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2017-18 Student Handbook www.nccu.edu

This book belongs to: Name:_____________________________________ Phone:_____________________________________ Email: _____________________________________

In Case of Emergency, please call: Name: ____________________ Phone: ___________


Office of the Chancellor

Dear North Carolina Central University Students, It is with deep Eagle Pride that I welcome you to the 2017-2018 academic year! As we soar into the new year with excellence, I know all of you are looking forward to new challenges and opportunities. To ensure that your success remains our No. 1 priority, there are several goals that I have set for the university. It is imperative that you, our scholars, continue to be retained and make progress towards the completion of your degrees and the realization of your individual dreams. We are committed to educating and providing you with the most powerful learning experience so you can succeed in the global marketplace. At the core of our institution is “Truth and Service,” a motto that has guided NCCU for 107 years. We encourage and empower you to join the ranks of the most engaged citizens in the Triangle region, and enhance the quality of life and economic development of North Carolina, the nation and the world. In the coming year, I will also challenge you to become part of the community by exploring downtown Durham and the Research Triangle – a global hub for some of the world’s largest high-tech research and development companies. NCCU is centrally located in a city and region that is celebrated annually for its educational assets, including our signature programs and course offerings. North Carolina Central University is a global institution with a strong tradition of producing scholars, change agents and innovators and leaders since 1910. Together, with our exceptional faculty and staff, we will continue to soar to new heights. In Truth and Service, Dr. Johnson O. Akinleye Interim Chancellor

NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL UNIVERSITY • 1801 FAYETTEVILLE STREET · DURHAM, NC 27707 · (919) 530-6104

NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL UNIVERSITY IS A CONSTITUENT INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA


Dear New Eagles, Welcome to North Carolina Central University! As we begin the 2017-18 academic year, the Division of Student Affairs is excited to be a part of your educational journey. At NCCU, your success is our No. 1 priority. The Division of Student Affairs offers a variety of programs and activities that support your academic goals and enhance your overall student experience. Consider joining a student organization, attending a social event or becoming a student leader. We encourage you to get involved in activities that inspire you and ignite your passions. NCCU is committed to helping others and giving back to our community. As you become acclimated to campus life, you will learn more about our motto of “Truth and Service.� As a new student, you will also have the opportunity to participate in service projects and make a positive impact on the larger community. I hope that you take advantage of everything that we have to offer. I invite you to explore our beautiful campus, meet new people, and enjoy being an Eagle. This is your time to shine! Eagle Pride!...Amplified!

In Truth and Service,

Gary Brown Gary Brown Interim Vice Chancellor Division of Student Affairs


North Carolina Central University Student Government Association

“Service. Governance. Advocacy.”

Greetings Eagles! My name is Michael Hopkins and it is my privilege and honor to serve North Carolina Central University as your Student Body President for the 2017-2018 academic school year! On behalf of the Student Government Association, I would like to welcome all new and returning eagles to the sloping hills and verdant green of this illustrious University. I hope you are ready for a truly exciting and productive academic year. The entire Student Government Association (SGA) and I look forward to building a collaborative partnership with you to ensure that NCCU continues to strive for Eagle Excellence in everything that we do. The goal of the SGA for the upcoming academic year is three-fold:  to train, diversify, and increase the current pool of student leaders in order to improve our university as a whole,  to apply the pressure for the needs of the students in the areas of dining, housing, security, academic affairs and campus morale, and improve overall student advocacy,  and to uplift the nest, and transform the City of Durham for the betterment of our community. The Student Government Association will remain focused on the University’s motto of “Truth and Service” in everything that we do. All we ask in return is that you trust and support us, inside and outside the classroom, as we strive towards Eagle Excellence! We are excited to hear your ideas, address your concerns, and advocate for student issues that arise. Please feel free to contact SGA at (919) 530-6107 or by email at sgapresident@nccu.edu. Thank you in advance for your cooperation and support. Sincerely,

Michael Hopkins, 2017-18 Student Body President

______________________________________________________________________ North Carolina Central University Student Government Association ▪ 1801 Fayetteville Street ▪ Suite 110 Durham, NC 27707 Office: 919.530.6107 ▪ E-mail: sgapresident@nccu.edu


TABLE OF CONTENTS About the University ......................................................7 NCCU Emergency Information....................................12 Departmental Contact Information...............................12 Division of Academic Affairs, Schools/Colleges...........14 Scholarships and Financial Aid ...................................15 University College .......................................................18 University Honors Program .........................................22 Office of Transfer Services ..........................................22 Academic Success & Enrichment Services.................23 Academic Community Service Learning Program.......23 International Student Services.....................................23 Academic Regulations, Advising and Scheduling .......24 Class Attendance ........................................................32 Withdrawal Policy ........................................................33 Sitting in on Courses....................................................35 Challenging Courses for Credit by Exam ....................35 College-Level Exam Program (CLEP) .........................36 Off-Campus/ Inter-Institutional Courses ......................37 Credits, Grades, GPA...................................................38 Final Examinations.......................................................42 Enrollment of Seniors in 5000-Level Courses..............43 Excessive Credit Hours ...............................................44 Academic Forgiveness Policy ......................................44 Graduation Requirements.............................................47 Transcripts ...................................................................49 Recommended Student Standards .............................51 NCCU Dress Code.......................................................52 Division of Student Affairs ............................................52


Campus Recreation

Career Services and Outreach

Diversity and Inclusion

Men’s Achievement Center

New Student and Family Programs

Residential Life

Spiritual Development and Dialogue

Student Conduct and Community Standards Student Health and Counseling Services

Student Engagement and Leadership

Transportation

Women’s Center

Campus Services

Information Technology Services

University Bookstore

Campus Dining and Vending

Central Graphics/University Copy Center.....................61 Eagle Card Office ........................................................62 Eagle Service Center ..................................................62 Mail Center...................................................................62 Ticket Office.................................................................62 University Police Department ......................................62 Shuttle Service.............................................................62 Parking.........................................................................63 Student Code of Conduct ............................................67 Events/Activities Calendar............................................89 Building Directory & Class Codes................................200


ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY History

In 1910, Dr. James E. Shepard, a Durham pharmacist and religious educator, opened the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race and declared its purpose to be “the development in young men and women of the character and sound academic training requisite for real service to the nation.” The institution struggled financially in its early years. In 1915, it was sold and reorganized, then becoming the National Training School. In 1923, the state legislature appropriated funds to buy the school and renamed it the Durham State Normal School. Two years later, the legislature converted the institution into the North Carolina College for Negroes, dedicating it to liberal arts education and the preparation of teachers and principals. The college thus became the nation’s first state-supported liberal arts college for black students. In 1939, the college offered its first graduate-level courses in the arts and sciences. The School of Law opened in 1940, followed in 1941 by the School of Library Science. In 1947, the legislature changed the name to North Carolina College at Durham. Shepard served as president until his death in 1947. Dr. Alfonso Elder was installed in 1948 as his successor. North Carolina College at Durham became North Carolina Central University in 1969. On July 1, 1972, all the state’s public four-year colleges and universities were joined to become the Consolidated University of North Carolina. As part of the transition, the chief executive’s title changed from president to chancellor. Dr. Albert N. Whiting presided over the transition, leading the university from 1967 until 1983. He was succeeded by Dr. LeRoy T. Walker, vice chancellor for university relations and an internationally renowned track and field coach. Dr. Tyronza R. Richmond succeeded Walker in 1986; Richmond’s tenure saw the establishment of the School of Education. In 1993, Dr. Julius L. Chambers, a noted civil rights attorney, became the first NCCU alumnus to lead the university. He launched a major capital effort that led to construction of a biomedical/biotechnology research institute and a new School of Education building. Dr. James H. Ammons became chancellor in June 2001, eight months after state voters approved a major bond issue for UNC system capital improvements. NCCU was among the campuses targeted for growth, and under Ammons’ leadership the university experienced a surge in enrollment. Dr. Charlie Nelms succeeded Ammons in 2007. During his five-year tenure, he emphasized student success and focused on improving retention and graduation rates. Nelms presided over NCCU’s centennial celebration during the 2009-10 year. Under his leadership, NCCU was ranked as the nation’s No. 1 public historically black university by U.S. News & World Report for two consecutive years. Nelms retired in 2012 and was succeeded on an interim basis by Charles L. Becton, a prominent attorney and former judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Dr. Debra Saunders-White succeeded Becton in June 2013. Saunders-White was the first permanent female chancellor at NCCU. Devoted to her vision of “Eagle Excellence” in classrooms, on campus and in service, Saunders-White strategically enhanced, elevated and showcased NCCU as a first-choice, premier and global institution of higher learning with a significant increase in retention and graduation rates, strength and reputation among education administrators, student-faculty ratios and alumni giving. The university recorded several institution fundraising records, became the third-highest ranked public Historically Black College of University (HBCU) in the nation by U.S. News & World Report and was named 2016 HBCU of the Year by HBCU Digest. She was also named Educator of the Year by Spectacular Magazine. Saunders-White passed away in 2016. She was succeeded by Dr. Johnson O. Akinyele, who now serves as NCCU’s interim chancellor.


MISSION

North Carolina Central University, with a strong tradition of teaching, research, and service, prepares students to become global leaders and practitioners who transform communities. Through a nationally recognized law school, highly acclaimed and innovative programs in the visual and performing arts, sciences, business, humanities, and education programs, NCCU students are engaged problem solvers. Located in the Research Triangle, the University advances research in the biotechnological, biomedical, informational, computational, behavioral, social, and health sciences. Our students enhance the quality of life of citizens and the economic development of North Carolina, the nation, and the world.

Traditions at NCCU

North Carolina Central University was founded in 1909 as the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua by Dr. James E. Shepard. It became the first public liberal arts institution for African Americans in the nation. The University is now a master’s comprehensive institution that offers bachelor’s, master’s degrees, a Juris Doctor and Ph.D. in Integrated Biosciences to a diverse population.

University Bell Tower

The University Bell Tower, an icon of the University, is located on Eagle Campus Drive beside the Helen G. Edmonds Classroom Building. The Bell Tower was reconstructed by the NCCU Alumni Association. During the early years, the bell was rung to signal the beginning and end of the day. Later it was rung to signal each athletic victory. The Bell Tower originally rested on the presentday site of the William Jones Building.

James E. Shepard Statue

The James E. Shepard statue was unveiled in 1957 — 10 years after the founder’s death. It was commissioned by the James E. Shepard Memorial Foundation and the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of North Carolina. Sculptor William Zorach created the life-size statue as a memorial to the Founder of North Carolina Central University.

Alma Mater

Mrs. Annie Day Shepard, wife of Dr. James E. Shepard, founder of the University, wrote the university’s alma mater “Dear Old N.C.C.” The music was by the noted musician Harry T. Burleigh and was later revised by Alston W. Burleigh. Dr. Shepard had the University alma mater copyrighted in 1939. It was the second school song. Dr. Cadd G. O’Kelly drafted the first in 1936. To this day, students, faculty, staff and alumni sing the song at university programs and athletic events.

Famous Quote by Founder

“The Eagle is no common, ordinary barnyard fowl.” – Dr. James E. Shepard.

School Flower

The school flower is the White Carnation.

University Mottos

July 1911–June 6, 1928 Jan. 1929–Dec. 1929 June 5, 1930–June 6, 1934 June 5, 1935–May, 1995 May, 1996–Present

“I Serve” “Laboramus servare” “Service-Truth” “Truth and Service” “I Serve” “Truth and Service”


University Seal

University Name Logo

The official mascot is the eagle

School Colors

The school’s original colors were red, white and blue. In the mid-1920s, they were olive green and white; in 1928, the colors changed to maroon and gray, and have been so ever since.

Accreditation

North Carolina Central University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, masters, education specialist, and doctoral degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of North Carolina Central University.

Points of NCCU Pride

For more than 100 years, the university has educated the citizens of North Carolina, the United States and the world. • North Carolina Central University’s two biotechnology facilities conduct cuttingedge research into minority health disparities and operate in collaboration with pharmaceutical and biotech companies in nearby Research Triangle Park. • NCCU was named the country’s No. 1 historically black college or university in 2016 by HBCU Digest. • The Biomanufacturing Research Institute and Technology Enterprise (BRITE) houses the largest drug-discovery library owned by a public university in the U.S., with more than 500,000 unique compounds on site. • The Department of History at NCCU has produced more African-American scholars who have gone on to earn a Ph.D. in history than any other HBCU in the country. • NCCU is designated as a Carnegie Foundation Community Engaged Campus for extensive volunteer work with nonprofit organizations and agencies.


• The School of Library and Information Sciences is one of only two fully accredited full-time LIS programs in North Carolina and among only 14 nationally to offer the joint Juris Doctorate and a Master of Library Science (JD/MLS) degree. • NCCU’s Online Hospitality and Tourism Administration Program ranks at No. 5 in the nation in a best-of list by College Choice, an independent online publication for college-bound students. • The Eagles have won or tied to win the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference football title for the past three years, earning an invitation to the Celebration Bowl in 2016. • NCCU was the first school in the UNC system to offer a bachelor’s degree in Jazz Studies and now offers a master’s degree, as well. Artists in residence include Branford Marsalis and Joey Calderazzo. • National Jurist magazine honored NCCU’s School of Law as one of the most diverse in the nation and as a top school for hands-on legal education through its several clinics. The Law School opened its Intellectual Property Law Institute in 2016. • NCCU’s master’s degree program in Educational Technology was named by U.S. News & World Report as the best online graduate program at any historically black college or university and second-best among all institutions in North Carolina. • The Institute for Homeland Security and Workforce Development receives federal funding to train rural communities, faith communities and economically disadvantaged groups in emergency response. • The School of Business is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, a distinction held by only 5 percent of business programs worldwide. • The NCCU Men’s Basketball team won the MEAC tournament championship in 2014, earning the university its first invitation to the NCAA tournament. • NCCU’s School of Criminal Justice was one of only six universities chosen by The City University of New York to participate in a national research project examining prosecutions of low-level crime. • NCCU now offers a Ph.D. in Integrated Biosciences. The first cohort of doctoral students will graduate in spring 2017. • The Blue Cross and Blue Shield Speaker Series brings eminent experts in the fields of medicine, science and other disciplines to campus twice each year for presentations and interaction with students and faculty.


Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities This Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities seeks to empower the students of North Carolina Central University. The Rights and Responsibilities outlined below are aligned with the mission of the University; the University’s policies, regulations and rules; and the vision and shared values of the University’s schools, colleges, divisions, departments and programs. The University encourages students to endorse the expectations outlined below and to aspire to exhibit exemplary behavior that upholds the values of respect, integrity and inclusiveness. Students have the right to: 1. Be afforded equality of opportunity and receive an education that prepares them to be global leaders. 2. Be taught in an environment conducive to success. 3. Be heard, respected and receive courteous delivery of services from University personnel. 4. Be informed of their rights and the University’s obligations under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). 5. Be protected from acts of harassment, discrimination and violence. 6. Be provided with accessible materials and reasonable and appropriate accommodations in accordance with federal and state laws to ensure full access to all programs and facilities of the University. 7. Be provided with due process in all disciplinary and administrative actions according to established procedures of the University and as required by law. Students have the responsibility to: 1. Conduct themselves in a manner that upholds the integrity of an institution of higher learning. 2. Conduct themselves in a manner that furthers the University’s commitment to the promotion of diversity and respectfulness of each individual. 3. Become acquainted with and fully comply with all University policies, regulations and rules, including those established in the Student Code of Conduct as published in the Student Handbook and on the University’s Policies, Regulations and Rules website. 4. Exercise sound judgment in their choices. 5. Assume the consequences of their own actions. 6. Refrain from conduct that impairs or may impair the capacity of the University to ensure the safety of the University campus and community. 7. Comply with federal, state and local law.


CONTACT INFORMATION University Police Department (919) 530-6106

Student Health & Counseling Serv. (919) 530-6317

Campus Alerts (Emergency and Weather Communications) (919) 530-7220 or nccu.edu

ADDITIONAL SERVICES

Student Health & Counseling Services 919-530-6106 Student Central Hotline

919-530-6999

Academic Advising- 205 Alexander-Dunn Bldg.

919-530-6129

Chancellor’s Office 919-530-6104 3rd Floor Hoey Administration Building Chancellor’s Scholars Services Center 919-530-7651 College of Behavioral & Social Sciences 113 Taylor Education Building 919-530-7642 Criminal Justice 919-530-6280 301 Whiting Criminal Justice Building Developmental and Supplemental Learning 102 Alexander-Dunn Building 919-530-6932 Human Sciences 919-530-6477 108 Dent Human Science Building Physical Education 919-530-6186 C211 Walker Complex Latham Parking Deck

Academic Affairs - Provost Office 310 Hoey Administration Bldg 919-530-6230 Academic Community Service Learning 206 ACSL Building 919-530-6143 Dean’s Office, University College 238 Alexander-Dunn Bldg 919-530-5235 Administration and Finance 919-530-6204 301 Hoey Administration Building Alumni Relations 919-530-6363 Alumni House, 2223 Fayetteville St. Athletics 919-530-7057 101 McDougald-McLendon Arena Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute 105 BBRI Bldg 919-530-7630 Biomanufacturing Research Inst. & Tech. Enterprise BRITE Bldg 919-530-6846 Bursar/Cashier 919-530-6209 012 Hoey Administration Building Billing (Student Accounting) 919-530-5071 207 Hoey Administration Building University Bookstore Latham Parking Deck

919-530-6445

Campus Recreation Walker Complex

919-530-6130

919-530-6445

Psychology 919-530-5165 209 Taylor Education Building Political Science 919-530-6434 101-C Edmonds Classroom Building Public Health Education 135 Miller-Morgan Building

919-530-6422

Public Administration 919-530-7265 318 Whiting Criminal Justice Building Social Work 308 Hubbard-Totton Building

919-530-7596

Sociology 919-530-6222 301 Edmonds Classroom Building College of Arts and Sciences 919-530-6798 115 Farrison-Newton Comm Building Aerospace Studies 919-530-6312 309 Taylor Education Building Military Science/ROTC 919-530-7195 103 Taylor Education Building Art 123 Fine Arts Building Eagle Card Office 117 Lee Biology Building

919-530-6391

919-530-5010

Evening & Wknd Degree Prog. 919-530-7914 2004 H. M. Michaux, Jr. School of Ed.


Office of Fraternity & Sorority Life Alfonso Elder Student Union 919-530-6316

Physics 919-530-6217 1202 Mary M. Townes Science

Honors Program 919-530-5379 G-05 Annie Day Shepard Hall

School of Business 919-530-6458 221 Willis Commerce Building

Human Resources Hubbard-Totton Building

919-530-6334

School of Education 919-530-6466 H. M. Michaux, Jr. School of Ed

International Affairs 102 Lee Biology Building

919-530-7912

School of Graduate Studies 919-530-7396 123 Taylor Education Building

Inclement Weather 919-530-7220 University Police Department

School of Library & Information Sciences 313 Shepard Library 919-530-6485

ITS Help Desk 919-530-7676 3rd Floor H. M. Michaux, Jr. School of Ed. James E. Shepard Library 919-530-6426

School of Law 263 Turner Law Building

Mail Center 919-530-7261 Lower Level, A.E. Student Union English and Mass Comm. 919-530-6221 307 Farrison-Newton Comm Bldg Global Studies 919-530-7218 325 Edwards Music Building History 919-530-6321 204 Edmonds Classroom Building Men’s Achievement Center 919-530-7814 208 Student Services Building Modern Foreign Languages 919-530-6331 211 Farrison-Newton Comm Bldg Music 211 Edwards Music Building 919-530-6319 Theatre/Drama 919-530-6242 106 Farrison-Newton Comm Bldg Biology 919-530-6407 2242 Mary M. Townes Science Chemistry 919-530-6462 3202 Mary M. Townes Science Environmental, Earth & Geospatial Sciences 2202 Mary M. Townes Science 919-530-5296 Mathematics and Computer Science 3242 Mary M. Townes Science 919-530-6315 Nursing Nursing Building

919-530-7235

919-530-6773

University College 919-530-6773 239 Alexander-Dunn Building Office of Student Conduct & Comm Standards G-20 Student Services Bldg 919-530-6311 Office of Student Advocacy 919-530-7492 G-20 Student Services Building New Student Services 919-530-6336 A. E. Student Union WNCU-FM90.7 Radio 919-530-7445 145 Farrison-Newton Comm Registrar’s Office 919-530-6654 102 Hoey Administration Building Residential Life 919-530-6227 G-06 Student Services Bldg Scholarships & Student Aid 919-530-6180 1st Fl Student Services Bldg Student Activities Board A. E. Student Union

919-530-7846

Student Affairs 919-530-6342 Suite 236 Student Services Bldg Student Government Assoc. A. E. Student Union

919-530-6107

Student Health and Counseling Services 1st Floor, Old Health Bldg 919-530-6317 Student Disability Services 919-530-6325 120 Student Services Building Student Engagement and Leadership A.E. Student Union 919-530-6486


Summer Sessions 919-530-6349 Auxiliary Services W. G. Pearson Cafeteria 919-530-6192 2048 H. M. Michaux, Jr. School of Ed University Testing Center 919-530-7368 Ticket Office 919-530-5170 C305 Walker Complex W. G. Pearson Dining Hall University Switchboard 919-530-6100 H. M. Michaux, Jr. School of Ed. Undergraduate Admissions Latham Parking Deck 919-530-6665 University Police Department 919-530-6106 Transfer Services 919-530-6811 106 Lee Biology Building 919-530-5593 Women’s Center Career Services and Outreach 005 William Jones Building 919-530-6337

Writing Studio 102 Taylor Education Building 919-530-6035

DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Dr. Carlton Wilson 310 Hoey Administration Building | 919-530-6100 Dr. Carlton Wilson serves as the interim chief academic officer of the University, overseeing the University’s academic programs, research, personnel, resources and support services. The provost provides academic leadership and oversees the quality of instruction and research through collaborative work with deans, department chairs and faculty, addressing issues such as effective planning, management, and program reviews. The provost also administers and monitors procedures and criteria for faculty appointments and tenure promotion, working to ensure the quality of student learning by enhancing teaching and learning, coordinating initiatives in undergraduate education and fostering a diverse climate University-wide.

Schools and Colleges

College of Arts and Sciences 919-530-6798 Dr. Veronica Nwosu, Interim Dean 115 Farrison-Newton Communications Building Departments: Art, Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences, History, Language and Literature, Mass Communication, Mathematics and Physics, Music, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Theatre and Dance. College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 919-530-5349 Dr. Debra Parker, Dean 111 Taylor Education Building Departments: Criminal Justice, Human Sciences, Nursing, Political Science, Physical Education and Recreation, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Health Education, and Social Work. School of Business 919-530-6175 Dr. Wanda Fleming Lester, Interim Dean 226 Willis Commerce Building Departments: Accounting, Computer Science and Business, Finance, Hospitality and Tourism, Management, and Marketing.


School of Education 919-530-5327 Dr. Audrey W. Beard, Interim Dean 2062 H.M. Michaux, Jr. School of Education Departments: Allied Professions and Curriculum and Instruction. School of Library and Information Sciences 919-530-7585 Dr. Irene Owens, Dean 310 Shepard Library For more information: www.ncculsis.org School of Law 919-530-6333 Phyliss Craig-Taylor, Dean Turner Law Building For more information: www.law.nccu.edu School of Graduate Studies 919-530-7396 Dr. Jelah Rezaie, Associate Provost and Dean 123 Taylor Education Building Enrollment Management 919-530-6682 Sr. Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management Dr. Monica T. Leach 306 Hoey Administration Building

SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT AID Student Services Building, 1st Floor | 919-530-6180

The burden of financing a college education can be eased with grants, scholarships, work-assistance, and loans. Most families initially seek funds that are free, such as grants and scholarships. Other funds that must be repaid, such as low-interestrate student and parent loans, also are used to meet the cost of education. Some students find opportunities to work. Regardless of your income, there are funds available at NCCU to assist with college expenses. Apply for NCCU Scholarships Jan. 1 – Feb. 28 at nccu.edu/scholarships. The initial step to receiving financial assistance is to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov. The financial aid cycle (FAFSA Application/Student Aid Report/Verification/Award) typically takes 4 weeks. Apply early to ensure that you receive the best financial aid package. Students are encouraged to apply immediately after Jan. 1 of each year. When completing the financial aid application, the income reported on a W-2 statement or final pay stub may be used, if your federal tax return has not been filed. Financial Aid recipients’ grades are reviewed after the spring semester to confirm that they are progressing toward a degree. Your cumulative GPA and earned hours are reviewed to determine if you are meeting the university standards to receive financial assistance for the next school year. Carefully choose your classes to ensure that the classes attempted are successfully passed each semester. Maintaining a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and passing at least 67 percent of attempted hours are the minimum requirements for receiving financial aid.


You may view updates and changes to your financial aid award through Eagles Online (My-EOL). A hard copy of revised award notifications will not be mailed. To ensure that you are aware of changes, view your financial aid award at least twice a month. Computers are available in the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid to view financial aid award changes, complete the FAFSA, search for scholarships, complete promissory notes, entrance/exit loan counseling, etc. Apply for financial aid early, maintain a copy of federal tax returns, meet deadlines and read correspondence are the keys to successfully completing the financial aid cycle.

FREQUENTLY VISITED WEBSITES

Apply for Financial Aid www.fafsa.gov View Status of FAFSA www.fafsa.gov Make Corrections to Financial Aid www.fafsa.gov Loan Entrance Counseling Session www.studentloans.gov Master Promissory Notes for Students www.studentloans.gov Master Promissory Notes for Parents www.studentloans.gov Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy www.nccu.edu/ssa Scholarship Webpage www.nccu.edu/scholarships Scholarship & Student Aid Forms www.nccu.edu/ssa Banner Web for Students www.nccu.edu/eol

Accept Your Financial Aid Award

Log into MyEOL, then use the following steps to accept your Financial Aid award: Step 1: Select BANNER SSB Step 2: Enter Banner ID & Pin, select login Step 3: Choose “Student & Financial Aid” Step 4: Select “Financial Aid” Step 5: Select “My Award Information” Step 6: Select “Award for Aid Year” Step 7: Select Current Award Year (i.e., 2015-2016) & Submit Step 8: Look for “Accept Award Offer” Step 9: Choose “Accept Full Amount” or “Accept Partial Loan Amounts” and submit decision.  Note:  Any loan amount you accept will automatically split between Fall and Spring

Financial Aid Tips

Apply Early Apply for financial aid on October 1st of each year; the application may be filed online at www.fafsa.gov. To complete the FAFSA, you may use your final check stub to record your earnings from work, if you have not filed a Federal Tax Return.  Maintain a copy of pertinent income records (W-2’s, IRS Tax Return Transcript, etc.). Finalize Pending Documents: Submit requested documents such as IRS Federal tax return transcripts, W-2 forms, and verification worksheets immediately.  Please ensure that documents are appropriately signed.  If your financial aid is pending, you are ineligible for a book allowance. The Office of Scholarships and Student Aid has partnered with CFI School Servicing Center (SSC) to streamline the verification process. After submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid for 2015-16, students who are identified as selected for verification through SSC will be required to complete an interview and submit tax transcripts, and other required forms directly to SSC. It is extremely important for students who are selected for verification to act immediately by visiting https://www.sscwp.org/ivi/student/student_landing.htm and submitting all requested documents. Documents may be scanned, faxed or emailed to the agency. Should you have any questions, please contact an SSC


representative at 855-328-4400. Review Award Notifications: Review and understand the financial aid indicated on the award notification and complete the necessary paperwork for receiving each award. The financial aid awarded represents assistance for the Fall and Spring semesters.  A signed copy of the award notification must be provided to our office unless accepted through MyEOL. Loan Requirements: New and transfer students who desire a Stafford loan (subsidized or unsubsidized) are required to complete loan entrance counseling and complete a Master Promissory Note  online at www.studentloans.gov.  In addition, if you desire a parent loan, the online PLUS application must be completed at www. studentloans.gov. The borrowing parent must sign in using their information and federal pin. A Master Promissory Note (MPN) must be completed for parents borrowing a Federal Direct PLUS loan online at www.studentloans.gov. Stafford Loan delayed loan disbursements are required for first-time, first year borrowers.  Stafford loans are credited 30 days after classes begin for First-Year Students who accepted loans, attended a loan entrance counseling session, and completed a master promissory note.  These funds will be considered for meeting the one half payments. Federal Work-Study contracts for students are provided in September.  Work Study is awarded on a first come, first serve basis.  Notification will be sent to your NCCU email address.  Students are paid $7.50 per hour for regular work-study and $8 per hour for the America Reads program (tutoring elementary students). Award Revisions: Automatic adjustments to financial aid awards are performed for undergraduate students with less than 12 credit hours, upon receipt of external resources (i.e., scholarships) and for students who withdraw.  Revised award notifications are not issued; you may review your account adjustments online. SAP: Satisfactory Academic Progress Federal regulations require schools to monitor the academic progress of each applicant for financial assistance and certify that the applicant is making satisfactory academic progress towards earning his/her degree or certificate.  Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and successfully complete 67% of attempted credit hours.  View the policy online at www.nccu.edu/ ssa. 150% Maximum Time Frame: The maximum timeframe that a student may receive Stafford Loans and a Pell Grant is 150% of the program or six years.  Students are encouraged to register and successfully complete 15 credit hours each semester.  New regulations for Federal and State student aid programs specify that previously passed courses repeated (with a D or higher grade) more than once can no longer be counted in the enrollment status for determining a student’s federal and state aid eligibility.  Financial Management: Budget and plan for academic expenses including summer School.  View your account balance periodically to ensure that your account balance is zero.  Always borrow wisely, remember student and parent loans must be repaid.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE                                                                                Alexander-Dunn Building

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919-530-6129

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www.nccu.edu/universitycollege

The mission of the University College is to ensure a successful transition of first and second year students to the point that they accomplish educational goals during their college matriculation. In addition to promoting the mission of the University as a whole, the University College will create a learning environment that fosters academic commitment, civic and community responsibility, school pride and lifelong learning. University College provides tutoring and Supplemental Instruction services along with advising to all first and second year students in order to place them on a clear path to success within the University and to ultimately enable them to reach their goal of graduation. North Carolina Central University’s First Year Seminar Course, often referred to as UNIV 1100 is a two credit course offered under the University College department. This general education curriculum course is mandatory of all first-year, full-time students. As a requirement for graduation, this course is designed primarily to introduce students to college life and develop skills necessary for their success. It serves to promote scholastic attainment, the value of education, self-actualization, involvement in the campus and local community, and leadership skill development. The course focuses on the mastery of study skills, writing skills, critical thinking, health issues, and related issues.  To assist with transition to the university, each incoming students is assigned an academic advisor to guide them to their destination - Graduation. Based on their ACT/SAT scores and prior performance, the student and their advisor will review the academic plan and an advising syllabus indicating what they need to do to be a successful and competent student. Advisors in the University College are available to students on a daily basis. Students are required to meet with their advisor several times per semester. In addition, the advisor will receive regular progress reports from each of student’s professors for the first eight weeks of classes. At the end of the sophomore year, students will complete the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) Test, and clearance regarding GPA and any pre-requisite requirements from the Dean of the University College. When this is successfully completed, students will transition to the department of their major discipline. The college is led by: Dr. David S. Hood, Dean 919-530-5235 Dr. Jennifer Schum, Associate Dean, Academic Advising 919-530-6129 William Moultrie, JD, Interim Assoc. Dean, Academic Success & Enrichment Serv. (Acad. Counseling, Lyceum Series, Aspiring Eagles Academy) 919-530-6932 Dr. Kesha Lee, Executive Dir. for Student Academic Success 919-530-6976 Jacqueline Owens, Director, Tutoring &Supplemental Instruction 919-530-6973 Dr. Karen Keaton Jackson, Director, The Writing Studio 919-530-6035 Kwadjo Steele, Coordinator, Student-Athlete Acad. Support Serv. 919-530-6759 Cynthia Duarte, Director, University Testing Center 919-530-7368 Angela Street, Director, Training and Seminar Designer 919-530-6970

ACADEMIC SUCCESS & ENRICHMENT SERVICES                                                     102 Alexander-Dunn Building | 919-530-6932

Academic Success & Enrichment Services focuses on enhancing student performance through academic counseling, tutorial services, supplemental instruction and student


engagement sessions on test-taking skills, stress management, time management and how-to-study programs. The program uses a hands-on approach to improving academic skills. This approach instills a sense of pride and responsibility in students to maintain satisfactory progress. The goal is graduation from North Carolina Central University in four years.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

The mission of University College Academic Advising (UCAA) is to promote student learning and development in first-year, second-year and transfer students with fewer than 60 credit hours. By providing professional and ethical advisement that assists students with making informed decisions regarding their educational, career and life goals, UCAA helps students evaluate and clarify interests and talents; understand available resources, curriculum plans, academic standards and graduation requirements; become engaged in their education as they learn to navigate the University; and develop and achieve educational plans consistent with personal and career goals. To ensure success and empower students to become lifelong learners in a global society, Academic Advisors share responsibility with advisees, and collaborate with faculty, staff, and administrators to uphold the mission and standards of the University. Academic Advising Learning Outcomes Through individual and group meetings with your assigned academic advisor, we will assist you in achieving the following Academic Advising Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Students will be able to evaluate academic and personal interests, strengths and challenges. 2. Students will be able to identify appropriate courses meeting curricular requirements for selected degree programs. 3. Students will be able to describe and follow academic policies and procedures as listed in the undergraduate catalog, NCCU website and official university communication. 4. Students will be able to utilize student information systems (Banner, GradesFirst, email) for access to personal information, registration and advising appointments. 5. Students will be able to describe and utilize various campus resources. Remain in frequent contact with your academic advisor about your progress and consider the partnership a primary resource for your academic success. At NCCU, we take student success seriously. On a recent survey of sophomores attending public institutions of North Carolina, the average satisfaction of NCCU students was higher than those attending every other UNC institution for nine of 12 aspects of academic advising, and second highest of all schools for three other criteria.

UNIVERSITY TESTING

University Testing Services offers many programs and services to the North Carolina Central University and local communities, including: Computerized Placement Tests [ACCUPLACER] and Computer-based interest and personality assessments.


Web-based testing Scanning and scoring test documents, surveys, and questionnaires for faculty and regional secondary and postsecondary institutions. Online/Distance Education Proctoring Services Students taking classes or training through other colleges and institutions by correspondence or other long-distance methods often are required to take exams. The University Testing Center agrees to provide supervision and a secure testing environment for those exams. Usually this involves a correspondence or online class through a university, but various types of organizations make use of this service. The Testing Office has proctored exams for institutions around the country, and welcomes international organizations as well. Exams Proctored Paper-pencil exams and online exams are the most common exams proctored, but with advance notice almost any type exam can be accommodated. The fee for proctoring services is $30 per test. The Testing Center accepts checks, credit and debit card payments. Babies and children are not permitted into the exam rooms at any time. They must be supervised outside the Testing Office. Testing staff will not provide child supervision for any reason.

WRITING STUDIO

The mission of the Studio is to support your learning and work as a writer in the university community through one-on-one and small group collaborative sessions. Who comes to The Writing Studio? Writers at all levels of proficiency and at all stages in the writing process: Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students do! What will you do at The Writing Studio? Talk one-on-one with a consultant about your writing. Brainstorm topics • Develop rough drafts • Organize ideas • Fine tune your writing • What should you bring to The Writing Studio? • Written assignment from your professor • Comments or suggestions from your professor or classmates • Two double-spaced printed copies of your draft (if possible) • Any other information on your assignment • Your disk or portable USB drive • A positive attitude

STUDENT-ATHLETE ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Office of Student-Athlete Academic provides academic support for student athletes. The acronym describes our commitment to each individual Eagle. E qually commit to preparing student-athletes academically and professionally A ssist parents and student-athletes with the essentials they need to succeed in college G uide student-athletes in the right direction academically, athletically and socially


L ead student-athletes to become more accountable and responsible individuals who can make decisions independently E qually commit to preparing student-athletes to become leaders in a diverse, global society S ucceed by using all campus resources available to navigate the college experience in fulfilling and rewarding ways while earning their degree from NCCU

TUTORING AND SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION

Tutorial Services are offered through the Academic Success and Enrichment Services Department of University College. For the students’ convenience, tutoring sessions are held in various locations across the campus. While our primary focus is to provide tutorial services for those courses in the General Education Curriculum (GEC), our graduate, professional and undergraduate tutors are equipped to meet the needs of many students enrolled in many upper and lower level courses. Tutors seek to engage students in dialog by asking probing questions which help students develop critical thinking skills by assisting them in articulating what they do not understand to become proactive learners. The University College Supplemental Instruction Program at North Carolina Central University focuses on peer-facilitated study sessions for selected GEC courses. Supplemental Instruction creates opportunities for students to work with trained Supplemental Instruction Leaders and collaboratively with their classmates to solve problems, compare notes, discuss readings, develop academic skills, and prepare for tests and exams.

STUDENT SUCCESS SERVICES

The Student Success Services (SSS) Program is a five-year, $1.1 million federally funded TRiO Program intended to improve the retention and graduation rates of first-generation and income-qualified students and students with disabilities at North Carolina Central University. Housed within University College in suite 227 of the Alexander-Dunn Building, SSS offers its approximately 140 participants personal and academic support, tutoring, supplemental instruction, academic counseling, developmental programming and financial literacy workshops to overcome barriers to success. Students who meet the criteria will be eligible to apply for an Educational Opportunity Grant to help reduce their dependency on loans. Goals SSS will provide services to increase the persistence, academic achievement and graduation rates of financially challenged, first-generation and disabled students as follows: Assist participants in acquiring the necessary skills, knowledge, and attributes to complete a post-secondary education; Maximize opportunities for financial assistance by improving the financial and economic literacy of participants; and Identify graduate and professional opportunities. Objectives The Student Support Services program at NCCU will strive to meet the following grant objectives:


Serve 140 participants each year, Confirm 77% of all participants served will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or will have earned a bachelor’s degree, Ensure 75% of all enrolled participants served by SSS will meet the performance level required to stay in good academic standing and Affirm 45% of new participants served each year will graduate within six years.

UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM

G-05 Annie Day Shepard Hall | 919-530-5379 | www.nccu.edu/honors The University Honors Program is designed to challenge and reward academically gifted students, encouraging them toward intellectual initiative and independence. It enriches the academic experience by providing students with opportunities to reach higher levels of in dependence, maturity and scholarly achievement. Students are selected for their outstanding academic achievements and monitored throughout a strategic four-year course of study that prepares them to pursue advanced degrees in competitive graduate or professional programs and to assume leadership roles in their professions and in society. The motto of the University Honors Program is “Preparing World Changers!� Students completing the University Honors Program will: develop effective leadership skills through interaction with exceptional faculty members; learn to solve contemporary problems through critical thinking, analysis and collaboration; be astute at identifying and engaging global issues, their context and ramifications in our world; and develop refined research, writing and communication skills. High-achieving students are encouraged to apply to the University Honors Program. Current students and transfer students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 are encouraged to apply. High school applicants need either a 1500 on the SAT or a 23 on the ACT.

OFFICE OF TRANSFER SERVICES

106 Lee Biology Building | 919-530-5593 The Office of Transfer Services was established in January 2011 to serve as a centralized resource for students transferring to the university. It is a clearinghouse for information regarding NCCU, including admission requirements, course equivalences, campus services, academic associations, networking opportunities and overall advising regarding integration into student life. The Office of Transfer Services advocates for current and prospective transfer students by aligning with both NCCU and community college counselors, advisors and academic staff. These relationships promote clarity for students on questions they may have regarding their preparedness to enter NCCU. The Office of Transfer Services, along with Undergraduate Admissions, has continual on-campus presence at North Carolina community colleges to provide insight on various NCCU program offerings, engage prospective students in campus activities and answer any questions students may have about the transfer process. The office oversees implementation of articulation agreements with N.C. Community Colleges to promote seamless entry into the university along proper study tracks for transfer students.


ACADEMIC COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAM 200 Eagle Campus Drive | 919-530-7079

The ACSLP program has been a pioneer in higher education in expanding the classroom setting to include service to community. The university encourages all undergraduates to embrace the leadership skills, critical thinking skills, and research training developed through community service. The university requires all full-time, transfer and readmitted undergraduate students to complete 30 hours of community service for each academic year of attendance at NCCU.

HOW DO I EARN COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS?

Community Service: In your first and second years, most of your community service hours will be earned through one-time service events sponsored by academic departments, the Community Service Office, and clubs and organizations. You may also sign up to conduct your service with one of more than 100 community organizations registered with the Community Service Office. We have volunteer service that fits every academic field and suits every interest. Most upper-class students will complete their service portfolios through participation in service-learning courses and unpaid internships and practicum experiences.

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS/ INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES

Ste 102A & 103 Lee Biology Blg | 919-530-7912 | nccu.edu/academics/resources/ The Office of International Affairs (OIA) at NCCU was established to promote a greater international presence within the NCCU community and to build a stronger NCCU presence in the world. To help NCCU achieve its goals, OIA focuses on the following areas of service: international student and scholar services, study abroad and exchange, campus internationalization, international curriculum development, and community outreach. The office facilitates all study abroad programs for the university. Undergraduate and graduate students from all fields of study have opportunities to study abroad for a semester, academic year or summer in more than 40 countries through the University of North Carolina-Exchange Program (UNC-EP) and the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). Students can study in English or a variety of other languages. They may also have the opportunity to study abroad through NCCU faculty-led short-term programs in certain disciplines. Students interested in study abroad should visit the Office of International Affairs for more information about programs, eligibility requirements, application procedures, financial aid, and scholarships. Interested undergraduate students should visit OIA in their freshman year (no later than their sophomore year) in order to study abroad as sophomores or juniors. Graduate students should visit as early in their program as possible. Students who have obtained an *F-1 visa are assisted with the immigration regulations for maintaining legal status while pursuing a full course of study. The Office of International Affairs provides pre-arrival information, **SEVIS I-20’s, check-in processes, orientations, F-1 student advising on issues involving travel, program extension employment information, curricular practical training, optional practical


training, and transfers. *An F-1 visa is a non-immigrant, full-time, student visa that allows foreign nationals to pursue education in the United States. *The SEVIS I-20 is an official U.S. government form. A prospective nonimmigrant student must have a Form I-20 issued by an SEVP-certified school in order to become eligible for an F-1 student visa.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Policies and Procedures for Undergraduate Studies Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Guidelines North Carolina Central University is required by federal law to notify students annually of their rights under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). FERPA provides that a student may inspect his or her education records. If the student finds the records to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights, the student may request amendment to the record. FERPA also provides that a student’s personally identifiable information may not be released to someone else unless (1) the student has given a proper consent for disclosure or (2) provisions of FERPA or federal regulations issued pursuant to FERPA permit the information to be released without the student’s consent. The following categories of personally identifiable information about students have been designated as public or directory information that may be disclosed for any purpose without student consent: name, local and permanent address, email address, telephone number, date and place of birth, class, major field of study, dates of attendance, enrollment status, degrees and awards (including scholarships) received, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended. Directory information does not include a student’s Social Security Number or student identification number. Under FERPA, the student has the right to request that the disclosure of directory information be withheld. (Currently enrolled students may request that the university withhold disclosure of directory Information by completing the appropriate form available in the Office of the Registrar. A request for non-disclosure will be honored by the university indefinitely, unless the student submits to the University Registrar a written revocation of such request for non-disclosure). The university may also release personally identifiable information from student education records without the student’s consent to school officials who have a legitimate educational interest to access the records. “Education records” mean records that are maintained by NCCU in any media (e.g. paper, electronic, digital image, film, video, audio tape) that contain information directly related to a student and are personally identifiable to a student. Education records do not include 1) personal records of university employees that are in the sole possession of the maker, 2) records of the NCCU police department used for law enforcement purposes, 3) student medical and counseling records maintained and used only in connection with provision of medical treatment or counseling of the student and are made available only to the individuals providing the treatment, 4) employment records unrelated to the student’s status as a student (these records are covered under the N.C. Personnel Records Act), or (5) records that contain information about a student after he or she is no longer in attendance at the university. “School official” means: 1) an employee, agent or officer of the university or the


University of North Carolina’s Office of the President or General Administration in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position and acting in his or her official capacity, including a student assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks, 2) a person serving on university committees, boards, and/or councils, including a student serving on a disciplinary or grievance committee, 3) another educational institution that requests records for a particular student who seeks or intends to enroll, and 4) a person or company with whom the university has contracted (e.g. internship and clinical facilities, attorney, auditor, or collection agent), but limited to only the specific student information needed to fulfill the contract. “Legitimate educational interest” means the function of a school official who is performing an authorized task or an activity that he or she is undertaking in the name of the university for which access to an educational record is necessary or appropriate to the operation of the university or to the proper performance of the educational mission of the university. If a student believes that the information contained in his/her education records is inaccurate or misleading, or that it violates privacy or other rights, the student may request that the university amend the record. Such request shall be in writing addressed to the registrar, and shall specify the amendment sought. The registrar or his/her designee shall, within 30 days after receiving the student’s request, and after consulting with appropriate university officials, decide whether the record will be amended in accordance with the request, and inform the student. If the decision is to refuse to amend the record in accordance with the request, the registrar shall simultaneously advise the student that he/she may request a hearing to challenge the content of the education record to ensure that the information therein is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy or the rights of the student. Students who believe that the adjudications of their challenges were unfair or not in keeping with FERPA, may request in writing assistance from the chancellor. Further, students who believe that their rights have been abridged, may file complaints with the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202, concerning the alleged failures of the university to comply with the law. All questions concerning this FERPA Annual Notification may be directed to the attention of the Office of the Registrar. For additional FERPA information, visit the website at www.ed.gov.

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION, ADVISING AND REGISTRATION

All new students (first-time college students and transfer students) are required to attend a Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (SOAR) session after they are admitted to the university and prior to the semester they enroll. SOAR sessions are scheduled for May, June, and July for those enrolled for the Summer and Fall semesters and in January for those enrolled for the Spring semester. The primary purpose of the orientation program is to equip students and families with the necessary information to successfully transition into campus life. They will have the opportunity to engage with the university community, register for classes, tour the campus, and receive answers to pertinent questions. Students will register for a particular session and will then be notified confirming the arrival date, time, and location. This is an opportunity for New Eagles to get a flying start as they begin the next phase of their lives!


Academic Advising

Academic advising is an integral component of the educational experience at North Carolina Central University. In concert with the mission and goals of the university, academic advising is open to all students in all academic departments, schools, and colleges. One of the main purposes of academic advising is to assist students in reaching personal and professional goals. Students are expected to meet with advisors several times per semester. A signed advising syllabus between the University College advisor and student provides guidance in terms of what the student needs to do in order to be successful in their academic pursuits. It is important that students sign in each time they visit their advisor. While academic advisors are available to assist students in making course selections as well as providing additional resources for student success, the student is ultimately responsible for his/her success. The university strongly expects students to become familiar with graduation requirements for their chosen majors, to meet with their academic advisors on a regular basis to discuss their academic progress, give their academic work the highest priority, and carefully plan course selections and sequences. Carefully following these expectations and forming a strong working relationship with an assigned academic advisor can ensure student success and graduation from NCCU.

Placement Testing

Academic skills assessment and course placement activities are designed to evaluate a student’s proficiency in reading comprehension, sentence skills, mathematics and foreign language. All freshmen who do not transfer courses that are the equivalents to ENG 1110 and/or MATH 1100 are required to take placement tests in English and mathematics before they can register for classes. Transfers are exempt from the English placement exam. Students may be exempt from the English and/or mathematics placement tests if they score a minimum of 480 on the math portion and/or a minimum of 530 on the verbal portions of the SAT. Students who take the ACT may also be exempt from the English and/or mathematics placement tests if they score a minimum of 20 on the math portion and/or a minimum of 22 on the reading portion of the ACT. Except as herein provided, all new students who have taken two years or more of the same foreign language in high school are tested to determine their foreign language placement unless they choose to study a different foreign language. Students who have not taken two years or more of the same foreign language in high school or who choose to study a different foreign language must enroll in an introductory foreign language course. However, students who transfer foreign language credits equivalent to or above the first level in Spanish, French or German are not required to take the foreign language placement test.

Registration

Students complete the registration process via Banner Self Service (SSB). Students use the Eagles Online (EOL) website to access Banner SSB. Banner SSB is available for registration during the period of time set forth by the academic calendar each semester. Additionally, Banner SSB affords the opportunity for students to register, to view class schedules, NCCU transcripts, student account information, financial aid information, grades, and to track their academic progress. Students are required to meet with their advisors to discuss curricula plans and course schedules. The Alternate Personal Identification Number (PIN) is used during the registration process. The Alternate PIN is the property of the university and faculty


members and advisors issue the Alternate PIN to the student once the student has been properly advised to complete the registration process. The Alternate PIN is changed each semester to insure security and to encourage students and advisors to meet at least twice each academic year to review the students’ progress. As designated by the academic calendar, the registration period officially ends on the day designated as the last day of late registration and schedule adjustments. Course schedules will be canceled for students who do not make satisfactory payment arrangements on or before the registration ending date. Late fees for registration are imposed on the date indicated on the academic calendar. Classes may not be added or dropped after the last day for schedule adjustments as indicated in the academic calendar.

Course Loads

A minimum full-time course load for an undergraduate student during fall and spring semesters is 12 credit hours and 6 credit hours in the summer. The maximum course load for which a student may register during fall and spring semesters is 18 and 12 credit hours during the summer. Students may petition their dean for permission to exceed maximum course loads. It is highly recommended that students enroll in at least 15 hours each fall and spring semester to graduate in a timely manner. CAUTION: Carrying less than a full-time course load may affect financial aid eligibility. Students who plan to take less than a full-time load should check with the donor of their aid or with the NCCU Office of Scholarships and Student Aid. Aid may be withdrawn if the academic load is less than full-time. The student will then be responsible for the payment of any tuition and/or fees. Students with a 3.0 or better cumulative grade point average may be allowed to carry a maximum of 21 semester hours with the approval of the dean of their college or school. Students with less than a 3.0 cumulative grade point average may not take more than 18.5 hours in a single semester. Under no circumstances will a student be allowed to register for more than 21 hours in a single semester.

Schedule Adjustments / Dropping & Adding Courses

During the late registration period, students may drop and/or add courses with the approval of the faculty advisor and the dean of their college or school. Undergraduate students may add and drop courses using the registration system during the first 5 business days of the fall and spring semesters; however, students are responsible for insuring that any registration schedule changes do not result in less than a twelve-academic credit hour semester unless intending to be part-time. Students are permitted to drop classes online until 4 p.m. of the last day of the drop/add period. After the end of the drop/add period, students may not add a class or change sections. Also, they will not receive a refund or adjustment for the amount owed or paid for classes dropped. Students may withdraw from individual classes with the permission of the academic advisor by presenting a signed withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office until the last day for students to withdraw from classes without academic penalty as governed by the academic calendar. However, there will be no adjustment in bills if classes are withdrawn during this period. The grade received for these withdrawn courses will be “W” (withdrawal from a course). Undergraduate students may not withdraw from courses after the date designated in the academic calendar as the last day to withdraw from a course. Students who do not attend classes after the last date for withdrawing from courses are withdrawn from the non-attended classes and will receive the grade of “NF,” which is the


equivalent of an “F” when calculating a student’s grade point average (GPA). CAUTION: Withdrawals from courses may affect eligibility for financial aid regardless of the grade assigned to the withdrawn course. Students should check with the donor of their aid or with the NCCU Office of Scholarships and Student Aid before withdrawing from a course. Students may change their status in a course from credit to audit only before the end of the official drop/add period. Any course not declared as an “audit” course by the last day of drop/add will count as a credit course on the student’s academic record. See “Auditing Courses” for the complete procedures to declare an audit. The appropriate NCCU officials may remove a student from class or authorize enrollment in additional classes when such changes are necessary to conform with North Carolina Central University or the University of North Carolina policies. A scheduled class may be canceled if a sufficient number of students do not register for the class. The meeting time for previously scheduled classes may be changed with proper authorization. Students affected by such changes will be given the opportunity to move to another class or will be allowed to drop any affected classes during the first week of the fall and spring semesters, or the first two days during a summer session, after receiving notice of such changes without penalty.

Transfer of Credit

All work accepted for transfer credit must be at least a “C” grade and will be treated as semester hours earned. The grades a student earned on transferred work will not be recorded on the academic transcript of the student’s work at NCCU and will not count toward the student’s grade point average (GPA). However, the transferred hours will count towards the maximum of 168 semester hours that a student may attempt as an undergraduate. Students transferring from a two-year institution may receive up to a total of 64 semester hours of academic credit from all institutions attended. Extension courses, advanced placement, CLEP credit, and military service credit are included in this maximum. Students who transfer from a four-year accredited institution may receive any number of semester hours of academic credit from all four-year institutions attended. These students, however, must meet the 30-semester hour residency requirement before receiving their degrees from North Carolina Central University. Students who transfer to NCCU and who request financial aid must also submit for evaluation an official financial aid transcript from all schools attended previously.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES

In keeping with the mission of the university, Academic Support Services provides assistance and support and gives students an opportunity to achieve maximum success. These services are designed to assist students in enhancing their academic performance in all subject areas. The services provide students the opportunity to develop relationships with counselors, faculty, tutors, supplemental instruction leaders, peer mentors, librarians, and other resource persons on the campus. Students will receive encouragement to internalize and apply learning experiences to classroom assignments and everyday living. All students will have access to the following services: individual and group tutorial sessions, mandatory academic advising, electronic tutoring, transfer students’ services, individual and group study programs, “how to study” programs, supplemental instruction, engagement sessions, curriculum monitoring, computerized


learning programs, counseling services, developmental skills programs, and class attendance monitoring. Students who avail themselves of these services will have an enhanced sense of personal responsibility for maintaining satisfactory progress toward graduation from North Carolina Central University in a timely manner.

ACADEMIC HONOR CODE Undergraduate Student Code of Academic Integrity

North Carolina Central University is dedicated to instilling in its students the highest principles of integrity and responsibility. In this regard, students are expected to demonstrate respect for these principles in the performance of their academic activities. Academic dishonesty, which is a violation of academic integrity, will be dealt with according to the provisions of the Student Code of Academic Integrity.

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty is defined as any conduct which is intended by the student to obtain for him/herself or for others an unfair or false evaluation in connection with any examination or other work for academic credit. Cheating, fabrication, plagiarism, and complicity are examples of conduct that is academically dishonest. Cheating is the unauthorized use of materials in connection with an examination or other work for academic credit, including but not limited to: (1) the use of books, notes, outlines, etc., during an examination where the instructor has not authorized use of such materials or information; (2) seeking unauthorized materials or information from others in connection with an examination; (3) giving or attempting to give unauthorized assistance to a person in connection with an examination; (4) obtaining or attempting to obtain unauthorized copies of examinations; (5) bringing to an examination, or attempting to use during an examination, unauthorized answers which have been prepared before the examination period; (6) copying or attempting to copy the work of another student during an examination; (7) the use of electronic equipment or media to provide unauthorized assistance to oneself or others; and (8) submitting for evaluation in a course, part or the whole of a work for which credit has been given previously. Fabrication is the intentional invention, counterfeiting, and/or alteration of quotations, data, procedures, experiments, sources, or other information for which the student claims authorship in an exercise which he or she submits with the expectation of receiving academic credit. Plagiarism is the intentional use of the ideas, words, or work of another without attribution when the information they provide is not common knowledge, either in content or form, and includes but is not limited to: (1) quoting from the published or unpublished work of another without appropriate attribution; (2) paraphrasing or summarizing in one’s own work any portion of the published or unpublished materials of another without attribution; and (3) borrowing from another’s work information which is not in the domain of common knowledge. Complicity is the intentional giving of assistance or the attempt to give assistance to another for the purpose of perpetrating academic dishonesty.

Penalties for Academic Dishonesty

The imposition of the penalty for academic dishonesty shall be made by the instructor responsible for assigning the final grade in the course within the guidelines set forth in subsections (a) through (c) below. The instructor will determine the appropriate penalty in relation to the gravity of the offense, the type of academic exercise on which the offense occurred, and the weight of that exercise in the computation of the


final grade consistent with the following: For an academic dishonesty act committed in an exercise counting for up to 10% of the final grade, the penalty will be the grade of F/Zero for the entire exercise or parts of it. For an academic dishonesty act committed in an exercise counting for between 11% and 24% of the final grade, the penalty will be the grade of F/Zero or a reduced grade for the exercise. For an academic dishonesty act committed in an exercise counting for 25% or more of the final grade, or for final examinations and papers, the penalty may be as severe as the grade of F for the course. However, the penalties for refusing to respond or failing to respond within 48 hours to the formal charge of academic dishonesty will be an automatic F/Zero for the exercise in cases of category (a) or (b) above, and an automatic F/Zero for the course in cases of category (c). In addition, the charge of academic dishonesty will stand and will be recorded on a student’s academic transcript. The dean of the school shall check the records of all students reported for academic dishonesty and refer all cases involving a second offenses of academic dishonesty to the Academic Integrity Board. The penalty for a second act of academic dishonesty committed any time before the offender’s graduation may be as severe as suspension or expulsion.

Policy Regarding Student Academic and Disciplinary Records

In order to maintain appropriate records regarding its students, North Carolina Central University follows the policy and procedures described below. They are designed to guide the university’s efforts in maintaining information about students’ academic performance at the university while treating it ethically and appropriately safeguarding their privacy. For purposes of this policy, the following definitions apply: (Unsatisfactory earned grades, violation of the undergraduate class attendance policy, and withdrawal from large numbers of courses resulting in a deficiency in earned credit hours may contribute to academic performance deficiencies.) Academic Misconduct - Any violation of the “Undergraduate Student Code of Academic Integrity” for undergraduate students or any violation of the comparable policy for the graduate or professional program in which the student is enrolled. Non-Academic Misconduct - Any misconduct that is non-academic in nature and that violates the Student Code of Conduct in force at the time of the infraction.

Early Warning and Midterm Grades

An early warning is issued during the fourth week of the semester for any student performing below the grade of ‘C’. Mid-term grades are issued for students performing below the grade of ‘C’. Any undergraduate student whose GPA falls below 2.0 for any semester will receive a letter of warning from the dean of the college or school in which the student’s academic program is housed.

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Good Academic Standing

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Good Academic Standing are determined by


term and cumulative grade point averages (GPAs), and the ratio of attempted to completed semester credit hours.

Term Grade Point Average

After the first full-term at NCCU (enrolled in at least 12 credit hours during a fall or spring term, or 6 credit hours during summer), all full-time undergraduates must maintain a 2.0 semester NCCU grade point average.

Cumulative Grade Point Average

After completing the first academic year at NCCU (to include one fall, spring, and summer term), all undergraduate students must maintain a 2.0 cumulative NCCU grade point average.

Ratio of Attempted to Completed Semester Credit Hours

Students must complete 67% of all credit hrs attempted, including accepted transfer hours. Students who do not earn 67% of all attempted credit hrs will be placed on financial aid warning as well as academic probation for the following semester.

Probation and Appeals Process

New students who do not achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA after the first academic year at NCCU, or complete 67% of all attempted credit hours will be placed on academic probation for one semester. If at the end of the probation semester the student fails to earn the required 2.0 semester or cumulative GPA, or to complete 67% of attempted hours, s(he) will be suspended from NCCU for two semesters. After the suspension, a student may apply to be readmitted to the University on probation. If at the end of the probation semester after readmission, the student again fails to earn the required 2.0 semester or cumulative GPA, or to complete the 67% of attempted hours, s(he) will be dismissed from NCCU. A dismissed student may then appeal the dismissal to the dean of his/her academic college/school.

Academic Transcripts

Academic transcripts are permanent records documenting student performance in courses and degree programs completed at the university. Transcripts are maintained in the Office of the Registrar and printed on authentic tamper-protected paper; they are official documents of student matriculation, course-work and degrees completed at the university. Transcripts will be transmitted to third parties only in strict accordance with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and only for those students who have no outstanding financial balances with the university. Official transcripts contain notations regarding grades for academic work taken at the university, transfer credits accepted, academic probation and academic suspension, administrative withdrawal, degrees earned at North Carolina Central University, and appropriate identifying biographical information. Notations of academic misconduct and non-academic misconduct shall not be recorded on transcripts or retained by the Office of the Registrar except for notice of expulsion. Notations of academic performance deficiencies shall remain on transcripts.

Internal University Student Files

Official files regarding disciplinary actions will be maintained in the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. As with academic transcripts, a student’s disciplinary file will be released to third parties in a manner consistent with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Notations regarding academic misconduct and


non-academic misconduct, except for expulsion, shall be removed from all academic transcripts.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to be present and on time at all regular class meetings and examinations for the classes for which they are registered. Each instructor is required to withdraw a student from the class roll when that student has been absent from class for the number of class meetings that equals a two-week period. Students representing the university on official business that will require absences beyond the two-week period must make pre-arrangements to be absent from classes at the specific request of their university sponsor. For classes that meet two times a week, this means after four absences, the student is withdrawn from class and assigned the grade of “NW” (withdrawn for non-attendance) or “NF” (non-attendance failing). For classes that meet three times a week, this means after six absences, a student is withdrawn from classes and assigned the grade of “NW” or “NF”. The calculation of absences will begin at the date that the student officially registers for the class. Withdrawal grades for non-attendance are “NW” and “NF.” A student who is withdrawn from a course after the last day to withdraw from courses will receive a grade of “NF” which is treated the same as “F” in determining credit hours and grade point averages. The student has the right to appeal the decision of the faculty member to withdraw him/her from the class roll as well as the assignment of the “NF” or “NW” grades through the Grade Appeal Policy. Absences will not be designated as “excused” or “unexcused”; therefore, administrators from Student Health Services and the Division of Student Affairs will no longer write excuses for students’ absences. Extenuating circumstances will be handled on an individual basis by the Division of Student Affairs, the Student Health Services, and academic deans.

Definition of Extenuating Circumstances

An “extenuating circumstance” is defined by the university as a situation that is beyond the student’s control and which could not have been prevented by the student. Such circumstances include, but are not limited to, the following: Medical/Psychological Personal/Family Emergency Death of a Family Member Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Serious Car Accident Changes in Employment/Unexpected Financial Difficulty Military Service Undergraduate Student Withdrawal North Carolina Central University recognizes that the enrollment of some students may need to be discontinued for reasons beyond the control of the student. The purpose of the policy on withdrawal is to provide guidelines for establishing the basis for such withdrawals and for determining the course grades, eligibility for refunds, and satisfactory progress for financial aid in such discontinuations.

Course Withdrawal without Extenuating Circumstances

A student is allowed to withdraw from any class for any reason (and receive a


grade of W) after the end of the drop/add period and until the published deadline for withdrawing from class(es), not exceed 16 credit hours. Course withdrawals prior to fall 2014 are excluded from the 16 credit hour limit.

Course Withdrawal with Extenuating Circumstances

Students may request withdrawal with extenuating circumstances for one or more courses due to serious and compelling reasons, such as an accident or serious illness, where the cause of withdrawal was due to circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control. Courses will count as attempted hours but not towards tuition surcharge or GPA calculations, and are subject to all financial aid and SAP rules and calculations. Students may submit an appeal to the dean or the designee of their college/school for evaluation. Appeals of a negative decision are handled by the Office of the Provost.

Extenuating Circumstances for Course Withdrawal and Academic/ Financial Aid Appeals

Extenuating circumstances and examples of suggested documentation include, but are not limited to the following: • Medical/Psychological - Statement from physician or therapist on letterhead including dates of service and whether or not the student is stable and ready to return to the University. • Personal/Family Emergency - Medical documentation or statement from physician on letterhead including dates of service; Notarized statement from parent or family member. • Death of a Family Member - Copy of an obituary, funeral program, or certified death certificate; and Statement of the relationship between the student and deceased. • Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault - Copy of policy report or court/legal documents; Statement from physicians or therapists on letterhead including dates of service and whether or not the student is stable and ready to return to the University. • Serious Car Accident - Copy of police report; Medical documentation or statement from physician on letterhead including dates of service; Documentation from repair company indicating seriousness of accident. • Changes in Employment/Unexpected Financial Difficulty - Statement from employer indicating employment change/termination; Financial/bank statements. • Military Service/Deployment - Military orders showing dates of deployment, training, or service. • Reinstatement/Made up Deficit Hours - Official academic transcript review and posting of transfer hours by the NCCU Registrar’s Office. • Unusual Enrollment History - Documentation of academic or personal reasons which may explain the failure to earn credits.

Institutional Withdrawals

Students who wish to withdraw from the University for personal, medical, or academic reasons at any time during the semester must complete the Official University Withdrawal Form, which may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office. After the form has been completed and approved by the student’s academic advisor and the Registrar’s Office, the Registrar’s Office will update the student record in Banner. Students who leave the university without completing the Official Withdrawal Form will forfeit their eligibility for refunds of tuition and fees. Students who are unable to appear in person may notify the Registrar’s Office by letter of their intention to withdraw. (It is conceivable that the letters may sometime be sent to deans when the withdrawal is of an academic nature. The dean would then collaborate with the Office of the Dean of Students.) Withdrawals are effective upon receipt and processing of the letter by the Office of the Dean of Students.


The student identification card must be submitted with the withdrawal letter before refunds are made for tuition and fees.

Class Withdrawals

Grades received as a result of officially withdrawing from classes are “WC” or “WF.” Withdrawal from classes prior to the date listed in the academic calendar as the last day for undergraduates to withdraw from a class without penalty will result in a grade of “WC” being recorded on the student’s transcript. No grade points or hours are counted for a grade of “WC”; however, the “WC” grade counts in the attempted hours. Withdrawal from classes after the last day for undergraduates to withdraw from courses without penalty will result in a grade of “WF” being recorded on the student’s academic transcript. A grade of “WF” is computed in the grade point average the same as “F.”

• Students abandoning courses without initiating withdrawal procedures shall receive

failing grades. To avoid receiving a failing grade, students must officially withdraw from courses prior to the last day for withdrawing from courses as stated on the academic calendar. Classes from which a student withdraws after the drop/add period count as attempted but not earned hours. Therefore, withdrawing from classes after the drop/add period will negatively affect students’ ability to satisfy the hours earned standard. • Audited courses count as attempted but not earned hours. Therefore, auditing classes will negatively affect a student’s ability to satisfy the hours earned standard. • When a student repeats a course, the total attempted hours will increase with each repeat, but the student may only earn hours once for a successfully completed course. Therefore, repeating courses may negatively affect a student’s ability to satisfy the hours-earned standard. • Accepted transfer credit will count as both attempted and earned hours.

Administrative Withdrawals

The university may approve the withdrawal of a student from a course or courses for circumstances such as health, psychological counseling, administrative requirements, or other conditions beyond the control of the student. Such action is called an Administrative Withdrawal and is non-punitive. The student must complete an Official University Withdrawal Form, include any supporting documentation and submit the completed form and supporting documentation to the student’s academic advisor or the dean of the student’s college or school. A grade of “W” is recorded on the student’s transcript if the student is granted an Administrative Withdrawal by the appropriate academic dean upon a recommendation from the vice chancellor for academic affairs. The action of the dean is final and must be rendered either prior to the end of the semester or as soon as the official documentation is received. Student fees are adjusted for any withdrawal based on the university’s regular policy governing refunds (see “Student Expenses” section in this Catalog). Exceptions to the refund policy will be considered only upon the recommendation and approval of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

“Sitting In On” (Auditing) a Course

Students may “sit in on” (audit) a course without credit with the permission of the advisor. The forms to audit a course are available in the Office of the University Registrar, Room 102 Hoey Administration Building and must be completed and submitted to the Registrar before the end of the official drop/add period. Individuals


not regularly enrolled as students in the university who wish to audit courses must apply for admission as special students and will be required to pay the regular tuition and fees for the courses audited as is charged for credit courses. NCCU students in regular status can audit courses and must pay the same tuition and fees as required for credit courses. Audited courses will not count as credit for any degree program. Students who wish to audit a course must complete a “Declaration of Audit” form in the Registrar’s Office before the end of the official drop/add period as indicated in the academic calendar.

CHALLENGING COURSES FOR CREDIT BY EXAM Institutional Challenges

North Carolina Central University subscribes to the belief that learning can occur in places other than the classroom and through measures other than those practiced in the regular classroom setting. NCCU subscribes also to the principle that undergraduate students should be provided opportunities to demonstrate that skills and knowledge they have acquired outside their normal classroom operations are equivalent to the competencies they attain through their regular classroom activities. Based on these principles, the university adheres to the following policy on Institutional Challenge of undergraduate courses for undergraduate credit: Subject to the limitation stated in the following challenge procedures: Undergraduate students may challenge for credit any course in the General Education Curriculum that has been approved for challenge by the GEC Advisory Council. Undergraduate courses not in the General Education Curriculum may be challenged only with the consent of the department or school in which the courses are housed.

Challenge Procedures

Only currently enrolled students may challenge courses, unless the challenging students are members of an official North Carolina Central University program that explicitly includes such challenges as part of the curriculum. Students may not challenge courses in which they have previously made a grade other than “W.” Students carrying 15 hours but less than 21 hours in a regular term may challenge, without extra charge, enough eligible courses to make their total hours (enrolled and challenged) equal to 21. Students carrying 15 hours but less than 21 hours may challenge enough eligible courses to make their total of enrolled and challenged hours exceed 21 hours in a regular term, but they will be charged the regular credit hour rate for all challenged hours above 21 hours. Students carrying fewer than 15 hours may challenge eligible courses, but they will be charged the regular credit hour rate for all challenged courses between the number they are taking and 15 credit hours. If the number of challenged hours and enrolled hours exceeds 21, they will be charged the regular credit hour rate for the challenges between the number enrolled and 15 hours, plus the same rate for all hours over 21 hours. If the challenge is conducted through a standardized, externally-supplied test, the students will pay the cost of the test and/or the cost of administering and scoring the test, in addition to the cost, if any, of the credit earned by the challenge. Challenge examinations may be by department-authorized standardized test or by


department-developed test. If the test is a department-developed test, the test must be department-approved and withstand the test of reliability and validity. During each semester or summer session in which faculty resources are available, challenges must be completed by 5 p.m. of the 12th business day following the first day of classes. Departments and schools may, in order to administer the challenges efficiently, establish deadline dates for applications for challenges. The departments and schools should publish such deadlines at the beginning of the pertinent semester or summer session when faculty resources are available. The notice should include both the deadline for application and the date of the examination itself. A student may challenge a given course only one time. Passing grades for challenges are A, B, and C only and are reported to the Registrar through channels designated by the appropriate dean. Grades below C will be reported as unsuccessful challenges but will not appear on the student’s transcript or other grade reports. Departments and schools will keep a record of each challenge attempt in order to enforce the provision of No. 10 above. Standardized external test score results will be interpreted from predetermined criteria by individual schools and departments, and reported as A, B, or C grades. Passing grades for challenges will have all the same qualities of grades earned in regular classes. Passing grades for challenges are counted for any purpose for which similar regular classroom course grades are counted. Grades earned through challenges will be so designated on the student’s transcript in order that changes may be ascertained whenever the total of enrolled and challenged hours exceed 21. Challenges are a purely academic matter; hence, all disputes about permission to challenge courses, appeals from grades in challenged courses, and other procedural or substantive questions about the challenge process will be handled through the same procedures and structures established by the appropriate dean for handling such questions for the regular classroom courses.

College-level Exam Program (CLEP)General Exams

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) gives students the opportunity to receive college credit for what they already know by earning qualifying scores on up to 33 college-level placement examinations. Students may earn credit for knowledge acquired through independent study, prior course work, on-the-job training, professional development, cultural pursuits or internships. North Carolina Central University is an approved national CLEP Testing Center through which students may arrange to take examinations in composition and literature, sciences and mathematics, foreign languages, history and social sciences and business. Baccalaureate students will be granted college credit for each test in the battery (five tests) in the award of up to six semester hours of credit in the areas covered by the tests; the total amount of credit granted for all five tests will not exceed 30 semester hours of credit or the equivalent of one academic year. Credits awarded through CLEP by accredited institutions will be accepted on the same basis as other transfer credits from those institutions. Credit will be awarded on the basis of minimum scores. Scaled scores range from 20, the lowest, to 80, the highest, for each 90-minute General Examination. To learn more about CLEP scores and semester credit hours please visit http://www.collegeboard. com/student/testing/clep/scores.html. The scores that appear in the table are the credit-granting scores recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE). North Carolina Central University accepts the score recommendations of ACE for


credit-granting purposes. For additional information on the CLEP examinations that are available, contact the University Testing Center at 919-530-7367 or visit the CLEP website at http://clep.collegeboard.org.

Taking Courses Off Campus

Students who wish to enroll in courses at other institutions and apply credit for those courses toward a degree at North Carolina Central University must obtain prior written approval of the advisor, the department chairperson, and the appropriate dean before registering for the course. This permission must be filed in the Registrar’s Office before the course is taken. Credit will not be granted for courses taken offcampus for which prior permission to take the course was not obtained. Forms to obtain permission to take a course at another institution may be obtained from the advisors or the appropriate dean. Credit for courses taken at another institution, except through the inter-institutional program as outlined below, is treated the same as any other transfer credit. Credit is given for any approved course work on which a grade of “C” or better was earned. However, the grade received at the institution where the work was completed does not appear on the student’s NCCU academic record nor does it figure into the student’s cumulative grade point average. Only credit for completing the course appears on the NCCU transcript.

Inter-Institutional Courses

Students regularly enrolled in a full-time degree program at North Carolina Central University may enroll by inter-institutional registration through NCCU for a course or courses at Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, or the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Before enrolling in a course at Duke, N.C. State, UNC-G, UNC-CH, or UNC-Charlotte, the student must receive certification from the appropriate dean that the course is relevant to the student’s degree program and that the equivalent course is not available at NCCU. Enrollment by inter-institutional registration during a regular term is limited to one course per semester for an undergraduate student, provided that the student is registered for the balance of his/her normal full-time load at NCCU and is limited to two courses per semester for a graduate (or professional) student, provided that he/she is also registered for at least three credit hours at NCCU. A summer school student must be enrolled in at least one summer school course at NCCU in order to enroll by inter-institutional registration at the other institution. A student taking a course at Duke, N.C. State, UNC-G, UNC-CH, or UNC-Charlotte through inter-institutional registration will be billed by NCCU for all courses taken. There is no additional charge for any fees associated with taking the course. Grading for a course taken by inter-institutional registration will be in accordance with the grading system of the institution where the course is taken. The grade will appear on the student’s transcript and will be counted the same as though the course had been taken at NCCU. Students who desire to complete a course via the inter-institutional program must: (1) register for the required number of courses at NCCU; (2) complete the Interinstitutional Approval Form and the Approval for Inter-Institutional Registration Form; (3) obtain signatures from either department chair or advisor and the dean in the


student’s school or college; and (4) submit the approved forms to the NCCU InterInstitutional Coordinator in the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar’s Office will then fax the Inter-Institutional Approval Form to the visiting university’s registrar’s office.

CREDIT AND GRADES

North Carolina Central University uses the semester-hour credit and the grade-point system in determining student achievement. A semester hour is the amount of credit earned for the satisfactory completion of one hour a week lecture or recitation or two hours a week laboratory practice throughout one regular semester. No student will be allowed credit for any course in which he or she was not officially registered at the end of the official drop/add period. At the end of each semester, a student is given a grade in each course in for which he or she is registered. This grade represents the quality of work done by the student in the course. The grade symbols used are: A Excellent, work of exceptionally high quality B Good, work of above-average quality C Average quality D Passing, but poor quality F Failing I Incomplete P Passing W Withdrawal (administrative) WC Student initiated withdrawal for a course WF Withdrawal, failing AU Audit

CALCULATING GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

While semester hours measure the quantity of work done, the grade point system is a measure of the quality of work a student performs. Grade points are assigned as follows: 4 for a grade of “A,” 3 for a grade of “B,” 2 for a grade of “C,” and 1 for a grade of “D.” No grade points are assigned for any other grades. The following formula is used to compute the GPA: Total Quality Hours (QHRS) divided into Total Quality Points (QPTS) = GPA. Thus, a student enrolled in six (6) three semester hour courses and earns “A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, and “WC”, would yield the following computation:

ENG 1110-101 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 4 (value of “A”) = 12 QPTS ENG 1400-101 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 3 (value of “B”) = 9 QPTS FREN 2100-101 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 2 (value of “C”) = 6 QPTS BIOL 1130-104 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 1 (value of “D”) = 3 QPTS HIST 1160-109 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 0 (value of “WC”) = 0 QPTS GEOG 2100-101 3 sem. hrs. (QHRS) x 0 (value of “NF”) = 0 QPTS 15 sem. hrs. 30 QPTS Thus: 15 QHRS divided into 30 QPTS = 2.00 GPA

Incomplete Grades

Students who desire to receive a grade of “I,” or incomplete, should submit a written request to the instructor. Students may be given a grade of “I” at the discretion of the instructor when not all of the work required in the course has been completed for reasons beyond the control of the student. All incomplete grades must be completed according to the agreement between the student and the instructor within the deadline established by the instructor, not to exceed one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the student was enrolled in the course.


Any incomplete grade remaining on the student’s record one year from the end of the relevant semester becomes a grade of “F,” and the student must retake the course in order to receive a grade other than “F.” All incomplete grades for graduating students are to be completed by March 15th for Spring Commencement and October 15th for Fall Commencement. If not, the student will forfeit his/her right to march in the Commencement Exercises.

Receiving Grades

Grades awarded will be available each term to all students who have no financial or other holds on their account. Students may receive their grades at the end of each semester or summer term in any of the following ways by using the term code, their student ID number and their personal identification number (PIN): On the Self Service via Banner (SSB): Midterm and final grades may be accessed through Eagles on Line at http://eol.nccu.edu, at the university web site. In person: Students may also report in person to the Office of the Registrar in Hoey Administration Building, Room 102, and request a copy of their grades for the last enrolled term (Photo ID required). Complete instructions for receiving grades are available each semester in the NCCU online class schedule or from the Registrar’s Office.

Undergrad Course Grade Repeat Policy & GPA

Students may for a variety of reasons elect to repeat a course. However, repeating courses often delays and adds to the cost of students’ education. Students are therefore urged and counseled to work hard all courses and to select courses carefully to graduate on time. If students elect to repeat a course, the following policies are in place:

Students entering NCCU in fall 2014 or thereafter are allowed four course repeats without penalty. After repeating a course, the lower grade is excluded from the GPA calculation. After four course repeats, all grades will be included in the cumulative GPA computation. Students may not repeat grades of C or better, but may audit without credit.

Students who attended NCCU prior to fall 2014 are allowed five course repeats, with all gradesincluded in the cumulative GPA calculation after the fifth repeated course taken. Transcripts will include all attempts to complete a course, and all attempts will be included in calculations of satisfactory academic progress and tuition surcharge.

Classification of Students

Undergraduate students are classified as freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, or special undergraduates. Special undergraduates are those conditionally admitted to take courses, but not admitted to a degree program and are not permitted to take more than 12 cumulative hours of course work. The classifications of freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior are based on the number of semester hours a student has completed and earned credits. The following credit hour classification is used: Freshman– less than 30 hours; Sophomore– 30 hours, but less than 60 hours; Junior– 60 hours, but less than 93 hours;


Senior– 93 hours or more. Curricula plans require a minimum of 124 hrs for graduation and a maximum of 128.

UNIT GRADE APPEALS BOARD

A Grade Appeals Board shall be selected by each of the following degree granting and other academic units: the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Science and Technology, the University College, Biomanufacturing Research Institute of Technology Enterprise (BRITE), the Department of Nursing, the School of Education and the School of Business. Faculty representatives will be selected by the respective deans from a list of nominees prepared by the Faculty Senate. Student representatives will be selected by the SGA president from students in each of the respective units. Each board will consist of seven voting members: four faculty and three students and one non-voting member who is the appeals counselor. Each board member will serve a one-year term, with the option of being appointed to a second one-year term at the discretion of the appointing dean or SGA president. A chairperson for the appeals board shall be elected from among the faculty members. A secretary shall also be elected from among the board members. A quorum shall consist of five board members, including at least three faculty and two students. Appeals board members are necessarily excluded from deliberations in which: 1. The board member is related to one of the two principals, 2. The board member is a departmental colleague of one of the principals, 3. The board member is enrolled in a course taught by one of the principals, or 4. The board member is one of the two principals involved. All questions of scheduling and satisfying deadlines shall be adjudicated by the chair of the appeals board. All records of the Grade Appeals Board shall be kept in a file maintained and preserved by the chairperson of the board.

The Appeals Counselor

Grade appeals counselors shall be selected by each of the following degree granting and other academic units: College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, College of Liberal Arts, College of Science and Technology, Biomanufacturing Research Institute of Technology Enterprise (BRITE), Department of Nursing, University College, School of Education, and School of Business. Each degree-granting unit will select an appeals counselor and an alternate. Appeals counselors and their alternates will be chosen by the students of the unit from a list of four nominees prepared by the dean of each unit. The University College will select two members to serve as appeal counselors. Each will serve a one-year term. The appeals counselor is an ex-officio non-voting member of the Grade Appeals Board. The president of student government will be responsible for convening the students of each unit for the purpose of electing the appeals counselors. These meetings should take place during the first full week of classes during the fall semester, with the appeals counselor assuming the responsibilities of the office immediately upon election.


Grade Appeals Procedures

The grade appeal policy is intended to provide a standardized, formal process for undergraduate students to resolve instances of alleged unfair or improper treatment in academic matters. The policy seeks to protect both students and faculty from acts of caprice, while preserving the integrity of the teaching/evaluation process. The policy is written to be consistent with the university’s concern for due process through a system of appeals. A student is allowed to remain in class during an appeal except in cases where the student’s remaining in class would endanger human life or the integrity of the academic program. Step 1: A student who believes that he or she has been graded unfairly or improperly must first schedule a conference with the concerned faculty member to attempt to arrive at a mutual understanding and to resolve any differences in an informal, cooperative manner. The student must express the appeal clearly, in writing, and listen to the instructor’s rationale. The meeting should be scheduled within 10 class days of the incident or two weeks after the student could reasonably be expected to be informed of the assigned grade. Step 2: If consultation with the instructor is impractical or if the student is dissatisfied with the results of the initial conference with the instructor, the student must seek the assistance of the department chair within five class days of meeting with the instructor. If the instructor involved is the department chair or if a satisfactory solution is not reached, the student should seek the assistance of the appeals counselor. This contact should be made within five days of the meeting with the department chair. The appeal counselor’s role is to guide the student through the remaining steps of the appeals process. In no way is the role of the counselor to be construed as that of advocate for either the student or the instructor. Step 3: A student may choose to file a formal grievance. However, a formal grievance may be filed only after conferring with the appeals counselor. The grievance must include the following: (a) date of incident; (b) date of first meeting with instructor; (c) reasons for which the student contends that the assigned grade is improper or unfair; (d) reasons for which the student believes that the grade should be changed or for why other corrective action should be taken; and (e) copies of any and all pertinent examinations, papers, and other relevant materials. Step 3a: To file a formal grievance, the student must submit four copies of the formal grievance to the counselor. This formal grievance should be submitted on the form designed for that purpose. The grievance must be filed with the Counselor within 20 class days of the initial meeting with the instructor (Step 1). (In cases of doubt concerning time limits, the appeals counselor will determine whether proper procedures have been followed.) Failure to meet these deadlines forfeits the student’s right of appeal under this policy. Further, it is understood that only issues documented in the grievance statement will be considered at the subsequent hearing. Step 4: After a formal grievance has been filed, the appeals counselor must within two class days forward a copy of the student’s grievance to the instructor, the instructor’s immediate supervisor, and to the chairperson of the unit’s Grade Appeals Board. Step 5: The chair of the unit’s Grade Appeals Board shall convene a meeting of the board not sooner than five and no later than 10 class days after receipt of the grievance statement. In a closed hearing, the student shall present the grievance, including any additional supporting evidence and pertinent arguments. Decisions by the Grade Appeals Board shall be determined as follows: A vote concerning the student’s grade appeal shall be taken by the faculty board members and a separate vote shall be taken by the student board members. If


a majority of the faculty group or a majority of the student group vote against the student’s appeal, the student’s appeal is denied. If a majority of either group votes in favor of the student’s appeal, the board shall recommend that the student appeal be granted. Step 6a: If an appeal is determined to be unfounded at the hearing, the chair of the appeals board shall provide written notification of that fact to the student, the faculty member, and the immediate supervisor. Students appealing grades should contact the appropriate dean of the college or school in which the course is offered. Step 6b: If an appeal is deemed valid, the appeals board shall forward its recommendation to the appropriate dean, including a written account of its deliberations and its recommendations for redress. The dean shall take whatever action is deemed appropriate. Step 7: Should either the student or the faculty member be dissatisfied with the decision of the dean, a formal, written appeal may be made to the vice-chancellor for Academic Affairs, who will review all written material and make final disposition of the appeal. This final appeal must be filed within five class days of notification of the decision of the dean. Exceptions to the procedure: If a student is unable to file an appeal because it is the end of classes for a spring or a summer session, the student must, within 20 days of the end of that session, notify the concerned instructor and department chair in writing of his or her intention to appeal a grade when classes resume in the fall. The timetable described in section C is initiated by the beginning of classes in the fall semester. In the event that the aggrieved student is a graduating senior, a separate process designed to expedite the matter will be followed. The latter process is described as follows: Step 1: Conference with instructor Step 2: Conference with department chair or appeals counselor Step 3: Meet with appeals board. To expedite the matter, the appeals board will establish a time to hear any grievance for which redress is sought. Such a time for hearings should be set not less than 24 hours before the graduation ceremony is scheduled to begin.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Final examinations periods are scheduled for each semester. The schedule is released about mid-semester and provides that examination periods be three hours in length and that no student should take more than three examinations within a single day. A student who has more than three examinations scheduled for the same day should first try to make arrangements with his/her instructors to have one of the examinations rescheduled. If unsuccessful in this attempt, the student should contact the dean of his/her college or school no later than the last day of classes. The dean will make arrangements for one of the examinations to be rescheduled. All new freshmen, sophomore, and new transfer students will contact the dean of the University College. Final examinations must be given at the time indicated on the final examination schedule unless rescheduling has been approved by the appropriate dean before the last day of classes for the semester. Some undergraduate courses have final examinations scheduled at a common time for all sections of the course. Whenever a student has a regularly scheduled final examination at the same time as the common exam, the common examination has precedence over the regularly scheduled examination. The instructor of the class with the regularly scheduled exam must


make arrangements for that student to take that final exam at another time. Grades for the semester are due 48 hours after each final examination is given.

Enrollment of Seniors In 5000-level Courses

Seniors in their final semester may obtain special permission to register for 5000-level courses only if they lack no more than 9 semester hours of undergraduate credit. This privilege applies ONLY during the final semester of the student’s undergraduate work, and permission is extended ONLY if the student has maintained a grade point average of at least 3.0 in his/her major. Seniors wishing to register for a 5000-level course should obtain permission from the dean of their college, school or academic unit; and must present this permission at the time they are registering for the class. A student’s total registration (undergraduate and graduate credit) may not exceed 15 semester hours. Graduate credit for course work completed under this arrangement will be granted upon the student’s admission into a graduate program only if the course or courses did not count toward fulfilling the 124 hours minimum required for the bachelor’s degree and if the course or courses were not used to fulfill the hours or requirements of the undergraduate major.

Readmission

Students who left the university in good academic standing will be eligible for readmission. Readmission is completed on-line on the university website.

Tuition Surcharge

A 50 percent tuition surcharge applies to all undergraduates who take more than 140 degree credit hours to complete a baccalaureate degree in a four-year program, or more than 110 percent of the credit hours necessary to complete a baccalaureate degree in any program officially designated by the Board of Governors as a five-year program. Courses and credit hours include those taken at the constituent institution or accepted for transfer. In calculating the number of degree credit hours taken: Included are courses that a student: • Fails. • Does not complete, unless the course was officially dropped by the student pursuant to the academic policy of the appropriate constituent institution. • Excluded are credit hours earned through: 1. The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program, CLEP examinations, or similar programs. 2. Institutional advanced placement, course validation, or any similar procedure for awarding course credit. 3. Summer term or extension programs. No surcharge shall be imposed on any student who exceeds the degree credit hour limits within the equivalent of four academic years of regular term enrollment or within five academic years of regular term enrollment in a degree program officially designated by the Board of Governors as a five-year program. The undergraduate credit hours to be counted in the calculation of the tuition surcharge include: All semester (fall and spring semester) academic credit hours attempted (includes repeated course work and failed course work); and

All transfer credit hours accepted by North Carolina Central University, including those hours accepted as electives and not applicable to the student’s program of study.


The Tuition Surcharge Guidelines as required by the North Carolina General Statute § 116-143.7 as codified by Section 9.10(a) of Session Law 2009-451 is available on the University of North Carolina website: www.northcarolin.edu/ policy/index.php?tag=1000.1.5[G]

Tuition Surcharge Waiver

Upon application by a student, the tuition surcharge shall be waived if the student demonstrates that any of the following have substantially disrupted or interrupted the student’s pursuit of a degree: (i) a military service obligations, (ii) serious medical debilitation, (iii) a short-term or long-term disability, or (iv) other extraordinary hardship.

Tuition Surcharge Waiver Request Procedures

The student must complete and submit to the Office of the Registrar a Tuition Surcharge Waiver Request Form within 30 business days of receiving written notification of a tuition surcharge fee from the Office of Student Accounting. The Registrar’s Office will forward the request to the Tuition Surcharge Waiver Committee for a decision. The Tuition Surcharge Waiver Committee is comprised of four members. The committee will review all pertinent documents relative to the Tuition Surcharge Waiver Request Form in determining a decision. A favorable or unfavorable decision will require a majority vote by the committee. The student shall be notified in writing by the committee of the decision within 30 business days. The Office of Student Accounting and the Office of the Registrar shall be notified in writing by the committee of the decision within 30 business days.

Excessive Credit Hours

Any student who has attempted more than 168 hours toward a single undergraduate degree will be dismissed from the university. Students who are working toward two undergraduate degrees simultaneously may register for hours in excess of 168 only with special permission from the appropriate dean. Attempted hours also include courses graded “WC,” “NW,” “NF,” and “I.” Deans also may make exceptions in cases where students have transferred more than 44 hours from other institutions. In these cases, only transfer hours that apply toward the NCCU major will count toward the 168 hours attempted.

ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS POLICY Overview

Academic Forgiveness is a process which allows students to both resume their studies at North Carolina Central University after a period of non-enrollment and potentially mitigate the impact of previously earned unsatisfactory grades. Students sometimes are forced to withdraw from the University for either academic and/or personal reasons, but upon return, find that their attempts to gain admission to a program or apply for scholarships are hindered by their prior academic record. Academic Forgiveness permits students with an opportunity to renew their efforts to resume their education with the University and demonstrate that they are now prepared for academic success.

Eligibility


In order to be eligible for Academic Forgiveness, applicants must: be formerly enrolled students who have less than a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA); not have been enrolled at North Carolina Central University for a period of at least three (3) years.

Protocol

All eligible students who are interested in seeking Academic Forgiveness must contact the chairperson of the department in which they were previously enrolled. The chair of the department, upon review of the student’s academic record, will then recommend to the Dean of the school at issue that the student be readmitted. The Dean will then contact the University Registrar and ask them to offer the student a conditional readmission for the sole purpose of seeking academic forgiveness. In order to then receive Academic Forgiveness, students must: - complete a minimum of twelve (12) consecutive credit hours from the University during the first semester the student is readmitted; - earn a minimum GPA of 2.0 for the semester; make a grade of “C” or better in each class during the first semester the student is readmitted; and - maintain, pursuant to the University’s Fostering Undergraduate Student Success Policy, a minimum course completion rate of 67 percent of attempted hours for each semester of enrollment. Once the student has completed the above-referenced requirements, he/she must complete an application for Academic Forgiveness and submit it to the chairperson of the Undergraduate Admissions Standards Committee. The application shall include a letter of intent from the student, an approval form from his/her advisor, and a copy of the student’s transcript, which should include the grades earned in the semester of return. The committee will review the application, and if it is deemed successful, the committee will notify both the student and the University Registrar of the successful petition. The petition will then be forwarded to the Provost’s Office for final approval. A successful petition for Academic Forgiveness will result in the forgiveness of all grades of less than “C” the student earned in their prior enrollment. While all grades will remain on the student’s transcript, only the classes in which the grade earned was a “C” or better will count toward their graduation and cumulative GPA. Students should note, however, that all coursework, including that of the initial enrollment attempt, count toward their total of attempted hours. A successful petition will also result in a notation of “Academic Forgiveness” on the student’s transcript in the Office of the University Registrar.

Financial Aid

The Academic Forgiveness Policy does not impact a student’s financial aid eligibility. Any student who was previously not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress and subsequently granted academic forgiveness must submit a financial aid SAP appeal to be considered for financial aid eligibility. In calculating students’ academic progress for federal aid eligibility, the University cannot ignore credits attempted or grades earned from previous periods of enrollment. Students should therefore be prepared to pay all charges owed to the University until a decision is made on the Financial Aid Appeal and financial aid may be awarded.

Policy Parameters

Students who seek Academic Forgiveness should also understand the following guidelines:


Successful Academic Forgiveness petitions will only apply to grades obtained at North Carolina Central University. It does not apply to coursework from other postsecondary institutions. Students may only receive Academic Forgiveness once. Students who receive a conditional admission solely for the purpose of academic forgiveness but who do not meet the stipulations regarding GPA, completed hours, or do not score at least a “C” in each course during their first semester will be denied full-time admission to the University.

Honors

Students who complete a minimum of 15 hours in a given semester and who make an average of 3.0 or above for that semester, without any grade lower than “D,” are considered “honor students.” The Honor Roll is divided into two groups. Those students who have a grade point average for the semester of 4.0 are on the “A” Honor Roll while those students who have an average of 3.0 to 3.99 are on the “B” Honor Roll. The Dean’s List is composed of all juniors and seniors on the Honor Roll for the semester who also have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

The University Honors Program

The University Honors Program is an academic program within the Department of Academic Affairs at North Carolina Central University. The University Honors Program (UHP) is designed to enroll, reward, and prepare academically gifted students, encouraging them toward intellectual initiative and independence. These students, selected for their outstanding academic achievements, and monitored throughout a rigorous four-year matriculation, will be prepared to pursue advanced degrees in highly competitive graduate or professional programs and to assume leadership roles in their professions and in society. The University Honors Program enriches the learning experience by providing the student every possible opportunity for reaching a level of maturity, independence, and scholarly achievement that might not be possible without such a program. UHP is specifically committed to preparing globally astute and engaged community leaders. Student completing the University Honors Program will 1) develop effective community leadership skills from dynamic, innovative, and exceptional faculty; 2) demonstrate effective problem solving of contemporary issues through critical thinking, analysis, and collaboration; 3) identify and engage global issues, their context and ramifications in our world; and 4) develop refined research, writing, and communication skills through rigorous preparation. High achieving students are encouraged to apply to the University Honors Program. High school applicants must have either a 1500 on the SAT or a 23 on the ACT. Current college and transfer students are also encouraged to apply and must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3.

Undergraduate Research Program

The University Undergraduate Research Program is intended to provide a select number of talented and highly motivated students with one-to-one mentorships with faculty members. The purpose is to promote scholarly activity by providing enhanced opportunities for structured, definitive, and meaningful research involvement. Interested students who have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 may


get additional information by contacting the deans in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, College of Liberal Arts, College of Science and Technology, School of Education, School of Business, or the director of Undergraduate Research Program.

Academic Awards and Prizes

There are numerous academic awards and prizes given by the university and its departments. These awards are presented at the annual Honors Day Convocation, usually the first Friday in April. All students, faculty members and parents are invited to this event to honor the university’s most talented students.

Chancellor’s Award for Academic Excellence

The Chancellor’s Award for Academic Excellence is the university’s top academic award and is

presented each year during Honor’s Convocation. The recipient must be eligible to complete the requirements for graduation during the current academic year, must have completed at least seven consecutive regular semesters at NCCU as a fulltime student (enrolled in a minimum of 15 semester hours each term), and must have earned a GPA of at least 3.8. The GPA will be calculated using only work completed at NCCU. The award will be made to individuals whose character and academic achievement demonstrate the capacity for real service to the nation.

University Award for Academic Excellence

The University Award for Academic Excellence is given each year during the Honors Convocation Program. The recipient must complete the requirements for graduation during the current academic year and complete at least 50 credit hours at NCCU. The recipient must have attended NCCU for at least four consecutive regular semesters and earned a cumulative GPA of 4.0. while carrying a minimum load of three courses or nine credit hours. The GPA will be calculated using only work completed at NCCU. The student named for this award must meet all qualifications listed above.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Students may meet the requirements for the bachelor’s degree by completing: 1. The General Education Curriculum requirements, 2. The approved course of study in a major area, 3. A minimum of 124 semester hours of course credit (some programs may require up to 128 hours) and 4. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. 5. In most degree programs grades of “C” or better are required for all courses in the major. 6. All incomplete grades for graduating students are to be completed by March 15 for Spring Commencement and October 15th for Fall Commencement. If not, the student will forfeit his/her right to march in the Commencement Exercises. 7. The Community Service requirement for graduation is 120 hours. Since requirements vary from major to major, students should consult the sections of this catalog pertaining to their specific area of interest for the precise degree requirements of that academic area. Undergraduate students seeking North Carolina licensure and majoring in education, including health education and physical education and seeking licensure must also complete a second major in an approved academic program. Students should consult the “Health Education,” “Physical Education,” and “School of Education” sections of


this catalog for listings of approved academic second majors. The final 30 semester hours of course credit must be completed at North Carolina Central University. Graduation exercises take place in May and December, and diplomas are awarded only at those times. However, graduation will be certified at the end of the term in which all academic requirements are completed and that term will appear on the student’s transcript as well as the diploma. Application for graduation must be filed in the Office of the University Registrar on or before the dates specified in the University Calendar of Events. Applications received after the deadline will not be handled until the next term, and diplomas will be delayed accordingly. The faculty advisors, deans, and the registrar try, in advising and registering students, to make certain that every student who intends to graduate from North Carolina Central University registers for those courses which are required for a degree. However, the final responsibility for meeting the graduation requirements as set forth in the University Catalog rests with the students. A student who is admitted into a degree program at North Carolina Central University during any academic year and who earns credit for work done during that year will graduate under the academic requirements of the student’s major listed in the University Catalog in effect at the time of the student’s matriculation, unless otherwise indicated. A student who is readmitted after an absence of one academic year, or who changes majors, will graduate under the provisions of the University Catalog in effect at the time of readmission or change of major.

Policy on Student Participation in Commencement Exercises

In as much as the annual commencement exercises at North Carolina Central University are held in recognition and celebration of the earning of degrees, only those persons who have satisfactorily completed all of the requirements for their respective degrees, including all financial obligations, and who have been officially certified for graduation, will be allowed to participate in the traditional May and December commencement exercises.

Requirements for a Double Major

Undergraduate students may major in two separate disciplines with the permission of the chairperson of each of the departments and the appropriate dean(s) and on the condition that they meet the requirements for each major. Students who meet the requirements for a double major will receive a diploma for each degree. At the time of graduation, the official transcript will indicate both majors.

Requirements for a Second Baccalaureate Degree

A student who already holds a bachelor’s degree may receive a second baccalaureate degree if he/she fulfills all requirements for the second degree and completes a minimum of 30 hours in residence beyond the requirements of the first degree.

Degrees with Distinction

Baccalaureate- North Carolina Central University awards Latin Honors to graduating students based on the completion of requirements for the baccalaureate degree as follows: Cum Laude - a cumulative grade point average of 3.2-3.499 Magna Cum Laude - a cumulative grade point average of 3.5-3.799


Summa Cum Laude - a cumulative grade point average of 3.8-4.000 First-degree transfer students who have earned a minimum of 60 semester hours at NCCU and meet the cumulative GPA requirements stated above will be awarded a Degree with Distinction. First-degree transfer students who have earned between 30 - 59 semester hours at NCCU will be awarded a Degree with Distinction if the average of GPAs from all institutions previously attended and at NCCU meet the cumulative GPA requirements stated above. Second-degree students who have earned a minimum of 30 semester hours at NCCU and meet the cumulative GPA requirements stated above will be awarded a Degree with Distinction.

TRANSCRIPTS

Processes to order an Official NCCU Transcript

Important Information: Please allow two business days for the processing of transcripts. A student who requests to pick up their transcripts in the Registrar’s Office must do so within two weeks of processing. If not picked up within the two weeks, the transcripts will be mailed to the student.

Option 1 (Online Method):

The cost of an official transcript ordered online is $8. Transcripts may be sent electronically or through U.S. mail. Go to https://iwantmytranscript.com/nccu. To create your account at this ordering site, follow these steps:

a. Go to https://iwantmytranscript.com/nccu b. Go to ‘Don’t have an account?’ c. Fill in all of your information on the Create Your Account Screen and click SUBMIT d. Proceed by filling out all the information on the Recipient Info Screen and click CONTINUE e. Once you have completed these steps, look for the CONSENT FORM link f. Click DOWNLOAD FORM (then OPEN it) g. Print out this form, sign and date it, and scan the form to todsupport@scrip-safe.com or fax to (513)697-0012

Option 2 (Fax Method):

The cost of an official transcript is $5.00. Payments may be made telephonically to the Bursar’s

Office. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The number is (919) 530-6209. Once payment is made, a confirmation number will be given to the student. A written request with signature may be faxed to Office of the Registrar. The fax number is (919) 530-7974. The following information is needed in your written request: a. complete your name and any names you may have had at the time of attendance; b. phone number to contact you if necessary; c. dates of attendance; d. birthdate; e. banner ID or last 4 of your social security number; f. contact person and complete address to where the transcript is to be sent; g. confirmation number given by the Bursar’s Office to show proof of payment.

Option 3 (Mail):

The address to mail your request is as follow: North Carolina Central University Office of the Registrar 1801 Fayetteville Street Room 102, Hoey Administration Building


Durham, NC 27707 2. Please complete in your request the information stated above in item 3, option 1. 3. Note: No personal checks are accepted.

Option 4 (Walk-in):

Students may complete a Transcript Request Form in the Office of the Registrar, Room 102, Hoey Administration Building during normal duty hours 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Payments will be made in the Bursar’s Office. Two receipts will be given to the student. One is to be attached to the Registrar’s Office copy and the second receipt is for the student’s records. Once payment is completed, please turn in the request to the Registrar’s Office. Student Indebtedness All indebtedness to the university, including requirements of any loan programs in which the student participated, must be satisfactorily settled before a diploma or transcript will be issued to the student. Continuing students who have an outstanding balance on their student accounts will not be permitted to pre-register, register, or receive grades until the balance has been paid in full. Change of Name or Address Each student is required to notify the Office of the University Registrar in writing of any change in name or mailing address for grades, bills, registration information, and other materials. A student’s name is changed only upon presentation of an official document such as a marriage license, birth certificate, or court order. For historical reasons, a student’s name is not changed on his/her records for any reason after that student is no longer enrolled at North Carolina Central University or on any records for which that student has already received a degree. Processing Complaints To file any complaint based on matters outside of sexual harassment or other illegal discrimination, the student should follow the university’s chain of command. With respect to academic matters, (involving the student’s classes or course work), the student should file a written complaint with the department chair or program director.  If the matter is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student can file a written complaint with the dean of the school/college. The process may continue to the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, and finally the chancellor of the university.  With respect to non-academic matters, the student should file a complaint with the director of the department that handles the matter. Students may obtain a list of the relevant departments and their responsibilities from the university website, the University Catalog, the Academic Planner and Student Handbook, the BOOK, or Undergraduate Enrollment Handbook. Students may also file an official complaint by contacting the Student Ombudsperson, located in the Office of Student Rights & Responsibilities.  The student should receive a written response to his/her complaint at each level within seven business days.

RECOMMENDED STUDENT STANDARDS

Becoming a part of the North Carolina Central University community is an honor that


comes with privileges and expectations. NCCU expects each individual to uphold the policies, regulations and guidelines established for students, faculty, administration and staff, and the laws of the State of North Carolina. Each member is expected to adhere to and conform to the instructions and guidance of the leadership of his/her respective area. Therefore, the following are expected of each member of the NCCU family: 1. Respect yourself. Each member of the NCCU community will exhibit maturity and self-respect and foster an appreciation for one’s own culture and the many cultures that compose the NCCU community. It is imperative that we maintain equity and respect as values of our institution. 2. Respect the dignity, feelings, worth and values of others. Members of the NCCU community will respect one another and guests. Therefore, it is strictly prohibited and in direct violation of the NCCU Student Code of Conduct, on or off campus, to accost, cajole or proselytize students, faculty or staff, parents or others; to engage in gender and sexual harassment; to use vile, obscene or abusive language or exhibit lewd behavior; to possess weapons such as knives or firearms, or to be involved in the possession, use, distribution or sale of illegal drugs. 3. Respect the rights and property of others, and discourage vandalism and theft. Members of NCCU will refrain from illegal activity, both on and off campus, and will be subject to all applicable provisions listed in the NCCU Student Handbook. 4. Do not discriminate; strive to learn from differences in people, ideas and opinions. Each member of NCCU will support equal rights and opportunities for all regardless of age, sex, race, religion, disability, ethnic heritage, socio-economic status, political, social or other affiliation or disaffiliation, or sexual orientation. 5.Practice personal, professional, and academic integrity, and discourage all forms of dishonesty, plagiarism, deceit and disloyalty to the Code of Conduct. Personal, professional, and academic integrity is paramount to the survival and potential of NCCU. Therefore, individuals found in violation of NCCU’s policies against lying, cheating, plagiarism, or stealing are subject to disciplinary action, which could include dismissal from the University. 6. Foster a personal professional work ethic and quality service within the NCCU Family. Each employee and student of NCCU should strive for efficiency and job perfection. Each employee should exhibit a commitment to “Truth and Service,” and job tasks should be conducted in a humane and civil manner. 7. Foster an open, fair and caring environment. Each member of NCCU is assured equal and fair treatment in the adjudication of all matters. In addition, it is understood that intellectual stimulation is nurtured through the sharing of ideas. Therefore, the University will maintain an open and caring environment.

NCCU DRESS EXPECTATIONS

The dress expectations are based on the theory that learning socially acceptable manners and selecting attire appropriate to specific occasions and activities are critical elements in the total educational process. Understanding and employing these behaviors improve the quality of life, contribute to optimum morale and enhance the overall campus image. They also play a major role in instilling a sense of integrity and an appreciation for values and ethics.


The continuous demonstration of appropriate manners and dress insures that NCCU students meet the minimum standards of quality in areas of development necessary for propelling them toward successful careers. Students will be denied admission to various functions if their manner of dress is inappropriate. On this premise, students at NCCU are expected to dress neatly at all times. The following are examples of appropriate dress for various occasions: • Classroom, Pearson Cafeteria, Alfonso Elder Student Union and University offices: neat, modest, casual or dressy attire. • Formal programs in all residence halls, McDougald-McLendon Arena, B.N. Duke Auditorium, Farrison-Newton Theater and Centennial Chapel: business or semi-formal attire. • Interview: business attire. • Social/Recreational activities, Residence hall lounges (during visitation hours): casual or dressy attire. • Balls, Galas, and Cabarets: formal, semiformal and dressy, respectively.

Examples of Inappropriate Dress and/or Appearance

• Do-rags, stocking caps, skullcaps and bandannas (inappropriate at all times on the campus of NCCU except in the privacy of the student’s living quarters). Baseball caps and hoods for women in any building. This policy item does not apply to headgear considered as a part of religious or cultural dress (excl. residence halls). • Bare feet. • Shorts or all types of jeans at programs dictating professional or formal attire, such as coronations, musical performances, plays, fall convocation, Founder’s Day, honors convocation and commencement • Clothing with derogatory, offensive and/or lewd messages, words or pictures. • Men’s undershirts of any color worn outside of the private living quarters of the residence halls. • Sports jerseys without a conventional T-shirt underneath. • Men’s and women’s pants that show underwear, shorts that reveal buttocks.


DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

Gary Brown, Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Student Services Building, Suite 236 | 919-530-6342 The Division of Student Affairs provides students a wide variety of programming and services that support engagement, academics, leadership and developmental opportunities. The division also provides leadership to the following departments: Campus Recreation, Career Services, Diversity and Inclusion, LGBTA Resource Center, Men’s Achievement Center, New Student Services, Residential Life, Spiritual Development and Dialogue, Student Disability Services, Student Engagement and Leadership, Student Health and Counseling Services, Student Conduct and Community Standards, Transportation and Women’s Center.

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Tierney Bates Student Services Building, Suite 236 Dean of Students Dr. Toya Corbett Student Services Building, Suite 208 Office of the Vice Chancellor Support Staff: Business Manager Marquita Johnson | 919-530-6379

Director of Marketing and Comm. Samantha Hargrove | 919-530-6784

Director of Development Tifanie Lewis | 919-530-7068

Technology Support Specialist Joseph Davis | 919-530-5420

Director of Assessment and Staff Development Dr. Pedro Nino | 919-530-5263

STUDENT AFFAIRS DEPARTMENTS Campus Recreation Director | Nicole Piscitelli Walker Complex, 919-530-6130

New Student and Family Programs Director | Ferreli McGilvary A.E. Student Union, 919-530-6336

Career Services and Outreach Director | Catrina DosReis William Jones Building, 919-530-6337

Residential Life Executive Director | James Leach Student Services Bldg G-06, 919-530-6227

Diversity and Inclusion Director | Emily Guzman A.E. Student Union, 919-530-5546

Spiritual Development and Dialogue Director | Gloria Winston-Harris ADS Res Hall, 919-530-7814

Men’s Achievement Center Director | Dr. Harvey Hinton III Student Services Bldg 208, 919-530-7814

Student Advocacy Office Student Services Bldg G20, 919-530-7492


Student Health & Counseling Services Executive Director | Dr. Ruth G. Phillips Student Health Building, 919-530-6317

Student Conduct and Comm. Standards Director | Jocelyn Hartfield Student Services Blg 120, 919-530-6311

Student Disability Services Student Services Bldg, 120, 919-530-6325

Transportation Director | Cha’ssem Anderson McDougald House, Lower, 919-530-6362

Student Engagement and Leadership Executive Director | Orok Orok A.E. Student Union, 919-530-6316

Women’s Center Director | Nichole Lewis The Women’s Center, 919-530-6811

Campus Recreation L.T. Walker Complex | 919-530-6013 | www.nccu.edu/campusrec

Campus Recreation provides a wide variety of programs and services to the University Community to meet their recreational needs. The L.T. Walker Complex serves as the main hub for Campus Recreation activities. Each semester, we offer a calendar of intramural sporting events to include flag football, basketball, dodge ball, volleyball and more. The fitness program offers nightly group exercise classes that include Yoga/ Pilates, Zumba, Cardio Dance, and more. We also provide one on one personal training with certified trainers. New this fall is our Eagle Adventure program. Trips are scheduled for whitewater rafting, horseback riding, skiing and more. Stop by the L.T. Walker Complex and check out Fitness Center, which is equipped with state of the art equipment, try out the pool, or join in on a pick-up basketball game. Hours of Operation: Fitness Center: Monday-Thursday, 6 am–11 pm Friday, 6am–9pm Saturday, 10am–5pm Sunday, 1–5pm

Career Services and Outreach

William Jones Building, Lower Level | 919-530-6337 | www.nccu.edu/careerservices Career Services and Outreach provides comprehensive career development and serves as a focal point for students at all levels of their college experience. Staff members in Career Services help students identify, explore, and apply their skills, interests, and values to life and career goals. Undergraduate and graduate students are provided with career counseling, career research information, and educational and employment opportunities. The Center also maintains an active on-campus recruiting schedule that includes representatives from government, education, and Fortune 500 companies. Online services are available for students to access information. Students can register with the office by visiting the website and clicking on the Eagle Career Network. Once registered, students will have the ability to attend career fairs, become eligible for internships, and attend programs and workshops on career development.


How to register with Career services in Four Steps! STEP 1: LOG INTO EAGLE CAREER NETWORK (ECN) Go to www.nccu.edu/careerservices Click on “students”, enter your NCCU email address, then click forgot password. A link will be sent to you to enter a new password. Update all information as necessary to ensure your profile is complete and accurate. STEP 2: BUILD AND SUBMIT RESUME USING ECN You can find this link on the bottom right hand side of your profile under Resume Builder. You will receive feedback on you resume and may need to make changes before your approval form will be signed by a career services staff member. STEP 3: COMPLETE TYPE FOCUS ASSESSMENT USING ECN You can find this link on the top right hand side of your profile under quick links. Complete and follow assignment instructions provided by your professor if applicable. Once you have taken your Type Focus Assessment (complete all sections) and have completed resume, please visit room 005 in the William Jones Building (Career Center) to receive approval form Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to review you assessment results STEP 4: SUBMIT THIS APPROVAL FORM IF REQUIRED If this is a class or program requirement, please obtain a signature from career services.

Diversity and Inclusion

Alfonso Elder Student Union, Lower Level G-31 | 919-530-5546 The Department of Diversity and Inclusion provides inclusive programs and diverse educational experiences for students at NCCU. We offer students opportunities to mentor local high school students and provide leadership development training. The department provides support and guidance to various student organizations and serves as a hub for diversity and inclusion resources. We also offer training for faculty and staff and work to expose the entire campus community to multicultural programs and activities. The department is home to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Ally (LGBTA) Resource Center which provides support, awareness and advocacy for LBGT+ students. The department welcomes students of diverse backgrounds, races, ethnicities, sexual orientations, gender identitiies, religions and abilities. To learn more, visit the A.E. Student Union, Room G-32 on the ground floor.

Men’s Achievement Center

Student Services Building, 208 | 919-530-7814 | www.nccu.edu/mac The Men’s Achievement Center (MAC) is home to a dedicated team of professionals, staff and mentors committed to enriching the quality of students’ collegiate experience and ensuring their academic and personal success. Male students can participate in a variety of programs offered at MAC that provides support with academics, leadership training and development, and cultural and education experiences. Our goal is to provide students with the necessary tools, resources and opportunities to enhance their potential. At MAC, we focus on the student male population, while also partnering with our female students to build strong programs, networking opportunities and leadership skills. MAC participants are provided tutoring services, mentors, advising, financial literacy workshops and much more. But we also give back. MAC students believe in NCCU’s motto of Truth and Service and participate in a host of community service projects throughout the year. The MAC programs and initiatives include the MAC Brothers and the Centennial Scholars Program.


New Student and Family Programs

Alfonso Elder Student Union, Lower Level | 919-530-6336 | www.nccu.edu/firstyear The Office of New Student and Family Programs provides programs and services for newly admitted undergraduate students and their families throughout the year to assist them with their transition to college life. These programs include Student Orientation, Advising and Registration (S.O.A.R) and Eagle Mania. During the S.O.A.R. sessions, academic advisors, university faculty, administrators and student leaders guide incoming students and their parents through a program that introduces them to college life, campus services and the general education curriculum. Eagle Mania offers interactive activities designed to encourage all students to become engaged in the NCCU community. Family members are encouraged to stay connected by becoming involved with the NCCU Parents and Family Association, Family Weekend and other university activities.

Residential Life Student Services Building, G-06 | 919-530-7298 | www.nccu.edu/reslife

The Department of Residential Life is responsible for the administration of the NCCU residence hall system. The department is committed to supporting the academic mission of the university and facilitating the educational and personal development of the residents by having a positive, diverse living and learning environment. Through partnerships within and outside the university, the department maintains residence halls that are comfortable, safe and affordable. The department also provides quality residence hall programming and services for all residents. To learn the rules and regulations governing residence hall living, students should familiarize themselves with the publication Policies & Guide for Living on Campus. Any residential student who withdraws from the university must submit a completed cancellation form directly to the Residential Life Office to terminate Housing Agreements. Termination charges will be assessed as outlined in the Residence Hall Agreement.

Spiritual Development and Dialogue A.E. Student Union, G-33 & 62 | 919-530-6380 | www.nccu.edu/spiritualdevelopment

As an ecumenical ministry supported by a variety of faiths, community members, local churches and other contributors, the Office of Spiritual Development and Dialogue serves as a vessel by which all sectors of the University community can work together, living and expressing their respective beliefs. The Office of Spiritual Development and Dialogue offers a variety of services, including, worship, study, spiritual guidance, fellowship and counsel. We are here to connect with students and embrace the community around us. Student are provided with opportunities to become involved in community service projects. The primary purpose is to support religious awareness and spiritual development of students, faculty, and staff. The office sponsors worship services, spiritual studies, retreats, religious forums, community programs, initiatives, and pastoral counseling for NCCU students.

Student Disability Services

Student Services Building, 120 | 919-530-6325 | www.nccu.edu/sds

The Office of Student Disability Services works diligently to ensure that individuals with disabilities are provided equal access at North Carolina Central University. The Office of Student Disability Services (SDS) assists eligible students with documented


disabilities by determining and coordinating reasonable academic accommodations. Under Section 504, the ADA and ADAAA, reasonable accommodations are determined individually and are intended to minimize the effects of the impact of specific limitations caused by a disability in order for a qualified individual to have equal access to programs, services and activities. Disabilities include the following: cognitive impairments, learning disabilities, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, hearing impairments, visual impairments, physical/mobility impairments, psychological impairments and/or chronic medical conditions. To receive or request accommodations, students are encouraged to contact the office at 919-530-6325.

Student Engagement and Leadership

Alfonso Elder Student Union | 919-530-7453 | www.nccu.edu/seal Hours: Monday- Friday 7am -11pm | Saturday- 7am-8pm | Sunday- 11am-6pm The Department of Student Engagement and Leadership (SEAL), housed in the Alfonso Elder Student Union, serves as the “lifeline” for programs and activities for all students on the campus of North Carolina Central University. It is the focal point of student involvement and campus life. Student interested in getting involved can join the student activities Board (SAB) located in the suite 134 or the Student Government Association (SGA) located in suite 118. The Union serves as the meeting place for many student organizations and interest groups. It also serves as a common area where student interact, share class information, and engage in meaningful campusorientated activities. Services available in the Student Union: • Meeting rooms • Student Government Association • Student Activities Board • Fraternity & Sorority Life • LGBTA Resource Center • Leadership Library

Student Government Association (SGA)

SGA is designed to be the voice of the students and is broken down into three different branches: Executive, legislative, and Judicial, It serves as a medium through which students may express their opinions and concerns on issues that affect them.

Student Activities Board (SAB)

SAB provides fun and creative social, multicultural recreational and educational activities that promote student involvement on and off campus. From movies, lectures, cultural celebrations, concerts comedy shows, cookouts, homecoming and much more. If you want to meet new people, learn new skill and get involved with planning and executing campus activities, join the SAB for these reasons and more.

Emerging Leaders

This program provides a leadership development experience for first year students. Participants learn leadership skills and develop competencies that facilitate their personal growth, enabling them to assume leadership roles in campus organizations, the Durham community and global society. For more information contact, student Engagement and Leadership at 919-5305436 or got to www.nccu.edu.students/union

Student Health and Counseling Services Student Health | 919-530-6317 | Counseling Center | 919-530-7646


Old Student Health Building (adjacent to W.G. Pearson Dining Hall) | www.nccu.edu/ studenthealth New Immunization Requirements for Fall 2017 All students entering the University for the first time and taking four or more credit hours of on campus classes need to show proof of the following immunizations: • 2 doses of MMR (measles, mumps, rubella). These are childhood vaccines. • 3 doses of DTP (diphtheria and tetanus). These are childhood vaccines. • 1 dose of Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) within the last 10 years. • 3 doses of Hepatitis B vaccine (only for students born 7/1/1994 and after) • Students age 50+ only need a Tdap (within last 10 years). If you are a Distance Education (online student ONLY) you do not need to submit an immunization record. Please contact Twanna Graham at tgraham@nccu.edu to change your status. The NC Public Health Law requires that students must have a complete immunization record within 30 days after the start of classes. Please feel free to fax (919-530-7969), mail (SHCS POB 19491, Durham, NC 27707) or email (tgraham@nccu.edu) your Report of Medical History form and Immunization Records. Please visit http://www.nccu.edu/formsdocs/proxy.cfm?file_id=87 to download your Report of Medical History Form. Student Insurance - YOU MUST TAKE ACTION If you plan to KEEP the Student Insurance or WAIVE the Student Insurance you must visit the Blue Cross Blue Shield Portal at www.bcbsnc.com/student to ENROLL or WAIVE. It is the student’s responsibility to ENROLL or WAIVE. Please choose one of these actions by the deadline date. Otherwise, your coverage will not be active at the start of the semester. To be eligible for the University Sponsored Student Insurance Plan, you must be degree seeking; and eligible to pay the medical fee; and enrolled in 6 or more credit hours of on campus classes. Come See Us if You Need: • Urgent and medical care • Counseling and mental health • Alcohol & drug prevention or intervention • Lab services Take advantage of services offered at the Student Health Center that help keep our students healthy and well. A multidisciplinary staff of doctors, nurse-practitioners, registered nurses, psychologists, consulting psychiatrist, counselors, pharmacists, health educators and others collaborate to provide a comprehensive approach to meeting your health needs. Know Who to Call: General Information & Appointments: (919) 530-6317 Mental Health Services: (919) 530-7646 Pharmacy: (919) 530-6289 Laboratory: (919) 530-5387 Immunizations/Medical Records: (919) 530-5003 Nursing/Triage: (919) 530-7604 Health Education and Wellness: (919) 530-6664 Open: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Closed on weekends and holidays) Located in the Student Health Building on Cafeteria Drive (off Lawson Street)

Student Advocacy Office

Student Services Building | 919-530-6342 The Student Advocacy Coordinator, located in the Student Services building, is there to provide confidential, neutral and informal assistance to students who have


concerns arising from or affecting their studies at NCCU. The Student Advocacy Coordinator listens to students, offers information about University policies and procedures, helps students examine options for resolving concerns, and accepts suggestions and data from individuals who seek orderly and responsible systems change. The advocate will not answer questions about students with whom they may have spoken to, or disclose an individual’s name or specific issue with anyone, unless during the course of discussions with a student, they have given permission to do so for the purpose of informal conflict resolution. Communications with the advocate are considered confidential and privileged. The only exception to the pledge of confidentiality is where the advocate determines that there is an imminent risk of serious harm. Any questions or concerns unrelated to the Student Conduct Process should be directed to the Student Advocacy Coordinator at 919-530-6342.

Student Conduct and Community Standards

Student Services Building G20 | 919-530-6311 | www.nccu.edu/studentrights The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards is a central force in helping students navigate successfully through college life. The office has oversight of student conduct process and assists with student awareness and of their rights and responsibilities as community members. Using an educational approach, the goal of the office is to help students with decision-making, while maintaining accountability and community standards that support the university’s mission. To learn more, visit nccu.edu/studentconduct or cal (919) 530-5287.

Transportation

Eagle Landing, First Floor | 919-530-6362 The Department of Transportation provides exceptional services to students, faculty, and staff on and off campus through the Eagle Shuttle Service, the Eagle Charter Service and the GoPass Program. Students can take advantage of the Maroon and Gray shuttle service program offered at no cost. The campus shuttles (Maroon or Gray line) depart every 20 mins from 7am. to 10 pm, Monday through Friday, (fall and spring semesters only) from the Latham Parking Deck, and transports passengers to major points on campus. Shuttle service schedules are available in various areas on campus, including the Student Union, Police Department and Student Services building or can download the app to your mobile device at nccumobile.etaspot.net. Students, faculty and staff can also take advantage of the Holiday Shuttle Service feature that takes passengers to the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, the train station and bus depot for a nominal fee. The Eagle Charter Service provides transportation through its motor coach and shuttle buses and vans. To take advantage of the GoPass Program, which allows all students and eligible faculty and staff to have unlimited rides on GoDurham, GoTriangle, and GoRaleigh. For more information, visit www.nccu.edu/transportation, call (919) 530-6362 or email transportation@nccu.edu

Women’s Center    Women’s Center Building | 919-530-6811 | www.nccu.edu/womenscenter

The Women’s Center is an integral thread throughout the campus community where female students are encouraged, allowed and empowered to truly explore their selfdevelopment in a way that uniquely matches the wide variety of ways in which they contribute to the campus community and beyond. The Women’s Center promotes personal and professional development, and celebrates the accomplishments, strengths and aspirations of all women on campus. Through structured “edutainment”,


and our Reak Talk Series, the Center focuses on the benefits of healthy female to female, and female to male relationships, and the role relationship management has in the preparation for life and work. The center engages campus, local and national leaders in activities that intentionally creates equity in the way women see themselves and are perceived across a variety of industries and fields. The center is home of the HBCU HAVEN (Helper and Advocates for Violence Ending Now), a program established to provide a resource for students on campus, and women in particular, who find themselves in unhealthy or unsafe interpersonal relationships. Want to be a part? The Women’s Center is located in the Women’s Center Building on Eagle Campus Drive.

CAMPUS SERVICES Information Technology Services

H. M. Michaux Jr. School of Education Building, 3rd Floor | 919-530-7676 The Techno-Scholar Guide to Computing at NCCU There are many technology resources available to assist all students with becoming successful Techno-Scholars at NCCU. Find out more at: www.nccu.edu/its/students. cfm IMPORTANT INFORMATION Eagles Wi-Fi: Wireless access is available throughout the campus, including classrooms, residential halls & outside sitting areas for students, faculty, staff & guests. For steps to connect your device visit: http://bit.ly/1zkWe98

Student Printing: Each student receives a $15 page print credit each semester through the Student Printing Program. Printers are located in various areas across campus. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/1GMJJ6r myEOL: myEOL is the one stop portal to email, course registration, campus news

and more. To explore myEOL visit the NCCU homepage and click on “Log into myEOL” in the upper right corner.

Eagle Apps: You can access NCCU technical resources on and off campus with Eagle Apps. Eagle Apps gives you the power to access the published applications anywhere you have an internet connection on many devices. To login to the website visit: https://eagleapps.nccu.edu ETC:

The Eagle Technical Center manages computer repair services of personally owned devices for NCCU students, faculty and staff. Students receive one free hardware or software service per semester. We offer many services at competitive prices. To find out more information visit: http://bit.ly/1PcOQ1D

Software/Hardware: Students and employees are eligible to obtain academically discounted software, free software and/or discounted computers, tablets and select electronics and accessories through many ITS initiatives: Microsoft Distribution Program University Laptop Program Software Repository To find out information about the programs listed above visit: http://bit.ly/1DIjSI4. Stay Connected with ITS -ETAC: Eagle Technical Assistance Center (ETAC). ETAC is the frontline of support for ITS. You can contact ETAC by calling 919-530-7676, emailing helpdesk@nccu.edu or submitting a ticket to http://helpdesk.nccu.edu. Come visit us in Shepard Library beginning Fall 2015. Follow us on Facebook (NCCU Eagle Technical Assistnace); Twitter (@nccuetac) and Instagram (@nccuetac).


University Bookstore

Latham Parking Deck | 919-530-6445 The University Bookstore is located in the Latham Parking Deck and is provides a huge selection of new and used books are organized by class and instructor. The bookstore also provides various items that include snacks, bags, electronics and plenty of NCCU T-shirts, jackets, and paraphernalia and more.

Campus Dining

W.G. Pearson Cafeteria | 919-530-7418 NCCU’s W.G. Pearson Cafeteria is the crown jewel in a wealth of dining possibilities. Convenient and affordable meal plans are available to students, faculty, and staff and allow for flexibility of use about the campus. No matter where you are on campus, there is a retail dining location nearby to satisfy your hunger.

Central Graphics/University Copy Center Alexander Dunn Building, basement | 919-530-6835 The NCCU community takes advantage of the custom printing services to enhance communications, documents, resumes, books, advertisements, posters and presentations.

Eagle Card Office

117 Lee Biology | 919-530-5010

Students are required to have their NCCU Eagle Card on their person whenever they are on campus. The NCCU Eagle Card is required to use university facilities, register, check out library books, access meal plans, purchase books, use laundry/ vending machines and attend campus events for free or at a discounted rate. An NCCU Wachovia Visa Card can also function as your Eagle Card while allowing access to your Wachovia checking account. The NCCU Eagle Card will be issued during orientation and registration for new students. Students who register late or who need to replace their Eagle Card should visit the Eagle Card Office in the Lee Biology building. There is a $20.00 fee for replacement of the Eagle Card.

Eagle Service Center

Alfonso Elder Student Union | 919-530-6180

The Eagle Service Center is a place to assist past, current and future students (and their parents/guardians), faculty and staff of North Carolina Central University by answering their questions, concerns and inquires in a timely and professional manner. The Call Center answers inbound telephone calls and services students in person for some of the most critical departments on campus such as: Undergraduate Admissions Scholarships and Student Aid Student Accounting Student Health Residential Life Student Password reset (My EOL) The Eagle Service Center conducts outbound calling services that assist these offices by providing support for student outreach projects and other projects that will aid in the success of our students.


Mail Center Alfonso Elder Student Union | 919-530-7262

The Mail Center operates as a full United States Post Office satellite location. Each student residing on campus will be automatically assigned a mailbox and charged a mailbox rental fee. That box will remain with the student for the duration of his/ her stay in University housing. In addition, all student organizations are required to have a post office mailbox on campus. Organizations should pay the rental fee by September 30th of each academic year. Mail is distributed to students’ mailboxes daily, Monday through Friday.

Ticket Office

W.G. Pearson Cafeteria, lower level | 919-530-5170 The Ticket Office manages all tickets to university events. All events on campus that require paid admission must be coordinated with the Ticket Office. Students must present a valid NCCU student ID to receive special student prices. Students are limited to the quantity of tickets that may be purchased at the student price. From athletics to arts, the Ticket Office is your one-stop shop to be a part of the action.

University Police Department

2010 Fayetteville Street | 919-530-6106 | www.nccu.edu/health-safety/police The North Carolina Central University Police Department is located at 2010 Fayetteville St. and is open 24 hours a day. The campus is patrolled, 365 day a year by sworn police officers and security officers. Our primary objective is to provide a safe and secure environment within which students, faculty, and staff can live, learn, and work. The University Police Department is organized as a department of 28 sworn law enforcement officers, 16 security officers, 5 telecommunicators and 4 administrative staff. All sworn officers are professionally trained and certified by the state of North Carolina, with the same authority and right to bear arms and arrest as any law enforcement officer in the State of North Carolina. The department provides a full range of police services, including, but not limited to, investigating all crimes committed in and around its jurisdiction, making arrests, providing crime prevention/community services programs, enforcing traffic laws, and maintaining crowd control for campus special events. The department maintains close partnership with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies in implementing and coordinating campus law enforcement operations.

Parking Services

2010 Fayetteville Street | 919-530-5023 | www.nccu.edu/health-safety/police Shuttle Service- NCCU faculty, staff, students and visitors are encouraged to take advantage of the free Maroon and Gray shuttle service offered through NCCU Student Services. The campus shuttle buses (Maroon or Gray line) will depart every 15 minutes from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday from the Latham Parking Deck to transport passengers to major points on campus. Schedules are available in the NCCU Police Department. Parking on campus is by permit only. All faculty, staff and students who park on campus are required to register their vehicles with the University Police Department, pay a registration fee and display a valid permit on their vehicle. Faculty, staff, student, and visitor hangtags must be placed on the rearview mirror facing outward at all times the vehicle is parked on university


property. All questions should be directed to NCCU Police Department Traffic Office, 2010 Fayetteville St., Durham, NC 27707, 919-530-5023.

Visitor Parking- Visitors are individuals not enrolled or employed by the university. They must display a parking permit while using campus parking spaces. Visitor permits are issued one per day by the NCCU Police Department. The permit temporarily registers the vehicle and allows parking in various areas of the campus. Visitors are expected to comply with university parking and traffic rules and are held responsible for citations issued for incorrect or improper parking. Purchasing Parking Permits- Beginning fall semester of 2011, the NCCU Parking Office began using the T2 eBusiness automated system to manage parking accounts. Student Parking- Student parking spaces are limited and are assigned on a firstcome first-served basis. All students who wish to park on campus must register their vehicles with University Police and purchase a parking permit. Students may park in the assigned designated lots only. Commuter Lots • Criminal Justice • Latham (surrounding spaces) • Lincoln Street • Mary Townes Science Building (Lower) • Nelson Street • O’Kelly – Riddick • School of Education (Front) Freshman Parking- All freshman and first-year students who purchase a parking permit must park in the Latham Hall Parking Deck. This policy is being instituted to address NCCU student growth, create easier access to campus and address concerns from residents contiguous to campus about overflow parking near their homes. Reserve Parking- Reserved-space parking is enforced at all times, including university holidays. A reserved-space permit holder is entitled exclusive use of a designated space. Permit holders may not allow others to park in their space or a space not registered to the individual. Latham Parking Deck-The Latham Parking Deck automatic gate arms operate on a swipe-card system. To enter the deck to your reserved parking space you must pull up to the gate and swipe your University ID card. Along with the ID card you must have a valid parking deck permit. The parking deck provides separate public and cardholder access, 24-hour security surveillance, extra lighting, guaranteed parking, no waiting and an attendant during business hours. Replacement Permits- When a replacement permit is needed, you must contact the University Police Department traffic manager and complete an official report indicating the status of your permit. There is a replacement fee of $20 on all lost, stolen or damaged decals. The current decal will then be canceled. Possession of a lost, stolen, altered or illegally purchased permit will result in the loss of parking privileges. This violation will also result in a fine, and the violation will be referred to the Office of Student Rights & Responsibilities for disciplinary attention. Criminal charges may also be brought against the violator if warranted. Any person found filing a false police report will be fined and possible criminal prosecution. Counterfeiting, Theft, Deceit and Unauthorized Transfer- It is unlawful for any person to produce any facsimile or reproduction of a permit, sticker, decal or other


device indicating eligibility to park on campus. It is unlawful to steal or obtain a permit by fraud, deceit or trickery, willful misrepresentation of facts, purchase or gift from another. It is unlawful for any person in lawful possession of a parking permit to alter, give, sell, transfer or attempt to transfer a permit to another person or to place on a vehicle other than that which is registered. Violation of the provision shall be a misdemeanor. Fees- The parking permit for vehicles will be paid at the beginning of the period for which the permit is issued or when any person first becomes associated with the university and wishes a permit. The fees are (annual cost unless otherwise indicated): Reserved $575 Parking Deck, Reserved $575 Parking Deck, Non-Reserved $475 Vehicle Immobilization Policy- Vehicles may be immobilized for any of the following reasons: • Checks returned to NCCU for any traffic related payments. • Display of a lost, stolen or revoked permit. • Non-payment of accrued fines, to include three or more unpaid citations. • Unsatisfactory payment for a permit. Removal of the boot requires a payment of $25 in addition to payment of all accrued fines and late fees. Wheel boots may be removed only by a member of the NCCU Police Dept, upon payment of the boot removal fee and all outstanding fines. The owner or custodian of a vehicle impounded under any regulation of this ordinance may petition the immobilization. Submitting a petition is not a substitute for payment of the boot removal fee. Vehicles immobilized for longer than 48 hours will be towed or relocated to a designated storage facility. All payments must be made at the Bursar’s Office in room 12, Hoey Administration Building, during business hours Monday through Friday. Conference, Seminar & Workshop Parking- Parking for guests attending a program, conference or special event is available in the Latham Parking Deck at the rate of $5 a space. Guests will enter the parking deck on the Lincoln Street side, where they will pay the officer, who will issue them a pass and guide them to the designated area. Arrangements must be made through the Traffic Office before the conference, program or special event. If a university department chooses to pay, the department must submit a written request by e-mail, and an invoice must be signed. Request must be submitted 10 working days prior to the scheduled event or it will not be processed. Once the fee has been paid, we will issue the permits to the department. The individual department can mail the permits to guests or provide a list of guests to the Traffic Office, in which case the officer will issue permits as guests enter the deck. Vendor/Contractor- All vendors/contractors working on campus must register their vehicles with University Police and purchase a parking permit ($300/year). All departments requesting vendor permits should pre-order them. No permits will be issued if a two-week pre-order is not received by the University Police Department. Traffic Appeals- Faculty, staff, students and visitors have the right to appeal a campus parking citation issued for violation of the university’s parking and traffic regulations. Appeals must be submitted within five days of the violation. Appeal forms are available on NCCU’s website (enter appeal form in the search field). Complete, print and bring the form to the Traffic Office (or mail to the University


Police Department, 2010 Fayetteville St., Durham, NC 27707) along with the ticket and a self-addressed stamped envelope. The Citation Appeal Board is made up of faculty, staff and students. Once the appeal has been heard and a decision made, notice is sent to the appellant informing him or her of the decision by mail. If you fail to comply with the appeal guidelines, your appeal will not be honored. Moving Violations- University Police may issue either a university citation or a uniform state citation for moving violations occurring on campus. Moving violations include (1) failure to stop for a stop sign, (2) one-way street violations, (3) exceeding safe speed, (4) careless and reckless driving, (5) illegal left turn, and (6) unsafe movement. The University Police will also issue state citations for seat belt violations. Vehicular Accidents- All persons involved in motor vehicle accidents on campus shall report the accident to the NCCU Police Department. NCGS 20-16.1 provides, in part, that all accidents involving vehicles in which bodily injury and/or damage to one or more vehicles appears to be $1,000 or more shall be reported by the driver involved to the NCCU Police Department, municipal police, or sheriff as the location of the accident may require. Pedestrians Obstructing Traffic- Except as may be required to travel safely on authorized crosswalks, pedestrians shall not stand in or otherwise obstruct or prevent the flow of traffic on any street, driveway, or paving lot upon which traffic may flow. Repeated Offense- If the conduct of any student or employee establishes a continuing pattern of violations or disregard of parking regulations, they may be temporarily suspended from enrollment or employment pending a hearing. Football Parking- All Eagle Club and Reserve parking for football game days will be handled through the Athletic Department. Game Day Parking- During O’Kelly-Riddick Stadium events, traffic may be restricted. For Saturday home football games, Nelson Street at Lincoln Street, Eagle Campus Drive and George Street will be closed to through traffic starting at 7 p.m. on Friday. To better accommodate patrons and permit holders, certain lots will be reserved or have spaces reserved for employees who report for work on game days or evenings. Even with a valid permit, commuters and other employees may not park in these lots, reserved spaces or in public lots without paying the event fee. Certain lots are reserved for Eagle Club parking. Employees and students are required to move their vehicles from the Walker Complex, the O’Kelly lot, the Criminal Justice gravel lot, Law School, Eagle Campus Drive, Latham Parking Deck and the Communication lot by 7 p.m. on the Fridays before home-game Saturdays. Employees and students with permits for these lots will have to pay to park on game days. Students residing on campus must move their vehicles by 7 p.m. on Friday to the lower lot of the Science Complex. Those scheduling other events on game days must make arrangements for parking with the Athletics Department at 919530-7057.

DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS – STUDENT-ATHLETE ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES


The mission of the Student-Athlete Academic Support Services Office is to create an environment that will allow student-athletes the opportunity to maximize their collegiate experience. We recognize that every student-athlete has lifelong goals that can fulfilled by both athletic and academic success. The Student Athlete Academic Support Services Office strives to help student-athletes achieve these goals. Office of Student-Athlete Academic Support Services E.A.G.L.E.S. (Educate, Assist, Guide, Lead, Everyone, Succeed) Educate - parents/students on the resources for a smooth transition from high school to college Assist - parents and students with the essentials they need for the first year of college. Guide - students in the right direction academically, athletically and socially; concentrating on the individual as a whole. Lead - students to become more accountable and responsible individuals who can make decisions independently. Everyone - is equally committed to preparing our students academically and professionally to become leaders prepared to excel in a diverse, global society. Succeed - by using all campus resources available to navigate the college experience in fulfilling and rewarding ways; while ultimately earning their degree from NCCU Meet the Team: Kwadjo Steele- Academic Coordinator-ksteele9@nccu.edu Edward Reid-ereid14@nccu.edu Christine Bouck-Learning Specialist-cbouck@nccu.ed George Midgett - PSP Coordinator-gmidgett@nccu.edu SAASS Academic Standards Class Attendance (Be on time and actively participate) Hard Work (use your resources) Communication (often and truthfully)

Important Things to Know Regarding Academic Eligibility University Requirements:

67% of Courses Completed Per Semester and Overall 67% of Courses Completed Overall Only 16 credits of WC’s allowed during entire enrollment 2.0 GPA NCAA PTD 1st Year 6 hours per semester (9 for football in the fall semester) 18 hours per academic year (fall and spring) 24 hours in the calendar year (fall, spring, and summer) 2nd Year 1.8 GPA. 6 hours per semester (9 for football in the fall semester) 18 credit hours per academic year (fall and spring) 3rd Year 40% of specific degree requirements (50 credit hours) 1.9 GPA. 6 hours per semester (9 for football in the fall semester) 18 credit hours per academic year (fall and spring) 4th Year


60% of specific degree requirements (75 credit hours) 2.0 GPA. 6 hours per semester (9 for football in the fall semester) 18 credit hours per academic year (fall and spring) 5th Year 80% of specific degree requirements (75 credit hours) 2.0 GPA. 6 hours per semester (9 for football in the fall semester) 18 hours per academic year (fall and spring)

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT 1. Introduction

The policies and procedures, herein described, govern the conduct of students of North Carolina Central University (“NCCU�). Included is the code of student conduct, disciplinary procedures, hearing procedures, and judicial actions. Students are responsible for complying with the rules and regulations of the University, as well as with all federal, state, and local laws.

2. Basic Premises

Standards of behavior at North Carolina Central University are intended to enhance and protect the University’s general educational process, including research and public service activities, as well as promote personal academic advancement and maturation. Realization of such goals can only be achieved in a civil atmosphere of mutual respect among individuals, of appreciation and respect of the rights of other individuals, and of recognition of the rights of individuals and groups to express dissent. For any community to be self-governing, the rules under which it operates must be publicized and understood by the community. The Student Code of Conduct is intended to codify and explain the rules for standards of behavior and responsibilities, as well as the rights and remedies accorded to all members of the community.

3. Scope of Student Conduct Process

Upon acceptance of admission to NCCU, each student agrees to abide by the policies of the University and to conduct him/herself in a manner consistent with its educational mission. Students have a responsibility to review the Student Code of Conduct and other policies and to seek clarification, if necessary, from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. The Student Code of Conduct and other related policies and procedures may be found in the Undergraduate Catalog, Graduate Catalog, Student Handbook, and other University manuals. In addition, various academic units and administrative departments have policies specific to their area of responsibility. It is the responsibility of each student to be familiar with the University policies and procedures. The Student Code of Conduct and related policies are available online. Printed copies are available in the Dean of Students Office and Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards.

4. Campus Rules and Their Applicability to Student Organizations

As part of the North Carolina Central University community, campus organizations represent and are accountable to the University. All campus organizations, as well as the individuals who compose the student organization, are expected to abide by the Student Code of Conduct and related policies. Each student organization must ensure that its members comply with the Student Code of Conduct and related policies. A student organization may be held responsible for violating the Student Code of Conduct and related policies and any such violations may result in disciplinary action in accordance with the Code. Disciplinary action may be taken against the organization, individual members, or both. See Appendix for Registered Student Organizations (RSO)


5. Definitions

5.1 The term “Advisor” means an attorney or non-attorney advocate. 5.2 A “Controlled Substance” is a drug, substance, or immediate precursor included in Schedules I through VI of the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act. (N.C. Gen. Stat § 9086.) 5.3 With respect to sexual behavior, “Consent” is an understandable exchange of affirmative words or actions, which indicate a willingness to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be informed and freely and actively given. The lack of a negative response is not Consent. An individual who is incapacitated by alcohol and/or drug both voluntarily or involuntarily consumed may not give Consent. Past Consent for sexual activity does not imply ongoing future Consent. 5.4 “Day” Unless otherwise specified, the term “day” refers to business days. As defined by the University normal operation of Monday through Friday. 5.5 A “Dean of Students Hold” is an administrative action to limit activity on a Student’s University records and prevents the Student from completing the following University processes: pre-registration, registration, drop/add, withdrawal, graduation, receiving official transcripts, etc. Dean of Students Holds may be applied to a Student’s account to facilitate participation in the Student conduct process; to facilitate completion of sanctions; when interim action has been taken; or when a Student is suspended/expelled; etc. 5.6 “Discrimination” is unequal and unlawful treatment based on race, color, creed, religion, gender, age, national origin, disability, military veteran status, political affiliation, or sexual orientation. 5.7 “Drug Paraphernalia” is any legitimate equipment, product, or material that is utilized or is modified for making, using, or concealing illegal drugs and/or other Controlled Substances. 5.8 The term “Gambling” means operation of any “game of chance” or playing at or betting on any game of chance at which any money, property or other thing of value is bet, whether the same be in stake or not. A game of chance is any game or scheme in which receiving something of value depends on chance rather than skill. (NC General Statute § 14-292) 5.9 “Guest” is a person present on University Premises at the invitation of or being hosted by a Student. 5.10 A “Hate Crime” is an offense that is motivated by the offender’s bias against a race, color, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, or ethnicity. Conduct that may not rise to the level of a “Hate Crime” may still constitute unlawful Harassment. 5.11 The term “Hearing Panel” means any person or persons designated and/or appointed by the Director of SCCS to determine whether a Student, Student Group, or RSO has violated the Student Code of Conduct and make decisions about sanctions. A Hearing Body may include students, faculty members, and staff. A Hearing Body member who has a conflict with, bias about or interest in the case should recuse him or herself. If the Hearing Body member refuses to recuse him or herself, the Director of SCCS shall make the decision about whether to remove t that person from the panel. 5.12 The terms “Institution” and “University” specify North Carolina Central University. 5.13 The term “member of the University community” means any person who is a student, employee or volunteer at the University. 5.14 “Nonconsensual Sexual Contact” (either direct or indirect) is engaging in any other physical contact not described in the definition of Sexual Assault which is performed without a person’s Consent. Examples of “Nonconsensual Sexual Contact” include but are not limited to the intentional touching of an unwilling person’s genitalia, groin, breast, buttocks, or clothing covering them, or forcing an unwilling person to touch another’s intimate parts as listed above. 5.15 “Preponderance” is the standard of proof by which all student conduct decisions are made and means that it is more likely than not that the Respondent violated the Code of Student Conduct. 5.16 The term “SCCS” is an abbreviation for the “Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards”. 5.17 The phrase “record of the hearing” includes the letter containing charges, the audio recording of the hearing, and all documents offered as information at the hearing; the written opinion of the Hearing Body; and any documentation related to any appeal.


5.18 The term “Registered Student Organization” (RSO) means a collection of persons who have complied with the requirements for formal University recognition. 5.19 The term “Respondent” means a Student, Student Group, or RSO charged with a violation of the Code. 5.20 The term “separation of the student from the University” means that, other than contacting SCCS and/or University department(s) approved by SCCS, the Student may not be present on University premises, attend or participate in classes, enter or use any University service or facility, including residence halls, dining facilities, recreation, leisure, library, or computer lab services or facilities, or participate in recognized University clubs or any University-sponsored program, activity, or related event. 5.21 The term “Student” means either (i) a person who has applied for admission, been accepted, and is enrolled in a schedule of undergraduate or graduate courses at the University, (ii) a person attending classes at or through the University, or (iii) a person participating in orientation programs on the University Premises. The term “Student” includes a person who is enrolled in courses on a full-time or part-time basis, at any of the University’s locations. The term also includes a person enrolled in distance education programs and a person participating in Study Abroad programs, or other University sponsored trips. 5.22 The term “Student Group” means a number of persons associated with each other for a common purpose and who have not complied with Student Government formal requirements for registration. 5.23 The term “University Official” means any person employed by the University and authorized to perform administrative or professional duties, including but are not limited to: faculty members, staff members, student employees, or University office(s). 5.24 The term “University Premises” means all buildings, facilities or grounds owned, leased, operated, controlled or supervised by North Carolina Central University, including adjacent streets and sidewalks.

6. Authority and Jurisdiction

6.1 Authority of the University North Carolina Central University is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina. Pursuant to The Code of the University of North Carolina, as adopted by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina, the Chancellor is solely responsible for all matters of student discipline at North Carolina Central University. The Chancellor may delegate this authority in matters of student discipline to administrative officers, faculty, and staff committees. The Chancellor has delegated her authority through the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards to implement policies and procedures in the matters of student discipline at North Carolina Central University. 6.1.1 Authority of the Code The Code is the University’s primary policy governing student behavior. The provisions of the Code are not contractual covenants between the University and the student. The University reserves the right to change the Code at any time during a student’s term of enrollment. Such changes will be communicated to members of the University community through various publications. Each student is responsible for maintaining current knowledge of the Code. Students are subject to the Student Code of Conduct and related policies from the time they accept admission until their graduation from the University. This means that conduct occurring before classes begin or after classes end, during the academic year, and during periods between terms of enrollment is governed by the Code. An operating unit of the University (e.g., academic colleges or departments, University Housing, Athletics) may also establish conduct standards for the student/departmental relationship, so long as those standards are consistent with the provisions of the Code or establish higher standards of conduct set forth in the Code. Disciplinary action pursuant to the Code does not preclude additional action by the operating unit. Sanctions applied under the Code cannot be waived or modified by the operating unit. Sanctions may be imposed by the operating unit in lieu of sanctions applied in proceedings under the Code only when done in consultation with the Director. The Student Code of Conduct also applies to student behavior, which violates University policies, but which was discovered after the student has left the University or has graduated. Depending


on the circumstances of the case, degree revocation might be a consequence. The University reserves the right to administratively rescind and void a student’s admission offer prior to their first day of class if the student provided false information or omitted information on their application. 6.1.2 Precedence of the Code The Code addresses general student conduct. The Code details the fundamental fairness and process requirements for student conduct proceedings. In areas of duplication, wherein a student’s conduct violates the Code as well as his/her academic department, the academic department will have final decision making authority regarding resolution of the conduct matter. The Academic Honor Code governs student conduct directly related to the academic life of the University. The Academic Honor Code is applicable to any academically related experience involving NCCU students (or alumni in cases where violations are discovered after graduation) whether occurring on the campus or at host institutions or sites. All alleged violations of the Academic Honor Code must be resolved in accordance with this Academic Honor Code and under the direct authority of a NCCU faculty member. Graduate or professional schools within the University may initiate charges against students for alleged violations of professional standards or ethics as a separate issue or as an extension of alleged acts of academic dishonesty or violations of the Code. Graduate students should note that they are simultaneously accountable to multiple and separate jurisdictions―institutional standards of academic dishonesty and/or general conduct, or a departmental conduct officer in cases of alleged violations of departmental policies. Faculty members of each academic unit may implement classroom rules and regulations that govern student conduct during classroom and instructional times. The primary responsibility for managing the classroom environment rests with the faculty member. However, sanctions applied by the individual faculty member may not exceed those specified in the Code. In addition, no faculty member has the authority to suspend or expel a student from his/her classroom for greater than one class period without invoking the student conduct process set forth in the Code. 6.2 Jurisdiction of the Code The University has jurisdiction over all behavioral infractions that occur on University Premises. It reserves the right to consider the behavior of students off campus when it is determined that the off campus behavior interferes with the University, its educational mission and the safety of the University community. The Director of the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards in consultation with the Dean of Students and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs shall determine if an incident off campus affects University interests and falls within the scope of the Code of Student Conduct. Application of the Code of Student Conduct to off-campus Student conduct will be consistent with the following values: 6.2.1 to prevent and reduce behavior that undermines Student academic success and that negatively detracts from the educational mission of the University; 6.2.2 to improve the health and safety of Students and other community members; 6.2.3 to provide timely intervention, support, and resources for those who may be struggling with substance abuse/addiction and; 6.2.4 to address activities of a Student(s) that clearly conflict with the University’s interests and mission. 6.3 Violation of Law In cases where a student charged with a violation of law that is also a violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the University reserves the right to proceed under the Student Code of Conduct with a hearing and the possible imposition of a sanction, prior to, concurrent with or subsequent to, civil litigation, criminal arrest, and/or criminal prosecution. 6.4 Off-Campus Violations and University Disciplinary Proceedings The primary types of off-campus violations addressed by the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards include, but are not limited to, the following: 6.4.1 felony charges; 6.4.2 act of harm charges, including, but not limited to, assault, harassment, sexual misconduct, or threats; 6.4.3 driving while impaired (DWI) charges or charges of driving by individuals less than twenty-one (21) years old after consuming alcohol or drugs; 6.4.4 repeated or high risk alcohol misdemeanor charges; 6.4.5 repeated or high risk drug misdemeanor charges; and 6.4.6 activities of a student or group of students that conflict with the University’s interests


and mission, including, but not limited to, patterns of behavior that put the health and safety of others at risk or show disregard for the policies of the University. 6.5 Freedom of Expression The University embraces and strives to uphold the freedoms of expression and speech guaranteed by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution and the North Carolina Constitution. The University has the right under appropriate circumstances to regulate the time, place, and manner of exercising these and other constitutionally protected rights. In administering the Code, due care will be exercised in order to preserve freedom of speech and expression, as articulated in current legal standards. 6.6 Standards of Due Process Any Student charged with a violation of the Code of Conduct is entitled to a hearing before a Hearing Panel appointed by the Director of SCCS, as specified in the Conduct Process (Section 9) of the Code, except where the party and the University agree to settle the charge without a hearing, as provided in Resolution of Disciplinary Actions (Section 9.2). Sections 7and 9 are consistent with and satisfy the procedural requirements of UNC Policy Manual 700.4.1. The focus of inquiry in student conduct proceedings shall be to determine whether the respondent is or is not responsible for violating the Code of Conduct. Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable, nor shall deviation from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or proceeding, unless significant prejudice to the Respondent or the University may result.

7. Rights of Involved Students

Students are guaranteed the following elements of fundamental fairness throughout the Conduct Process. 7.1 Rights of the Respondent 7.1.1 to be provided a fundamentally fair process; 7.1.2 to be presumed not responsible for a violation of the Code until determined otherwise; 7.1.3 to be given written notice of any allegation(s) or formal charge(s) of prohibited conduct; 7.1.4 the right to have a reasonable amount of time to prepare for a hearing; 7.1.5 to review the information that will be presented in any resolution, provided that the information may be given to the student in a redacted format; 7.1.6 to present relevant information on their behalf; 7.1.7 to be represented by an Advisor throughout the entire Student Conduct Process, provided written Notice of Representation, a signed FERPA authorization, and Certification forms are received within four (4) business of notification of allegations. Note: The Notice of Representation must include the identity of the Advisor, specification of their status, address, telephone number, and email where they may be reached. The FERPA Authorization and Certification forms will be provided in the notification email. 7.1.8 to have sanction(s) imposed on the basis of the guidelines set forth in the Code; 7.1.9 to be informed of the final decision and results of a disciplinary proceeding; 7.1.10 to request reasonable accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act through the North Carolina Central University Office of Student Disability Services; 7.1.11 to know the identity of individuals speaking or providing written information for consideration at any hearing; 7.1.12 to confront, in some manner, the allegations and information presented relevant to the formal charge(s) against them, which in all cases will be brought forward by the University; 7.1.13 to request a delay of the hearing for academic or extenuating circumstances; 7.1.14 to admit responsibility for any or all of the charges against them; 7.1.15 to request that a member of a Board be excluded from the hearing on the basis of a conflict of interest or bias; 7.1.16 to not speak or answer any question(s), if such testimony or answers would tend to establish against them a violation of the Code. When a student refuses to speak, therefore avoiding questioning, they relinquish the right to make a written or verbal statement at the end of the findings stage the hearing; however, a summation of the relevant facts of the matter under adjudication may be made by the student’s Advisor, provided that the summation is not a substitute for the statement the student declined to provide; 7.1.17 to pose reasonable questions to any witness appearing at a hearing in a manner


determined by the Chair; except the alleged victim of alleged sexual violence 7.1.18 to appeal any decision of a Hearing Panel, pursuant to Section 11 of the Code; 7.1.19 to have supervised access to a recording of the hearing proceedings; and 7.1.20 to have any disciplinary records kept confidential, unless an exception is allowed or required by law or regulation. 7.2 Rights of the Complainant 7.2.1 to be provided a fundamentally fair process; 7.2.2 to file a complaint with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards upon discovery of the violation; 7.2.3 to file criminal charges or pursue civil action in addition to any action taken under the Code; 7.2.4 to have prior disciplinary history excluded from information presented during a Board’s hearing and deliberation of findings for any charge(s); 7.2.5 to have sanction(s) imposed on the basis of the guidelines set forth in the Code; 7.2.6 to request reasonable accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act through the Student Disability Services; 7.2.7 in cases involving an alleged crime(s) of violence or act(s) of sexual misconduct or sex/ gender based harassment, to provide an impact statement, provided that such statement shall only be considered during the sanctioning phase of a hearing; 7.2.8 in cases involving an alleged crime(s) of violence or act(s) of sexual misconduct or sex/gender based harassment, to be informed of the final decision and results of a disciplinary proceeding in accordance with FERPA and the Clery Act; 7.2.9 in cases involving an alleged act(s) of sexual misconduct or sex/gender-based harassment, to review the information that will be presented in any resolution, provided that the information may be given to the student in a redacted format; 7.2.10 to present relevant information on their behalf; 7.2.11 to obtain support, advice, or assistance from an Advisor, pursuant to relevant sections in Section 9 of the Code; 7.2.12 to know the identity of individuals speaking or providing written information for consideration at any hearing; 7.2.13 to be provided the same opportunities as the Respondent to address any University official involved with the resolution of the complaint, including being present during the findings stage of the hearing. Please note: the complainant has the right not to participate in the hearing if he/she so chooses but the University may still move forward in addressing the alleged violation of the student conduct process. 7.2.14 to request that a member of a Board be excluded from the hearing on the basis of a conflict of interest or bias; 7.2.15 to not speak or answer any question(s), if such testimony or answers would tend to establish against them a violation of the Code. When a student refuses to speak, therefore avoiding questioning, they relinquish the right to make a written or verbal statement at the end of the findings stage of the hearing; however, a summation of the relevant facts of the matter under adjudication may be made by the student’s Advisor, provided that the summation is not a substitute for the statement the student declined to provide; 7.2.16 to pose reasonable questions to any witness appearing at a hearing in a manner determined by the Chair; 7.2.17 to appeal any decision of a Board, pursuant to Section 11 of the Code; 7.2.18 to have supervised access to a recording of the hearing proceedings in which the Complainant had an opportunity to participate; and 7.2.19 to have any disciplinary records kept confidential, unless an exception is allowed or required by law or regulation.

8. Acts of Misconduct

8.1 Prohibited Conduct Behavior that is subject to disciplinary action under the Code includes: (1) violations of federal, state or local Law, (2) policies of the State of North Carolina, the University of North Carolina, or North Carolina Central University, (3) conduct which presents a clear and present danger to members of the University community, and (4) any other behavior that significantly and


unreasonably has an adverse effect on the University or its educational mission. Examples of behavior that will be subject to disciplinary action include, but are not limited to, the following: 8.1.1 Acts of Dishonesty: 8.1.1.1 Cheating, Plagiarism or Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty 8.1.1.2 Furnishing False Information to any University Official, Faculty Member or Office 8.1.1.2.1 Knowingly making in public a false oral statement with the intent to deceive and/or mislead or knowingly publishing and/or distributing a false written or printed statement with the intent to deceive and/or mislead or injure the character and/or reputation of another; and/or 8.1.1.2.2 Knowingly furnishing false information to a judicial board, to a judicial hearing officer or to any other University official in the discharge of their duties. 8.1.1.3 Forgery, Alteration or Misuse of any University Document, Record Instrument of Identification: Includes signing of another student’s name, using another student’s identification card (Eagle Card), credit card, or other personal documents, affixing the signature of a University official to any document circumventing the procedural process of the University or to gain an unfair advantage. 8.1.1.4 Misuse of Student Identification Card: University-issued identification may be required to enter the dining hall or other designated facilities and events. This identification must be used by the person to whom it is issued, it is non-transferable and must be used for the purpose it was issued. Students are not allowed to use another student’s identification card (Eagle Card) for any reason. If your card is lost or stolen, report it to the North Carolina University Police and the Eagle Card Office immediately. Students are required to present their identification card (Eagle Card) when it is required by any University Official. 8.1.2 Alcohol Violations. Any violation of NCCU’s Policy on Alcoholic Beverages and/or North Carolina Law, including, but not limited to, binge drinking, use or personal possession of alcoholic beverages or containers by undergraduate students, sale or deliveries of alcoholic beverages to undergraduate students, or, serving alcoholic beverages to undergraduate students; also includes being intoxicated in public. 8.1.3 Arson. The malicious, voluntary, willful and/or intentional act of setting fire to a building(s) or other structure(s). Also includes activities further defined by North Carolina law. 8.1.4 Breaching Campus Safety or Security. Includes but is not limited to: Unauthorized access to University facilities or unauthorized possession of, use of or duplication of master keys or access cards to University office or residential facilities; and unauthorized occupancy of or entry into locked or off-limit University buildings. This includes burglary and trespassing. Propping University exterior facility doors open is not allowed. 8.1.4.1 Tampering with fire alarms, extinguishers and emergency safety systems. This includes tampering with any emergency system, pulling alarms, using extinguishers and covering smoke detectors, all of which are prohibited. 8.1.4.2 Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on University premises or at University-sponsored or supervised functions. 8.1.5 Bullying/Cyberbullying. Any pattern of gestures or written, electronic or verbal communications, behaviors, or any physical act or any threatening communication that is threatening or intimidating which (1) places a person in actual and reasonable fear of harm to his/her person or damage to his/her property, or (ii) creates a hostile environment by substantially interfering with or impairing a student’s educational performance, opportunities or benefits, or a University student employee’s ability to perform the essential functions of his/her job. Examples include, but are not limited to, spreading rumors, teasing, taunting, and intentionally embarrassing another individual. 8.1.6 Classroom/University Event Disruptions. Acting in a manner that disrupts or interferes with teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, other University missions, processes or functions including public-service functions, or other University activities is prohibited. Disruptive activities may include but are not limited to: 8.1.6.1 Any act that deliberately interferes with the academic freedom or the freedom of speech of any member or guest of the University community. 8.1.6.2 Classroom behavior that seriously interferes with either (a) the instructor’s ability to conduct the class or (b) the ability of other students to profit from the instructional program. 8.1.6.3 Leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled or normal activities on University premises.


8.1.6.4 Conduct that is disorderly, lewd or indecent. 8.1.7 Dating Violence. Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: (i) the length of the relationship; (ii) type of relationship; and (iii) frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. An intimate relationship is defined as a relationship related to marriage, cohabitation, dating or within a family and can occur in opposite-sex and same-sex relationships, regardless of whether it is a current or past relationship. 8.1.8 Destruction of property. Vandalism, malicious destruction, damage, misuse or abuse of public or private property, including library materials and computer programs and equipment. 8.1.9 Disorderly conduct. For purposes of the Code, disorderly conduct shall include, but is not limited to, the following: 8.1.9.1 Disruptive conduct in game rooms or during intramural play, including the use of profanity, display of violent temper, refusal to leave the building or area when asked to do so by appropriate University officials, as well as conduct which infringes upon the privacy, rights, privileges, health or safety of members of the University community; 8.1.9.2 Excessive or disruptive noise, the public use of unapproved amplified sound, the amplification of sound in a manner that disrupts or disturbs the normal functioning of the University. 8.1.10 Domestic Violence. Violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the state of North Carolina. 8.1.11 Drugs, Drug Paraphernalia and Other Controlled Substances. Possessing, using, distributing, buying, selling, facilitating a sale, delivering, manufacturing, and/or abusing illicit or illegally obtained substances. Misusing prescription or counterfeit drugs. Consuming, including huffing or sniffing, any substance not intended for such use. Possessing or using drug paraphernalia. This includes anything which otherwise violates NCCU’s Policy on Illegal Drugs and/or North Carolina law. 8.1.12 Endangerment: Any act or conduct that threatens the health and safety, or well-being of one’s self or another person or the NCCU community. Examples of endangerment include, but are not limited to, fighting, operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and engaging in non-consensual sexual contact. 8.1.13 Failure to Comply. Failure to comply with directives of University officials or law enforcement officers, and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so. This includes, but is not limited to, showing identification, the conduct process, investigations, and sanction completion. 8.1.14 False Alarm/Misuse of Fire or Safety Equipment. Falsely reporting the presence of an unlawful explosive or incendiary device with the intent to mislead, deceive, or disrupt the operation of the University or a scheduled event sponsored or co-sponsored by the University; or falsely reporting a fire or other emergency; falsely setting off a fire alarm or discharging a fire extinguisher. 8.1.15 Gambling. Placing a bet or wager on an uncertain outcome for money or other items of value unless permitted by law. Also includes engaging in activities further defined by North Carolina law. 8.1.16 Harassment. Repeated, persistent, severe, or pervasive actions directed toward specific individual(s) with the intent or effect to harass, harm, or alarm, including attempted or threatened physical contact, or acts that create the reasonable apprehension of unwanted contact. Such acts may include but are not limited to face to face interactions, phone calls, text messages, and/or use of social media. 8.1.17 Hazing. Prohibited acts committed for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization or student group. Physically abusing or harassing another person or creating a situation which produces physical hurt or discomfort, severe emotional distress, embarrassment, or ridicule of another person. It includes physical injury, assault or battery, kidnapping or imprisonment, intentionally placing at risk of mental or emotional harm (putting “over the edge”), degradation, humiliation, the


compromising of moral or religious values, forced consumption of any liquid or solid, placing an individual in physical danger (at risk) which includes abandonment, and impairment of physical liberties which include curfews or other interference with academic endeavors. Hazing is also a violation of North Carolina law; see N.C.G.S § 14-35. 8.1.18 Infliction or Threat of Bodily Harm. The intent, attempt, or assistance with, the inflict physical injury upon a person, which includes, but is not limited to: 8.1.18.1 Intentionally or recklessly causing physical harm to any person while on University premises or at University-sponsored activities; or 8.1.18.2 Intentionally or recklessly causing other persons on University property or at University-sponsored activities to believe that you mean to harm them; or 8.1.18.3 Intentionally or recklessly causing any act that creates a substantial risk of bodily harm to any person who is on University property or at University-sponsored activities, including, but not limited to, throwing objects from buildings. 8.1.19 Improper Use of Elevators. Unauthorized entry into an elevator shaft and/or riding on top of an elevator car. 8.1.20 Misuse of Technology/Communication Systems. Use of technology or communication systems, including, but not limited to, NCCU’s telephonic system, internet, intranet or wireless network, in any manner that is prohibited by the Student Code of Conduct, the UNC Policy Manual, The Code of the University of North Carolina, or local, state or federal law. 8.1.21 Riotous behavior. Rioting, inciting to riot, assembling to riot, raiding, inciting to raid, and assembling to raid University units. 8.1.22 Sexual assault. Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will, or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent (e.g., intoxicated). Non-Consensual sexual contact occurs when a person subjects another person to sexual contact without having first obtained explicit consent or when he or she knows or should have known that the person was incapable of giving consent because of mental incapacitation, mental disorder or physical helplessness. Sexual contact, includes, but is not limited to, kissing, touching of the genitalia, anus, buttocks or breast of a person. Sexual penetration includes any insertion, however slight, of the penis, fingers(s) or any object into the vagina or anus, or the insertion of the penis into someone’s mouth. Unwanted sexual touching (including between acquaintances); Sexual contact when the person is less than the statutory age of consent. Also includes behavior outlined in NCCU’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. 8.1.23 Sexual Harassment. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that tends to create a hostile or offensive environment. Also includes behavior outlined in NCCU’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. 8.1.24 Stalking. Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress. 8.1.25 Theft. Stealing, larceny, shoplifting, embezzlement, conversion or the unauthorized possession of the property of another. 8.1.26 Trespass. Unauthorized presence in or forcible entry into a University facility or University owned or leased properties. 8.1.27 Unauthorized Sales/Fundraisers. Unauthorized solicitation or activity designed to raise money on behalf of an individual or group. 8.1.28 Violation of copyright. Unauthorized use of the name of the University, the name of University officials or the likeness, image, logo, or seal of the University, or the names of members of organizations in the University community. 8.1.29 Violation of Residential Life Polices. Violation of any rules or policies published in the Guide to Campus Living or Community Living Standards constitutes misconduct. 8.1.30 Violation of University Polices Regulations or Rules. Violation of any written policies, regulations or rules of the University constitutes misconduct. 8.1.31 Weapons. Unauthorized use or possession of firearms, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, hazardous chemicals, explosives, bows and arrows, knives longer than four inches, swords, stun guns, BB guns, or other dangerous weapons. (While some objects are clearly dangerous, the manner in which an object is used may also subject it being considered a weapon.). 8.2 Parental Notifications For Alcohol And Drug Violations The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards will notify the parent of any student


who is less than twenty-one (21) years of age at the time of being charged with violating Section 8.1(2) of the Code regarding alcohol violations and/or the parent of any student who is less than twenty-one (21) years of age at the time of being charged with violating Section 8.1(11) of the Code regarding drugs, drug paraphernalia and other controlled substances, as soon as practically possible following the initiation of charges against the student.

9. Conduct Process

When a student engages in behavior that may violate the Student Code of Conduct, the processes set forth in this section shall be followed. The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards has been delegated primary responsibility over the judicial process for resolution of student conduct issues. 9.1 Initiation of Charges 9.1.1 Filing of Complaint/Initial Review 9.1.1.1 Any member of the University community may register a complaint with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards against a student for an alleged violation of University policy. The complaint must include factual information supporting the allegation. Allegations concerning violations of the Code must be brought in writing to the attention of the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 9.1.1.2 Upon receipt of a complaint, the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards will conduct a preliminary investigation of the allegations included in the complaint. In the absence of sufficient substantive evidence, a complaint will be dismissed. The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards shall provide written documentation to the complainant (person who filed the complaint) that there will be no further substantive review of the allegations made in the complaint. 9.1.1.3 Should the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards determine that sufficient substantive evidence exists to substantiate the allegations made in the complaint; disciplinary proceedings will be initiated. 9.1.2 Notification of Conduct Allegations 9.1.2.1 Allegations of Code violations will be presented to respondent(s) by means of a written notice of referral from the University Police or in other cases by written or electronic notification from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards or designee. This notice will contain the substance of the allegations refer the Student to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards to schedule a Student Conduct Conference. 9.1.2.1.2 Allegations shall be prepared in writing and directed to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards designee. Such allegations shall be submitted as soon as possible after the incident takes place, preferably within thirty (30) days of the discovery of the violation. 9.1.2.1.3 The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards will conduct a preliminary screening of the allegations to determine whether (1) the allegations, if proven, would constitute a violation under the Code; and (2) based upon the allegations, there is reasonable belief that such a violation may have occurred. This screening may involve reading of the description of the alleged conduct, or discussion with the individual(s) making the allegations, as appropriate to the situation. The University may decide to proceed with charges without the complainant’s consent, if in the professional judgment of the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, the University community’s interests are best served by proceeding with the conduct process. 9.1.2.1.4 Following the preliminary screening of the allegations, the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards designee will schedule a Student Conduct Conference with the respondent to discuss the allegations. 9.1.3 Notification of Charges 9.1.3.1 The respondent will be provided written notification of the charges, at least five (5) days prior to any hearing or administrative review on the charge. 9.1.3.2 The notification will: 9.1.3.3 Specify the alleged violation of the Code. If the respondent is a dependent student, a copy of the written notification shall be sent to the parents/guardians of dependent students. 9.1.3.4 Inform the student that he/she is presumed not responsible until proven responsible by a preponderance of the evidence. 9.1.3.5 Inform the student that he/she has the right to be represented by an attorney/non-


attorney Advisor from the moment of notice of an allegation. 9.1.4 Student Conduct Conference. The purpose of the Student Conduct Conference is to ensure that the respondent understands his or her rights and responsibilities within the student conduct process. The Student Conduct Conference shall be held within five (5) days of the student’s receipt of the notification of alleged charges. The Student Conduct Conference shall be held with a conduct officer from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 9.1.4.1. At the Student Conduct Conference, the respondent will be: 9.1.4.1.1 Given the opportunity to discuss the allegations and provide information. 9.1.4.1.2 Afforded the opportunity to review the Fundamental Fairness Guarantees. 9.1.4.1.3 Notified of the possible charges which may result from the allegation(s). 9.1.4.1.4 Given notice of the student conduct process to resolve charges in the Code. 9.1.4.1.5 Provided a copy of the Student Code of Conduct and any other appropriate written material. 9.1.4.1.6 Advised to consult further with the conduct officer handling their case concerning any questions or interpretation of procedure. 9.1.4.1.2 Following this conference, the conduct officer will inform the accused as to whether a formal conduct charge will be pursued to resolve the allegations. 9.1.4.1.3 If the accused is formally charged with a conduct violation, the conduct officer will inform the student of his/her rights, options available for resolution, and procedures in cases of failure to respond or withdrawal from the University in the face of conduct charges. 9.2 Resolution of Disciplinary Actions 9.2.1 Students who have disciplinary charges pending against them may choose one or more of the following means of resolution. 9.2.1.1 Request a hearing. 9.2.1.2 Plead responsible for the charges, waive a hearing on the charges and accept the sanctions to be levied after an administrative review by the Director, or his/her designee. The Director, or his/her designee, will consult with appropriate officials, inclusive of the Dean of Students, and other parties involved and determine the appropriate sanction. A written document stating that the accused waives his/her right to a hearing and will accept the sanctions levied by the Director, or his/her designee, must be signed and witnessed by the accused and made a part of the record. 9.2.1.3 Request that an interim sanction be imposed so that the student may resolve any pending criminal charges prior to proceeding with the campus disciplinary process. 9.3 Hearing Procedures 9.3.1 Administrative Hearings (for respondents who elect to resolve their disciplinary actions before the Director or his/her designee) The following Administrative Hearing procedures apply in cases where the alleged charges do not rise to the level of warranting a suspension or expulsion from the University, as determined by the Office Student Conduct and Community Standards. In addition, these procedures also apply when a student desires to resolve a charge(s) that could result in his/her suspension or expulsion from the University if SCCS determines that resolution of the issues via the Administrative Hearing process is appropriate. 9.3.1.1 A student who is charged with an alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be provided an opportunity to meet with a conduct officer selected by the Director. During this meeting, a student may accept responsibility for Student Code of Conduct violations and waive his/her right to a hearing before a judicial panel. A student who fails to attend the meeting with the conduct officer will forfeit his/her right to respond on his/her behalf regarding the alleged violation, unless the student can demonstrate that an extraordinary circumstance prevented his/ her appearance as determined by Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 9.3.1.2 During the Administrative Hearing, the student will be provided with the following: 9.3.1.2.1 An explanation of the charges; 9.3.1.2.2 A summary of the information gathered in support of the charges; 9.3.1.2.3 A reasonable opportunity for the student to reflect upon and respond on his/her own behalf to the charges; and 9.3.1.2.4 An explanation of the applicable disciplinary procedures. 9.3.1.3 The Administrative Hearing Officer will determine whether he/she finds the respondent responsible or not for a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and, if so, the appropriate disciplinary sanction to apply. In determining the sanction, the conduct officer will


consider any aggravating or mitigating factors, including any prior violations of the Student Code of Conduct. 9.3.1.4 The conduct officer will inform the student of the decision in writing within three (3) days of the conclusion of the hearing. 9.3.1.5 The written decision will include a statement of the charges, the determination, and the sanction to be imposed, if any. This decision is considered to be in full force and effect, unless a notice of appeal is received by the Dean of Students (non suspendable/expellable cases) or the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (suspendable/expellable cases) within three (3) days after the conduct officer/Administrative Hearing Officer pronounces his/her decision in writing. 9.3.2 Hearing Panels (University Committee on Student Conduct, Student Judicial Board) 9.3.2.1 University Committee on Student Conduct -When a student is suspected to have engaged in behavior, which violates the Code, and which could result in expulsion or suspension, the Director, or his/her designee, will assemble a three to five-member hearing panel from the University Committee on Student Conduct. 9.3.2.1.1 The Committee shall hold a hearing, consistent with Section 9.3(3) of the Code, ten (10) days after formal notification of charges to the respondent. 9.3.2.1.2 Members of the Committee will serve a one-year term but may be reappointed at the discretion of the Director. Any vacancies that occur during the course of the year will be filled by the Director. 9.3.2.1.3 The Committee shall also serve in an advisory capacity to the Director in the revision and promulgation of regulations and procedures related to matters of student conduct. Suggestions regarding potential revisions to the Code from members of the University Committee may be addressed to the Director. 9.3.2.2 Student Judicial Board- the Student Judicial Board shall be composed of fifteen (15) members. Ten (10) members will be selected by an application and interview process. The interviews will be conducted by a member of the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards staff, and the Student Government Association President, or designee, whenever possible. Five members shall be appointed by the Director and Student Government Association President to serve in Judicial Board leadership positions. The Student Judicial Board shall hear, try and decide cases involving student conduct as determined by SCCS. The Board shall not have the authority to hear cases, which involve sexual misconduct or may result in suspension or expulsion. 9.3.3 Hearing Procedures: 9.3.3.1 The chair of the hearing panel will state that the hearing is closed to the public. The chair will also remind everyone present that the hearing proceedings are confidential. 9.3.3.2 The chair will facilitate the introductions of those present and will explain the hearing procedures to the parties. 9.3.3.3 The chair will state the charge(s) against the respondent, advise the student of his/ her rights and ask the respondent whether or not he/she agrees or disagrees to the charges. 9.3.3.4 The conduct officer from SCCS will present the University’s case in the form of documentary evidence and witnesses. The panel and the respondent will be provided with copies of any documentary evidence introduced during the hearing. 9.3.3.5 The respondent may respond to the charges and may also present evidence in the form of documents and witnesses. The panel and the conduct officer from SCCS will be provided with copies of any documentary evidence introduced during the hearing. 9.3.3.6 The conduct officer from SCCS will be permitted to question the respondent’s witnesses and the respondent will be permitted to question the conduct officer or his/her designee’s witnesses except the alleged victim of alleged sexual violence (See Section 7.2). 9.3.3.7 The conduct officer from SCCS and the respondent will be permitted to present rebuttal evidence following the conclusion of the other party’s presentation of evidence. 9.3.3.8 The panel will be permitted to question the conduct officer from SCCS, the respondent and witnesses for both parties. The panel will normally endeavor to question the witnesses following questioning by the opposing party, and will question the parties at the conclusion of their presentations. Nevertheless, panelists are permitted to question witnesses and the parties at any time during the hearing. 9.3.3.9 The conduct officer from SCCS will be provided with the opportunity to make a closing statement. 9.3.3.10 The respondent will be provided with the opportunity to make a closing statement.


9.3.3.11 The Chair will conclude the evidentiary portion of the hearing and set up a time for deliberations to begin at the earliest possible time. 9.3.3.12 During panel hearings, deliberations about responsibility are conducted by the panel in a closed session. 9.3.3.13 The decision of the panel shall be determined by majority vote. 9.3.3.14 If the panel finds that the respondent is responsible, the conduct officer from SCCS and the respondent may present evidence and argument regarding the appropriate sanction. Written statements by either party are permissible. 9.3.3.15 If the panel finds the respondent responsible, the conduct officer from SCCS will indicate whether the student has any prior findings of responsibility for academic or non-academic conduct violations. 9.3.3.16 The panel will then deliberate and determine an appropriate sanction. All sanctions imposed shall be pursuant to and in accordance with the sanctions in Section 10. These deliberations shall be conducted in closed session. 9.3.3.17 The hearing panel shall render a written decision as to whether they find the respondent responsible or not responsible for the charges within three (3) business days of the conclusion of the hearing. The decision shall state the recommended sanction, if any, and the procedures for the appeal. Once recommended sanctions have been reviewed and approved by the Dean of Students, the respondent and the conduct officer from SCCS shall each be given a copy of the decision. 9.3.3.18 Decisions of a panel and sanctions rendered by a panel (after approval by the Dean of Students) are considered to be in full force and effect unless a notice of appeal is received by the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (suspendable cases) or the Dean of Students (non-suspendable) within three (3) days after the panel pronounces its decision and makes the decision known to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 9.4 In Absentia Consideration of Charges 9.4.1 If the Respondent has been notified pursuant to the Code and fails to respond within five (5) days of the initial notice, the case may be resolved in their absence. If the case is resolved in absentia, the Respondent shall have waived their right to a hearing. The Conduct Officer will, in their professional judgment, determine findings for any alleged violation(s) and may specify any sanction(s) described in the Code. 9.4.2 The resolution must be delivered in writing to the Respondent within five (5) days. 9.4.3 If the Conduct Officer determines that the student’s failure to appear was not for the purpose of circumventing the Conduct process, the Director may rescind the disciplinary action and alter the sanction imposed, or refer a student to the appropriate hearing panel to have the allegation heard on its merits. 9.4.4 A student who fails to attend his or her scheduled hearing shall have the case adjudicated by the appropriate hearing panel or administrative officer in the student’s absence. Note: An Advisor without the presence of the student in question cannot fulfill the student’s attendance obligation.

10. Sanctions for Misconduct

The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards may impose the following sanctions or combination of sanctions upon any respondent found “Responsible” for violations of the Student Code of Conduct. Conduct sanctions are implemented to educate and inform students on the behavior that led to the violation. It is the intent of the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards to educate students on their behavior in regards to the Student Code Conduct so they are better able to make informed decisions. In light of the facts and circumstances of each case, a Dean of Students hold may be placed (if not already in place) upon receiving sanctions or failure to comply with the imposed sanctions. A student found responsible for a violation of the Student Code of Conduct shall be subject to sanctions commensurate with the offense with consideration given to any aggravating and mitigating circumstances, including but not limited to the student’s conduct record. Potential sanctions are outlined below: 10.1 Disciplinary Warning. Disciplinary Warning involves written notice to the respondent indicating that specific behavior or activity is in violation of the Code and that repetition of similar or other unsatisfactory behavior would likely result in more serious disciplinary action. A copy of the warning becomes a part of the respondent’s conduct record. 10.2 Disciplinary Probation. Disciplinary Probation permits continuation of the relationship


between the respondent and the University. The probationary period is to provide a time of reflection for the respondent to consider the offense and his/her future responsibilities as a member of the University community. Subsequent violations of university rules, regulations, or policies could result in more severe sanction(s) (even after a particular probationary period expires). Probation is a status in which the respondent is deemed not to be in good conduct standing with the University for a defined period of time. Probation is imposed for a specified period of time, the terminal date of which shall coincide with the official ending of an academic semester, summer session, or academic school year. The status of Disciplinary Probation may involve restrictions, conditions, or terms imposed for a definite period of time. Restrictions, conditions, or terms of probation may include, but are not limited to, ineligibility to participate in university activities or events; periodic contact with a designated member of the University community; and restrictions on accessibility to University facilities and/or housing areas; 10.3 Residence Hall Separation. Residence Hall Separation involves the removal from the University residence hall community for conduct, which clearly demonstrates an inability to function appropriately in the residence hall living situation. Such separation may be permanent or for a fixed period of time (but not less than the remainder of the semester. Such separation prohibits accessibility to all or designated residence halls. Visitations will not be permitted without securing prior approval from the hearing officer or panel. 10.4 Restitution. Restitution is reimbursement for actual damage or destruction of, or misappropriation of University property or property of any person which results from conduct in violation of the Code. The hearing officer or hearing panel will investigate and determine the appropriate reimbursement. 10.5 Deferred Suspension. Deferred Suspension is used for offenses found serious enough to warrant suspension, but where the specific circumstances of the case mitigate the offense or for repeated offenses of a less serious nature. Deferred Suspension is a designated period of time during which a respondent is given the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to abide by the community’s expectations of behavior articulated in the Code of Conduct. During a Deferred Suspension, the respondent will be officially suspended from the University, but the suspension will be deferred, meaning that the respondent may continue to attend classes at this time, however, the suspension will be automatically enforced for failure to complete any assigned sanctions by the deadline and/or for any subsequent violations while on the open sanction, unless the Dean of Students and/or Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs determines otherwise in exceptional circumstances. Respondents on Deferred Suspension may be limited in their abilities to represent the University on any athletic team other than intramurals, hold an office in any registered student organization, represent the University in any extracurricular activity or official function, or participate in any study abroad program. Deferred Suspension may also include the denial of specific University privileges, including but not limited to, attendance at athletic functions and residence hall visitation for a designated period of time. The duration of any Deferred Suspension period and the specific restrictions imposed will be determined by the resolution body on a case-by-case basis. 10.6 Suspension. Suspension severs the respondent’s relationship with the University for no less than the remainder of the semester or summer session in which the sanction is imposed or no more than one year. It is imposed for a specified period of time, the terminal date of which shall coincide with the official ending of an academic semester, summer session, or academic school year. Conditions for readmission may include, but are not limited to, disciplinary probation for a specified length of time; no on-campus housing; restricted visitation to specified University facilities; and a written statement from an accredited mental health professional or medical doctor verifying the capability of the respondent to function successfully at the University. Respondents separated from the University by suspension may not enter University premises or university-related premises without securing prior approval from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. If a respondent is suspended as a result of a disciplinary hearing, any credit earned at another institution during the time of suspension will not be accepted for transfer credit. 10.7 Expulsion. Expulsion severs the relationship of the respondent with the University. It may be recommended by the appropriate hearing panel but can be imposed or rescinded only by the Chancellor. This penalty implies permanent separation from North Carolina Central University and any institution within the University of North Carolina System, and will likely prevent admission to any other institution of higher education. Respondents separated from the


University by expulsion for reasons, which represent a threat to persons, or property may not enter University premises or university-related premises without securing prior approval from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 10.8 Interim Sanction when a respondent is charged with violating a federal, state or local law, the University will normally choose to proceed with the campus disciplinary process pursuant to Section 9 of the Code. However, a respondent who faces criminal charges may choose to submit to an interim sanction, such as an interim suspension and/or eviction from University housing, pending the criminal proceeding, provided that such suspension is done in compliance with existing policies. The interim suspension will be imposed by the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, after consult with the Dean of Students, without a hearing or a ruling on the behavior in question so as to protect the campus community while also protecting the respondent from creating a record that may be used against him or her in criminal court. Once a criminal judgment has been rendered (including prayer for judgment continued), the campus disciplinary process may proceed. The respondent has the responsibility for timely notifying the University upon the conclusion of the criminal proceeding. If a respondent chooses to submit to an interim sanction, the respondent shall be administratively withdrawn from his/her classes, and the respondent shall only be responsible for fees incurred up to and including the date of the administrative withdrawal. However, the respondent must complete an Official Administrative Withdrawal Form in order to be withdrawn from his/her classes. 10.8.1 Interim Suspension. 10.8.1.1 Purpose of Interim Suspension In special circumstances, Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, after consult with the Dean of Students, may suspend a respondent charged with violating the Code for an interim period until the outcome of a full disciplinary hearing based on the merits of the charge. 10.8.1.2 Circumstances Where Interim Suspension May Apply Interim suspension shall be exercised only in those situations in which there is reasonable cause to believe that the respondent’s alleged act of misconduct is of such a serious nature that his or her continued presence at the University is potentially dangerous to the health and safety of the University community, its property, or its educational mission. Such acts of misconduct include, but are not limited to, all acts of assault and/or battery with any type of weapon or instrument; gross sexual misconduct; rape; hazing; possession of weapons; false bomb threats or community threats against University officials, staff or faculty; armed robbery; arson; the manufacture, distribution, and/or possession of any incendiary or explosive device; and other acts which might endanger persons or property. This list is not exhaustive or conclusive. 10.8.1.3 Procedure for Interim Suspension To invoke interim suspension, the Director, or his/her designee, will conduct a preliminary investigation and hearing with the respondent, if possible. The respondent will be informed of the alleged violation(s) and the name of the person(s) bringing the charge(s). The respondent will be given an opportunity to explain the circumstances of the alleged behavior that has become the source of the alleged misconduct. 10.8.1.3.1 A judicial board hearing or administrative decision as provided under the Code shall be initiated within seven (7) days after the date of the interim suspension. The respondent’s interim suspension shall not be used as evidence in any hearing or administrative decision. 10.8.1.3.2 A respondent who fails to attend his or her scheduled hearing will be heard in absentia as specified in Section 9.4. 10.8.1.3.3 Should a judicial hearing panel find that the respondent did not commit the act(s) for which he or she was suspended, the suspension will be revoked and the respondent immediately reinstated without penalty. 10.8.1.4 Terms of Interim Suspension Interim suspension is to begin immediately after the preliminary investigation and hearing. The respondent is to physically remove himself or herself from the property of the University until the initiation of a full hearing and shall be informed that he/she may not trespass. Presence on the campus by the respondent during the interim suspension shall be considered a violation of the Code, and the respondent may also be charged with criminal trespass under the state law. 10.9 Administrative Mediation. This method of resolving a dispute utilizes a third party to consult with those involved and recommends a solution, which is binding on the parties. The parties involved will be held to the agreement. Should parties violate the agreement, they will


be charged with: Failure to comply with University process, in the Code of Conduct, plus any additional violations. 10.10 Post-Enrollment and Post-Graduation Sanctions A respondent who commits a violation of the Code or is found responsible for violating the Code, but who graduates from NCCU before imposition of a sanction, is subject to (1) revocation of any degree awarded, (2) temporary or permanent withholding of the transcript for any degree earned, regardless of whether the degree has been awarded, and/or (3) having sanctions imposed as a condition of re-enrollment at the University. 10.11 Psychological Evaluation A psychological evaluation may be required of a respondent found responsible of an offense by the hearing panel when in the hearing panel’s judgment the respondent might benefit from some form of treatment as part of the hearing panel’s overall plan of sanctions. Such an evaluation, provided by the appropriate staff in the Student Health and Counseling Services area or other bona fide agency would focus on recommending an appropriate way to assist the student in understanding and correcting the behavior that led to the respondent’s difficulties. The results of the evaluation will be shared with the respondent and the Director, or his/her designee who will maintain the confidentiality of the evaluative record. The Director, or his/her designee, has the discretion to either determine an appropriate sanction for the respondent, or refer the matter back to the hearing panel for final resolution, based on the nature of the information contained in the evaluative record. 10.12 Additional Sanctions In addition to the above individual sanctions, any one or a combination of the following may be concurrently imposed for an offense provided that such additional sanctions shall be imposed for a definite period of time. Such sanctions are examples only and do not limit the type of additional sanctions which may be imposed: 10.12.1. Loss of on campus parking privileges; 10.12.2 Exclusion from practice or membership in organized groups or activities sponsored by the University; 10.12.3 Requirement to perform additional community service or work sanction; 10.12.4 Trespass from the University or any University-sponsored event; 10.12.5 Requirement to enter into a behavioral contract with the University as a condition of readmission; 10.12.6. Required counseling, substance abuse assessment, or similar evaluations; and/or 10.12.7 Required participation in a program of education as determined by the Director or his/her designee.

11. Appeals

11.1 Purpose of an Appeal An appeal is not a new hearing, but a review of the record of the original hearing. It is not the purpose of the appeal process to provide for a new hearing at a higher administrative level. The respondent and his/her advisor have the right to review the respondent’s disciplinary file, including any verbatim record (audio recording) of the hearing. In cases involving sexual violence/ harassment, the complainant and/or the respondent has the right to appeal the conduct decision. 11.2 Appellate Process 11.2.1 A written petition for appeal of suspendable offenses shall be submitted online to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. 11.2.2 A written petition for the appeal of non-suspendable offenses shall be submitted online to the Dean of Students. 11.2.3 All petitions for appeals must be filed by 5 p.m. of the third (3rd) day after the decision was rendered. 11.3 Appeal Forum 11.3.1 Decisions resulting from a hearing before the Student Judicial Board or an Administrative Hearing that do not involve suspension or expulsion are limited to an appeal to be heard by the Dean of Students or his/her designee. This is the final appeal that can be requested in these cases. 11.3.2 Decisions from the University Committee on Student Conduct that involve the imposition of a sanction of suspension are limited to an appeal to be heard by the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. 11.3.3 Decisions from the University Committee on Student Conduct that involve the


recommendation or imposition of a sanction of expulsion by the Chancellor are limited to an appeal to be heard by the UNC Board of Governors. 11.4 Grounds for Appeal 11.4.1 An appeal may be sought on two grounds: 11.4.1.1 On a claim of error in the hearing procedure; 11.4.1.2 On a claim of new evidence or information material to the case which was not available at the time of hearing. 11.4.2 The petitioner must specify in writing the grounds which form the basis of his/her appeal. The petitioner has the burden of proving the stated grounds for appeal in the petition. The petitioner must provide factual information to support his/her claim and explain the outcome that he/she is seeking. The appeal should include the following: 11.4.2.1 A statement of the grounds for appeal, which at a minimum should contain a list of alleged errors in the decision or procedure and statement of why the decision or sanctions are in error; 11.4.2.2 Documentation which supports the grounds for appeal, to include specific dates if newly available information is the grounds for appeal; and 11.4.2.3 A requested remedy. 11.5 The Appeal 11.5.1 If a respondent timely submits a written petition for appeal that meets the requirements of Section 11.4, his/her appeal shall be heard by the appropriate person as set forth in Section 11.3. An official summary of previous action in the case being appealed must be prepared by the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards and submitted to the individual hearing the appeal. The official summary shall contain a statement of the charges brought against the petitioner, a summary of the evidence, and a statement of the sanction imposed. When appropriate, the summary shall also contain a statement of procedural rulings made and of interpretations of the rules and regulations given during the proceedings. A transcript of the hearing or verbatim record of the hearing (but not the deliberations) shall also be submitted to the individual hearing the appeal. 11.5.2 Decision on Appeal After the appeal has been received, a decision to take one of the following actions must be made by the individual hearing the appeal: 11.5.2.1 Uphold the prior decision; 11.5.2.2 Uphold the prior decision, but modify the sanction imposed; 11.5.2.3 Remand the case to the initial decision maker with suggestions for a supplemental hearing to receive additional evidence, or for a new hearing; 11.5.2.4 Reverse or modify the prior decision; or 11.5.2.5 Dismiss the entire case. 11.5.3 Notice of Decision on Appeal The individual reviewing/hearing the appeal shall make a decision within ten (10) business days of the submission of the appeal. Notice of the decision must be delivered in writing to the Respondent within five (5) days of the decision. A copy of the decision shall be maintained in the respondent’s disciplinary file in SCCS. 11.5.4 Appeal to Board of Trustees A respondent may appeal the decision of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs to the Board of Trustees (BOT) of North Carolina Central University by filing a written petition for appeal with the Chancellor by 5 p.m. of the third (3rd) day after notice of the decision has been received by the respondent. A respondent may communicate with the BOT only by transmitting the communication to the BOT through the Chancellor. That is, a respondent should write to the Chancellor and request that the Chancellor transmit specific information to the Board of Trustees. Appeals to the Board of Trustees are limited to a claim that the decision violated University policy.

12. Confidentiality and Records

Disciplinary files are retained by the department which conducted the disciplinary hearing in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). A respondent’s disciplinary file is not released outside the University without the written and dated consent of the respondent identified in the record and a record shall be maintained of each request for a respondent’s disciplinary file. Disciplinary information will be provided within the University


to individuals who are determined to have a legitimate, educational interest in obtaining this information. Disciplinary records may also be shared with third parties to the extent allowed under FERPA. Victims of violence will be notified of the final disposition of the case to include the name of the accused, the written notification of the charges filed against the accused, the decision of the administrative hearing office or hearing panel, the sanctions imposed (if any), the date the sanctions were imposed and the duration for which the sanctions shall be imposed. Disciplinary files for non-expulsion and non-academic cases, as well as files for expulsion cases, shall be maintained in accordance with the Records Retention Regulation and the UNC General Records Retention and Disposition Schedule.

13. Review and Revision

13.1 Annual Review Subject to the authority of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, the Code shall be reviewed annually by a committee developed by the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, after consult with the Dean of Students, to determine appropriate revisions that are in the best interest of the University. These revisions shall be considered recommendations to the Chancellor. 13.2 Changes Beyond the Annual Review: The Chancellor reserves the right to review and amend the Code at any time.  

APPENDIX I: REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS CODE OF CONDUCT 1. Introduction

This Appendix establishes specific guidelines and procedures for the handling of disputes and violations of the university policies, rules, regulations, and procedures by registered student organizations (RSOs). All RSOs have considerable freedom to accomplish their goals. However, these organizations must comply with the federal, state, local laws, as well as University rules, policies, and procedures. In addition, individual members (students and non-students) representing a student organization and the University are expected to abide by federal, state, local laws, as well as University rules, policies, and procedures on and off campus.

2. Registered Student Organizations:

2.1 Must comply with the Student Code of Conduct; 2.2 May be subject to disciplinary action as a result of violations of federal, state or local laws not otherwise addressed in this Policy; 2.3 May be subject to disciplinary action as a result of actions of individual members of the organization undertaken while representing the organization; 2.4 Shall be responsible for all activities and/or damages resulting from its events. An RSO must exercise reasonable caution to ensure that its events, and agents acting on its behalf, do not cause damage to the property of students, University employees, other organizations, or the University; do not harm or constitute a serious danger to the personal safety of a member of the University community (students and University employees) or guests and do not obstruct or seriously impair University run or University authorized activities; 2.5 Shall be responsible for compliance with all University policies, including, but not limited to, the use of University facilities and grounds, fleet vehicles, electronic information technology and facility reservation contracts; 2.6 May not knowingly organize, sponsor, co-sponsor or in any way coordinate an event with any student organization that has been prohibited from participating in that type of event or has had its RSO status terminated. If an RSO is suspended or on probation, the RSO shall not participate in any activities which would violate the conditions of the suspension or probation;


2.7 Are accountable, through their primary contact, officers and other designated representatives, to the University. When an organization’s primary contact, officers, or other designated representatives make a knowingly false statement, either orally or in writing, to any University employee, committee, or agent, on a matter relating to the activities of the organization or its members, the organization shall be subject to discipline. Organizations must also submit any updated contacts to the Student Engagement and Leadership (SEAL) if/when contacts or the contact information for contacts change; 2.8 An RSO shall not conduct or condone any activity expected of someone joining the RSO or to maintain full status in the RSO that humiliates, degrades, abuses, endangers, sexually violates, causes emotional and/or physical harm or requires a person to give up personal liberty regardless of the person’s willingness to participate. Examples may include but are not limited to use of alcohol, servitude, taking away cell phones, not allowing class attendance, requiring apparel that would normally be considered poor taste, scavenger hunts for questionable materials, engaging in activities designed to create excessive fatigue, smearing of substances on skin or consumption of vile substances.

3. Rights of the Accused Student Organization

Throughout the Conduct process, the Accused RSO is guaranteed the following elements of fundamental fairness: 3.1 Be advised in writing of all charges as initiated in a charge letter. 3.2 Decline to make any statements concerning the charges. 3.3 Be advised of the evidence that will be presented during the hearing and the identity of individuals who will be present at the hearing. 3.4 Submit a written account relating to the alleged charges. 3.5 Be represented by an Advisor throughout the entire Student Conduct Process, provided written Notice of Representation, signed FERPA authorization and Certification forms are received within two (2) business days after notification of allegations. Note: The Notice of Representation must include the identity of the Advisor, specification of their status, address, telephone number, and email where the Advisor may be reached. The FERPA Authorization and Certification forms will be provided in the notification email. 3.6 Have a reasonable amount of time to prepare for a hearing. 3.7 Request a delay of the hearing for academic or extenuating circumstances. 3.8 Admit responsibility for any or all of the charges. 3.9 Hear and question witnesses when a formal hearing is held and present relevant evidence and witnesses. 3.10 Present character references at the sanctioning phase of the hearing. 3.11 Request an alternate hearing officer with the same disciplinary authority as the initial officer if it is felt that the officer has an interest in the case or is biased. 3.12 Be free from being charged by the University twice for the same instance of misconduct. 3.13 Be presumed not responsible until proven otherwise. 3.14 Appeal a decision by a hearing or a conduct officer within the time limits specified in the Code.

4. Procedures for Filing Student Organization Conduct Complaints 4.1 Any member of the University or member of the public may file a complaint against a RSO with the Assistant Director of SEAL. Complaints must include the following information: 4.1.1 Date, time, and place of the alleged violation 4.1.2 Name(s) of the student organization(s) involved in the alleged violation 4.1.3 Name(s), if possible, of the individual(s) involved in the alleged violation 4.1.4 Name(s), if possible, of witnesses 4.1.5 Name(s) and address(s) of the complaint(s) 4.1.6 Detailed description of the alleged violation 4.2 Allegations should be submitted in writing as soon as possible after the incident takes place, preferably within thirty (30) days of the discovery of the violation. 4.3 The Assistant Director of SEAL reserves the right to determine the immediate status of the RSO based on the alleged violations (being investigated) until the meeting with the student organization can occur.


5. Disciplinary Procedures for Violations of the Student Code of Conduct by Registered Student Organizations

5.1 All RSOs shall be afforded due process. The following guidelines will be followed upon receipt of a written complaint: 5.1.1 Within five (5) days, the Assistant Director of SEAL will determine: 5.1.1.1 Whether the complaint is timely; 5.1.1.2 Whether the complaint puts forth a possible violation of the Code of Conduct 5.1.2 If the complaint is not timely or no potential violation of the Code of Conduct is determined by the Assistant Director of SEAL, no formal action will be taken. The reporter and RSO will be informed of this decision in writing. 5.1.3 If the complaint is timely or reflects a potential violation of the Code of Conduct, the Assistant Director of SEAL will proceed with the Conduct Process as detailed below: 5.2 Notification: Within five (5) business days of determining merit to the complaint the accused RSO will receive written notification. The notification shall: 5.2.1 Specify the alleged violation of the Code. The RSO’s advisor shall also receive a copy of the written notification. 5.2.2 Inform the RSO that it is presumed not responsible until proven responsible by a preponderance of the evidence. 5.2.3 Inform the RSO that it has the right to be represented by an Advisor from the moment of notice of an allegation. 5.2.4 Request a meeting to be scheduled with the Assistant Director of Student Leadership & Engagement or his/her respective designee to occur within five (5) calendar days. 5.3 Meeting with Registered Student Organization 5.3 Current chapter president and the advisor of RSO are required to attend. RSO may also invite up to two additional members. 5.3.1 The purpose of this meeting is: 5.3.1.1 to explain the conduct process, 5.3.1.2 to review alleged violations, 5.3.1.3 to allow the RSO to have an opportunity to speak and participate in a question and answer discussion. 5.4 Investigation 5.4. 1 Following this meeting, the Assistant Director of SEAL or his/her designee will 5.4.1.1 review the submitted complaint, 5.4.1.2 information provided by the RSO, and 5.4.1.3 collect any additional information necessary in resolving the complaint. 5.4.2 The Assistant Director of SEAL or his/her designee will inform the RSO as to whether a formal conduct charge will be pursued to resolve the allegations. 5.4.3 If there is not enough information to support a Code violation, no formal action will be taken. The reporter and RSO will be informed of this decision in writing. 5.5 Resolution of Disciplinary Action 5.5.1 Registered Student Organizations who have disciplinary charges pending against them may choose one or more of the following means of resolution: 5.5.1.1 The RSO can plead responsible for the charges, waive a hearing on the charges and accept the sanctions to be levied after an administrative review by the Assistant Director of SEAL or his/her designee. 5.5.1.2 The RSO can request a hearing before the Organizational Review Board (ORB). 5.5.1.3 The RSO can rrequest that an interim sanction be imposed so that the organization may resolve any pending criminal charges prior to proceeding with the campus disciplinary process.

6. Hearing Procedures

6.1 The Organizational Review Board will hear all cases that involve student organizational misconduct. 6.1.1 During this Hearing, the student organization will be provided with the following: 6.1.1.1 An explanation of the charges;


6.1.1.2 A summary of the information gathered in support of the charges; 6.1.1.3 A reasonable opportunity for the student organization to reflect upon and respond on their own behalf to the charges; 6.1.1.4 An explanation of the disciplinary procedures. 6.2 A RSO president or advisor who fails to attend the scheduled hearing shall have the case adjudicated by the Organizational Review Board in their absence.

7. Sanctions for Student Organizational Misconduct

7.1 The following sanctions or combination of sanctions may be imposed upon any RSO found “Responsible” for violations of the Student Code of Conduct. Conduct sanctions are implemented to educate and inform student organizations on the behavior that led to the violation. It is the intent of Student Engagement & Leadership to educate students on their behavior in regards to the Student Code of Conduct so they are better able to make informed decisions. Potential sanctions are outlined below: 7.1.1 Disciplinary Warning - documented warning which will remain in the organization’s file and be taken into consideration during the annual review or request for recognition. 7.1.2 Social Probation – the organization will not be allowed to host, sponsor, or conduct any social activities acting alone or in conjunction with another organization or entity (including but not limited to parties, social gatherings, events with social components, etc.) The organization will be allowed to host educational and awareness events and activities. 7.1.3 Probation - place the organization on probation for one to five calendar years. The organization will ONLY be able to operate under prescribed circumstances. Deviations from the probationary limits will cause for an additional review by the ORB and a new sanction. 7.1.4 Suspension – suspend the organization temporarily for the period of one to five calendar years. During the suspension period, the organization may not meet, host any events and activities, nor represent the entity in any shape of form. 7.1.5 Ban - permanently revoke organization’s recognition with the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs approval. 7.1.6 Other - other penalties as deemed appropriate including but not limited to community service hours and restitution for any damage to University policy.

8. Appeals 8.1 An appeal is not a new hearing; it is a review of the record of the original hearing.

Appeals must be submitting in writing. The RSO must follow the following steps to submit an appeal: 8.1.1 Time for filing: an appeal must be submitted online to the Executive Director of SEAL by 5:00pm of the third (3rd) day after the decision was rendered. 8.1.2 Grounds for an appeal include 8.1.2.1 claim of error in hearing procedure, 8.1.2.2 new evidence or information material to the case which was not available at the time of the hearing. 8.2 If the RSO submits an appeal that meets the requirements of an appeal process, their appeal shall be heard by the Executive Director of SEAL or his/her designee and notice of decision on the appeal shall be provided in writing to the RSO within ten (10) business days. A copy of the decision shall be maintained in the SROs disciplinary file with Student Engagement & Leadership. 8.3 After an appeal has been received, a decision to take one of the following actions must be made by the Executive Director of Student Leadership & Engagement or his/her designee: 8.3.1 Uphold the prior decision; 8.3.2 Modify the sanction imposed in the prior decision; 8.3.3 Remand the case to the initial decision maker with suggestions for a supplemental hearing to receive additional evidence, or for a new hearing; 8.3.4 Reverse or modify the prior decision; 8.3.5 Dismiss the entire case. 8.4 Appeals beyond Student Engagement and Leadership


RSO’s may appeal the decision of the Director of Student Engagement and Leadership to the Director of Student Rights and Responsibilities by filing a written petition for appeal by 5 p.m. of the third (3rd) day after notice of the decision has been received by the RSO. RSO appeals will handled in the same manner as appeals from cases heard by the University Committee on Student Conduct as outlined in Section 11 of the Code.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2017 – 18


“To tend, unfailingly, unflinchingly towards a goal is the secret to success.” – Anna Pavlova Monday

31

tuesday

1

wednesday

2

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

3

friday

4

Aug 2017

saturday 5

sunday 6

Follow NCCUlife on


“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela Monday

7

tuesday

8

wednesday

9

Purple Heart Day

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

10

friday

11

Eagle Mania (Aug. 10-13) Outdoor Carnival Class of 2021 Takeover (8-11 pm)

Eagle Mania LIVE! (8-10 pm)

Aug 2017

saturday 12 Eagle Mania Training Day (7-11 pm)

sunday 13 New Student Induction & Eagle Pinning Ceremony (3-5 pm)

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“The triumph can’t be had without the struggle.” – Wilma Rudolph Monday

14

tuesday

15

wednesday

16

First 10:40 Break 10:40am

Career Services Kick-OFF Event 3pm

Women’s Center Real Talk Series

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

17

friday

18

Aug 2017

saturday 19 SAB Welcome Back Pre-Dawn Party 11pm-5am

TURN UP!

Fraternity & Sorority Life Retreat

sunday 20

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“Live as if you were to die tomorrow; learn as if you were to live forever.” – Gandhi Monday

21

tuesday

22

Membership Intake 10:40 Break: Fall Election Orientation Interest Meeting Pre-registration Begins 10am 8:30am

Fall 2017 Election Interest Meeting 6pm

wednesday

23

Membership Intake Orientation 3-7pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

24

Career Minute Clinic 1pm

friday

25

Election Application due online by 12pm

Aug 2017

FloEtic Friday 7pm Student Health and Counseling Services Open House 4pm

saturday 26 Women's Equality Day

Whitewater Rafting

sunday 27 Membership Intake Orientation 9am-1pm Little Mister & Miss NCCU Pageant 5pm

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“Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response to the error that counts.” – Nikki Giovanni Monday

28

Men’s Achievement Center - Durham Public Schools Back to School Service Project

tuesday

29

wednesday

30

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


augthursday

31

Part-time Job Expo 3pm

friday

1

SGA Election Clearance Notification

sept 2017

saturday 2 NCCU vs. Duke AWAY football game (shuttle available)

sunday 3

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“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it’s faced.” – James Baldwin Monday

4 Labor Day, NO CLASSES

tuesday

5

Spirit Week begins

On-Campus Recruiting Season Begins

wednesday

6

Membership Intake Orientation 3pm-7pm Welcome Wednesday

Rock The Mic Lecture Series 7pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

7

Membership Intake Orientation 3pm-7pm

friday

8

SGA Election Campaign begins

sept 2017

saturday 9 NCCU v SHAW HOME football game Paintball

sunday 10 Stress Less Fest 10am

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“If you don’t like something change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” – Maya Angelou Monday

11

tuesday

12

wednesday

13

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 10:40am Student Union Rm 144

SGA Fall Elections: Speech & Debate Night 6pm

TNT: Tuesday Night Tournament 6pm-8pm

Wellness Wednesday 6pm

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

14

Career Fest 10am SGA Fall Elections: Candidate Meet & Greet 10:40am

friday

15

Latino/ Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)

sept 2017

Men’s Achievement Center - Ties of Honor 6:30pm Mr. & Miss Freshman Showcase 7pm

Donate. Give Life!

saturday 16 NCCU v SCSU HOME football game

sunday 17

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“Words have no power to impress the mind without the exquisite horror of their reality.” – Edgar Allen Poe Monday

18

tuesday

19

National Hazing Prevention Week (Sept. 18-22)

SGA Election Voting Day ends 9am

Internship Week (Sept. 18-22)

100 Men in Suits 10:40am

SGA Election Voting Day begins 8am

REAL TALK series 6:30pm

wednesday

20

Welcome Wednesday

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

21

friday

22

I Know What You Did Last Summer 1pm

sept 2017

saturday 23 NCCU v S.C. State HOME football game

sunday 24

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“It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.” – E.E. Cummings Monday

25

tuesday

26

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 10:40am Student Union Rm 144 Extreme Resume Makeover 3pm

wednesday

27

Speed Interviewing 3pm Wellness Wednesday 6pm

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


oct 2017 sept

thursday

28

friday

FloEtic Friday 7pm

29

NCCU v FamU Football Game Excursion 7pm

saturday 30 NCCU v Florida A&M AWAY Football game

sunday 1

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“In recognizing the humanity of our fellow begins, we pay ourselves the highest tribute.” – Thurgood Marshall Monday

2

PINK WEEK! Breast Cancer Awareness 8am

tuesday

3

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

wednesday

4

Hire Me Summit 5pm

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

5

friday

6

Majors Fair 10:30am-11:30am A.E. Student Union Lobby

oct

2017

Pop of Pink! 10:40 Break 4th Annual Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon saturday 7 NCCU v Howard University AWAY Football game Afro-Latino Night

Eagle Preview

sunday 8

Major Key Alert

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“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King Monday

9

Columbus Day

tuesday

10

wednesday

11

Stress Less Fest 10am

National Coming Out Day

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 10:40am Student Union Rm 144

Wellness Wednesday 6pm

TNT: Tuesday Night Tournament 6-8pm

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller-Morgan Aud.

Your t e G ts! e k c Ti

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

12

friday

13

oct

2017

saturday 14 NCCU v Garner-Webb HOME Football game Graduate School Exposure Tour (Oct. 14-18)

sunday 15 Domestic Violence Awareness Month (Oct. 15-19)

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“The biggest adventure you can ever take is to live the life of your dreams.” – Oprah Winfrey Monday

16

tuesday

17

Fall Break Dodge that Drink and Have a Ball 6pm

REAL TALK series 6:30pm

wednesday

18

Classes Resume Welcome Wednesday National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week/ Project SUCCESS Recruitment 11am

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

19

friday

20

oct

2017

saturday 21 NCCU v Norfolk State HOME Football game

sunday 22 Homecoming Worship Service Soul Food Dinner Community Service Paint the Town Maroon and Gray Ultimate Gospel Concert

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“To stimulate wildly weak and untrained minds is to play with mighty fires.” – W.E.B. Dubois Monday

23

HOMECOMING Day with the Eagles Ultimate Talent Show

tuesday

24

HOMECOMING 10:40 break Mock Funeral Late Night Breakfast

wednesday

25

HOMECOMING It’s All about Royalty! Coronation & Ball

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

26

HOMECOMING Legacy Talk Eagle Street Fest

Visit nccuhomecoming.com

friday

27

HOMECOMING Founder’s Day Convocation Wreath Laying Ultimate Step Show

oct

2017

saturday 28 NCCU v Delaware State HOME Football game HOMECOMING Ultimate Parade Football Game Post-Game Party Hip-hop Concert Pre-Dawn

sunday 29

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“Success is only meaningful and enjoyable if it feels like your own.” – Michelle Obama Monday

30

tuesday

31

Latino Awareness Month Halloween Day Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 10:40am Student Union Rm 144 Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

wednesday

1

Native American History Month Welcome Wednesday

Men’s Achievement Center - No Shave November!

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


nov 2017 oct

thursday

2

friday

3

saturday 4 NCCU v Hampton AWAY Football game

Happy Birthday! Dr. James E. Shepard, Founder of NCCU

sunday 5

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“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” – Frederick Douglass Monday

6

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

tuesday

7

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

wednesday

Q

8

VOTE! Election Day

Wellness Wednesday 6pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

9

friday

Veterans Day

10

nov 2017

saturday 11 NCCU v Bethune-Cookman HOME Football game Professional Development Conference 9am

sunday 12

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“Both tears and sweat are salty, but they render a different result. Tears will get you sympathy; sweat will get you change.” – Jesse Jackson Monday

13

Transgender Awareness Week

tuesday

14

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 10:40am Student Union Rm 144

wednesday

15

Welcome Wednesday

REAL TALK series 6:30pm

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

16

Welcome Wednesday

friday

17

nov 2017

International Festival

saturday 18 NCCU v N.C. A&T AWAY Football game

sunday 19

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“The future belongs to those who prepare for it today.” – Malcolm X Monday

20

Transgender Day of Remembrance

tuesday

21

Eagle T.A.L.O.N.S. 7pm Miller Morgan Auditorium

wednesday

22

Thanksgiving Break- NO CLASS (Nov. 23–27)

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

23

Break

friday

24

nov 2017

Thanksgiving Day

saturday 25

sunday 26

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“With confidence, you have won before you started.” – Marcus Garvey Monday

27

Classes Resume 8am

tuesday

28

wednesday

29

Reading Day for Graduating and nonGraduating students

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


dec 2017 nov

thursday

30

friday

1

saturday2

sunday 3

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“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” – Eleanor Roosevelt Monday

4

Art Department Holiday Show and Sale (Nov.15–Dec. 9)

tuesday

5

wednesday

6

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

Last Day of Classes

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

7

Break

friday

8

dec 2017

Residence Halls Close 10am Alumni Eagle Pinning Ceremony 7–9pm Commencement Rehearsal 11am Chancellor’s Reception saturday 9 6pm (A.E. Student Union) Commencement Ceremony 9am

sunday 10

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“One man can be the crucial ingredient on a team, but one man cannot make a team.” – Kareem Abdul Jabbar Monday

11

tuesday

12

wednesday

13

Break

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

14

friday

15

dec 2017

saturday 16 Wright Brothers Day

sunday 17

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“No person is your friend who demands your silence, or denies your right to grow.” – Alice Walker Monday

18

tuesday

19

wednesday

20

Break Winter Solstice

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

21

friday

22

dec 2017

saturday 23 Christmas Eve

sunday 24 Christmas Day Hanukkah

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“We must accept finite disappointment but never lose infinite hope.” – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Monday

25

tuesday

26

wednesday

27

Break

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


jan 2017 dec

thursday

28

friday

29

saturday 30

sunday 31

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“To tend, unfailingly, unflinchingly towards a goal is the secret to success.” – Anna Pavlova Monday

1

tuesday

2

New Year’s Day observed

wednesday

3

Residence Hall check-in 9am–5pm NCCU reopens

Don’t forget! File 2018-19 FAFSA

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

4

friday

5

jan 2018

saturday 6

sunday 7

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“No person is your friend who demands your silence, or denies your right to grow.” – Alice Walker Monday

8

tuesday

9

TNT: Tuesday Night Tournament 6pm-8pm

wednesday

10

Truth About Tobacco 101 6:30–8:30pm

1st Day of Classes

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

11

friday

12

March on Fayetteville 11am

It's Lit!

jan 2018

saturday 13 Welcome Back Pre-Dawn 11pm–5am

sunday 14

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“It’s not the load that breaks you down, it’s the way you carry it.” – Lena Horne Monday

15

tuesday

16

Martin Luther King, Jr Day Roc The Mic Lecture Series 7pm NO CLASSES

wednesday

17

Welcome Wednesday

MLK Day of Service 9am–12pm (Walker Sports Complex) Regular Season Basketball Sign up at imleagues.com Jan 9–20

Life's most persistent and urgent question is, 'What are you doing for others?

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

18

friday

19

jan 2018

saturday 20

sunday 21

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“Have a vision. Be demanding.” – Colin Powell Monday

22

tuesday

23

wednesday

24

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

25

friday

26

Celebration of Latino Achievements

jan 2018

FloEtic Friday 7pm

saturday 27

sunday 28

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“When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” – Audre Lorde Monday

29

tuesday

30

wednesday

31

Regular Season Basketball Starts UC- Get to Know Your Advisors Meetings Jan. 30– Feb. 3

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


janthursday

1

Eagle in F.L.I.G.H.T Go Red Cook OFF (National Heart Health Month) 11am

friday

2

Groundhog Day

feb 2018

saturday 3

Rosa Parks Day

sunday 4

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“Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations.” – Dr. Mae Jemison Monday

5

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

tuesday

6

wednesday

7

Welcome Wednesday

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

8

friday

FloEtic Friday 7pm

9

feb 2018

saturday 10

sunday 11 Lincoln’s Birthday

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“Sometimes it’s worse to win a fight than to lose.” – Billie Holiday Monday

12

tuesday

13

TNT: Tuesday Night Tournament 6-8pm

wednesday

14

Valentine’s Day

Week of Love Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

15

friday

16

feb 2018

saturday 17

sunday 18

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Grab the broom of anger and drive off the beast of fear.” – Zora Neale Hurston Monday

19

tuesday

20

wednesday

21

Washington’s Birthday Welcome Wednesday Presidents’ Day REAL TALK series 6:30pm

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

22

friday

23

Erotic Utterances 6pm

feb 2018

saturday 24

sunday 25

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“Find the good. It’s all around you. Find it, showcase it and you’ll start believing in it.” – Jesse Owens Monday

26

tuesday

27

wednesday

28

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


feb-

thursday

1

friday

2

March

2018

Disability Awareness Month saturday 3

sunday 4

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“One important key to success is selfconfidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.” – Arthur Ashe Monday

5

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

tuesday

6

wednesday

7

Welcome Wednesday

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

8

friday

9

LET'S GO!

March

2018

saturday 10

sunday 11

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“Where there is no vision, there is no hope.” – George Washington Carver Monday

12

tuesday

13

wednesday

14

Break

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

15

friday

16

March

2018

saturday 17 St. Patrick’s Day

sunday 18 Residence halls reopen at noon

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Freedom is never given; it is won.” – A. Philip Randolph

Monday

19

tuesday

20

REAL TALK series 6:30pm

wednesday

21

Welcome Wednesday

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

22

friday

23

Campus Chaos 7pm

March

2018

saturday 24

sunday 25

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How to Survive Dorm Life 1). EXPECT NOISE-- When you’re living in a building filled with dozens of fellow students, you have to expect some noise! TIP: Buy earplugs to help block out noise when you’re trying to sleep. 2). PRIVACY CAN BE HARD TO COME BY-- To echo the point above, it’s time to face a reality that many incoming freshmen find especially jarring – it’s hard to find privacy living in the dorms. TIP: Find somewhere you can focus on yourself and not those around you. It can be the caf or even a bench in the Library Bowl. 3). SHOWER ESSENTIALS ARE ESSENTIAL-- Ain’t nobody got time for bubble baths! Keeping your shampoo, razor and body wash in a shower caddy is a lot easier than attempting to carry them and better looking than lugging them in a plastic bag. TIP: Buy a bathrobe. Nothing could be more embarrassing than the slip of a towel! 4). PREPARE FOR ALL KINDS OF PERSONALITIES-- College is a place to meet new people, and the clashing of personalities is inevitable. There are tons of reasons why you may not see eye to eye, but it’s important to keep in mind that when living on your own for the first time, even the most mild-tempered can be on edge. TIP: Living in the dorms, you’ll have to see people on a regular basis, so weigh the importance of “keeping the peace.” 5). GET YOUR SNACKS IN ORDER-- NCCU offers special menu items for those with certain eating habits (vegetarian, vegan, etc). Check out the various Cafes and places to grab wings or a salad. TIP: A big issue amongst roommates is eating each others’ food. Ask before you munch! 6). GET TO KNOW THE RA--Your RA is the closest thing to “parental supervision” that you’ll have in the dorms. Just like you they are trying to juggle school, work, and friends, so making life any more difficult for them will not make it any easier for you. TIP: Introduce yourself! Putting yourself out there is a strong way to make an impression. You’re going to find yourself dealing with all sorts of situations while living in the dorms – that’s just part of the college experience. Stay focused, work hard, and be social…everything else will fall into place.


“Do not fear mistakes. There are none.” – Miles Davis

Monday

26

tuesday

27

wednesday

28

I’m Every Woman Expo AND NCCU Women’s Symposium

Don’t Miss this!

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


March-

thursday

29

friday

Good Friday No classes

30

April

2018

saturday 31

sunday 1 April Fool’s Day

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“There’s no excuse for the young people not knowing who the heroes and heroines are or were.” – Nina Simone Monday

2

LGBTQ Pride Week (April 2- 7)

tuesday

3

wednesday

4

Welcome Wednesday

Eagles in FLIGHT-MAR 5pm

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

5

Mister & Miss NCCU Pageant 6pm

friday

6

Honors Convocation

April

2018

“Thirsty Thursdays” 7pm

saturday 7

sunday 8

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“No matter what accomplishments you make, somebody helped you.” – Althea Gibson Monday

9

tuesday

10

wednesday

11

TNT: Tuesday Night Tournament 6-8pm

Get Tested!

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

12

friday

13

TEAL WEEK Sexual Assault Awareness Month (April 13-19)

April

2018

saturday 14

sunday 15 Easter Sunday

Stressed out? Sore throat? Call 919-530-6317 to make an appt with a counselor or a nurse. Follow NCCUlife on


“The greatest gift is not being afraid to question.” – Ruby Dee Monday

16

tuesday

17

REAL TALK series 6:30pm

wednesday

18

Welcome Wednesday

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

19

friday

20

April

2018

saturday 21

sunday 22

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“To be afraid is to behave as if the truth were not true.” – Bayard Rustin Monday

23

tuesday

24

wednesday

25

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

26

friday

27

4th Annual Relay for Life, 4pm

April

2018

Skiing FloEtic Friday, 7pm

saturday 28 King’s Dominion Trip 10am

MAC M.A.S.T.E.R.S. Summit

sunday 29 Scholars Moving On

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“Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly.” – Langston Hughes Monday

30

tuesday

1

wednesday

2

Reading Day Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month Lavender Graduation

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

3

friday

4

National Day of Prayer

May

2018

saturday 5 Cinco de Mayo

sunday 6

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“Whatever we believe about ourselves and our ability comes true for us.” – Susan L. Taylor Monday

7

tuesday

8

wednesday

9

Res Halls Close

(for non-graduating students)

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

10

friday

11

May

2018

saturday 12 Commencement 8am

sunday 13 Mother’s Day

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“The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity.” – Viola Davis Monday

14

tuesday

15

wednesday

16

Keep Durham Beautiful 10 am

Student Leaders’ Retreat

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

17

friday

18

May

2018

saturday 19

sunday 20

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“We have to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society.” – Angela Davis Monday

21

tuesday

22

wednesday

23

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

24

friday

25

May

2018

saturday 26

sunday 27

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“There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving and that’s your own self.” – Aldous Huxley Monday

28

tuesday

29

wednesday

30

Memorial Day No Classes

Weekly Goals

Events subject to change.


thursday

31

friday

1

MayJune

2018

saturday 2

sunday 3

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Books to Read

Bucket List


Alma Mater

I The sloping hills, the verdant green, The lovely blossoms’ beauteous sheen Surround our college proud and gay, Where wave our colors, Maroon and Gray. What matters it how far we roam? Our thoughts will oft return to home, And hearts will e’er be true to thee, Our Alma Mater, N.C.C. Refrain: Then Rah! Rah! Rah! For our colors so gay! Dear old N.C.C.’s Maroon and Gray; Thy sons and daughters will honor thee, Dear old N.C.C. II We’ve gathered here to fit our lives, As from the darkness light revives, So let us hail, both night and day, Our glorious colors, Maroon and Gray. We’ll ever love and honor thee, For thou hast taught us loyalty. Then let our watchword “service” be, To Alma Mater, N.C.C. III You send us forth with hearts of love; So like a blessing from above, And from the path we’ll never stray, Our dear Alma Mater, Maroon and Gray. We’ll work and fight, we’ll win our way. When duty calls, we shall obey. And may we e’er return to thee, Our Alma Mater, N.C.C!


Be Eagle Smart!

Be a leader, not a follower!


2017-18 NCCU Student Handbook  
2017-18 NCCU Student Handbook