Newcomb 2022: Tech Initiatives Zine

Page 1

Volume 5

2021 - 2022


The various authors' views and opinions contained herein do not necessarily reflect the official views, opinions, or policies of Tulane University/ Newcomb Institute administrators, staff, or faculty. All material contained herein is the views and opinions of the authors themselves.


<!Contributors> Editor { }

Jacquelyne Thoni Howard, Ph.D. Administrative Assistant Professor of Technology and Women's History

Digital Research Interns {

}

Project Partners {

Emily O'Connell: Product Developer; Lucien Mensah: Product Developer; Marisa Long: Team Lead; Wendy Yang: Team Lead; Danielle Walder: Team Lead; Isabelle Haines; Kristen Osborne; Evan Hendrickson; Winna Xia; Rhea Majumdar; Madeline Nellis; Chloe Uhls; Helena Wang; Hannah Bartels;

Grace Hopper Celebration Attendees {

}

Hannah Bartels; Evan Hendrickson; Isabelle Hains; Jaclyn Wilson; Lola Ramineni; Lucien Mensah; Madison Lynch; Marisa Long; Madeline Nellis; Emily O'Connell; Rena Repenning; Rhea Majumdar; Kelly Romer; Danielle Walder;

Contact { Newcomb Institute: Tulane University; Website: https://newcomb.tulane.edu/technology-anddigital-humanities-lab }

}

Laura Adderley, Ph.D.; Nell Bolton; Freddi Evans; Dan Sharp, Ph.D.; Elisabeth McMahon, Ph.D.; Arianna King; Kate Adams, Ph.D.; Susan Tucker, Ph.D.; Kelly Harris DeBerry; Vicki Mayer, Ph.D.; Clare Daniel, Ph.D.; Sequioa Ragland; Andrew Liles; Laura Blokker; Brent Fortenberry; Thuy Le; Mark Davis; Chris Dalbom; Jacquelyne Howard, Ph.D. ; Anna Mahoney, Ph.D. Mike Fitts, Ph.D.

Information Technology Interns{

}

Rachel Tabor: Product Developer; Sophie Tannen: Team Lead; Wendy Yang; Naomi Stoner; Kailen Mitchell; Kelly Romer; Olivia Riess;

Zine Design { }

Lucien Mensah: Layout; Rhea Majumdar: Cover Design;


MESSAGE FROM THE EDITOR April 28, 2022

Since 2007, Newcomb Institute has supported undergraduates in gaining access to technology applications and building their technical expertise through its student programs and lab spaces. Since then, the technologies and professional practices used in technical fields such as computer science, digital media, digital humanities, digital design, and technology studies have evolved significantly. As the use of technology applications has become mainstream, questions have surfaced regarding how many of these work practices and algorithms have entrenched gender discrimination and racial bias, illuminating the lack of diversity and support that women and other marginalized groups face within these fields. In response to our students’ growing need to stay current with new technologies and receive tangible work experience, Newcomb Institute has expanded its student program offerings. The Technology and Digital Humanities Lab supports gender equity initiatives in technology by building caring technology-focused communities for undergraduates. Keeping in mind that all fields are now technology fields, the Lab makes technology work and digital research more accessible and relevant for technical and non-technical majors through interdisciplinary collaboration with peers, faculty, and community partners. These programs encourage students to consider how their work connects with social and humanities-based research questions and affects their communities. The Lab continuously strives to build a supportive community where all students regardless of their background can contribute important perspectives while working on technical teams and building relationships with faculty and community members.


The Technology and Digital Humanities Lab at Newcomb Institute houses four student programs and two student groups. The Digital Research Interns collaborate on an agile scrum team, modeled after the product development workflows across several technology fields. The student-led team works concurrently on a range of digital research projects for Tulane faculty, Newcomb Institute staff, and New Orleans community partners. Working on a scrum team helps students build a digital portfolio of authentic projects in a low-stakes work environment, develop relationships with students and mentors while working collaboratively, and learn skills such as digital media design, data analysis, computing, mapping, and digital archiving. The Information Technology Interns support the technology operations and infrastructure of Newcomb Institute. These students develop technical projects such as web and graphic design, and provide classroom and A/V support. This internship program will use an agile scrum model starting in the Spring of 2022 to encourage collaboration and mutual support among students. Grace Hopper Grantees attend the Grace Hopper Celebration each year, where they network with technology industry professionals, attend panels about gender equity in technology, and interview for jobs. The Gender and Technology Grantee receives a stipend to design and develop a technical project related to a gender topic. Newcomb Institute sponsors these grantees as they apply to the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC) Scholar program. The Equity in Technology (formerly Women in Technology-WIT) and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) student groups collaborate among peers to network with local STEM leaders, host workshops, and provide academic support. These experiences provide students with mentorship from faculty and concrete work and networking experiences that supplement their academic work. These programs have impacted the outlook and careers of several Newcomb Alumnae working in various sectors. This zine serves as a portfolio of work for the interns and grantees who work in the Lab. Project and conference posters, within the zine, showcases an array of technical and essential skills that students have honed over the past year. Each intern also has researched a social issue relating to technology that interests them. Other reflections show how we have regained momentum in building a lab and community that revolves around an intersectional feminist ethos after returning to a dedicated space in the Commons. This advocacy work, while never finished, has brought us together in tough times. In only a year, these students have laid an excellent foundation for continuing these aspirational goals in future years.

Sincerely, Jacquelyne Thoni Howard, Ph.D. Administrative Assistant Professor of Technology and Women’s History


<! Meet the Team >



<!Digital Research Interns> Lucien is a graduate student completing his Master’s in Computational Linguistics. He currently works as a graduate assistant for Newcomb Institute and has been a part of the Institute since joining the Digital Research Internship program during his final year as an undergraduate. He is from St. Petersburg, Florida. Lucien also works as a graduate assistance for the Office of Gender and Sexual Diversity, and within these positions, he is able to tie together his love and care for underrepresented languages and communities in technology.

Lucien Mensah { }

Product Developer;

Emily is a senior from Nashville, Tennessee majoring in Computer Science and French with a minor in Information Technology. She has been working in the Lab for three years, serving as a Digital Research Intern and an Information Technology Intern, and this year, she leads the Digital Research Team as a Product Developer. Outside of school and work, she likes to walk in Audubon park, watch TV and movies, and drink tea. Next year she will be a teaching assistant, teaching English in Caen, France. In the future, she hopes to work in a technical role to use all of the skills she has developed in the Lab.

Emily O'Connell { }

Product Developer;

Wendy is a sophomore majoring in Cell & Molecular Biology and Computer Science. She is an international student from China and uses she/her pronouns. In addition to being a Digital Research Intern and an Information Technology Intern, she works at Reily Recreation Center as a Fitness Attendant. Wendy loves both of her positions in Newcomb Institute because she can work collaboratively with her peers. Outside of school, she loves playing tennis, cooking, and trying out new restaurants!

Wendy Yang { }

Team Lead;

Hi! My name is Marisa Long and I use she/her pronouns. I’m in my third year majoring Linguistics and Computer Science. Originally, I’m from Columbus, Ohio, and I’ve been studying abroad in Dublin, Ireland this spring. This year, I was a team lead for the DRI. My favorite part of working on the DRI is getting to connect with hardworking, motivated individuals from a variety of disciplines. Outside of DRI, I’m involved the Tulane running club, Design For America, and I am a student instructor for an intro computer science course. In my free time, I love to run, spend time outdoors, and travel!

Marisa Long { }

Team Lead;


My name is Evan Hendrickson, and I use he, him, and his pronouns. I’m a third-year student majoring in Public Health and Computer Science, from Mount Vernon, Kentucky. Being a part of the Digital Research Internship team has allowed me to put the skills I’ve learning my classes to use, as well as learn more about the humanities and feminist pedagogy. I have also been able to form an amazing, supportive community with the interns. In addition to working as a DRI Intern, I am also the MENtality Project Coordinator, a First Year Experience Peer Mentor, and a Microsoft TEALS Volunteer Tutor. Outside of school and internships, I love to spend time outside with my friends and listen to podcasts.

Evan Hendrickson { }

Development Intern;

Hey y’all! My name is Helena (Zihui) Wang and I’m from Beijing, China double majoring in Theatre and Communications with a SLAM minor. I just started working as a DRI intern for Newcomb this semester and I’m looking forward to doing more projects in the future! I’m also the undergraduate intern for Tulane’s Office of International Students and Scholars and you can find me participating in a lot of ongoing art events and performances around campus! I love to spend my free time taking walks in the beautiful city of New Orleans and constantly exploring new restaurants with my friends.

Helena Wang { }

Development Intern;

Kristen Osborne { }

Hi, my name is Kristen Osborne and I am a current senior at Tulane University. I am an English and Communications major, with a minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies. I am from a suburb of the Seattle area. I have really enjoyed the engagement with the research projects and the acquisition of useful tech skills through this internship. Aside from DRI, I have participated in the Honors Summer Research program where I worked on a research project regarding reality television and gender. I also worked as an Undergraduate Teaching Fellow for the Spring 2021 semester. After college, I hope to work in the entertainment industry in an administrative role, ideally in development or casting/talent. I love media of all kinds, I am an audiobook addict, and I love to make playlists!

Development Intern;

Hi! My name is Winna Xia and my pronouns are she, her, hers. I am from Lexington, Massachusetts. At Tulane, I am a second year student majoring in neuroscience and history with a minor in Spanish. In addition to working as a Digital Research intern, I am the director of student health and wellness in USG, peer mentor, Service Learning Assistant, and medical scribe! I am also involved in Phi Delta Epsilon, the medical fraternity on campus. My favorite part of the digital research internship program is the intersection between the sciences and humanities!

Winna Xia { }

Development Intern;


Chloe Uhls is a senior majoring in Communications and Computer Science, with a minor in SLAMM. She is from Los Angeles, California and her pronouns are she, her, & hers. In addition to being a Digital Research Intern, she is also a part-time customer support specialist for Connected Camps. She is also the co-president of Equity in Technology and was the Director of Diversity and Inclusion for Pi Beta Phi. Over the summer, she interned for Cynthia Rowley and Purple PR in New York, and is planning on moving there full-time as she starts her new job at a tech start-up called Stylitics in July.

Chloe Uhls { Development Intern;

}

Madeline Nellis is a junior majoring in Computer Science and Music, with a minor in Music, Science, and Technology. She is from Long Island, New York and her pronouns are she/her/hers. In addition to being a Digital Research Intern at Newcomb Institute she is a Computer Science Instructor for Juni Learning and the Social Media Chair of the Newcomb Prison Project. Outside of school Madeline enjoys yoga, running, reading, and playing the piano.

Madeline Nellis { }

Development Intern;

Rhea Majumdar is a third-year undergraduate student from New York, pursuing a dual degree in Psychology and Design with a minor in Studio Art. She hails from Long Island, New York, uses she/her pronouns and joined the Digital Research Internship program at Newcomb Institute this academic year! On campus, she works as a research aide at the library and is a newly appointed assistant editor for the Crescent Magazine’s NOLA 360 section. In her free time, she makes an excessive amount of Spotify playlists, dabbles in the kitchen, and gets lost while exploring New Orleans with her friends.She hopes to mesh her interests after graduation by entering the design industry, honing in on product design and user research.

Rhea Majumdar { }

Development Intern;

Hannah is majoring in Architecture and English with a minor in Public Policy. Hailing from Bardsdale, California, she has worked as a Digital Research Intern under the direction of Dr. Jacquelyne Howard for the majority of this academic year. When she is not busy with school, she is at work in the wood shop at the Tulane School of Architecture designing and prototyping systems that challenge cultural attitudes of apathy and waste, with a specific interest in the built environment and its construction systems. Otherwise, she is reading speculative fiction and seeking joyful tethers to hope in a sinking city she has had the luxury of calling home for the last four years. She will be graduating later this May and going to work as an organizer and volunteer in her hometown. Hannah is honored to have been a part of Dr. Howard’s work alongside so many amazing interns; it was a privilege to learn and work with such powerful teammates.

Hannah Bartels { }

Development Intern;


Isabelle Haines (she/her/hers) is a senior from Seattle, Washington majoring in English and math. Last fall, she had the pleasure of joining the Digital Research Internship program and working with an amazing team. Currently, she is an intern with NASA’s Artemis communications team. Outside of school and work, she loves reading, biking, rollerblading, hiking, and baking pies. After graduation, she will return to the Seattle area and begin work as a communications specialist at a STEM education nonprofit.

Isabelle Haines {

Development Intern; }

<!Information Technology Interns> Rachel is a senior majoring in biomedical engineering from Abita Springs, Louisiana and uses she, her, and hers pronouns. In her free time, she enjoys going on walks around Audubon Park, reading books, and listening to podcasts while exploring New Orleans. She is also the President of Society of Women Engineers. She enjoys both of her positions in Newcomb Institute because it allows her to engage in the intersection of gender in the engineering and technology fields! She loves being an Information Technology Intern because it allows her to hone her technical skills while working in an empowering environment alongside amazing people!

Rachel Tabor {

Product Developer; }

Sophie is a senior majoring in Computer Science and Linguistics. She is from Rutland, Vermont, and has been working as an Information Technology Intern at Newcomb Institute since her sophomore year. On campus, she is president of the Tulane Women’s Club Rugby team, and also works at the Creole Creamery off campus. After she graduates in the spring, she will be moving to Chicago to work as an Associate Consultant for Red Hat!

Sophie Tanen { }

Team Lead;


Naomi is a Junior majoring in Information Technology (IT) Cybersecurity and Theatre Performance with a minor in Russian. She is from Cincinnati, Ohio and uses she/her pronouns. She is an Administrative Assistant for the School of Professional Advancement’s IT department in addition to being an Information Technology Intern. Outside of school, Naomi works as a Computer Science instructor for Juni Learning. In her free time, she enjoys playing music, painting, and designing her own clothing.

Naomi Stoner { }

Technology Intern;

Olivia is a junior majoring in Engineering Physics with a Mechanical Engineering concentration and a minor in Mathematics. She is from Wallingford, Pennsylvania, uses she/her pronouns, and is the Public Relations coordinator for Society of Women Engineers in addition to being an Information Technology Intern. In her spare time, you can find her outside reading a book, working on an engineering project, or giving tours for Tulane. Olivia is really excited to be a part of Newcomb’s Information Technology Intern team where she gets to learn from and collaborate with other women in tech!

Olivia Riess { }

Technology Intern;

Kailen is a first-year at Tulane studying Computer Science and Math with potential minors in Information Technology and English. She was born and raised in San Francisco, California. Kailen uses she/her/hers pronouns and in her free time enjoys spending time with her friends, reading for pleasure, and creative writing. She is part of the Current RLC, which is a residential learning community dedicated to women in STEM. Kailen is also the freshman representative of the Women in Technology club. She is passionate about gender equity as well as technology, and is greatly empowered by the opportunity to work alongside other women interested in technology while building a skill set within the field.

Kailen Mitchell {

Technology Intern; }

Kelly is a senior in Computer Science and Math. She is going into software engineering in the gaming industry upon graduation, with a focus on online security. When she’s not programming, you can find her cooking, spending time with friends, or watching a good movie. A fun fact about Kelly is that she’s taking Japanese for fun (and in case she ever decides to work for Nintendo)!

Kelly Romer { }

Technology Intern;


<!Digital Research Internship Program >


The Digital Research Internship Program provides undergraduates with an opportunity to obtain a skillset and diverse portfolio in technology. Undergraduates, working on a Scrum team, receive tangible experience in technology and feminist leadership while working on the digital projects of Tulane faculty in the humanities and sciences. This paid internship supplements students' majors and minors when seeking employment or prestigious technology internships.



2 2 0 2 1 2 0 2 : p i h s n r e t n I h c r Digital Resea Lucien Mensah This year, I had the opportunity to be the Graduate Assistant for Dr. Howard, working to support connections with Project Owners, specific projects, and the reorganization of the DRI team standards. One of the areas I focused on was the construction and reorganization of the GitHub. Last year, I created our new GitHub website, viewable at newcombtech.github.io. This year, I focused on the backend reorganization, creating repositories and guides that were easy to follow and clear for future teams to maintain project documentation and other necessary items to continue our goal of sustainability. GitHub remains a rather important place for tech-oriented teams, as it allows for future project owners to see previous work we've done, provides a place for team members to show off their work when applying for jobs, and helps build technical competencies as an industry-standard, version control capabilities, and low-tech solutions. I'm glad to have been able to foster this growth for future teams going forward! I am unbelievably grateful for all the opportunities I've had as a member of the DRI team. From improving my own technical skills by learning web development to improving my design knowledge, growing in my leadership, and pushing myself outside of my comfort zone, the DRI team has been an integral part of my growth at Tulane. Not only has the team been able to help me improve professionally and grow my network, but it has also allowed me to do impactful work with the New Orleans community, influencing my future plans. I would like to extend a huge thank you to Dr. Jacquelyne Howard for propelling this program forward and encouraging me at every opportunity, as well as to everyone I have worked with and led for being so resilient, intelligent, resourceful, and dedicated as we shifted to remote work, from remote work back to in-person, dealing with Hurricane Ida, and all other obstacles we've faced so far. I look forward to seeing next year's projects and all the lab's goals coming to fruition!


The Ups and Downs of the Impacts of Technology on the Environment By Chloe Uhls In the past few years, there has been debate on whether the effects of technology have a positive or negative impact on the environment. In 2020, we saw a significant decrease in air pollution from citizens using less transportation and staying inside their homes as a result of the pandemic. However, the greenhouse gas emissions that are being produced from cultivating tech devices and big data cause significant amounts of carbon dioxide (Rosenberg). Specifically, the Metaverse, a virtual reality world that is being created by Facebook, has caused a lot of debate about whether its impacts will negatively or positively impact the world around us. When we first think about the Metaverse, it is easy to assume that that effect would be overall negative. A virtual reality world where people will live in rather than being present in Mother Nature’s gift to us seems like a radical concept. On the contrary, the Metaverse is still very unknown, just as the Internet was to us a few decades ago. Humans and society are constantly evolving, as well as the ways we adapt to change.

Positives

Many argue that the Metaverse has positive effects on the environm

ent such aspeople staying indoors, similar to early COVID times, rather than contributing toreal world damage. For example, if someone w Museum in New York City, instead of paying for a plane ticket and contributing to air pollution, they could simply see it from the comfort of their own home in the Metaverse. Many believe that this is our future, and that while people stay indoors and live in the Metaverse, we will be able to create less pollution. It is also important to acknowledge that environmental tech solutions are contributing to clearing up waste on the Earth. From apps that discuss how to produce less food waste to machine learning contributing to sustainability issues, the technology that has been created in response to the climate crisis is extraordinary. The chart to the right shows money that is being invested in environmental tech solutions (ITA). While the data we collect is overall harming the environment, it is also contributing to an array of solutions; this supports how little we know about the environmental impacts of technology. Reports created by the Shift Project demonstrate the negative environmental impacts of digital technology, thus relaying how little is known, and how much more data must be collected to understand (Babinet).

Negatives While living in technology rather than living in our real world may seem like a way to cause less pollution to our environment, just one AI model could generate 626,000 pounds of carbon dioxide, diminishing the argument for the positive effects of technology on the environment (Rosenberg). Data Collection is also a huge player in producing emissions, demonstrating that environmental footprints can be caused by technological consumption (Geneva Environment Network). All in all, there are many ups and downs to technology’s impact on the environment. The way we look at it is up to us as we are becoming closer and closer to a technology-dominated world. It’s important to keep the negative effects in mind when building technologies such as the Metaverse, as we cannot be naive and think that it will only have positive effects in the future. Babinet, Gilles. “The Environmental Impact and Potential of Digital Technology.” Institut Montaigne, Institut Montaigne, 24 Mar. 2021, https://www.institutmontaigne.org/en/blog/environmental-impact-and-potentialdigital-technology. “Data, Digital Technology, and the Environment.” Geneva Environment Network, https://www.genevaenvironmentnetwork.org/resources/updates/data-digital-technology-and-the-environment/. Rosenberg, Lizzy. “Even Though It's Virtual, the Metaverse Does Actually Impact the Environment.” Green Matters, Green Matters, 9 Feb. 2022, https://www.greenmatters.com/p/metaverse-environmentalimpact#:~:text=What%20is%20the%20impact%20of,turn%2C%20this%20will%20decrease%20pollution. https://www.trade.gov/environmental-technologies-industry-overview https://www.epa.gov/climate-indicators/climate-change-indicators-us-greenhouse-gas-emissions


HOW DIGITAL EPIDEMIOLOGY CAN MAKE HIV

PREVENTION MORE EQUITABLE Evan Hendrickson

EPIDEMIOLOGY, MEET BIG DATA

From 2015 through 2019, all new HIV diagnoses were 69% men who have sex with men (MSM), 36% of

Digital Epidemiology is a rapidly growing field that

those diagnoses being Black MSM. 1 From this

leverages Big Data derived from social media and

statistic alone, it is evident that these populations

other mobile applications to improve public health

need to be targeted when working to find effective

4, 5

preventative strategies. However, traditional public

prevention and intervention strategies. Using traditional epidemiological methods, data from beyond the public health sphere that was not initially intended to be used for epidemiology is collected, allowing for larger amounts of data to be collected from a broader pool. The emergence of Digital Epidemiology has raised several ethical concerns from both tech and public health leaders. However, I believe there are ethical applications to make data collection, epidemiological analysis, and prevention initiatives more equitable. Digital Epidemiology can be utilized to better reach more

health interventions have and continue to struggle to reach these populations. The LGBTQ+ community and

communities

of

color

may

often

feel

disenfranchised due to trauma from the long history of mistreatment by the United States healthcare system,

or

by

medical

professionals

who

are

incompetent or discriminatory when caring for them.

Therefore,

MSM

and

BIPOC

individuals

understandably may feel less inclined to participate in HIV-related studies, which hinders progress in HIV prevention.

isolated and marginalized demographics than traditional data collection and epidemiological

Grindr, the world's largest social networking app for

methods, particularly concerning HIV prevention.

gay, bi, trans, and queer people, data was used in a 2012 study to assess HIV prevention practices and risk among MSM in Los Angeles. The researchers recruited MSM through the platform, and administered a computer-guided interview-based survey asking about user’s HIV statues, sex practices, and their 2

perceived risk of acquiring HIV. After collecting this information, participants were asked if they had ever participated in an HIV-related clinical trial, as well as if they would like to in the future. Just barely 11% of participants reported that they had ever participated in a clinical trial, while over half indicated that they


would be interested in being recruited for future

infectious diseases? Drs. Mello and Wang from

clinical trials. These findings demonstrate that social

Stanford University lay out a key tenet that all current

media and other online applications can be used as

and future Digital Epidemiology initiatives should

feasible

when

strictly adhere to: the use of a Digital Epidemiological

and

method must be deemed “the least burdensome

recruitment

attempting

to

methods,

surveil

the

especially behavioral

epidemiologic data of populations that are not easily

alternative” to achieve the desired public health

2

3

reached.

outcome in order to minimize privacy risks. Tech and public health professionals must join together in order to validate whether the collective interest to eradicate or at least prevent disease outweighs the individual interest of privacy. While it is argued that there is not a clear-cut solution to this conflict, by restricting data and the algorithms analyzing it, Digital Epidemiology can move forward to achieve 4

desired public health outcomes and health equity.

ETHICAL DILEMMA Although Digital Epidemiology has been determined to be a useful public health tool, it is raising many ethical concerns. The main concern is storing and using Big Data collected from individuals are algorithmic errors and security concerns, which could make this data publicly visible.3 Whether it be through surveys or applications and phone pings, 1

user data must be protected with the most robust safeguards. One of the newest Digital Epidemiology strategies in the United States is the release of the Google-Apple contact tracing application, which tells users when they have been exposed to someone who

has

tested

positive

for

COVID-19.

Many

Americans distrust government agencies using their data, given the many mass data breaches that have occurred over the past few years. Conversely, some are willing to hand over their data in order to do anything to end the pandemic. Will the same be true for other

HIV.gov. (2021). U.S. Statistics. hiv.gov/hiv-basics 2

Landovitz, R. J., et al. (2012). Epidemiology, Sexual Risk Behavior, and HIV Prevention Practices of Men who Have Sex with Men Using GRINDR in Los Angeles, California. Journal of Urban Health, 90(4), 729–739. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9766-7 3

Mello & Wang. (2020). Ethics and governance for digital disease surveillance. Science, 368(6494), 951–954. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abb9045 4

Salathé, M. (2018). Digital epidemiology: what is it, and where is it going? Life Sciences, Society and Policy, 14(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s 40504-017-0065-7 5

Young & Lewis (2014). Methods of using real-time social media technologies for detection and remote monitoring of HIV outcomes. Preventive Medicine, 63, 112–115. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.024


THE ART OF FOOD WHAT IS FOOD'S RELATION TO SCIENCE? Winna Xia Have you ever thought about the chemical compounds and proteins that make up your food or how the microstructures of different plants have different shapes? As it turns out, food is not that far removed

https://foodly.tn/tips/4-2996/

from science, nor is it that removed from

How is, per se, a gastronomic meal

the arts. This intersectionality comes in the

created?

form of gastronomy which “represents a

values found on the back of potato chips

new field combining technical, artistic, and

and other items are crucial here. In 1988,

social components in the creation of novel

Herve This and Nicholas Kurti designed a

foods” (Zeech). In essence, gastronomy

scientific discipline called molecular and

studies the relationship between food and

physical

its molecular compounds to create

molecular gastronomy in 1998 (Burke 1).

wondrous meals that have futuristic looks.

It is interesting to note though, that like

Gastronomic inventions can be seen in

typical scientific procedures, chefs have to

many restaurants due to their social media

go through a series of trials and errors to

friendly aesthetics especially in tourist

perfect their method of turning a raw dish

locations. Here are a few examples!

into a fully-cooked futuristic meal.

http://blog.chefsarmoury.com/2010/11/tokyo-food-trends-molecular-gastronomy-dinner-class/

Surprisingly,

gastronomy

the

nutritional

adjusted

just

http://culinaryphysics.blogspot.com/2018/12/10-best-molecular-gastronomy-kit.html#gsc.tab=0

to


What is Digital Gastronomy? Digital gastronomy involves the combination of digital fabrication and food As technology progressed, so has food. Inin the kitchen. Zoran and his team use a recent years, a new phenomenon hasUniversal robot-arm and laser-cutting risen. Its name is digital gastronomy. It ismachines to create specific molds for food the intersection between "digitallike desserts and 3D-print noodles. fabrication instruments in traditionalAt this time, there are still several obstacles kitchens" (Zoran). Amit Zoran, a seniorin making digital gastronomy mainstream. lecturer at the School of Engineering andFor one, there are not enough adequate Computer Science at The Hebrewsoftware tools for cooking. Secondly, the University of Jerusalem spearheads thecosts for robotic arms are sky-high. digital gastronomy research in the HybridHowever the future is bright and as Lab at HUJI. He notes that the integrationtechnology advances, food will surely of computers allows for more accuratefollow. I will leave you with this quote: and personalized meals as well as helps“while that this article considers only the feed the growing global populationtechnical aspect of culinary activity and through its efficiency and minimizationthat studies about the artistic and social of waste. sides remain essential in parallel” (Burke 7).

http://digitalgastronomy.co/

http://digitalgastronomy.co/

Sources:

Burke, Róisín, et al. “Molecular Gastronomy.” Reference Module in Food Science, Elsevier, 13 June 2016, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780081005965033023?via=ihub. V, Carlota. “Digital Gastronomy, Infusing Traditional Cooking with 3D Printing Technologies.” 3Dnatives, 24 May 2019, https://www.3dnatives.com/en/digital-gastronomy240520194/#:~:text=Digital%20Gastronomy%20is%20a%20culinary,cooking%20with%20new%20computational%20abiliti es. Zeece, Michael. “Food Additives.” Introduction to the Chemistry of Food, Academic Press, 7 Feb. 2020, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128094341000074. Zoran, Amit. “Digital Gastronomy.” Digitalgastronomy.co, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, http://digitalgastronomy.co/.


How Social Media Builds & Supports Community in LGBTQ+ Society Wendy Yang Social media is often stigmatized regarding its dangerous and sometimes hateful nature. From cyberbullying, toxic beauty standards, and even fake news, it can be challenging to spot the good in it. However, social media has made a significant positive impact on the LGBTQ+ community. These benefits come in many forms, including social communities, financial support, and identity exploration.


A significant positive of social media is the easy and safe access to an online community for those who identify under the LGBTQ+ spectrum. A major issue for these individuals is finding acceptance and support in their homes or in-person communities. Thus, they seek out that validation and consolation from friends they find online. In fact, LGBTQ+ social media users are more likely to have online friends to support them and their identities (Daley). Also, many social campaigns utilize social media to connect queer and trans people alike and create more awareness surrounding LGBTQ+ issues. One example is the #ComingOutMatters project, which is a hashtag shared on multiple social media platforms for LGBTQ+ users to share their stories and inspire others to live and accept their identities (TechImpact). Although only a few years old, the hashtag has helped encourage and support many individuals in the LGBTQ+ community, and it’s still in use today.


Likewise, there is a plethora of online access to LGTBQ+ support groups that offer an array of resources. A popular site that started as a social campaign is the Trevor Project, founded and based on principles aiming to help and support LGBTQ youth. Among its many resources, one of its wellknown crisis lines assists those who may need immediate attention (Trevor Project). Other resources available include informational web pages regarding common topics such as exploring your identity, and an online friend-making service called TrevorSpace (Trevor Project). The Trevor Project, as well as other popular LGBTQ+ support groups, such as GLAAD, share their content on popular social media sites such as Instagram and Twitter for easy accessibility and target reach. With these social media pages, more young queer users are aware that these resources exist and thus can be used and shared with others. In addition to community building and social support, social media offers another way of helping the LGBTQ+ community– financial contribution. Sites like GoFundMe, a fundraising platform, have a particular LGBTQ+ category for users to explore and donate to help with issues such as transformation surgery and home displacement (gofundme). A simple link addition to one’s social media account gives it access to thousands of users to view and share on their individual pages. With such high traffic and interaction, social media provides a beneficial source to those who need it most.


Although commonly condemned for its several flaws, social media undeniably connects queer and trans users alike. For those who want to seek financial and community support or simply want to make a friend, the internet is a vast place that can satisfy those needs.

Sources: https://theconversation.com/social-media-gives-support-to-lgbtq-youthwhen-in-person-communities-are-lacking166253#:~:text=We%20found%20that%20LGBTQ%20youth,than%20their% 20in%2Dperson%20friends. https://theconversation.com/social-media-gives-support-to-lgbtq-youthwhen-in-person-communities-are-lacking166253#:~:text=We%20found%20that%20LGBTQ%20youth,than%20their% 20in%2Dperson%20friends. https://blog.techimpact.org/lgbt-organizations-use-social-media-social-good/ https://www.gofundme.com/c/act/lgbtq


Artistic Activism and Building Community Helena Wang I recently read up on an article written by Jan Cohen Cruz, who founded Center for Art and Activism and I felt deeply inspired when she mentioned how interconnected art and activism have always been and how powerful artistic What is artistic activism and how does it

activism can be.

help build a community? I was introduced to this concept during my third year here at Tulane. Being a communications and theatre double major, I feel fortunate enough to have plenty of opportunities to explore the connections between media and community art. I have always been interested in seeing how to combine my fields of interest to together achieve something bigger.

Community art, by definition, refers to art that reflects more than the creators’ mindsets, perspectives, personal styles and beliefs, it’s about reflecting the collective and creating with and within the ensemble during the process.

1


It’s about the process of collecting our ideas as a team, gathering valuable resources accessible to us, putting in each of our unique backgrounds and perspectives into creating our projects, and together what we create represent the Community art can take any form ranging

creativity of our team as a whole, the

from movies, theatre, performance art,

values Newcomb Institute and Tulane

music to digital design, creative writing,

stand for, and the messages as well as

and artist training programs. The nature of

stories our partners strive to tell. This

community art itself contributes to

creating process is utilizing the concept of

activism in the sense that it aims to

artistic activism within the context of

change people’s intentions and behavior

building a community for communities.

for the greater good and motivates more people for the benefit of a bigger community with deeper influences.

Cruz, Jan-Cohen. “An Introduction to Community Art and Activism.” This makes me reflect on my experience

Accessed April 4, 2022. https://

of working with DRI team and I think to

library.upei.ca/sites/default/files/

me, my work here is a kind of community

an_introduction_to_community_art_and_

art.

activism_cohen_cruz.pdf.

2



PRINCIPLES OF

FEMINIST PEDAGOGY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Heather Anne De Lair and Eric Erwin were some of the first to advocate for an explicitly feminist approach within the academic field of early childhood education studies with their 2000 article "Working Perspectives within Feminism and Early Childhood Education". Although their article acknowledges there are overlaps between existing discussions of more general critical theory within the field and the approach they are advocating for, they explicitly state specifically feminist practices guide their research. Using examples from their existing experience as early childhood professionals (De Lair educates elementary school children and Erwin teaches undergraduates who wish to become teachers themselves), they outline five potential principles of a feminist centered approach to education.

Principle 1: Early childhood educators should practice justice centered lives, not just advocate for them. This task is not an easy undertaking, as it requires being consistently willing to correct injustice when seen from students, colleagues, and themselves in a manner that is specific to the needs of the circumstances. The authors designate this the most challenging principle to execute, but its placement at the beginning of the list highlights its importance.

Principle 2: Early childhood educators allows for subjectivity from both the educator and the students. Within the undergraduate program, a focus is examining how individual teacher’s positionality impacts their pedagogy in positive and negative ways. Additionally, student’s different perspectives are seen as assets rather than challenges and are used to shape lessons for greatest impact.


Principle 3: Early childhood educators advocate for the marginalized and oppressed. Feminist early childhood educators should not only speak out against injustice in a manner that is developmentally appropriate for their students, but also both give voice to these groups through their curriculum and discuss social changes that can be galvanized through the next generation.

Principle 4: Early childhood educators acknowledge the diverse backgrounds of students and how that may impact their education. Rejecting the objective approach developmental psychology can often bring to early childhood educators, feminist pedagogy instead advocates for getting to know each and every student as an individual from a unique context. Additionally, it allows space for each of those context’s effects on how they learn.

Principle 5: Early childhood educators build up their students and give them confidence in their abilities Both childhood education and teacher education programs are traditionally built on a hierarchical relationship where students are given little power or agency. Feminist pedagogy instead gives children freedom to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas. This also means challenging the university as an exclusive space of professional development and encouraging teachers to grow throughout their careers through relationships with students and their care networks.

By Kristen Osborne Information from De Lair, Heather Anne, and Eric Erwin. “Working Perspectives within Feminism and Early Childhood Education.” Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood 1, no. 2 (June 2000): 153–70. https://doi.org/10.2304/ciec.2000.1.2.4.






The Digital Research Internship Project Posters


The Digital Research Internship Program worked on a multitude of projects throughout the year. The following posters describe the mission of the research projects and the work completed by the Digital Research Interns. These projects ranged from categorizing archival materials to creating websites. We worked with project partners in a variety of fields such as English, Public Health, and Computer Science.


MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH COALITION

Aim to improve outcomes, experiences, and access to quality, respectful care during pregnancy, birth, and postpartum period by centering the experiences of Black birthing people and their infants in New Orleans The MCH Coalition is an advocacy group made up of over 100 diverse stakeholders in maternal and child health in New Orleans. Our members include researchers, healthcare providers, doulas, individuals employed by local and state government offices, and representatives of community organizations creating public health solutions for and providing direct services to New Orleans families in the perinatal period.

We believe that healthcare is a human right and should be equally accessible to all. We foster and demand racial equity. We demand transparency and accountability of facilities providing services and healthcare to pregnant people. We work to preserve and protect reproductive justice and rights. We create and maintain sustainable alliances across professions. We recognize the importance of intersectionality in preserving the health and dignity of pregnant populations. We envision a world free from birth violence.

Project Partners: Dr. Clare Daniel and Dr. Maeve Wallace To learn more about our history and available resources, visit our site at https://nolamch.org/


NANÁ TAVA LÁ Saudades is about Brazilian percussionist Naná Vasconcelos. Through pictures, interview snippets, audio recordings from both Naná and his peers, and interactive mapping of Naná's performance history, this website aims to bring the life and work of Vasconcelos to life.

We assisted Daniel B. Sharp in an audio-visual adaptation of his book Saudades by creating a website on WordPress to make the most important information from the book more engaging.

Additionally, we used Audacity to trim down the raw audio from the interviews into small soundbites of the quotes used in the book

Project Partner: Daniel Sharp Newcomb's Digital Research Internship Fall 2021-Spring 2022


Frances Gaudet Legacy Project Project Partners: Nell Bolton & Dr. Laura Adderley

https://francesgaudet.omeka.net/

We aim to share the example of Frances Gaudet's extraordinary life in order to guide and inspire similar work in our present time.

The Technologies - Omeka Website - WordPress - Premiere Pro


CONGO SQUARE CONNECTION

PROJECT Partner: FREDDI EVANS

OUR WORK

A website designed to explain the history of the Congo Square and the continuing education of it through associated local and international programs.

PURPOSE This project serves to provide resources that advance the study of Congo Square worldwide and acts as an archive of work done by past scholars on the Congo Square.

TECHNOLOGY USED - Wordpress - Tab responsive plug-in

Website: https://congosquareconnection.org/


Project Partners: Dr. Kate Adams with Dr. Susan Tucker

What We Are A Digital Creation of the Women' Literary Department from The 1884 New Orleans World's Fair

This Beautiful

Sisterhood of Books

ORIGIN

The original Women’s Literary Department was created for exhibition at the 1884 New Orleans World’s Fair. It comprised more than 1,400 items written and edited by women – books, journals, newspapers, and sheet music donated from across the US. Recognizing the significance of the collection, director Maude Howe was determined “to keep this beautiful sisterhood of books together” as a permanent library. But circumstances intervened and, within months of the exposition’s conclusion, the physical collection was scattered and lost.

WHAT WE DO This Beautiful Sisterhood of Books recovers Maud’s library for new readers and researchers. Directed by Katherine Adams and sponsored by the Newcomb College Institute at Tulane University. It is a collaborative project, an archive-in-process, that will continue to grow with help from people like you!

Join the Sisterhood This Beautiful Sisterhood of Books is a collaborative space. Our project contributes to the ongoing recovery of forgotten works by early women writers, and it provides a framework for exploring their significance to readers in 1884 and today. To learn more about the sisterhood and how to join us, visit our website: https://thisbeautifulsisterhood.wpcomstagi n g.com/



NUTRIENT POLLUTION

CASE TRACKER

We collaboratively worked on the website for the nutrient pollution tracking project. Part of this was uploading documentation regarding the different legal cases and figuring out the best way to display this information on the Wordpress site. We researched plug-ins and engaged in a dialogue with the project owners to decide on the ideal format for displaying the documentation.

watertracker.wp.tulane.edu Project Partner Thuy -Duyen N. Le

This project aims to help organizations, practitioners, and the general public remain abreast of upstream developments that may affect water quality downstream by providing a resource that tracks and displays information about efforts to increase water quality in several states within the Mississippi River Basin. For now, it will focus on issues relating to nutrient pollution, but will likely eventually expand to include other pollutants, including plastics and PFAS.


The African Letters Project Quandaries in Digital Humanities and Epistolary Research Project Partner: Elisabeth McMahon africanlettersproject.tulane.edu ALP is a database consisting of descriptive metadata for letters written between Africans and Americans during the era of decolonization (roughly 1945-1994). The project's aims at creating a globally-accessible database with indexing and fulltext access to the letters. The database draws on letters from the collections of Maida Springer Kemp and the American Committee on Africa, both held at the Amistad Research Center. The project's primary purpose is to make accessible to African researchers archival materials located in the U.S. but relevant to studying the history of decolonization in Africa.

Photo of the metadata layout.

This year the Digital Research team worked on the development of the ALP website, and made a biographies page where users can learn about people that appear in the database.




The Information Technology Internship Program


In the Information Technology Internship Program, undergraduates support technical operations within a non-profit research and education center. Undergraduates work in technical areas such as digital research, asset management, IT customer service, and Classroom/AV support. This paid internship supplements students’ majors and minors when seeking employment or prestigious technology internships.


THE

TIKTOK

ALGORITHM

RACHEL TABOR

TikTok may be known for silly dances, popular dance moves, and ungrateful influencers, but it can be a powerful tool for equity. In 2020 alone, over 700 million people were active on TikTok (Business of Apps). Of those users, 60% are women and 40% are men, and 60% are between the age of 16 and 24 years of age (Wallroom Media). To truly encapsulate the magnitude of TikTok’s influence, typically songs trending on billboard charts are also trending on the TikTok platform (Wallroom Media). It is well documented and abundantly clear that individuals, specifically Generation Z, are consuming TikTok at a very high rate compared to other social media networks. Anecdotally, I have noticed the majority of my college-educated peers enjoy TikTok, with some even having to control their screen time on the application because of their addiction. Although there are some questionable morals and issues concerning the application, there is no question to the influence and quick rise to fame it has had among society. Because of its young audience and unique For You Page, TikTok has rapidly increased in popularity. It is imperative that advocates for good understand the TikTok algorithm so they can enact the changes they wish to see by reaching their target audience.

Ti k Tok’s notoriety has grown due to a culmination of factors, but one most notable one being the distinctive ‘for you page’ which is a stream of videos curated to the user’s individual taste. This is done through an extensive algorithm that TikTok just recently declassified.


THE

TIKTOK

ALGORITHM

RACHEL TABOR So once a user posts a video, TikTok gives it an initial push to other users on the application. Then after this push, the content is evaluated on the completion ratio (the amount of users that completed the video), amount of shares, amount of likes, and the amount of comments on the video. Based one the quantitative rating the application gives that video, it will change the response. So if the resultant reading ratio is higher than the minimum requirements, TikTok will repush this video back into the circulation on the For You Page, and conversely if it does not meet the minimum requirements, then it will not be shown on the For You Page again. This process is outlined in the figure above.

As you can imagine, this iterative, self cultivating For You Page is the main appeal of TikTok. Essentially TikTok is allowing you to personally curate content that you would like based off of data from your previous reactions. This permits people that are typically underrepresented or repressed, to be at the forefront of their social media. This algorithm and application has huge implications for gender equity in technology, and pushing other social causes that have struggled to reach mainstream media. Engaging with popular social media with adaptive computing algorithms can allow underrepresented people to amplify their message to have a bigger audience and following than they would regularly.

Women have started to realize the power of this technology, and famous creators like @emilykager, @annaxsitar, and more have created a following by being the change we want to see for these causes. They have been a resource, mentor, and an honest friend for these young women watching their videos. In a world where gender and racial representation can get lost in the shuffle, applications like tiktok can allow users to find content creators that align with them and their interest. It is important to understand the algorithms that drive these sites to utilize it as a tool in finghting gender equity.


Naomi Stoner


WOMEN’S INTEGRAL ROLE IN EARLY COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IF YOU ARE A WOMAN PLANNING TO GO INTO SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, OR MATH, YOU KNOW PHRASES LIKE, “THAT’S GREAT, TECH NEEDS MORE WOMEN” ALL TOO WELL. THERE HAS BEEN INCREASING AWARENESS TO THE GENDER GAP IN TECH, AND THIS CREATES A SIGNIFICANT PUSH TO GET MORE WOMEN INTO MALE DOMINATED FIELDS LIKE STEM.GETTING WOMEN INTO THESE MASCULINE ORIENTED JOBS AND FIELDS OF STUDY HAS PROVED ITSELF TO BE VERY DIFFICULT. NOT ONLY DOES STIGMA AND SELF-DOUBT DETER WOMEN FROM THESE FIELDS, BUT ALSO WORK ENVIRONMENTS THAT ARE BUILT TO VALUE MASCULINE TRAITS PREVENT WOMEN FROM SUCCEEDING. WITH TECHNOLOGY FIELDS SPECIFICALLY, WOMEN STRUGGLE TO FIND THEIR PLACE BECAUSE TECHNOLOGY ITSELF HAS HISTORICALLY BEEN CONSIDERED MASCULINE, WHICH MAKES IT VERY DIFFICULT FOR FEMININE TRAITS AND VALUES TO SUCCEED AND FLOURISH. WHAT NOT MANY PEOPLE KNOW IS THAT ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR FORMS OF BUILDING TECH WAS NOT ALWAYS LIKE THIS. ORIGINALLY, WOMEN WERE THE ONES WHO DOMINATED PROGRAMMING, AND THEREFORE THE TECH INDUSTRY AT THE TIME. BUT THIS BEGS THE QUESTIONS: WHY WAS PROGRAMMING SO FEMININE DOMINATED, AND WHAT HAPPENED TO TRANSFORM THE FIELD INTO A MASCULINE ONE? AT THE ORIGINS OF THE COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FIELD, PROGRAMMING WAS CONSIDERED LOW LEVEL TEDIOUS WORK, SIMILAR TO TYPING OR FILING. HARDWARE WAS MORE HEAVILY VALUED, AND THEREFORE THE SOFTWARE PIECE OF WORK WAS PASSED TO WOMEN. WOMEN WROTE SOFTWARE AND PAVED THE WAY FOR THE FIELD OF CODING AND PROGRAMMING COMPUTERS.A GROUP OF MORE THAN 50 PERCENT WOMEN PROGRAMMED THE UNITED STATES’ FIRST MILITARY COMPUTER. FAMOUS WOMEN LIKE GRACE HOPPER AND MARGARET HAMILTON MADE HISTORY WITH THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO IMPORTANT PROGRAMMING WORK. THESE PROGRAMMING WOMEN EXCELLED AT THEIR WORK BECAUSE OF THEIR SHARP FOCUS AND HARD WORKING MINDSET.

Margaret Hamilton

Grace Hopper


By Kailen Mitchell N O W , W H A T C H A N G E D ? T H E T E C H I N D U S T R Y E X P L O D E D , A ND W I TH TH I S E X P L O S I O N , T H E J O B B E C A M E H I G H E R P A I D A N D G A I NE D NO TO R I E TY A ND P R E S T I G E B E C A U S E O F I N C R E A S E D D E M A N D . I T W A S W I TH TH I S TH A T W O M E N B E G A N T O B E P U S H E D O U T , A N D M E N R E - I N S E R T E D T H E M SE L V E S. C O M P A NI E S H I R I N G P R O G R A M M E R S D I D N ’ T K N O W T H E Q U A L I T I E S TH A T W O U L D P R O D U C E T H E B E S T W O R K E R S A T F I R S T , A N D S O T U R N E D T O S T U D I E S A ND SE XI ST V A L U E S T O F I N D O U T . O N E E X A M P L E I S A N A S S E S S M E N T M A D E B Y TW O P S Y C H O L O G I S T S , W I L L I A M C A N N O N A N D D A L L I S P E R R Y , W H O I NTE R V I E W E D A B O U T 1 , 5 0 0 E N G I N E E R S , T H E M A J O R I T Y O F W H I C H W E R E M E N, A ND SU P R I SE S U P R I S E , T H E A S S E S S M E N T C O N C L U D E D T H A T M E N W E R E M O R E F I T F O R TH E R O L E . F U R T H E R M O R E , I T C O N C L U D E D I N T R O V E R T E D , E M P A TH Y L A C K I NG I N D I V I D U A L S W E R E M O R E S U I T E D F O R T H E J O B . T H I S I S W H E R E TH E S T E R E O T Y P I C A L M A S C U L I N E C O D E R C O M E S F R O M W H O L A C K S F R I E ND S A S W E L L A S P E R S O N A L H Y G I E N E . T H E H I R I N G P R O C E S S T H E N F A V O R E D M E N, W H I C H C A U S E D T H E M T O B E O V E R R E P R E S E N T E D I N T H E F I E L D . TH I S C R E A TE D T H E P E R C E P T I O N T H A T M E N T H R I V E D I N T H E F I E L D M O R E , A ND TH U S B E G A N A CYCLE OF SEXISM WHICH EXCLUDED WOMEN. A L T H O U G H T H I S I S A S A D S T O R Y A B O U T H O W W O M E N P R O V E D TH E M SE L V E S M O R E T H A N C A P A B L E , T H E N F O U N D T H E M S E L V E S P U S H E D O U T O F TH E F I E L D , T H E R E I S A N I M P O R T A N T M O R A L H E R E . I T I S I T S E L F T H I S I D E A TH A T W O M E N A R E M O R E T H A N C A P A B L E O F T H R I V I N G A N D E X C E L L I N G I N TH E F I E L D O F P R O G R A M M I N G . W H A T T H I S M E A N S I S T H A T W E K N O W TH E P R O B L E M O F G E N D E R D I S P A R I T I E S I N T E C H L I E S W I T H I N T H E S Y S T E M A ND TH E W A Y TH E SE F I E L D S A R E S E T U P , A N D N O T W I T H I N W O M E N ’ S L A C K O F C A P A B I L I TY . M O R E WOMEN IN PROGRAMMING BENEFITS EVERYONE AS THE FIELD WILL HAVE A L A R G E R P O O L O F E X T R E M E L Y S M A R T A N D T A L E N T E D I ND I V I D U A L S, A ND W O M E N W I L L A L S O B E M O R E R E P R E S E N T E D I N T H E C R E A TI O N O F TE C H NO L O G Y . W E A L R E A D Y K N O W R E P R E S E N T A T I O N I S E X T R E M E L Y I M P O R TA NT, B U T I N TH I S CASE IT MEANS THE POPULATION OF WOMEN USING MODERN DAY T E C H N O L O G Y W I L L H A V E R E P R E S E N T A T I O N F O R T H E I R NE E D S A ND P E R S P E C T I V E S . T H E T A S K N O W B E C O M E S U N D O I N G T H E D A M A G E TH A T H A S BEEN DONE IN THE FIELD OF TECHNOLOGY.

Sources:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/13/magazine/women-coding-computer-programming.html-The Women in Bletchley Park-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_Bletchley_Park https://www.theguardian.com/careers/2018/jul/24/meet-the-female-codebreakers-of-bletchleypark#:~:text=Joyce%20Aylard%20was%20stationed%20at,93%20and%20living%20in%20Barnet https://www.history.com/news/coding-used-to-be-a-womans-job-so-it-was-paid-less-and-undervalued https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/what-programmings-past-reveals-about-todays-genderpay-gap/498797/-https://www.inc.com/magazine/201710/maria-aspan/how-women-once-ruled-computing.html https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/computer-programming-used-to-be-womens-work-718061/https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/02/19/women-built-tech-industry-then-they-were-pushed-out/




The Information Technology Internship Project Posters


The Information Technology Interns worked on various IT and digital projects that supported the operations of Newcomb Institute.




Project Partners: Dr. Jacquelyne Thoni Howard, Dr. Clare Daniel, Dr. Enilda Romero=Hall, Dr. Liv Newman, and Niya Bond



Project Partners: Dr. Anna Mahoney and President Mike Fitts


Grants


Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing is the world's largest gathering of women and underrepresented technologists. Named after computer scientist Grace Hopper, this conference brings together students, companies, educators, and professionals.























Student Groups


Equity in Technology & Society of Women Engineers Newcomb Institute offers a variety of clubs for students with an interest in STEM. These clubs supplement students' learning in the classroom and provide an avenue for students to explore different interests outside of class. Students also have the opportunity to meet other students with a shared interest in STEM fields.








Volume 5 | 2021 - 2022