & holidays. Basic food prep principals and knowledge of equipment used in large scale institutional setting and volume meal prep experience desired. Candidates with ServSafe certification preferred. Candidates will be required to pass background screening. Hourly wage for these placements: $11.04 Extra help applications & job description may be picked up at: Department of Health & Human Services, Employee Services, 507 F Street, Eureka, CA 95501. (707) 441-5510 AA/EOE

ď &#x2C6;ď Żď łď °ď Šď Łď Ľď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;  ď &#x201C;ď ¨ď Żď °ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď Žď Ąď §ď Ľď ˛

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northcoastjournal.com â&#x20AC;˘ North Coast Journal â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014

39

the marketplace Opportunities

Opportunities

Art & Collectibles

Auctions

Pets & Livestock

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JB Custom

CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 taxâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;free/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0227)

Welding & Artwork

HEALTH CONNECTIONS COORDINATOR 1 F/T (LCP or LCSW Preferred)

LAB ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka

REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka

BILLING DEPARTMENT FILE CLERK 1 F/T Arcata

REGISTERED NURSE 1 Temp P/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T McKinleyville

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek

LCSW 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville

INTEGRATED BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COUNSELOR 1 F/T Eureka Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application.

FINANCE DIRECTOR

CiTy oF ForTUnA $65,843.62 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $80,000.00 PEr yEAr. FULL TiME, ExCELLEnT bEnEFiTS.

Breeder of Show & Companion pets for over 28 years.

Clothing

Sporting Goods

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ď&#x20AC;Źď &#x2018;ď &#x2021;ď &#x2019;ď &#x2019;ď &#x2022;ď&#x20AC;&#x192;ď&#x20AC;ľď &#x201E;ď &#x2018;ď &#x160;ď &#x2C6; ď&#x20AC;Şď &#x2DC;ď &#x2018;ď &#x2013;ď&#x20AC;&#x192;ď&#x20AC;&#x2030;ď&#x20AC;&#x192;ď&#x20AC;¤ď ?ď ?ď &#x2019; ď&#x20AC;Şď &#x2DC;ď &#x2018;ď&#x20AC;&#x192;ď&#x20AC;ľď &#x2C6;ď &#x2018;ď &#x2014;ď &#x201E;ď ?ď &#x2013;

Now Offering Engraving Special artwork for your home or business Custom work for your vehicle

ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;ą ď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;šď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;Żď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;Ľď&#x20AC;Żď&#x20AC;¨

(707) 498-1067 jbcustomfabrication@yahoo.com facebook.com/justinbarrington.96

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT: classified.northcoast journal.com

ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď Śď Żď ˛ď ­ď łď&#x20AC; ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď śď Ąď ˛ď Šď Ľď ´ď šď&#x20AC; ď Żď Śď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Ąď łď Ťď łď&#x20AC; ď łď ľď Łď ¨ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď łď&#x20AC;  ODERUDWRU\DQDO\VHVRIĂ&#x20AC;FHZRUNDQG RXWUHDFKWRWKHSXEOLFDQGLQGXVWU\

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40 North Coast Journal â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ northcoastjournal.com

707.733.5101

*ACOBS!VE%UREKAs 

ď&#x20AC;¨ď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC; ď ¨ď Żď ľď ˛ď łď&#x20AC; ď ˇď Ľď Ľď Ťď&#x20AC;Šď&#x20AC;  ď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;Żď šď ˛ď&#x20AC;Ž

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AKC Champion Dam, Sire working lines, both parents health certifications.

Ready Feb. 14th

ď &#x192;ď &#x2030;ď &#x201D;ď &#x2122;ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď &#x2020;ď&#x20AC; ď ď &#x2019;ď &#x192;ď ď &#x201D;ď ď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2014;ď Ąď ´ď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2018;ď ľď Ąď Źď Šď ´ď šď&#x20AC;  ď &#x201D;ď Ľď Łď ¨ď Žď Šď Łď Šď Ąď Žď&#x20AC; 

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The Finance Director is a full-time position responsible for the functions of the Finance Department. Under the administrative direction of the City Manager, with extensive latitude granted for the exercise of independent judgment and initiative, to plan, organize, direct, and supervise the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial recordkeeping functions, including accounting, payroll, and utility billing; to be responsible for financial reporting; to assist with budget preparation and fiscal controls; to provide financial information and advice to City management staff and others; and to do related work as required. High School diploma or GED required. Advanced educational training equivalent to a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in accounting, business administration, or a closely related field with an emphasis on accounting courses preferred. Any combination of training and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. CPA may be substituted for previous experience. Must be 18 and have valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Application packet must be received by 5:00 pm on Friday February 28,2014.

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

LOCAL COMPANY Looking for CA Certified Jourâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; neymen Electrician to start immediately. Call 445â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8474 for details on how to apply. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0206) PROPERTY INSPECTIONS & ADMIN. For fast paced rental mgmt office. Duties include meeting w/clients, visiting properties, preparing inspection report & processing files. Qualified persons would have excellent written & verbal communications skills. Must be competent on computer & multiâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;line phones. Requires reliable automobile, valid license and insurance. F/T with benefits. $10â&#x2C6;&#x2019;$11 DOE. Submit handwritten cover letter and resume to: Office Manager PO Box 127 Eureka, CA 95502â&#x2C6;&#x2019;0127. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0206)

Rottweiller Puppies

THURS. FEB. 13TH 5:45 PM ď &#x2026;ď łď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď &#x2020;ď ľď ˛ď Žď Šď ´ď ľď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď Żď ľď łď Ľď ¨ď Żď Źď ¤ď&#x20AC;  ď ?ď Šď łď Łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Ťď&#x20AC; ď ď ¤ď ¤ď Šď ´ď Šď Żď Žď łď&#x20AC; ď Šď Žď Łď Źď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď &#x201A;ď Ąď ´ď ´ď Ľď ˛ď šď&#x20AC;  ď ?ď °ď Ľď ˛ď Ąď ´ď Ľď ¤ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2021;ď Żď Źď Śď&#x20AC; ď &#x192;ď Ąď ˛ď ´ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2014;ď Żď Żď ¤ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC;  ď &#x201D;ď Żď Żď Źď łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x192;ď Ąď ­ď Ľď ˛ď Ąď łď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC; ď &#x152;ď Ľď Žď łď Ľď ł Info & Pictures at

ATTENTION HAIRDRESSERS! COME JOIN Rosalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hair Styling 2 booths available for rent $350 each. Call 443â&#x2C6;&#x2019;0780 Ask for Rosalie.

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PUBLIC AUCTION

McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc. seeks BUSINESS OPERATION ADMINISTRATOR Looking for a career in the Solar and Electrical Construction industries? To download the application packet; visit our Facebook page, Humboldt craigslist or email nate@ mckeeverenergy.com

Community

Art & Design default

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13â&#x2C6;&#x2019;18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5013, ask for Peggy

Merchandise HAPPY VALENTINES DAY! JEWELRY & VASES 1/2 PRICE. FEBRUARY 4â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8 Dream Quest Thrift Store: Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (Mâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0206)

Pets & Livestock

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

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Got a few too many?

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20 words and a photo, in full color for only $25 per week. 442-1400 classified@northcoastjournal.com www.northcoastjournal.com

Auto Service CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1â&#x2C6;&#x2019;888â&#x2C6;&#x2019;420â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (Aâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0410) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442â&#x2C6;&#x2019;GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (Sâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0327)

classified SERVICES ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−0403)

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded, #3860. (707) 444−2001 or (707) 502−1600. Top Rated Cleaning Service on Angie’s List in the State. First Time Cleaning 2 hours or more $10 off. (S−0605)

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PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0227)

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0227)

HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/SCENIC TOURS. $245 per hour (707) 843−9599 www.redwoodcoast helicopters.com

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

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2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087, 845−3132 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−0227)

      

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

 

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707-840-0600

  

MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−0501)

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  default

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Financial PROBLEMS WITH THE IRS OR STATE TAXES? Settle for a frac− tion of what you owe! Free face to face consultations with offices in your area. Call 888−608−3016 (AAN CAN) (F−0206)

northcoastjournal

 

     ���      

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0508) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0327)

Other Professionals A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0327)

EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads − TV − Film − Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2014. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) (E−0206) PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency special− izing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866− 413−6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) (S−0220) SIMPLY ORGANIZED. Organizing garages, closets, papers, packing and unpacking. (707) 441−1709 Facebook: SimplyOrganizedEureka (S−0213)

Other Professionals

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    

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Home Repair

Other Professionals

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        

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CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0327)

Other Professionals

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

Musicians & Instructors

Garden & Landscape



Cleaning



   

Sewing & Alterations

   default

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com

FD1963



insured & bonded







      

Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

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body, mind ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com. (MB−0227) CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−0227)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111 LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH From the inside out with Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C. Ht. www.ManifestPositivity.com (707) 845−3749 (MB−0327)

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Medical Cannabis Evaluations

Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Love is everywhere.

Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems

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passionate om

“Love”

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE with Glenda Hesseltine

A Great Valentine’s Gift 268-3936 www.taichiforeveryone.net

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VIAGRA. 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1−800−374− 2619 Today! (AAN CAN) (MB−0206)

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$

80

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

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$

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

  

Medical Cannabis Consultants   

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

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1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

707.445.4642

444-2273

consciousparentingsolutions.com

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

New Patients ONLY

95

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

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Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

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EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Call for Walk-in Availability

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Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

fi d e n t i a l &

Vacation Rentals

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

707-822-5244

co n

Apartments for Rent HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

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NEW YEAR, NEW BODY ROLFING SPECIAL. 50% off first session and free body analysis! (541) 251−1885. (MB−0227)

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Offering Private Training and Small Group Classes in

�฀ Pilates �฀ Yoga �฀ ������฀������฀�����������฀ �����������฀��������� �฀ ���฀������฀�����฀�������฀�� �฀ ���฀������฀������฀���฀ ���������฀�����฀��������฀�� �฀ ����฀������฀�������฀����฀ ���������฀�������฀�� �฀ ������฀������������

Call 441-1484

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

1146 GASSOWAY APTS, MCK 2/1 Apts, On−site laundry, Carport, Small Pets, Rent $765 Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0206)

Houses for Rent 2140 UNION ST 2/1 Home w/ fireplace, St. Parking, Large Yard, Pet OK Rent $850 Vac 2/7 www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0206) 2220 WISTERIA WAY, ARCATA. 3/1 Central Home, Off street parking, fenced yard, Rent $1250 Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0206)

WILDERNESS AREA

Enjoy a winter hide-a-way in charming cabins nestled beneath the Trinity Alps. Perfect for snowshoeing, crosscountry skiing or just relax in peaceful seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505 (530) 531-5315 default

BEACHFRONT VA C AT I O N R E N TA L

romantic 14 secluded acres rustic chic www.oysterbeach.info (707) 834-6555

Samoa Peninsula Eureka, CA

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com

Acreage for Sale

2728 O ST. 3/2 Home near EHS, w/d hookups, garage, fenced yard Rent $1600 Vac Now Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0206)

Roommates ALL AREAS − ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online list− ings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R−0717)

707-268-0437

HENDERSON ROOM FOR RENT. 2 year securely employed indi− vidual, quiet home. No Pets/ Smoking/Drugs. Ref’s req’d, $450/month plus dep. 442−1337.

NCJ Cocktail Compass

northcoastjournal

www.sacredbodiespilates.com

HAPPY HOUR FINDER • FREE DOWNLOAD

OR

1140 E ST. Studio, laundry, Sec 8, cat OK, OSRM. Rent $515. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0230)

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

@ncj_of_humboldt

classified HOUSING Housing/Properties

2850 E St., Eureka

Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

(Henderson Center), 707

707

269-2400 839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

$515,000

Over twenty locations at

classified.northcoastjournal.com

4 bed, 2.5 bath, 3,328 sq ft quality McKinleyville home on half acre, gleaming hardwood floors, granite tile counters in kitchen, tons of storage in finished attic, new 40 year roof, nice deck.

$329,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,520 sq ft terrific McKinleyville home, excellent construction with granite counters in kitchen, walk-in closets in all bedrooms, superb layout, nice sized fenced backyard.

$207,000

NG:

LISTI

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NEW

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2 bed, 1 bath, 1,280 sq ft home on .75 acre in Elk River, enjoy the rural life but be close to town, room for a large garden, chickens, or maybe rabbits, great country benefits with beautiful views.

Acreage for Sale Apartments for Rent Commercial Property for Sale Commercial Space for Rent Houses for Rent Realtor Ads Vacation Rentals

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

707.834.7979

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Hyampom Land/Property

! ISTING

NEW L

5 great Kerlin Creek Ranch timber investment parcels in Hyampom. Four ±160 Acre parcels for $275,000 and one ±170 Acre parcel for 189,000. These remote parcels feature plenty of water with creeks and springs, mountain views, and sloping topography. Call Charlie or Kyla to schedule your private showing.

$275,000

Hoopa Land/Property Kneeland Land/Property

±18 Acres on Translator Road with beautiful Hoopa Valley views ready for your enjoyment. Undeveloped land awaiting your personal touch. Water and power are available to the parcel. Call Charlie today for your own private showing.

$109,000

±80 Acres located on Mountain View Road in Kneeland. This property is wooded with sloping topography. Featuring an unfinished cabin, developed building site, secondary potential building site, end of the road privacy, two year round springs, one of which has been developed, and year round property access. Enjoyable valley views with a small amount of Mad River access.

$349,000

2120 CAMPTON RD. STE #C – EUREKA, CA 95503

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, FEB. 6, 2014

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North Coast Journal 02-06-14 Edition