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connec t ing peopl e, nat ur e a nd communi t y t hrough educ at ion since 19 8 6

NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE SPRING& SUM M ER

SPR I NG A N D SU M M ER


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WHEN YOU SIGN UP FOR AN INSTITUTE EXCURSION, YOU GAIN ACCESS TO THE NORTHWEST’S MOST SPECIAL PLACES, LIKE EASTERN WASHINGTON’S ARID LAND ECOLOGY RESERVE. SEE “BUNCHGRASS DREAMS: HIGH DESERT ECOLOGY” ON PAGE 28. © C A RL MO LESWO RT H

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© CH R IST I A N M A RT I N

©BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

© J U LI E TO OME Y


© C A R O LY N W AT E R S

I BELIEVE WE LEARN OUR OWN LANDSCAPES BEST BY SUBMERGING OURSELVES IN THEM. NATURAL HISTORY IS CENTRAL TO OUR UNDERSTANDING OF BIOLOGY, CULTURE, MYTHOLOGY AND THE HUMAN CONDITION.

Welcome to our 2008 field season AT NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE, we believe in the power of experience and hands-on learning to shape lives and inspire change. That’s why, since 1986, we’ve offered many different ways to get people outside, learning for themselves about the rich natural and cultural history of the Pacific Northwest. Our Mountain School program has brought more than 12,000 4th-, 8th- and 12th-grade students out of the classroom and into the mountains to learn about the amazing ecosystems that make up their “big backyard.” Through seminars, retreats and field excursions, we’ve helped more than 7,000 adults connect to their environment in deep and enduring ways. And programs such as Girls on Ice, Family Getaways, North Cascades Wild, Eagle Watchers and Mountain Stewards are other routes we offer to expose people of all ages to the wonders of this amazing place we’re lucky to call home. In this, our latest catalog, we want to explore the connections between learning, personal growth, community and the environment. We’ve been asking people why they believe a connection to nature is important, what they have learned from a life spent

outside and how they pass those lessons on. I believe we learn our own landscapes best by submerging ourselves in them. Natural history is central to our understanding of biology, culture, mythology and the human condition. It shapes our communities by giving us deeper insights into our relationships with other beings and the places we all inhabit. And it inspires conservation, which is, in the end, why North Cascades Institute exists. If you believe, like we do, that getting outdoors is vital, we hope you’ll join us at the Learning Center and in the field this spring and summer to enrich yourself and your community through a North Cascades Institute program. Whether it is an art retreat, Diablo Downtime, birding or geology excursion, Family Getaway or Sourdough Speaker, we’re here to help you connect with your wild backyard in a meaningful way.

SAUL WEISBERG, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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Day Trips 8 Sourdough Speaker Series 8

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Learning Center Programs 10 Field Excursions 26

APRIL

Registration Information 35 M.Ed. Graduate Program 36 Summer Youth Programs 40 Group Rentals 42 Instructors 44

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JUNE

“Eating from our Foodshed” p.9

1 Wild Whatcom I: The Nature of Bellingham p.29 6-8 Spring Birding Weekend p.14 6-8 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 6-8 Wild Whatcom II: The Nature of Bellingham p.29 13-15 Diablo Downtime II p.11 14 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 15 Wild Whatcom III: The Nature of Bellingham p.29 15 Grant Writing in the North Cascades p.42 21 Bookmaking and Nature Journaling p.30 21 Sourdough Speaker Series III: Samuel Green,

23-25 Balsamroot and Bumblebees: Methow

“Washington’s Poet Laureate Reads Poems from

18-20 Trees: Drawing and Painting Forest Life

2-4 Environmental Architecture: Green Building Design and Operation p.14

18-20 Spring Flowers: Botany from Field 18-20 Digital Outdoor Photography: Springtime in

3-4 Birding Bellingham by Eye and Ear p.26 9-11 Diablo Downtime I p.11 10-11 Mother’s Day San Juan Islands Cruise with

the Skagit p.13

Jennifer Hahn p.27

26-27 Sourdough Speaker Series I:

17-18 Bunchgrass Dreams: High Desert

John Scurlock, “Over the North Cascades” p.9

Mountain School 38

MAY

with Molly Hashimoto p.12 to Forest p.12

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© LI BBY MI LLS

Family Getaways 6

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CONTENTS

Ecology p.28

17-18 Sourdough Speaker Series II: Maria Hines,

Valley Wildflowers with Dana Visalli p.28

Nature” p.9

24-26 Memorial Day Family Getaway p.6

21 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 23 Art Afield: Diablo Creative Arts Retreat p.15 26-29 Poetics of the Wild with Tim McNulty p.15 27-29 Family Getaway in June p.6 28 Home Ground: Gardening with Native Plants p.30 29 Seattle’s Wild Side with David Williams p.31


SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

4-6 Fourth of July Family Getaway p.6 11-13 Diablo Downtime III p.11 11-13 Landscape Watercolor Workshop with Molly

2 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 3 Volcanic Geology of Mount Baker’s Ptarmigan

5-7 Oil Pastels with Susan Bennerstrom p.22 5-7 Ravens, Crows and Jays: Corvid Ecology with

24-26 Sit, Walk, Write: Nature and the Practice of

Ridge p.32

John Marzluff p.23

8-10 Living with Climate Change p.21 8-10 Pacific Northwest Forest Ecology p.21 8-10 Dragonflies with Dennis Paulson p.22 9-10 Wildflower Photography in the Alpine

5-7 Writing Workshop with Nick O’Connell p.23 6 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 7-8 Treetop Forest Ecology with the Wind River

Hashimoto p.16

12 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 13 Roots and Shoots: Skagit Valley Farm Tour p.31 14-16 Mid-July Family Getaway p.6 17-20 Ross Lake by Boat and Boot: People of the Upper Skagit p.16

17-20 Northwest Naturalists Weekend p.17 18-20 After the Fire: Alpine Ecology and

Landscape p.33

9 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 11-13 Early August Family Getaway p.6 14-19 High Country Rhapsody: Searching for

Wildflowers p.32

Kerouac in the North Cascades p.33

19 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 24-27 Pacific Crest Backpack p.18 25-27 Late July Family Getaway p.6 30-Aug. 3 Thunder Arm Writing Retreat p.19 31-Aug. 3 Beats on the Peaks: Lookout Poets and

15-17 Mid-August Family Getaway p.6 22-24 Diablo Downtime IV p.11 23 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 30-Sept. 1 Labor Day Family Getaway p.6

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AUGUST

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© GR EGO RY M ROZ

© W R CC R F

© S COT T B A B O C K

©SARA STEELE

JULY

Presence p.25

Look for our next catalog in September for the fall and winter 2008-09 slate of Learning Center Programs, Field Excursions and Special Events!

Canopy Crane p.34

13 Learning Center Day Trip p.8 19-21 Nature Photography Retreat: High Country in Autumn p.24

19-21 Wildlife Tracking: Bears, Cougars and Cascadian Mammals p.24

20-21 Women’s Fly-Fishing Escape with Pat Bolton p.35

26-28 Diablo Downtime V p.11

Backcountry Tales on Ross Lake p.20

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GATHER Y O U R F A M ILY I N THE N O RTH C A SC A DE S

more information at www.ncascades.org/family. registration by phone at (360) 856-5700 ext. 209.

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North Cascades Institute’s 2008 Family Getaways May 24-26 (Sat-Mon) June 27-29 (Fri-Sun) July 4-6 (Fri-Sun) July 14-16 (Mon-Wed) July 25-27 (Fri-Sun) Aug. 11-13 (Mon-Wed) Aug. 15-17 (Fri-Sun) Aug. 30-Sept. 1 (Sat-Mon)

Prices: Adult (18 and older): $225 Youth (ages 3-17): $125 Children 2 and younger are free Children under the age of five are the responsibility of a parent throughout the program. Tuition includes lodging and all meals. There is no commuter option for this course.

© N O RT H C A SC A D ES I NST I T UT E

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FAMILY GETAWAYS

family—and nature too—at our Learning Center on Diablo Lake. Spend time together enjoying the invigorating mountain air and starry skies of the North Cascades, but leave the tent at home because our cozy lodges offer the excitement of the great outdoors without the complications of camping! With the tastes of young diners in mind, our chefs serve scrumptious, buffet-style meals in our lakeside dining hall. And our naturalists, with support from National Park Service rangers, help both kids and adults learn about nature through paddling and hiking adventures, along with games, arts and crafts, and rousing stories and songs around the campfire each night. Plus, there’s plenty of free time to enjoy as you please. We welcome families that include parents, guardians, grandparents, children and extended family. Getaways are $225 per adult (18 and older) and $125 per child (ages 3-17). Children age two and younger can be added to the “family” registration at no charge. Make this summer one your family won’t soon forget. Call 360-856-5700 ext. 209 to reserve your spot in one of our most popular programs, year in and year out.

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Connect with your


Big Canoe Adventure on Diablo Lake

Birds to Bears Wildlife Tracking Children’s Story Hour “Geology Rocks!” Waterfall Hike “I’m Lichen Hikin’” Search for Oddball Plants “Nature Nose Best” Five Senses Exploration

“THE FAMILY GETAWAY I ATTENDED WITH MY WIFE AND SONS WAS A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO RE-EDUCATE OURSELVES ABOUT WHAT WE LIKE ABOUT EACH OTHER. THE WEEKEND WAS A PERFECT BLEND OF FUN THINGS TO DO, LIKE TRIPS IN THE BIG CANOE OR RANGER-LED HIKES, AND FUN WAYS TO “DO NOTHING”, LIKE SPENDING AN HOUR TEACHING MY KIDS TO SKIP ROCKS ON DIABLO. FOR US, IT WASN’T ABOUT LEARNING THE THREE TYPES OF FERNS— WHICH WE ACTUALLY DID LEARN—BUT ABOUT RE-LEARNING THE WONDER OF EXPLORING TOGETHER.”

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Big Trees and Big Views

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©CHIP JENKINS

Family Getaway Activities

Neighborhood Hikes ~CHIP JENKINS, NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK SUPERINTENDENT “Slugs, Snags and Sapsuckers” Forest Life Introduction

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ŠPHIL FENNER

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Join us from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays this summer!

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LEARNING CENTER DAY TRIPS JOIN U S F O R A F RE E AD V E N TU RE IN THE N O RTH C A SC A DE S Institute naturalists and National Park Service rangers | Free Donations welcome | First come, first served. Pre-registration is not offered and group size is limited. more information at www.ncascades.org/daytrips {8}

June 7, 14 and 21 | July 12, 19 | August 2, 9 and 23 | September 6 and 13 Paddle on emerald-green Diablo Lake with peaks at every compass bearing. Scramble to a hidden waterfall beyond a forest trail. Our free Learning Center Day Trips are easy to enjoy—just lace up your boots, pack your lunch and venture to our campus off Highway 20 (mile 127.5). Bring personal gear, appropriate clothing, food and water. This is a day program only; participants are responsible for their own lodging and meals off campus. Driving directions can be found online at ncascades.org/daytrips.

Diablo Lake Canoeing Launch times: 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Two-hour voyager canoe trips are weather-dependent and first come, first served. Twelve passengers maximum per trip; must be over six years of age. Prior experience is not necessary and all canoeing equipment will be provided.

Forest and Waterfall Hikes Departure times: 9:15 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Gently paced, naturalist-led hikes depart from the Learning Center office. Visitors may hike independently as well.

SOURDOUGH SPEAKER SERIES ONE-NIG HT G AT HER ING S AT T HE LEAR NING CENT ER

For centuries, Native

people, miners, loggers, hikers, fire lookouts, climbers and dam workers have gathered together around campfires and shared stories of the upper Skagit Valley, the mountains and what lies beyond. Nestled at the foot of Sourdough Mountain, our Learning Center is a fitting location for intimate gatherings of Northwest artists, writers and naturalists sharing their own stories from the region. Each gathering in our Sourdough Speaker Series takes place in our lakeside dining hall and features an informal gourmet Saturday-night dinner of local and organic foods prepared by our chef, Charles Claassen. A fireside presentation by our guest speaker will follow, with plenty of time for questions, discussion and getting acquainted with others. Your ticket includes overnight accommodations in our comfortable guest lodges as well as a continental breakfast and optional naturalist-led activities Sunday morning. Dress is casual, of course. Your ticket letter will include travel directions, check-in information and other details. Attendance is limited to 40 guests; $95 per person for each event. registration at (360) 856-5700 ext. 209 or info@ncascades.org

Signup begins at 8:30 a.m. for the above activities

more information and a John Scurlock slideshow at www.ncascades.org/speakersseries


Photographer John Scurlock has been climbing, hiking and skiing the North Cascades since 1973. In addition to being a mountaineer, John further explores the region as a pilot and has documented the jumbled sea of peaks in the form of hundreds of amazing aerial photographs. His images of Mt. Baker, the North Cascades and British Columbia’s Coast Range have helped countless climbers and skiers search for routes, and they have also provided valuable research data for scientists studying phenomena like volcanism, geology and glaciology. “I certainly didn’t set out at the start to do what I have accomplished over the last few years,” he says. “In looking back, I have been incredibly lucky to pursue three of my great passions: mountains, photography and flying.” John’s presentation will include a stunning slideshow, with National Park scientist John Riedel in attendance to interpret the photographs of changing glaciers. Come prepared to see the North Cascades as you’ve never seen them before! Featured Farm Partner: Blue Heron Farm, Rockport

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© J O H N S C U R LO C K

O V E R THE NO R T H C A S C A D E S | John Scurlock | April 26–27 | $95

TA B L E TA L K : E AT I NG F R O M O U R “ F O O D S H E D ” | Maria Hines, Owner/Chef,

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©HSIAO-CHING CHOU

Tilth Restaurant | May 17–18 | $95 Named one of Food & Wine magazine’s “Best New Chefs,” Maria Hines has been capturing the attention of Northwest palates since she became head chef at Seattle’s popular Earth & Ocean restaurant in 2003. After impressive posts in Washington D.C. and New York, she returned to Seattle in 2005 to open Tilth Restaurant in the Wallingford neighborhood. It’s one of only two restaurants in the country to receive organic certification from Oregon Tilth. Maria has become an articulate and inspiring advocate for sustainable, organic—and delicious—food that comes to the table from our own “foodshed.” This special evening will feature a menu featuring fresh and organic Skagit Valley foods with remarks, ideas and inspiration from Maria to follow. Featured Farm Partner: Skagit River Ranch, Sedro-Woolley

WA SHIN G T O N ’ S P O E T LAU R E AT E R E A D S P O E MS FR OM NAT U R E

©SAMUEL GREEN

Samuel Green | June 21–22 | $95 Sam Green, who was named Washington’s first-ever poet laureate by Governor Christine Gregoire earlier this year, has spent a lifetime in the service of language. Sam and his wife, Sally, are proprietors of the award-winning Brooding Heron Press on Waldron Island where they have published work by Denise Levertov, Tim McNulty, Gary Snyder and others. He is the author of 10 poetry collections, including the recently published The Grace of Necessity (Carnegie Mellon University Press). In addition to his writing and publishing, he serves as a visiting teacher at Seattle University and is a leader in the Skagit River Poetry Festival. Well-known in our region as a dynamic speaker, passionate reader and engaging instructor, Sam will share readings from his own work as well as that of the Pacific Northwest poets he admires most. Featured Farm Partner: Frog’s Song Farm, Conway {9}


Here you can

O UR FI E L D C A M PU S IN N O R T H C ASC A DE S N ATIO N A L P A R K more information and slideshow tour at www.ncascades.org/learning_center

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© J ESSE K I NSM A N

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WELCOME TO THE NORTH CASCADES ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING CENTER

enjoy snowcapped peaks and tumbling streams, ancient forests and flower-filled meadows, and a rich Northwest history that includes more than 10,000 years of Native American culture. Better still, you can join a community—expert teachers, curious naturalists, intriguing new friends—all dedicated to the idea that learning about the environment together inspires stewardship. North Cascades Institute has operated the Learning Center in partnership with the National Park Service and Seattle City Light since 2005. Integrating sustainable building design with Earth-friendly operations, the tree-sheltered campus features 16 buildings clustered on the north shore of Diablo Lake. Facilities include: Three comfortable lodges with ADA-accessible accommodations for 69 guests A lakeside dining hall serving fresh, local and organic meals Multimedia classrooms, science labs and our Wild Ginger Library An outdoor amphitheater and secluded meditation shelters in nearby woodlands A dock on Diablo Lake for paddling adventures Trails leading deep into the national park Located along State Route 20 less than three hours northeast of Seattle, the Learning Center provides ready access to landscapes east and west of the Cascade Crest, from the pine-studded sagelands of the Columbia Plateau to the Skagit Valley, Puget Sound and San Juan Islands. And, stepping right out our front door, you need only grab a paddle or lace up your boots to head into the North Cascades backcountry. Whether you sign up for a natural history seminar or a Family Getaway, attend a free Day Trip, book a group rental or attend a Sourdough Speaker event, we look forward to sharing the Learning Center with you!


LEARNING CENTER REGISTRATION INFO First-timer 20 percent discount If you’ve never attended an Institute program with us, you may be eligible for a 20 percent discount! See page 35 for complete details.

Academic credit and clock hours Many seminars and retreats are offered for optional academic credit through Western Washington University (WWU). The number of credits available is listed near the title of each seminar, preceded by a “C.” North Cascades Institute is approved by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to grant teachers clockhour certification. The number of clock-hours available appears with a clock symbol near the title of each seminar. See page 35 for more registration details.

Diablo Downtime: Hiking and Canoeing, Yoga and Slow Food CHARLES CLAASSEN, ADAM RUSSELL, HANNAH SULLIVAN AND INSTITUTE NATURALISTS May 9–11, June 13–15, July 11–13, August 22–24 and September 26–28 (Fri eve–Sun) 15Ÿ Learning Center T $195, D $290, S $485

You asked for it: a weekend to relax. Diablo Downtime is for anyone looking for a break from the hurried life, a laid-back stretch in the mountains with only the simplest decisions to make: What kind of adventure should I choose today? Paddling on Diablo Lake or the hike to Fourth of July Pass with wildflowers and glacier views? How about a little yoga in the morning? Should I have seconds of that organic blueberry cobbler? Or just stroll to the dock to enjoy the sunset... Named for the beautiful lake at our doorstep, Diablo Downtime is a getaway for adults—singles, couples, siblings, friends, even parents looking for a hideout.

Each day, you can choose from a range of activities, from invigorating hikes with intriguing naturalists to canoe trips through pine-studded islands and ferndraped cliffs to beginning and intermediate yoga. Evenings will include plenty of tall tales ’round the campfire for late-nighters. You’ll also appreciate “slow food”—delicious meals and engaging discussion to celebrate food’s origins, traditions and role in community life. Then, of course, there’s nothing at all, which you’re more than welcome to enjoy. Just come upriver, settle in and relax. We’ll be waiting for you. { 11 }

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Most programs at the Learning Center offer several enrollment options, which are listed with each course description. The campus includes 23 rooms in three guest lodges, each with one twin bed and a set of twin bunk beds, and pricing varies according to sleeping arrangements. Depending on availability, you may choose one of the following: T (TRIPLE OCCUPANCY) is the tuition for sharing a room with two other people. This may require use of an upper bunk, accessible by an easy-to-climb ladder. D (DOUBLE OCCUPANCY) is the tuition for sharing a room with one other person. S (SINGLE OCCUPANCY) is the tuition for a room for one person. Shared occupancy is assigned on a gender-specific basis unless a particular roommate(s) is requested at time of registration. Single occupancy is limited and offered on a space-available basis. If you register for triple occupancy, please be prepared to use the top bunk, even though you might not be required to. To learn more about accommodations, visit www.ncascades.org/learning_center to see photos of our Learning Center guest lodges and other facilities. MEALS: All Learning Center programs include meals prepared by our chef, Charles Claassen, and feature local and organic foods. SCHOLARSHIPS: To make programs available to a wide audience, we have scholarship funds available for students, teachers, seniors over 60, environmental educators, conservation professionals and low-income participants. Applications are available online or by phone.

©DOUG OGLE

Pricing and Accommodations


MOLLY HASHIMOTO April 18–20, 2008 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

Spring Flowers: Botany from Field to Forest 1C/18 T $225, D $335, S $545

Celebrating Earth Day weekend with a special focus on trees, Molly, one of our most popular instructors, will lead you outdoors near the Learning Center campus to sketch a kaleidoscope of forest life—lichen-dappled alders, vine maples with delicate new leaves, lofty evergreens and a tapestry of twigs, cones, mosses and early flowers like trillium and wood violets. Back in the classroom, you’ll enrich your sketches with the painting media of your choosing: watercolors, watercolor pencils, acrylic inks, acrylic paints and more. During evening sessions, Molly will demonstrate how she uses acrylic paint and egg tempera to create small panel paintings. By Sunday, you’ll venture home with inspired ideas for artistic endeavors in any landscape, any time of year. All skill levels are welcome; participants must provide their own supplies. Molly Hashimoto has taught her craft at the Institute, North Seattle Community College, Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and elsewhere for more than a decade. You can learn more about her work at www.mollyhashimoto.com.

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©DIANA VISALLI

© M O L LY H A S H I M OT O

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Trees: Drawing and Painting Forest Life

SHELLEY WEISBERG April 18–20 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

1C/18 T $195, D $290, S $485

As spring’s green wave surges inland, join a botanist skilled in teaching plant identification and ecology from the tidal shores to mountain meadows of the Pacific Northwest. Starting in the lower Skagit Valley amid vibrant tulip fields and a full complement of blossoming plants, we’ll learn the basics of taxonomy and fundamental differences between flowering species. Studying native and some exotic plants common to the western Cascades, you’ll gain the skills necessary to identify many specimens using simple keys and field guides. Lodging at the Learning Center for the weekend, we’ll turn our attention to mountain woodlands whose trees have yet to mature for the season, leaving an understory of blooming wildflowers such as fringe cup, youth-on-age and Calypso orchids. Along the way, we’ll delve into such topics as species adaptations, pollination and traditional human uses of native plants. Whether you’re a newcomer to botany or a longtime enthusiast, this class will delight you. A springtime foray across diverse terrain is the perfect way to start the season.


Digital Outdoor Photography: Springtime in the Skagit Valley BENJ DRUMMOND April 18–20 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

Do you have a manual digital camera but have only scratched the surface of its potential? Changes in technology are allowing countless outdoor enthusiasts to capture nature imagery, but it takes creativity and competence to get the most out of beautiful scenery and a high-quality camera. Give yourself a spring weekend in the Skagit Valley with photographer Benj Drummond, who blends patience and creative genius with computer expertise. In a small workshop setting open to all skill levels, we’ll

18 T $225, D $335, S $545

address the fundamentals of outdoor photography, from selecting equipment and subject matter to field methods in challenging weather and light. Using editing software on the Learning Center’s iMacs, we’ll also cover digitalspecific processing techniques such as reading histograms and working with RAW files. Evenings will include slide shows to review the day’s work and offer friendly critiques. A digital camera capable of manual operation is required, SLR preferred.

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At North Cascades Institute, we are constantly investigating the connections between learning and the environment, vironment, knowledge and place, direct experience and deep ecology. These concepts form the foundation for our work. All of our programs, from Family Getaways to art retreats, backpacking trips to Sourdough Speakers, Field Excursions to the Graduate M.Ed. Program, are an intermingling of education and exposure to nature. We are motivated by the belief that the more a person knows about the landWE ARE MOTIVATED BY THE scape in which they live, BELIEF THAT THE MORE the more they will feel A PERSON KNOWS ABOUT connected to it and be THE LANDSCAPE IN WHICH THEY LIVE, THE MORE THEY motivated to protect it. WILL FEEL CONNECTED TO We decided to furIT AND BE MOTIVATED TO ther explore the ways in PROTECT IT which nature and education support each other. In the pages of this catalog, you’ll find a variety of perspectives on the relationship between learning and place. This investigation benefits from a series of interviews with Institute instructors and naturalists produced by Benj Drummond and Sara Joy Steele. They have generously allowed us to excerpt from their project The Dipper’s Attitude, an ongoing collection that explores who northwest naturalists are, how they attend to the natural world and why that matters. (You can learn more about their latest project, Facing Climate Change, on the back page of this catalog.)

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© E M I LY W E I S B E R G

What is the he nature of educat education? tion?

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~ALICE, NORTH CASCADES WILD PARTICIPANT { 14 }

© PA U L B A N N I C K

© LA R A SW I MME R

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THE NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE NOT ONLY SHOWED ME ANOTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD I HAVE NEVER SEEN BEFORE, RE, BUT LED ME TO DISCOVER R WHO I AM AND WHAT I STAND FOR FOR. IT GOT ME THINKING ABOUT WHAT I CAN DO TO MAKE THIS WORLD A BETTER PLACE. I DECIDED IF I WANTED TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE, I WOULD START BY VOLUNTEERING IN MY COMMUNITY. IT OPENED MY EYES TO HOW LIFE CAN BE JUST AS JOYFUL WITHOUT IPODS OR THE INTERNET.

Environmental Architecture: Green Building Design and Operation

Spring Birding Weekend: Avian Life in the Methow and Skagit Valleys

DAVID HALL AND RUSS WEISER OF THE HENRY KLEIN PARTNERSHIP WITH KRISTOFER GILJE AND JEFF MUSE May 2–4 (Fri eve-Sun) 1C/15 Learning Center T $225, D $335, S $545

JIM ALT, TIM MANNS, LIBBY MILLS, PAULA OGDEN-MUSE AND KENT WOODRUFF June 6–8 (Fri eve–Sun) 15 Learning Center T $195, D $290, S $485

Learn to build with geography, culture and ecology in mind. Join the Learning Center’s architects, director and facilities manager to examine sustainable design techniques at our Earth-friendly campus and a greenbuilt home in the upper Skagit Valley. Certified by the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program, the Learning Center highlights a range of green practices, from efficient heating and lighting, minimal waste and site restoration to construction with salvaged, recycled and low-impact materials. Along with behind-the-scenes tours and hands-on design activities, we’ll learn about LEED’s programs, which provide helpful concepts and strategies for anyone interested in environmental architecture. Sunday, we’ll visit the Learning Center director’s “Pacific Rim farmhouse” in Rockport, designed by David Hall with green materials and a strong sense of place.

Led by skilled birders and all-around naturalists, our second annual Spring Birding Weekend will investigate fields, forests and meandering streams in the Methow and Skagit valleys, strikingly different habitats thanks to the rainshadow of the Pacific Crest. Head east near Winthrops’s sage- and pine-studded hills and you might observe golden eagles, Lewis’s woodpeckers or a Wilson’s phalarope stirring up insects on a cattail pond. West, among the leafy woods, sloughs and pastures of the Upper Skagit, all manner of songbirds, raptors and waterfowl enter the scene. Each day, we’ll divide into instructor-led groups with eyes and ears open to different opportunities. We’ll discuss the life histories of birds, their adaptations and the challenges of migration. All skill levels are welcome; plenty of binoculars, spotting scopes and field guides will be on hand.


Diablo Creative Arts Retreat

On the cusp of Cascadian summer, enjoy our fourth annual retreat for aspiring and experienced artists. With grand views at our doorstep, our campus offers ready access to many inspiring vistas, from Thunder Creek’s deep green woods to the pink granite spires of Washington Pass to the tawny pine forests of the upper Methow. Upon registration, you’ll choose one instructor and her area of concentration for the duration of the retreat (group sizes are limited; all skill levels welcome). NATURE JOURNALING WITH JOCELYN CURRY: Create a durable, one-of-a-kind journal to record images and words with pencil, pen and ink, watercolor and light collage. Jocelyn will also tutor in sketching and painting methods useful for outdoor adventure and general travel.

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Poetics of the Wild 2C/24 T $245, D $365, S $595

WATERCOLOR WITH MOLLY HASHIMOTO: Learn the basics of watercolor painting, from choosing the paper, brushes and paint that are right for you to “plein air” techniques for trailside work. Emphasizing outdoor practice, we’ll focus on the summertime landscape. COLORED PENCIL FIELD DRAWING WITH LIBBY MILLS: Helping you create vibrant drawings in a variety of settings, Libby will teach the basics of color while introducing techniques in blending, layering, burnishing, impressed line and color removal. During your free time, you can paddle in our canoe, hike to a waterfall or simply soak up the scenery. Known for its welcoming atmosphere, this retreat will not only improve your art, but also rejuvenate your spirit.

TIM MCNULTY June 26–29 (Thu eve–Sun) Learning Center/Methow Valley

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JOCELYN CURRY, MOLLY HASHIMOTO AND LIBBY MILLS June 23–26 (Mon-Thu) Learning Center

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Art Afield:

1C/21 $ 225

Vanilla-scented ponderosa pines, a river stretched with snowmelt, coyote tracks in the sand—spend a weekend in the Methow Valley with distinguished Northwest poet Tim McNulty. As summer sweeps over the high country, you’ll explore the connection between nature, wilderness and poetic expression. From our campsite in the upper Methow, we’ll combine field observation with writing exercises that inspire creativity and a comfort with words. Along the way, we’ll dip into the long tradition of poets who have been inspired by the natural world, from Basho and Gary Snyder to John Haines, Jane Hirschfield and Mary Oliver. We’ll gather at the Learning Center Thursday evening to enjoy comfortable lodging and delicious meals. Friday morning, we’ll head east over the Cascade Crest to settle in for two nights of camping with meals and poems created by our own hands and minds. The intimate atmosphere and long summer days across diverse terrain will bring out the wordsmith in each of us. { 15 }


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At Water’s Edge: Landscape Watercolor Workshop MOLLY HASHIMOTO July 11–13 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

“The Learning Center provides a landscape of astonishing beauty,” says Molly Hashimoto, our popular watercolor instructor. “On Diablo Lake where Pyramid and Colonial peaks tower overhead, we wet the paper and stroke in grays for the edgeless mists. The cloud cover gives way to blue sky, and we note how the glacial milky green of Diablo Lake breaks all the rules of water in landscape and is unrelated to any color in the sky. For that rare green hue, we mix opaque cerulean blue with phthalo green.” At the height of summer’s color, enjoy a leisurely weekend with one of the Northwest’s most talented artists and teachers. Learn to paint landscapes big and small, { 16 }

Ross Lake by Boat and Boot: People and Places of the Upper Skagit 1C/18 T $225, D $335, S $545

from glacier-scraped peaks and forested ridges to the lichen-spotted trunks of leaning alders. Each day, we’ll examine one or more of these natural elements and do careful studies of them. Techniques will include working wet-into-wet, creating glazes and layering one landscape zone onto another, paying special attention to atmospheric perspective. Basic knowledge of watercolor materials and drawing experience is helpful, though all skill levels are welcome. Molly Hashimoto has taught her craft at the Institute, North Seattle Community College, Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and elsewhere for more than a decade: www.mollyhashimoto.com.

GERRY COOK AND BOB MIERENDORF July 17–20 (Thu eve–Sun) Learning Center/Ross Lake

1C/21 $ 225

Experience Ross Lake, a fjord-like jewel winding down the Skagit River some 25 miles from Canada into North Cascades National Park. With more than 60 years of National Park Service employment between them, Gerry Cook and Bob Mierendorf share a treasure trove of local knowledge and intimacy with the North Cascades. The generosity with which they hand down their stories will make this a backcountry adventure you’ll never forget. Friday morning, we’ll board the 30-foot Mule, an open-decked boat long helmed by Captain Cook. Camping at Lightning Creek at the foot of storied Desolation Peak, we’ll share meals, campfires and starry night skies unmarred by city lights. We’ll spend our days exploring fern-draped canyons and spirited waterfalls and take time for plant forays and a dip in the lake. Sunday will include an eight-mile hike over gentle terrain to witness the immense, centuries-old cedars along Big Beaver Creek.


RALPH HAUGERUD, LIBBY MILLS, ADAM RUSSELL AND SAUL WEISBERG July 17–20 (Thu eve–Sun) Learning Center

Stretch your legs in the mountains while learning about Northwest landscapes and history. Sign up for our annual gathering led by talented, fun-loving naturalists who enjoy rambling with people just like you. This year’s instructors include Libby Mills, a longtime Institute favorite who has taught about birds and Northwest landscapes for more than 30 years, Saul Weisberg, our executive director and co-founder, who has explored the North Cascades on foot, by paddle and with a climbing rope for more than 25 years and Ralph Haugerud, coauthor of Geology of the North Cascades and a veteran researcher with the U.S. Geological Survey whose maps tell fascinating stories about some of the most unique and complex landforms in the world. And, as a special treat, our staff

1C/21 T $245, D $365, S $595

naturalist Adam Russell will offer a daily option to paddle on Diablo Lake in our 14-passenger canoe. We’ll gather at the Learning Center Thursday night for a storytelling event with participants in our annual Ross Lake sojourn. Friday through Sunday, we’ll divide into instructor-led groups to explore various topics in diverse terrain. Possibilities might include birds and butterflies of the Methow Valley, wildflowers at Rainy Pass or the geologic history of the Pacific Crest. Wherever we roam, you can count on spirited camaraderie and plenty of mentorship on the use of field guides and equipment that will deepen your experience outdoors. Evenings will include fireside tales after leisurely dinners featuring local and organic fare from Skagit Valley farms.

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When I’m teaching people about birds, at first they can only watch birds for an hour, then they can do it for a couple of hours and then they can go days. I think you have to learn to be still. Beyond that, I think what makes a better naturalist is curiosity. You just constantly want to know. You know, it’s funny I am so focused on birds. My sister is an inter-tidal naturalist focusing on jellyfish. We kind of divvy up the natural world. She takes everything below high tide and I take everything WHAT IS NATURAL above. I was always hiking in HISTORY? I DON’T HAVE the mountains while she was THAT ANSWER. IT’S going to the beach. But when MORE LIKE SCIENCE OR we were little, we were turn- ART THAN ANYTHING ing over rocks together at low ELSE. tide. My dad thought a day wasn’t properly spent unless you’d at least had a walk outdoors.

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©SAUL WEISBERG

Northwest Naturalists Weekend

Libby Mills

Libby Mills is a wildlife biologist, artist and educator working in the Skagit Valley. Join Libby for the Spring Birding Weekend June 6–8, Diablo Creative Arts Retreat June 23–26 and Northwest Naturalists Weekend July 17–20 (see description to the left).

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© LAU R E N SA L ZM A N

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Dana Visalli HEY, THIS IS THE REAL WORLD. THIS IS BEAUTIFUL, AN INFINITELY INTRICATE, FANTASTIC FUN PHENOMENON! Why be a naturalist? It has to do with living in a natural world. If you dimly perceive that we live in an organic context, it affects the way you perceive life, what you think about and what you think is important. For me, there was this natural affinity for the natural world; the mystery is that everybody doesn’t have it, because we are of the earth, of the air and sun and water. It’s poetic, but it’s simply, physically true. That is what we are made of. You’d think everyone would feel that connection and it’s stunning the degree to which our society has drifted away. Being a naturalist or an ecologist is not so much a profession. It’s what we need to be as a culture. Dana Visalli is a field botanist specializing in rare plant species. As director of the Methow Biodiversity Project, he publishes The Methow Naturalist, a seasonal natural history journal. Join Dana for Balsamroot and Bumblebees: Methow Valley Wildflowers May 23–25; see pg. 28.

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Pacific Crest Backpack: Cascade Pass, Sahale Arm and Horseshoe Basin JEFF MUSE July 24–27 (Thu eve–Sun) Learning Center/Backcountry

Journey over Cascade Pass, an ancient trade route where waters spill east to the Columbia Basin or west to Puget Sound. Surrounded by icy peaks and flowerfilled meadows, we’ll hear tales of the people who traveled this path before us, from Indian traders and early Euro-American explorers to miners, road builders and world-class mountain climbers. We’ll explore the domain of glaciers on Sahale Arm, remnants of the Black Warrior Mine in Horseshoe Basin and the headwaters of two beautiful rivers, the Cascade and Stehekin. Along with backpacking basics and Leave No Trace principles, we’ll learn about the unruly

1C/21 $ 225

natural history of this remarkable landscape and discuss wilderness preservation with National Park Service rangers working along the trail. After lodging at the Learning Center Thursday night, we’ll enjoy two nights camping beneath starry alpine skies in the heart of the North Cascades. Participants should be prepared for a strenuous trip and have backpacking experience and equipment. We’ll carry full packs about 5 miles to and from our base camp near 5,300-foot Cascade Pass. Saturday, we’ll lighten our loads for a steep day hike to the base of Sahale Glacier at 7,700 feet. Whew!


T E NTH ANNU A L

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2C/27

America is steeped in story. Centuries of fact and myth have shaped a literary tradition that reflects, above all, how people relate to the land. Celebrate our vibrant heritage of fertile farmland and unbroken desert, rolling mountains and storm-lashed coasts at our 10th annual writing retreat. You’ll learn from three accomplished writers with strong ties to the outdoors and decades of teaching experience. Together, we’ll learn techniques for crisp, powerful writing about the landscapes that sustain us, influence our communities and ground our culture. The Thunder Arm Writing Retreat—so named for our location on Diablo Lake near the mouth of Thunder Creek—takes place at our Learning Center in North Cascades National Park. Home to hundreds of glaciers and wild river valleys, the national park has a distinct literary history of its own. Our neighborhood includes Sourdough Mountain and Desolation Peak, where writers Gary Snyder and Jack Kerouac served as fire lookouts during the 1950s. From hardscrabble explorers and trail-crew hands to Beat poets and park rangers, the North Cascades have inspired many to put pen to paper. Whether you’re a seasoned writer or eager newcomer, please join us. No need to submit a manuscript beforehand. We strive for a nourishing, professional yet noncompetitive atmosphere in which student groups rotate through instructors each day, enjoying a combination of lecture, discussion and writing activities. Our chef, Charles Claassen, will prepare delicious, nourishing meals with local and organic ingredients, and you’ll repair each night to comfortable accommodations in our lodges. You’ll also have ample time to enjoy our trails or canoe on Diablo Lake, as well as quiet moments to peruse our Wild Ginger Library, filled with more than a thousand titles. As a special treat, Thursday night we’ll celebrate with a rousing campfire to commemorate Cascadian literature, including the 50th anniversary of Kerouac’s locally inspired The Dharma Bums.

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T $325, D $485, S $795

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CLYDE FORD, BARBARA SJOHOLM AND ANA MARIA SPAGNA July 30–August 3 (Wed eve–Sun) Learning Center

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Beats On The Peaks: Lookout Poets and Backcountry Tales On Ross Lake

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DHARMA BUMS TURNS 50

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GERRY COOK AND JEFF MUSE July 31–August 3 (Thu eve–Sun) Learning Center/Ross Lake

RE DISC O V E R KER O U A C ’ S C LA S S I C B E AT- E R A N O VE L W IT H A TRIP TO DE SO LAT I O N P E A K

1C/21 $ 225

Venture up Ross Lake and hike to the top of Desolation Peak where the Beat writer penned tales of his Cascadian adventure as a fire lookout in 1956. Led by a former lookout and a book-toting naturalist, we’ll gather at the Learning Center Thursday night to share lodging, meals and a literary event with participants in our annual writing retreat. Friday, we’ll break away to Ross Lake to board the 30-foot, open-decked Mule, the perfect floating stage for backcountry storytelling and our own adventurous scribbling. Camping two nights at Lightning Creek, we’ll hike 12 miles round trip up the fabled 6,000-foot mountain to meet the lookout on duty and share readings by Gary Snyder and other writers who spent time in these mountains as wilderness rangers, trail crew laborers and roundabout explorers. Don’t miss this annual expedition of books and rucksacks, mighty sweats and jaw-dropping views! Participants should be prepared for strenuous hiking up Desolation Peak (12 miles round trip with a steep elevation gain). You must also provide your own equipment and food for the camping portion of this trip, and be able to carry personal gear one mile down a steep trail to the boat dock Friday and back up Sunday. Tuition includes boat transportation and shuttle to and from the Ross Dam Trailhead. For another Dharma Bums-inspired sojourn, check out “High Country Rhapsody: Searching for Kerouac in the North Cascades” on page 33!


JIM JOHANNESSEN AND JON RIEDEL August 8–10 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

How will global warming impact a landowner living along a shoreline or the farmer who grows crops in a floodplain? How will the changing Northwest climate impact the salmon fisherman, the high-country hiker, the city dweller counting on hydropower to electrify her home or business? What will our mountains, rivers and shorelines look like in the years ahead? Get outdoors with people who know the land—as it is, as it was, as it may become. In this down-to-earth workshop, geologists Jon Riedel and Jim Johannessen will help you understand the possible impacts of climate change on Northwest landscapes and waterways, and the measures we can take to mitigate such changes. A longtime resident of the Upper Skagit Valley, Jon is a geologist for the National Park Service working throughout

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Easton Glacier in 1992

Living with Climate Change: Northwest Mountains, Rivers and Shorelines in the Years Ahead

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© J ESSE K I NSM A N

©FRED DARVILL

Easton Glacier in 1978

Pacific Northwest Forest Ecology 1C/18 T $195, D $290, S $485

the region on glacier monitoring and managing geologic hazards, floodplains and erosion control. Jim runs Coastal Geologic Services in Bellingham, specializing in coastal processes and restoration throughout Puget Sound and the Northwest straits. Friday, we’ll stick close to campus for an introduction to Northwest geology and climate history and an intimate tour of the Skagit River gorge, which owes much of its character to repeated Ice Ages. Saturday, we’ll take a vigorous hike (eight miles roundtrip over moderately steep terrain) near Washington Pass to examine glacial formations and the distribution of forests and subalpine plant life. Sunday, focusing on flooding and restoration efforts, we’ll head downriver to visit sites along the Skagit and Puget Sound shorelines.

PHILIP HIGUERA AND SUSAN PRICHARD August 8–10 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

1C/18 T $195, D $290, S $485

Rising a vertical mile from valley bottoms to alpine ridges, the North Cascades harbor some of the most diverse coniferous forests in the world. A single hike can reveal more than 14 evergreen species! Join forest ecologists Philip Higuera and Susan Prichard to learn how climate, elevation and geology interact to create the ecological patterns we see in our local woodlands. Exploring forest history over thousands of years, we’ll learn about the tools these ecologists use to understand forests, and how tree-ring and lake-sediment records help reconstruct the paleoecology of a region. With the Learning Center as our base, be prepared for daylong hikes in elevations ranging from 1,000 to 7,000 feet. This class is best suited for those in strong physical condition; we’ll hike both on and off trail, carrying science equipment and personal gear. { 21 }


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~TRACIE JOHANNESSEN, INSTITUTE EDUCATION DIRECTOR

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©SUSAN BENNERSTROM

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SINCE THE BEGINNING, THE INSTITUTE’S EARLY FOUNDERS FELT THE FUNDAMENTAL SOURCE OF MANY OF OUR MODERN ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS WAS THAT PEOPLE WERE LOSING THEIR CONNECTION TO THE NATURAL WORLD. WE BELIEVED, AND STILL BELIEVE, THAT WITHOUT THE INSPIRATION AND WISDOM GAINED FROM DIRECT EXPERIENCE IN THE NATURAL WORLD, NO REAL ANSWERS WILL BE FOUND IN THE QUEST FOR A SUSTAINABLE WAY OF LIFE.

Dragonflies: Across the Cascades DENNIS PAULSON August 8–10 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

Introduction to Oil Pastels with Susan Bennerstrom 1C/18 T $195, D $290, S $485

Green Darner, Pacific Forktail, Western Meadowhawk—colorful insect names as diverse as the habitats they call home. Washington State harbors 76 species of dragonflies and damselflies, from the order Odonata meaning “toothed jaw.” Join Dennis Paulson, the Northwest’s foremost authority on odonates, to investigate landscapes and waterways across the North Cascades from the Skagit to Methow valleys. With nets at the ready, we’ll search sloughs and fields along the Skagit River, wildflower meadows near Washington Pass and hidden wetlands and cattail ponds among the pine forests and sagelands near Winthrop. We’ll document our findings, bring specimens back to the lab for inspection under microscopes and help establish a permanent teaching collection for the Learning Center. Don’t miss this opportunity to explore alongside one of the most experienced and knowledgeable biologists in the Northwest.

SUSAN BENNERSTROM September 5–7 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

1C/18 T $225, D $335, S $545

Capture the mountains in their many moods—daybreak, sunset, the shifting seasons—with the sweeping hues and textures of oil pastels. Join awardwinning artist Susan Bennerstrom to practice painting scenes and objects with this versatile and forgiving medium. Under her patient and attentive tutelage, we’ll learn basic strokes and how to mix color on paper while layering and working with values. Through a series of compositions, you will draw out the richness and translucency of oil pastels, creating the illusion of light for which this medium is celebrated. The atmosphere in class will be both fast-moving and relaxed, and all skill levels are welcome. Susan Bennerstrom is a full-time artist whose work has been featured in solo shows in Seattle, New York, Los Angeles, Portland, Santa Fe, San Francisco and Ireland. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including two Ballinglen Arts Foundation fellowships, a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant and two Artist Trust GAP grants.


NICK O’CONNELL September 5–7 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

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1C/18 T $245, D $365, S $595

Ravens, Crows and Jays: Corvid Ecology and Tales of Our Avian Shadows Fact or fiction, the most authentic and compelling stories are often those told in first-person, with the self as narrator. These include some of our finest contemporary “nature writing,” from Barry Lopez to Terry Tempest Williams to Rick Bass. But it can be tricky to craft an effective point of view and a persona that resonates with readers. Let the talented Nick O’Connell give you a hand. A longtime writer, editor and teacher, Nick founded the University of Washington’s Narrative Nonfiction program in 1993 and now directs the Writers Workshop in Seattle, which helps newcomers and veterans alike with memoir, travel, nature and other writing. Emphasizing the first-person perspective throughout the weekend, we’ll address many techniques that make for good stories, from description and metaphor to dramatic scene and narrative structure. Thanks to Nick’s professional mentorship and time for independent practice, you’ll head home Sunday with plenty of ideas and inspiration.

JOHN MARZLUFF September 5–7 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

From ravens and crows to jays and magpies, the Corvidae family is a brainy bunch. Known collectively as “corvids,” this clever clan of birds includes more than 120 species. Based on brain-to-body ratio, their brains are only slightly smaller than ours, which might account for their storied ingenuity, social complexity and adaptive success from wildlands to city streets. Study these fascinating birds with University of Washington wildlife professor John Marzluff, whose humor and expertise delighted participants during last year’s Spring Birding

1C/18 T $195, D $290, S $485

Weekend. This year, we’ll pursue corvids with John from the Skagit to Methow valleys, including Washington Pass where the industrious Clark’s nutcracker caches— and sometimes forgets—whitebark pine seeds that sustain a thin stand along the Pacific Crest. Drawing from his award-winning book with Tony Angell, In the Company of Crows and Ravens, John will share tales from across the globe and thoughts on “cultural coevolution,” the notion that corvids and humans have long influenced each other’s lives. { 23 }

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© TO NY A N GE LL

© PA U L A N D E R S O N

First Person Stories: A Writing Workshop


PAUL BANNICK, BRETT BAUNTON AND BENJ DRUMMOND September 19–21 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

From crimson huckleberry meadows laced with golden larches to a smiling loved one hiking down a snow-dusted trail, capture the North Cascades as autumn takes hold. With three expert photographers as your guides, we’ll turn our lenses to all the season has to offer—landscapes, wildlife and people at play or work in the out of doors. Rising early and staying out late, we’ll spend long days in the field, from Thunder Creek to Washington Pass to Diablo Lake, striving to create vibrant, lasting images. Departing each day from the Learning Center, you’ll learn the basics of nature photography such as selecting equipment, subject matter and methods for composition and exposure compensation. We’ll also cover digital-specific techniques such as reading histograms and working with { 24 }

© N O RT H C A SC A D ES I NST I T UT E

© ST EFA N B I TT N E R

©ROGER BOE

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Nature Photography Retreat: High Country in Autumn

Wildlife Tracking: Bears, Cougars and Cascadian Mammals 18 T $275, D $415, S $695

RAW files. Evenings will include slideshows to review the day’s work and offer friendly critiques. Depending on the weather and group interest, we may venture to lower elevations in the Skagit and Methow valleys to photograph landscapes both wild and pastoral. A digital camera capable of manual operation is required, SLR preferred. This is a retreat you’ll never forget, thanks to the beautiful images you’ll take home and the inspiration you’ll feel to continue your practice. To see the photographic work of last year’s participants, visit www.ncascades. org/multimedia. To view Paul Bannick’s work, visit www.paulbannick.com. Brett Baunton’s photos are at www.brettbaunton.com. Benj Drummond’s art can be sampled at www.bendrum.com.

DAVE MOSKOWITZ September 19–21 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

18 T $195, D $290, S $485

Watching wildlife comes easy in many landscapes, but the Northwest is a different creature. Just like our mountain views, you often have to work to see an animal in the Cascade woodlands, especially reclusive mammals such as bears, cougars, coyotes and bobcats. Learning to track wildlife can help. Such skills hone your senses and help you identify the ever-present but often hidden thread of animal life woven throughout our wildlands and even our towns and backyards. Join Dave Moskowitz, a longtime tracker and teacher at the Wilderness Awareness School, to study tracking fundamentals such as trailing, timing and identifying diverse signs including prints, scat, tree scrapes and food caches. We’ll spend long days in subalpine, montane and riverside habitats while learning about many animals and the complex ecosystems they support. Because we’ll search for bears, cougars and other large mammals, we’ll address safety precautions in the event of an encounter.


Sit, Walk, Write: Nature and the Practice of Presence KURT HOELTING AND HOLLEY HUGHES October 24–26 (Fri eve–Sun) Learning Center

Poet and Zen meditator Jane Hirshfield believes writing a poem is an act of attentiveness. Through the experience, we learn to see more clearly with our full range of feelings and perceptions. The attentiveness that writing encourages is similar to the deep presence sought through meditation. Both rely on careful observation. Both move us deeply into the mind as well as the natural world. Experience a nourishing weekend with Zen meditation teacher Kurt Hoelting and writer Holley Hughes. We’ll combine meditation practice—both moving and still—with time to write

15 T $245, D $365, S $595

and ponder the works of several reflective authors. We’ll start each day with sitting meditation and Qi gong movement, share poems and short nature essays, then put our own thoughts into words following freewriting practices pioneered by Natalie Goldberg. Outdoors, we’ll enjoy hiking, meditation and gentle observations with Institute naturalists as a way to deepen our connection with the natural world. After healthy, organic dinners, our days will end with discussion and silent reflection. No meditation or writing experience is necessary.

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At one time, it was an ordinary expectation of elementary education that you would know something about natural history, so what happened? After World War I, and during the buildup to World War II, there was a stronger imperative toward the technological, primarily for the purpose of warfare and international competition. Natural history really began its decline in the universities. When Sputnik I was launched, so were all of the advanced math programs in schools. Universities wanted hotshot scientists who were doing molecular and biochemical work. Natural history was considered passé, hokey, unsophisticated and anecdotal. They were trying to make the science better, but they were throwing out the people who were the backbone of knowledge for the outdoor world. I think natural history as a part of academia has to some extent redeemed itself. There are a lot of closet naturalists in the universities— people who were able to have a foot in both camps. But what isn’t getting done? One big hole is disseminating natural history, at both the artistic and factual level, throughout the culture. And that is woefully important. I really do think that the root of not only the ecological crisis, but also many world ills, lies in our almost willful profound ignorance of the natural world.

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©BRAD TUNINGA

Robert Michael Pyle

Robert Michael Pyle is a naturalist and author of many books including 2007’s Sky Time in Gray’s River. A longtime Institute instructor, Pyle is embarking on the first-ever Butterfly Big Year, in which he’ll identify as many of the 800 species in North America as possible in one calendar year.

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FIELD EXCURSIONS GET O UTSIDE A N D E XPE R I E N C E Y O U R WIL D B A C K YA R D

more information and slideshow tour at www.ncascades.org/seminars

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new series of Field Excursions! Over the next several pages, you’ll find a wealth of opportunities designed to get you outside in locations throughout Washington: Seattle, the Methow Valley, Columbia Gorge, Bellingham, the Skagit Valley, Deception Pass and beyond. Our trips are led by skilled and engaging instructors who are leaders in their respective fields. Whether you sign up for a half-day walking tour of Whatcom Creek, an overnight in the San Juan Islands or a multi-day backpacking trip in the North Cascades, you’ll challenge your thinking and expand your appreciation for the natural and cultural history of these special places.

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Welcome to North Cascades Institute’s

Colors and Calls: Birding Bellingham by Eye and Ear CLARK BLAKE AND DAVE ENGEBRETSON May 3–4 (Sat-Sun) Bellingham area

12 $ 165

As spring comes to Western Washington, feathered migrants will be arriving on the crest of a wave of warmer weather and longer days. Our location along the Pacific coast flyway gives us a roadside view of the parade flowing through on the atmospheric highway. Lifelong naturalists Clark Blake and Dave Engebreteson have been a birding duo for years, prowling around Whatcom County and beyond to seek out the magnificent array of bird life found just a short distance from their doorsteps. Dave, who has been legally blind for more than 20 years, is a geology professor at WWU who has developed a unique course based on tuning in to and explaining the sounds the earth makes. Together with Clark, they’ll teach techniques they’ve developed for getting the most from our senses when birding. Traveling as a group, we’ll tune in to the rich display of song and plumage when mating season is in full swing. Saturday, we’ll explore local shorelines and then head for the hills Sunday to search for the forest- and mountain-dwelling bird life of higher ground.


Field Excursions Registration Info First-timer 20 percent discount If you’ve never attended an Institute program with us, you may be eligible for a 20 percent discount! See page 35 for complete details.

Pricing

Accommodations

©JENNIFER HAHN

Participants are responsible for providing their own overnight accommodations. Exceptions include the Mother’s Day San Juan Islands Cruise, Women’s Fly-Fishing Escape and Wind River Canopy Crane excursion.

Meals Participants provide their own meals for Field Excursions unless otherwise noted in the program description.

Mother’s Day San Juan Islands Cruise JENNIFER HAHN May 10–11 (Sat-Sun) Snow Goose

Celebrate spring—and Mother’s Day—with an exclusive overnight cruise aboard the Snow Goose, a luxurious 65-foot trawler, accompanied by acclaimed writer and marine naturalist Jennifer Hahn. Disembarking from Bellingham, you’ll explore the nooks, crannies and hidden bays of the enchanting San Juan Islands, including excellent low-tide exploration opportunities with a minus-1.3 low tide. Jennifer, a gifted and ebullient naturalist, will introduce you to the tides, bird life, edible seaweed and native stories of the Salish Sea. She is intimately familiar with the San Juan Islands and the Inside Passage, and she’ll be sharing stories of her solo kayak journey from

Scholarships 12 $ 495

Ketchikan, Alaska to these home waters, an epic trip chronicled in her award-winning book Spirited Waters. Together, we’ll head toward Orcas Island and dock in West Sound where, on Sunday morning we’ll be welcomed by Christina Orchid, celebrated chef, cookbook author and authority on sustainable cuisine. After a short stroll to her Green Dolphin farm, surrounded by orchards of apples and pears and her mother’s bountiful heritage garden, she’ll prepare a private brunch for our group in her vintage barn overlooking Puget Sound. As a bonus, all mothers on board will receive a special gift, compliments of the Institute.

To make programs available to a wide audience, we have scholarship funds available. Preference is given to students, teachers, seniors over 60, environmental educators, conservation professionals and low-income participants. Applications are available online or by phone.

Academic credit and clock hours Many Institute classes are offered for optional academic credit through Western Washington University. The number of credits available is listed near the title of each seminar, preceded by a “C.” WWU will bill you $48/credit. “CP” denotes credits pending approval. North Cascades Institute is approved by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to grant teachers clock-hour certification. The number of clock-hours available appears with a clock symbol near the title of each seminar. The fee is $3.50/clock hour, payable to the Institute. See page 35 for more registration details. { 27 }

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Prices listed next to Field Excursions are per person.


~JOHN MILES, WWU PROFESSOR AND GRAD PROGRAM COORDINATOR

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©BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

© C A RL MO LESWO RT H

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OVER MANY YEARS AND A MULTITUDE OF INTERACTIONS IN THE NATURAL WORLD, BE THEY IN MY GARDEN OR DEEP IN THE WILDERNESS, I HAVE GAINED A SENSE OF TIME THAT HELPS ME BE HOPEFUL, HUMBLER AND PATIENT. THE MORE I’VE LEARNED, THE MORE I KNOW THERE IS TO LEARN, WHICH IS HUMBLING.

Bunchgrass Dreams: High Desert Ecology MARK DARRACH May 17–18 (Sat-Sun) Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

Balsamroot and Bumblebees: Methow Valley Wildflowers 1C/12 $ 175

The broad and rolling hills of Eastern Washington’s fawn-colored shrubsteppe hold a stunning variety of textures and depth of hues when light falls across the land. Join us for a weekend at the Arid Land Ecology Reserve, located within the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near the Tri-Cities in Eastern Washington, to experience the largest remnant of native sagebrush-steppe habitat in the state. Traveling with Mark Darrach, a botanist and geologist with many years of intimate field experience in this landscape, we’ll explore the reserve on foot—a rare opportunity that requires special permitting and a qualified guide. An unspoiled refuge for an indigenous landscape disappearing throughout the intermountain West, the ALE is home to an entire community of diverse and unique plants, reptiles, birds and mammals. Discover the singular beauty of this unheralded region that appears much the same as it did when Lewis and Clark first passed through in 1805, and appreciate the intricate details hidden to the passing eye.

DANA VISALLI May 23–25 (Fri-Sun) Methow Valley

1C/18 $ 195

Treat yourself to a weekend immersion into the bloom of the spring wildflower season on the North Cascades’ eastslope with Dana Visalli, longtime Methow resident and founding editor of The Methow Naturalist. After a Friday-evening orientation on the biology and psychology of wildflowers, we’ll take to the field to spend the weekend in their florid company, learning to identify what we encounter, practicing basic keying techniques, examining pollination strategies and simply reveling in their beauty. This excursion will visit several different sites—from the banks of the Methow River to high grasslands and Ponderosa forests—to discover the variety of blossoms inhabiting their ecological niches. Participants are welcome to camp along the river on Dana’s property, enjoying camaraderie around the campfire, or make arrangements in nearby Twisp or Winthrop.


INSTITUTE NATURALISTS June 1, June 8 and June 15 (Sundays) 9am–1pm Bellingham Marine Life Center

Nestled between Puget Sound and Mt. Baker, Bellingham’s charm is defined by its geography. Easy access to urban green spaces, wildlife and shorelines are often touted as what makes Bellingham, named one of the “Best Outside Towns” by Outside Magazine, a great place to live. But how much do you really know about the rich natural and cultural history of the area? Join the Institute for an illuminating stroll through the city with a personable field naturalist, visiting with local experts and historians along the way. Our excursion begins and ends on the banks of Whatcom Creek, the resurgent pulse that courses

$ 50

through Bellingham’s past, present and future. Together, we’ll unbraid the many stories the creek keeps and learn about its major characters: fish, humans, hatcheries, birds, urban living, art, commerce, fire and restoration. Salmon running under sidewalks, falcons hunting overhead, sandstone supporting downtown buildings—the very streets will come alive when you begin to look at them with a naturalist’s eye! These half-day field excursions are specially priced—bring your out-of-town guests for a great, down-to-earth introduction to the Fourth Corner!

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Shortly after I came here to live, I met a young man at Shi Shi Beach (on the Olympic Peninsula) who had just built a small cabin. It was in a little inaccessible cove on an 80-foot cliff, built out of a single cedar log. I was totally enamored by Henry David Thoreau and the Chinese mountain poets, the hermit poets, and it was like meeting one. That winter he knocked on my door. Something had come up. He asked if I would be willing to take over the cabin. I didn’t have to think two seconds. So I spent most of that next year out there, and that gave me a sense of really bonding with the place. As a naturalist, I was learning so much, and I also had a lot of time alone to work on my writing. Looking back, I think that was a pretty critical year for me, for really rooting myself here. It was almost like being an apprentice to this ecosystem. Later that year, I got involved in the conservation movement that led to an act of Congress being passed that added Shi Shi and the eastern shore of Lake Ozette to the park. That legislation was kind of my introduction and baptism to wilderness and environmental politics.

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Wild Whatcom: The Nature of Bellingham

Tim McNulty

Tim McNulty is a poet, conservationist, fire lookout and nature writer who lives with his family in the foothills of the Olympic Mountains. He is the author of several books of poetry and natural history. Join Tim for Poetics of the Wild June 26–28; see pg. 15.

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Nature’s Pages: Bookmaking and Nature Journaling MARIA CORYELL-MARTIN June 20–22 (Fri-Sun) La Conner

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ALL PEOPLE NEED THE OPPORTUNITY TO CONNECT THE WATER IN THEIR WATER BOTTLES, THE MEAT IN THEIR BIG MACS, THE MILK IN THEIR FRIDGE AND THE EMPTINESS IN THEIR HEARTS TO THE MANIPULATION OF THE WILDERNESS. WE ALL KNOW OF THE SLOW CHANGES THAT ARE AFFECTING OUR NATURAL WORLD BUT NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE WOKE ME UP AND TURNED THE WHEELS OF AWARENESS, APPRECIATION AND RESPONSIBILITY IN MY BRAIN.

Home Ground: Gardening with Native Plants 18 $ 225

Rocky shorelines, high bluffs and old-growth forests provide the inspiration for book-making, field sketching and journaling on this weekend excursion to Deception Pass State Park. Join expeditionary artist Maria Coryell-Martin to create your own one-of-a-kind field journal using simple bookbinding techniques. With our homemade books in hand, we’ll venture onto Puget Sound beaches and forest trails to explore and document the region with pencil, ink and watercolor media. Maria, who has painted the world from Africa to Greenland to the North Cascades, will cover the basic techniques of field sketching and share her hard-won tricks for successfully working in the open air. Studio sessions will be based out of La Conner, the picturesque port town famous for inspiring generations of artists and writers. To help deepen our perceptions, the group will travel with a skilled naturalist to learn the natural and cultural history of the areas we visit. Lodging is not included in the price; the Institute can recommend many options in La Conner.

SHELLEY WEISBERG June 28 (Sat) Bellingham

6 $ 95

By looking around at the innovative ways local gardeners are designing, developing and tending gardens here in the Northwest, we can learn a lot about how to integrate a love of gardening with a passion for a healthy environment. What are the best bioregional gardening practices for the Pacific Northwest? How can landscaping be drought-resistant? When caring for your garden, in what ways can working with nature actually make life easier? What are “good” bugs, how can you invite them into your garden and why would you want to? What is a backyard wildlife habitat? What plants encourage visits from butterflies and hummingbirds? What is a rain garden? Spend the day with Shelley Weisberg, native plant botanist and professional garden designer, exploring a diverse group of gardens in and around Bellingham on a private tour designed especially for this field excursion. Together, we’ll search out the answers to these questions and, in the process, you’ll gain new inspiration for your own garden.


DAVID WILLIAMS June 29 (Sun) Seattle

6 $ 95

From downtown to down by the Sound, explore Seattle’s wild side with a field excursion led by David Williams, author of The Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from Seattle. With humor, enthusiasm and sharp observation skills, he’ll open our eyes to the natural wonders of the urban environment and reveal secrets previously hidden beneath the hustle and bustle of the Emerald City. The day will begin along the Duwamish River, where we’ll read the record of Seattle’s scariest earthquake zone. We’ll then proceed to Pioneer Square to start a 2-mile-long transect to investigate 330-million-year-old fossils, learn why glaciers are bad for automobile clutches, see where mammoths once roamed and explore the ecology of the new Olympic Sculpture Park, including the fascinating Neukom Vivarium nurse log exhibit. David will conclude our day gathered beneath the Magnolia Bluff, the perfect spot for seeing coastal geological processes as well as for remembering that nature bats last! Think globally, learn locally: discover Seattle’s wild side!

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Seattle’s Wild Side: Natural History in the Streets Roots and Shoots: Skagit Valley Farm Tour CHARLES CLAASSEN AND INSTITUTE STAFF July 13 (Sun) Skagit Flats

An interest in “farm-to-table” cooking and eating is on the rise—we’re all hungry for fresher, healthier food and want to know more about who grows it and where. This farmland excursion will introduce you personally to the Skagit Valley’s leading small farmers and provide a behind-thescenes look at the practices that sustain their operations. Our day will start in the gardens of Larkspur Farm where we’ll gather for coffee and Chef Charles’ morning pastry. We’ll continue on to Frog’s Song Farm where Nate O’Neil is successfully growing a bounty of lush vegetables using remarkably little water. Our day will also include a tour of Hedlin Farms, a 100-year-old family farm, and an

6 $ 95

introduction to Taylor Shellfish nestled on the shores of Samish Bay. We’ll stop for lunch at the vintage Rexville Grocery and enjoy a menu of fresh foods harvested from the farms we visited. Don’t worry: we’ll be tasting samples along the way, too! As our Skagit excursion winds down, we’ll drop by the Breadfarm, an artisan bakery in the historic market town of Edison, and pop into Slough Foods next door for a tasting of local wine, cheese and chocolate. Your guide for the day will be Chef Charles Claassen, head of the Learning Center’s excellent culinary program and coordinator of the Institute’s “FoodShed” program of local and organic foods. { 31 }


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After the Fire: Alpine Ecology and Wildflowers

Volcanic Geology of Mt. Baker’s Ptarmigan Ridge DAVE TUCKER AND LEE WHITFORD August 3 (Sat) Ptarmigan Ridge

Experience time travel by foot on the Ptarmigan Ridge trail in Mt. Baker’s radiant late-summer high country. Our field excursion will travel over a distinct record of one million years of volcanism as we traverse across the top of the 1.15-million-year-old Kulshan caldera, a crater that erupted cataclysmically through the thick continental ice sheet before the mountain built itself from stacks of lava. As we hike past lava domes that erupted shortly after the caldera collapse, we’ll also lay hands on columnar andesite that { 32 }

6 $ 95

predates Mt. Baker, discuss the origin of Table Mountain and examine layers of volcanic ash preserved in the soil. Dave is a leading geological expert on the Mt. Baker region, and Institute staff naturalist Lee will be along for the journey to share her knowledge of the natural and cultural history of the area. Together, they’ll interpret the story of this landscape as evidenced in its rocks and ash. The hike may be as long as 10 miles round trip, though elevation gain is less than 600 gradual feet.

SHELLEY WEISBERG July 18–20 (Fri-Sun) Hart’s Pass

1C/18 $ 195

The land above treeline presents a challenging habitat: a short growing season, heavy snows, arid summers, harsh winds and dramatic fluctuations in temperature. Plants found in this fragile ecosystem have developed unique strategies for survival, but how do they adapt when a fire passes through? Hart’s Pass, classic North Cascadian high country surrounded by spectacular peaks and fragrant alpine meadows, was altered when wildfire swept through in 2004, creating a mosaic of burned and unburned areas. Serving as a powerful example that landscapes are never static, the region presents an excellent outdoor classroom for examination of post-fire restoration. Join skilled field botanist Shelley Weisberg for a weekend in the mountains and investigate the effects of fire on alpine habitats and wildflower recolonization strategies. We’ll make short forays into this area, exploring a range of plant habitats on foot and by car, including areas untouched by the fire. For those who would like to camp, sites are available at Meadows Campground; other participants may wish to arrange lodging in nearby Mazama.


High Country Rhapsody: Searching for Kerouac in the North Cascades 6 $ 95

Join photographer Mark Turner for a day of learning and practicing techniques for photographing alpine wildflowers. We’ll start above treeline at Artist’s Point, hiking along the talus slope of Table Mountain before descending to Galena Chain Lakes. This field excursion will emphasize discovering new ways to see the flowers, techniques for creative composition, separating subjects from distracting backgrounds and controlling natural light—all techniques Mark used to produce Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest, his award-winning field guide. Other topics of the day will include ethical field practices, understanding technical descriptions to help create scientifically relevant images and learning how to see nature’s stories in order to create richer images. Saturday evening, Mark will share a slideshow of his wildflower photographs in Bellingham, illustrating ideas and techniques that we’ll put into practice in the field the next day. Participants should be familiar with operating their camera, whether it is digital or film, and bring a tripod and an assortment of lenses. Participants are responsible for lodging in Bellingham.

MEGAN MCGINTY August 14–19 (Thurs-Tues) North Cascades National Park

From his fire lookout-cum-hermitage perched on top of remote Desolation Peak, Jack Kerouac unleashed his barbaric yawp and felt it reverberate back to him from the dark walls of Hozomeen. As the fearsome echo washed over him, he must’ve wondered, “When in these mountains, what’s the difference between a rapturous poet and a raving lunatic?” Fifty years after the publication of The Dharma Bums, the cult classic novel that chronicles Kerouac’s summer in the North Cascades, the question still rings out over the peaks. Join Institute naturalist and alpine guide Megan McGinty for six glorious days in the backcountry celebrating the natural and cultural history of one of Washington State’s crown jewels: North Cascades National Park. Beginning at the mouth of the wild and rarely visited Little Beaver Valley on the west side of Ross

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MARK TURNER August 9–10 (Sat eve–Sun) Chain Lakes Trail

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Wildflower Photography in the Alpine Landscape

2C/24 $ 295

Lake, we’ll ascend to awe-inspiring Whatcom Pass, a 5,200-foot Elysium regarded by many climbers, rangers and tramps as one of the most stunning locations in the park. Camping together and sharing meals, we’ll explore alpine meadows, ancient forests and night skies laden with stars, all the while paying homage to The Dharma Bums and the daring literary experiments these mountains have inspired from backcountry beat poets past and present, including Gary Snyder, Phillip Whalen, Kenneth Rexroth and Tim McNulty. Tuition includes boat transportation to and from Little Beaver campsite on Ross Lake. Participants must be in good physical condition, have previous backpacking experience and provide their own food and equipment. Details on page 35. { 33 }


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Everywhere I go, I call. If there’s a barred owl in here it’ll answer. Owls are cool because they open up peoples’ imaginations. By the time my daughter Emma was four, she knew three owl vocalizations. Just like I don’t draw that line between classroom and outside, I hesitate to say you have to have a pure experience in wilderness as opposed to any other place. Our yard is a very interactive space and that’s an imporFOR ME, IT WAS THE tant learning ground. For Emma, IDENTIFICATION OF everything is a discovery. A PASSION THAT WAS I’d love to be outside more. IMPORTANT, NOT THE I lived that life for a little while, SINGULARITY OF BIRDS. doing plant research and birds on the side, but to do it in isolation was never enough. I always wanted to bring it back to that value you can teach about. My environmentalism nmenta is all based on educational endpoints. I’ve never needed to be outside to be a go good educator. Good education happens everywhere. Don Burgess, an accomplished field biologist gist and Institute instructor, is on the faculty at Western Washington University versity in the Science, Math, Engineering and Technology Education Department. artment.

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Don B Don Burgess

Treetop Forest Ecology with Wind River Canopy Crane KEN BIBLE AND CINDY UPDEGRAVE September 7–8 (Sun-Mon) Wind River Research Forest

Join the Institute for a field excursion to the Columbia River Gorge area and explore temperate forest ecology from the ground up, starting from the roots in the soil to the airy crown. Under the leadership of Ken Bible, scientist and site director, we’ll take to the Wind River Canopy Crane for an exclusive lift high into the sky, observing the old-growth canopy from the perspective of a soaring raven. Th The architecture and personality of the forest look very different indeed from 285 feet above the earth! Short day hikes in into the surrounding forests will allow us to compare natural n forests with intensely managed ones by looking at physiography, structure and function, biogeography and history. Cynthia Updegrave, protégé of Estella Leopold

1C/12 $250

with training in botany, ecology and environmental history, will teach us techniques for reading the interwoven story of the landscape. Together, we’ll discover why the trees in the area are so big, how old-growth forests might react to global warming and why lowly fungi are critical to the survival of Doug Fir giants. Featured in National Geographic and Audubon magazines, the Wind River Canopy Crane has the most extensive research program of any crane operating in the world today and is the world’s second tallest—now is your chance to take advantage of this rare opportunity to get to know the forest from a new perspective. We’ll stay at the site’s bunkhouses near Carson and prepare our own meals.


2008 Registration Information

Women’s Fly-Fishing Escape PAT BOLTON September 20–21 (Sat-Sun) Cady Lake Manor

1CP/12CH $ 350

Baffled by flies? Tangled up over the idea of knots? Treat yourself to a weekend of relaxation at Cady Lake Manor on the Kitsap Peninsula while learning to fly-fish in an atmosphere of encouragement, support and camaraderie. Over the weekend, we’ll come to appreciate the contemplative craft of fly-fishing while exploring a private 15-acre lake that is stewarded for fly-fishing. Pat Bolton, an expert guide who has flyfished for more than 30 years, will cover basic skills including choosing the right equipment, reading water, selecting appropriate flies, tying knots and landing fish. Last but not least, we’ll dedicate plenty of time to practice the subtle art of casting. In the evening, we’ll relax, listen to presentations and enjoy one another’s company. Breakfast is provided both days and dinner is provided Saturday. More info about our special accommodations at www.cadylake.com/manor.

20% first-timer discount Our first-timer discount applies to new participants in adult programs that cost $100 or more per person. Offer does not apply to Family Getaways and may not be combined with other discounts or scholarships. Maximum discount is $75. If registering for multiple programs, discount will be applied to most expensive course. Standard cancellation policy applies.

Cancellations If a registration is cancelled 21 days or more before a program starts, we will refund the tuition minus a registration fee. Fees are $25 for tuition of $99 or less; $50 for $100-299; $75 for $300-799; $125 for $800 or more. Cancellations received less than 21 days before the start of a program will not receive a refund. If we are forced to cancel a program, participants will receive a full refund or transfer option.

Academic credit and clock hours Many Institute classes are offered for optional academic credit through Western Washington University. The number of credits available is listed near the title of each seminar preceded by a “C.” (“CP” denotes credits

pending approval.) WWU will bill you $48/ credit. The Institute is approved by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to grant teachers clock hour certification. The number of clock hours available appears with a clock symbol near the title of each seminar. The Institute will bill you $3.50/ clock hour.

Adult Learning Center and Field Excursion programs are for adults only. Youth ages 14-17 may sometimes participate, pending approval by the program coordinator prior to registration. Approved minors must be accompanied by a responsible, participating adult.

Scholarships

Risk and responsibility

Scholarship funds are available for students, teachers, seniors over 60, environmental educators, conservation professionals and low-income participants. Applications are available online or by phone.

Our programs are conducted in the field; participants should be in good physical condition and prepared to spend full days outdoors. We may encounter insects, inclement weather and other unpredictable circumstances. Participants assume full responsibility for their own safety and must provide their own health and accident insurance. You will be required to sign a health/risk and holdharmless waiver before the course begins. Please read and follow pre-trip letter recommendations carefully.

Accommodations and meals Accommodations range from our Learning Center and private lodges to campgrounds. See class descriptions for details. The Learning Center has three guest lodges, each with shared gender-specific bathrooms and showers. Guest rooms contain one twin bed and a set of twin bunk beds and pricing varies according to the sleeping arrangements —see class description for rates. Participants are asked to bring their own bedding and towels. Overnight accommodations are for paid registrants only. We cannot accommodate pets or unregistered guests. Delicious, healthy meals incorporating local and organic food are provided for paid registrants in Learning Center programs. If you have special dietary requirements or food allergies, we will gladly attempt to accommodate them with advance notice. Participants in Field Excursions are responsible for their own food and lodging unless otherwise specified.

Children

Backpacking Participants in backpacking classes must be in good physical condition, have previous experience and provide their own gear and food. You must be able to carry a full pack, weighing 50 pounds, for an average of 4-6 hours/day. The exception is “Ross Lake by Boat and Boot.”Group success in a backcountry experience is dependent upon how well each individual is prepared. Your class letter will have an itinerary and a list of essential items. Anyone not appropriately equipped may not be allowed to participate and no refund will be issued.

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Register online at ncascades.org or by phone at (360) 856-5700 ext. 209. Mail-in registration forms are available online. Online registration is not available for Family Getaways. Tuition is on a per-person basis and includes a non-refundable registration fee (see Cancellations below). No discounts for alternative lodging. Attendance is for paid registrants only.

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Registration and Tuition


LIVE, LE A RN A N D TE A C H I N T H E N O RTH C A S C A D E S

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MASTER’S OF EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAM SPEND A ONE-YEAR RESIDENCY AT THE NORTH CASCADES ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING CENTER IN NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK

STUDY WITH THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST’S BEST EDUCATORS, NATURALISTS AND CONSERVATION LEADERS

EARN YOUR MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND CERTIFICATE IN LEADERSHIP AND NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION WHILE OBTAINING VALUABLE HANDS-ON WORK EXPERIENCE

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Working in partnership

with Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University, North Cascades Institute offers an integrated Master of Education program that blends leadership and nonprofit administration, curriculum development and instructional strategies, natural and cultural history, and residential program operations. The professional residency at the Institute is the only one of its kind that is fully integrated into a degree program. Students are accepted into WWU and the Institute residency simultaneously, and hands-on teaching experience, combined with academic courses taught by Huxley College faculty, complement each other throughout the program. After completion of the two-year program, students receive a Master of Education degree from WWU and a Certificate in Leadership and Nonprofit Administration from the Institute. When you complete the Institute’s integrated MEd program, you are ready for doors to open to your new career!


more information at www.ncascades.org/graduate

Graduate Spotlight: Class of 2006

Meghan Peot

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North Cascades Institute’s Grad Program taught me about the essential components of educational program coordination in the nonprofit sector. Through professional experience, it illustrated the necessary components of program implementation. It prepared me to manage the less-than-ideal circumstances that are a reality of this job. These challenges included low enrollment, budget issues and risk-management situations. These skills allow me to confidently seek out new and groundbreaking opportunities for my programs, while building the necessary partnerships to sustain our success.

I co-led the 2007 “Leading the Way” Andes Trek, a unique program that paired blind and visually impaired students with their sighted peers as guides in the Cordillera Huayhuash in the Peruvian Andes. All “Leading the Way” programs focus on culture, science and leadership and include a service project in the travel destination. This group of students planted 200 trees for a highland Andean village to be used for erosion control and firewood.

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© CH R IST I A N M A RT I N

Program Coordinator for Students with Disabilities, Global Explorers ; www.globalexplorers.org

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“WHEN I WENT TO MOUNTAIN SCHOOL, SOMETHING INSIDE ME CHANGED. ALL THAT TIME I WAS THERE, I FELT MUCH BETTER AND MORE HEALTHIER INSIDE. THAT FEELS GREAT.” ~5TH GRADE STUDENT, BELLINGHAM more information and video tour at www.ncascades.org/school

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nature and educated in the natural sciences gain a valuable connection that will serve them their whole lives. Mountain School, which has served more than 12,000 children since 1989, is our nationally recognized residential environmental education program offered in cooperation with North Cascades National Park. Mountain School students come to the North Cascades for three days and two nights with their school class to learn about ecosystems, scientific investigation, geology and the natural and cultural history of the mountains through hands-on, experiential-based activities. In 2007, Mountain School served more than 1,350 4th–12th grade students and 130 adults from Methow Valley, Anacortes, Mount Vernon, Highline, Ferndale, Tukwila, Clover Park, Bellingham and Seattle— thanks to the opening of the North Cascades

©ERIC DUSTRUDE

Environmental Leaning Center, a 128 percent increase compared to 2004! North Cascades Institute offers Mountain School programs for upper elementary through high school students at our Environmental Learning Center, a wilderness campus located on the shores of Diablo Lake that includes wellequipped classrooms and labs, a library and experienced staff and hike leaders. Mountain School students come with their classmates, teachers and chaperones to learn why Northwest mountains are important to our plants and wildlife, our rivers and sea, and our communities and cultures. A unique network of trails and shelters surrounding the Learning Center provide quick and easy access to the surrounding wilderness and incredible outdoor learning opportunities. Participants stay in guest lodges and fresh, delicious and nutritious meals featuring local, fresh foods are served in the lakeside dining hall.

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BRIN G Y O U R C L A S S R O O M TO THE M O U NTA I NS

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MOUNTAIN SCHOOL

North Cascades Institute believes children exposed to


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In our popular

Eagle Watchers and Mountain Stewards programs are trained in the natural history of eagles, salmon, the Skagit watershed, mountain ecosystems, Leave No Trace practices and skills on how to teach these topics to the general public. Stewards are asked to volunteer 20–40 hours during the winter or summer months and provide valuable education for visitors to our state’s public lands.

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION HELPS CHILDREN AND ADULTS DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE, VALUES AND SKILLS TO MEET PRESENT-DAY NEEDS WITHOUT COMPROMISING THE WELL-BEING OF FUTURE GENERATIONS. A GREAT EXAMPLE OF LOCAL HANDS-ON LEARNING IS MOUNTAIN SCHOOL, AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM DEVELOPED BY NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE THAT HAS SERVED —REP. DAVE QUALL STUDENTS SINCE 1989.

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VOLUNTEER STEWARDS

more information at www.ncascades.org/stewards

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SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAMS When you enroll in an Institute program, your tuition dollars go toward helping us connect hundreds of young people more closely with the natural world. If you are interested in sponsoring one of our innovative youth programs, contact Kris Molesworth at (360) 856-5700 ext. 275.

ŠAMY BROWN

SCIENC E , STE WA RDSHIP A N D C O M M U N ITY IN THE N O R T H C A SC A D E S

more information at www.ncascades.org/youth

North Cascades Wild is a backcountry canoe and conservation service program for underserved youth on Ross Lake in North Cascades National Park. During the course of 12 life-changing days, high school students from the Seattle area and Skagit County complete service projects, learn Leave No Trace, outdoor and leadership skills and study wilderness, stewardship and the natural and cultural history of the region. This is a partnership program between the Institute, Student Conservation Association and the National Park Service. { 40 }


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a pilot program in partnership with the Forest Service that engages youth from one of the Skagit Valley’s most diverse neighborhoods in a variety of activities including field trips and afternoon activities. As many of the children know the Institute through their participation in Mountain School, these neighborhood excursions provide meaningful connection to the outdoors that builds on their environmental educational experiences.

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© E R I N P ET T I T

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Kulshan Creek Neighborhood project is

Girls on Ice

is a one-of-a-kind program for teenage girls that combines leadership, mountaineering and science during 10 amazing days on Mt. Baker’s Easton Glacier. By investigating glacial processes in the field as members of a research expedition, young women have a rare opportunity to feel at home in the wilderness while experiencing the Northwest environment under the guidance of professional female glaciologists and mountaineers.

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NOR T H CASCADES ENV IR ONM ENTAL LEAR NING CENT ER

Grant Writing in the North Cascades 24CH/1CP

Bring your group

to the North Cascades and host a group meeting or retreat at the Learning Center. Our unique field campus inspires reflection, understanding and connection to the natural world, as well as to each other.

Group rentals include: © J ESSE K I NSM A N

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Are you a nonprofit professional looking to improve your grant-writing skills? Or a teacher interested in securing funding to make those unfunded classroom improvements? Many nonprofit and government agencies rely heavily on grant funding and, in turn, the people who write those grants. With this in mind, North Cascades Institute and the Northwest Educational Service District (NWESD) have teamed up to offer a four-day intensive grantwriting course that will give you the knowledge, skills and tools necessary to identify funding sources, articulate agency needs and write compelling grants that will rise to the top. The class will offer some training specific to the environmental field, but the majority of the sessions will apply to all aspects of competitive grant funding. In addition to great learning and networking opportunities, you’ll stay at the Learning Center, where you can relax in our guest lodges, savor the vibrant cuisine of Chef Charles Claassen and have opportunities to paddle the waters of Diablo Lake or hike the many campus trails. You’ll draw inspiration from your wilderness surroundings as well as from interaction with like-minded people intent on saving the world. Eric Chambers has more than 10 years experience writing and winning successful grants. Susan Howlett has been assisting organizations to raise money in the Northwest and nationally for more than 30 years. The class includes three days instruction and three nights lodging at the Learning Center as well as a follow-up session July 25 at the NWESD headquarters in Anacortes.

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GROUP RENTALS

$ 450

» Lodging for as many as 69 guests » Delicious catering with local and organic food » Conference rooms, trailside shelters and a library » Internet access, projectors and other supplies » Naturalist-led activities like canoeing and hiking exclusive to your group

» Inspiring community of green living and sustainable practices The Learning Center primarily serves as a home for North Cascades Institute’s educational programs. However, as our calendar allows, we meet the needs of groups who want to experience the North Cascades through their own retreats and meetings. Conference fees help subsidize our youth education programs and scholarships for low-income participants. © S COT T B A B CO C K

ERIC CHAMBERS WITH SUSAN HOWLETT June 15–18 (Sun-Wed) Learning Center

rates, booking and other information at www.ncascades.org/ grouprentals or by calling (360) 856-5700 ext. 212


Your support makes our work possible. Return this form to North Cascades Institute, call us at (360) 856 5700 ext. 209 or donate online at www.ncascades.org/give

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C O NSER VE AN D RESTORE NO RTHW E ST E NVIRO NM ENTS

share our flagship program,

Mountain School, where children explore North Cascades wildlands up close with their classmates, teachers and chaperones. Children who attend show greater appreciation for their environment and improved attitudes toward classroom learning and teamwork. Mountain School is a life-changing experience for today’s youth.

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inspire teenage girls to be leaders and scientists through Girls on Ice, which combines leadership, mountaineering and science. Based on the Easton Glacier in the North Cascades, it is led by professional female glaciologists and mountain guides, and helps girls feel at home in the wilderness while gaining a new appreciation for science. Your financial support will help all qualifying girls participate regardless of their ability to pay.

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HELP US

Please consider a gift to North Cascades Institute and join our mission to conserve and restore Northwest environments through education. Your support will help us:

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introduce low-income, inner-city youth to the magic of wild places through our new North Cascades Wild. Led by experienced naturalists and wilderness guides, teenagers camp, canoe, hike and participate in the restoration of hiking trails and native plant sites. It’s a powerful way for young people to learn more about their public lands, each other and themselves.

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If you believe

direct experience in the natural world inspires change, please make a contribution to North Cascades Institute. Help a generation of young people step outside.

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INSTITUTE INSTRUCTORS JIM ALT, a longtime “wet-sider” in Corkindale, leads the Northwest Interpretive Association’s bookstores in North Cascades National Park and conducts eagle counts for the Nature Conservancy. PAUL BANNICK is naturalist and photographer specializing in the wildlife of North America. After a 15-year career in the software industry, Paul dove into photography to fulfill his passion for wilderness conservation. Widely published in books and magazines, Paul’s first book The Owl and The Woodpecker will be available from The Mountaineers Books in October 2008. In addition to working as a professional photographer, Paul serves as the director of development for Conservation Northwest. www.paulbannick.com

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Canopy Crane Research Facility overseeing longterm studies in forest ecosystem structure and function. depts.washington.edu/wrccrf

BRETT BAUNTON is an award-winning landscape photographer whose work has been published in magazines such as National Geographic, National Wildlife, Wilderness and Backpacker. A Seattle native, he lives in Bellingham operating his longtime scanning and printing business, ArtScan. www.brettbaunton.com, www.artscan.com

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CLARK BLAKE grew up in the San Francisco Bay area and attended U.C. Berkeley and Stanford University. He worked for the U.S. Geological Survey as a research geologist for more than 40 years. He has been interested in birds since childhood and leads field trips and bird population surveys in Washington and Arizona. PAT BOLTON has served as president and board member of the Northwest Women Flyfishers organization. She fly-fishes all over the world, from wading in Alaskan rivers to floating trout streams in Australia to saltwater-fishing in Mexico to surffishing in California. ERIC CHAMBERS is the development officer at the Northwest Educational Service District and holds an adjunct teaching position at Western Washington University, where he teaches nonprofit management, program planning, research and grant writing. CHARLES CLAASSEN is the Institute’s chef, foodservice manager and Foodshed Project leader. He has led professional kitchens for more than 15 years. An avid alpinist and certified climbing instructor, Charles lives on campus at the foot of Sourdough Mountain with his wife and two daughters. GERRY COOK is the most senior employee at North Cascades National Park, having worked on Ross Lake since before the park’s creation in 1968. He is an accomplished artist and naturalist, captain of the Ross Mule and has served as a fire lookout throughout the North Cascades range.

fine arts, traditional calligraphy and contemporary lettering design. When not working on assignments for diverse clients such as Nordstrom, Seattle Chocolate and Edmonds Community College, she delights in creating personal artworks and sketching. www.jocelyncurry.com

Klein Partnership, is the architect of the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center. He has spent more than 30 years designing sustainable homes and public buildings.

MARK DARRACH is a geologist and botanist with years of technical experience in plant taxonomy and plant ecology research in the Pacific Northwest and the western United States. Mark’s idea of a good time is hiking through the desert during wildflower season, searching for native plants.

RALPH HAUGERUD, coauthor of Geology of the North Cascades: A Mountain Mosaic, is a research geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey at the University of Washington. From the Columbia Basin to Puget Sound, his maps tell fascinating stories about some of the most unique and complex landforms in the world, including the geology of Bainbridge Island and Salish lowlands.

BENJAMIN DRUMMOND is a Seattle-based freelance photojournalist currently working on a longterm project, Facing Climate Change, to illustrate the impacts of climate change through profiles of people around the globe. From 2003 until 2006, he worked as the marketing coordinator for North Cascades Institute. www.bendrum.com

MOLLY HASHIMOTO is an artist and teacher who connects students of all ages with nature through watercolor workshops. In addition to many years with North Cascades Institute, she has taught at the Haystack Institute, Sitka Center for Art and Ecology and Yellowstone Association Institute. www.mollyhashimoto.com

DAVE ENGEBRETSON is a longtime Whatcom County resident and geology professor at Western Washington University. His innovative course on using sound to study earth sciences at Western was the first of its kind.

PHILIP HIGUERA is a National Parks Ecological Research Fellow at Montana State University with interests in long-term forest history, climate, fire and vegetation. His research has taken him from the forests of Western Washington to the Brooks Range of Alaska.

CLYDE W. FORD writes aboard his Bellinghambased 30-foot biodiesel trawler. He won the 2006 Independent Publisher Award for best mystery/ thriller and was a nominee for the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation 2006 Legacy Award for his series of nautical thrillers set in the San Juan Islands. www.clydeford.com KRISTOFER GILJE is the facilities manager for the Learning Center. Prior to arriving on campus in 2007, he served as operations manager for Holden Village, a Lutheran retreat center in the North Cascades.

SUSAN BENNERSTROM is a full-time artist whose work has been featured in solo shows in Seattle, New York, Los Angeles, Portland, Santa Fe, San Francisco and Ireland.

MARIA CORYELL-MARTIN is an “expeditionary artist” based in Seattle who explores polar and glaciated regions to witness and record climate change through art. Maria works with oils, pen, ink, watercolor and gouache, adding vodka to her paints to lower their freezing point. www.expeditionaryart.com.

JENNIFER HAHN is a Bellingham-based writer, naturalist and well-seasoned kayak guide. Her awardwinning book Spirited Waters: Soloing South Through the Inside Passage recounts her 750-mile solo kayak trip through the Inside Passage from Alaska to Washington.

DR. KEN BIBLE is site director for the Wind River

JOCELYN CURRY, a Seattle native, is trained in the

DAVID HALL, partner in charge for the Henry

KURT HOELTING is a wilderness guide, meditation teacher and commercial fisherman. A long time student of Zen meditation, Kurt has a special affinity for exploring the places where human nature and wild nature meet. www.insidepassages.com HOLLY HUGHES has taught writing at Edmonds Community College for 20 years, as well as naturewriting workshops at the Olympic Park Institute and Stillwaters Environmental Education Center. She has spent the last 28 summers working on a variety of boats in Alaska and living in a log cabin built in the 1930s. Her chapbook, Boxing the Compass, was recently published by Floating Bridge Press. JIM JOHANNESSEN of Coastal Geologic Services Inc. in Bellingham, specializes in beach processes, coastal erosion mitigation and applied coastal management. He has designed projects for beach


nourishment, sediment bypassing at channels and other methods to reduce coastal erosion throughout Puget Sound and the Northwest straits.

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TIM MANNS is an avid birder and naturalist who recently retired as Chief of Interpretation for North Cascades National Park. A recipient of the National Park Service’s prestigious Sequoia Award in 2003, Tim helped design the Learning Center, forged an outreach program for the Skagit Valley’s Latino community and served on a national task force to create a wilderness education program.

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JOHN MARZLUFF is an assistant professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington College of Forest Resources. His work has included research on corvids and birds of prey, long-term studies of urbanization on songbirds in the Seattle area, recreation and forest fragmentation on the Olympic Peninsula and endangered species conservation.

TIM MCNULTY is one of the Northwest’s best poets, naturalists and teachers. His titles include Pawtracks, In Blue Mountain Dusk, Reflected Light and, most recently, Through High Still Air: A Season at Sourdough Mountain. A resident of Sequim, Tim occasionally writes for the Seattle Times and is currently updating his book Olympic National Park: A Natural History. BOB MIERENDORF has been an archaeologist and anthropologist with North Cascades

©BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

MEGAN MCGINTY is the Institute’s Community Programs naturalist and coordinates the Girls on Ice program and field excursions. With more than 20 years of experience of teaching in the outdoors, she has guided in Mt. Rainer, the Florida Everglades, Patagonia, Costa Rica and the North Cascades, and has conducted field research in glacier monitoring, raptor migration and black swift nesting sites.

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phy in the North Cascades and he is currently studying the eruptive history of Mt. Baker and mapping the volcanic rocks near Ross Lake. He is a resident of Bellingham, retired mountaineering guide and occasional instructor at Western Washington University.

National Park for more than 20 years. One of the few experts in alpine archaeology. Bob has taught field seminars since 1986, emphasizing the historical and universal connections all people have with their environment.

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DAVE MOSKOWITZ is a longtime animal tracker, field researcher and backcountry guide. He serves as lead instructor for tracking programs at Wilderness Awareness School and manages the Cascade Wildlife Monitoring Project.

of the upper Skagit Valley, Paula is passionate about wild rivers and mountains, salmon and songbirds. An ardent hiker and gardener, she teaches regularly in youth, family and adult programs, where she’s known affectionately as “Ranger Paula.”

JEFF MUSE, our Learning Center director and backpacking beatnik, is a transplanted Hoosier who fell in love with Cascadia 20 years ago. With 10 years at the Institute, Jeff oversees programs and operations at our field campus when he’s not rambling with his rucksack or paddling down the Skagit.

DENNIS PAULSON is the former director of the Slater Museum of Natural History at the University of Puget Sound. With decades of field experience, he has researched birds and dragonflies, taught countless classes on wildlife, ecology and evolution and authored more than 70 scientific papers and a half-dozen books, including Shorebirds of the Pacific Northwest, Dragonflies of Washington and Alaska: The Ecotravelers’ Wildlife Guide.

NICHOLAS O’CONNELL is the author of On Sacred Ground: The Spirit of Place in Pacific Northwest Literature and At the Field’s End: Interviews with 22 Pacific Northwest Writers. He has contributed to Newsweek, Outside, Condé Nast Traveler, Food and Wine, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sierra, and other publications. Nick also teaches writing classes from Seattle for www.thewritersworkshop.net. PAULA OGDEN-MUSE is a National Park Service educator with more than 20 years in the North Cascades as a wilderness ranger, interpreter and naturalist. A longtime resident { 46 }

MARK TURNER is a freelance editorial photographer specializing in botanical subjects, especially Northwest wildflowers and gardens. He is a member of the native plant societies of Washington and Oregon and his last book, Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest, was selected as a 2007 American Horticultural Society Book Award recipient.

©BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

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LIBBY MILLS is a wildlife biologist and artist who has studied birds for nearly 40 years. She has taught natural history from Alaska to Baja to Costa Rica, recording the sights and sounds of nature in field journals, sketchbooks and on audiotape. Her illustrations can be seen in many publications including A Guide to Bird Finding in Washington and Wildflowers of Glacier Bay and Southeast Alaska.

SUSAN PRICHARD is a forest ecologist working for the Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Laboratory. A resident of the Methow Valley, she has spent most of her life in Washington State studying forests with a focus on the effects of fire and other disturbances on forest dynamics. JON RIEDEL is a National Park Service geologist working throughout the region on glacier monitoring and managing geologic hazards, floodplains and erosion control. A longtime

resident of the upper Skagit Valley, Jon has studied Northwest climate change for nearly 30 years. ADAM RUSSELL is the Learning Center’s naturalist. An inspired athlete and aspiring mountaineer, Adam earned a BS in Biology from Trinity University in Texas and spent time conducting field research in the Amazon, Galapagos Islands, Andes and North Cascades. BARBARA SJOHOLM, travel and mystery writer, novelist, memoirist and translator, lives on the Olympic Peninsula. She has taught writing at Richard Hugo House in Seattle, the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference, Haystack in Oregon and the Whidbey Island Writers’ Conference. Her books include Incognito Street: How Travel Made Me a Writer and The Palace of the Snow Queen: Winter Travels in Lapland. HANNAH SULLIVAN, a registered nurse and yoga instructor, splits time between Bellingham and the upper Skagit Valley when she’s not traveling the globe with her husband Gerry. She is an eager paddler, hiker and cross-country skier. DAVE TUCKER researches volcanic stratigra-

CYNTHIA UPDEGRAVE has a MS in Biology Teaching from the University of Washington and has training in botany, ecology, environmental history and restoration Ecology. Working closely with Estella Leopold for many years has grounded her in the historic and biogeographical aspects of regional floras. DANA VISALLI is a field botanist specializing in rare plant species. As director of the Methow Biodiversity Project, he coordinates a biological inventory of the Methow River watershed and publishes The Methow Naturalist, a seasonal natural history journal. Dana is the author of Northwest Dryland Wildflowers, Sagebrush-Ponderosa, Northwest Coastal Wildflowers and Northwest Mountain Wildflowers. SAUL WEISBERG is executive director and cofounder of North Cascades Institute. He has worked throughout the Northwest as a field biologist, fire lookout, commercial fisherman and climbing ranger. Saul is president of the board of the Environmental Education Association of Washington, adjunct faculty at Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University and on the board of directors of the Association of Nature Center Administrators. Saul lives in Bellingham with his wife and two daughters and is an avid

paddler, hiker and bug-watcher. SHELLEY WEISBERG is a talented field botanist who delights in teaching the wonders of native plants. She has studied plant communities throughout Washington, coordinated early plant restoration projects for North Cascades National Park and worked at local nurseries for many years. Shelley is the owner of Moonstone Garden Design, specializing in native plants and environmentally responsible practices. RUSS WEISER is the sustainable design coordinator for the Henry Klein Partnership. Before studying architecture, he was on the faculty at Virginia Tech, studying how plants respond to their physical environment. His passion is combining architecture and biology to design beautiful buildings that don’t stress the natural environment. LEE WHITFORD is an Institute naturalist and coordinates our Stewardship programs. In 2004, she earned her MEd in Environmental Education through our Graduate Residency program with Western Washington University. Now that her children are grown, Lee resides in Bellingham and can be found out and about collecting fungi, observing sea creatures, studying rocks or enjoying life. DAVID B. WILLIAMS is a freelance natural history writer and the author of The StreetSmart Naturalist: Field Notes from Seattle. At present, he is working on a book about the cultural and natural history of building stone from around the United States; Stories in Stone will be published by Walker and Co. in 2009. www.streetsmartnaturalist.com. KENT WOODRUFF is a naturalist and wildlife biologist with the Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forest. His classroom is where you can smell and hear and feel the subjects under investigation, and his favorite subjects are birds, bats and butterflies.


© LA R A SW I MME R

INSTITUTE ANNUAL PICNIC

MAY 31 AT THE LEARNING CENTER Don’t miss our annual picnic at the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center on Saturday, May 31. You’ll enjoy a free day at our field campus with sustainability tours, children’s activities, naturalist walks, canoe trips, a picnic buffet and live music. Find out more about the Institute and our many diverse programs at this popular annual event. more information at www.ncascades.org/events

COVER ART: North Umpqua Creek, 2000, oil on linen, 13 x 16 inches. This year’s cover art has bittersweet meaning. It is a painting by the late John Cole, who died in 2007 at the peak of his career. Permission to reproduce this fine piece was graciously extended to us by his widow, Lucille Cole, and Lisa Harris Gallery, which represents his work. (You can find more of his work at www. lisaharrisgallery.com.)

Cole’s death was a daunting loss to the Bellingham community, where he had so many friends and admirers, and to the art world at large. He was a painter in the best regional sense: his work resonates with a spirit of “place” that can only come from intimate, up-close observation of the Northwest landscape. Cole’s work will retain its meaning to viewers for generations to come because it is real: there is no doubt he fished those streams and walked those trails we see in his paintings. John Cole stepped out of the studio, into the natural world around him and we are better for it. We hope his work will inspire you to do the same. —Kris Ekstrand Molesworth NOTE: John Cole’s work is featured in The Pacific Northwest: A Painted History (Sasquatch) and 100 Artists of the West Coast (Schiffler Publishing). His work was showcased in a major retrospective at the Whatcom Museum

of History and Art in 2003 and the exhibition catalog, John Cole: The Enduring Northwest Landscape, is distributed by University of Washington Press. ARTISTS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS: We are also grateful to have the opportunity to reproduce the artwork of Molly Hashimoto, Maria Coryell-Martin, Susan Bennerstrom, Libby Mills and Jocelyn Curry, and the photography of Brett Baunton, Paul Bannick, Benj Drummond, Douglas Ogle, Hsiao-Ching Chou, John Scurlock, John Suiter, Lara Swimmer, Mark Turner, Paul Anderson, Phil Fenner, Jesse Kinsman, Carl Molesworth and staff and graduate students. Thanks to Jeff Jewell and the Whatcom Museum of History and Art for the archival photos of Whatcom Creek and to the Wind River Canopy Crane Research Forest for images of the crane. Thanks also to Saul Weisberg and Jenny Cloutier for allowing us to photograph their bug and rock collections.

FACING CLIMATE CHANGE: Benjamin Drummond is a Seattlebased freelance photojournalist and graphic designer. Sara Joy Steele is an independent writer and producer. They’ve collaborate on many projects including The Dipper’s Attitude: Conversations with Northwest Naturalists, an ongoing collection of profiles that explore who Northwest naturalists are, how they attend to the natural world and why that matters. They are currently at work on Facing Climate Change, a documentary project about the human impacts of climate change. See back cover and learn more at www.facingclimatechange.org. COPYRIGHT: All rights reserved. Art, photo and poetry copyrights remain with creators and are used by permission.

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EDITOR: Christian Martin www.moontrolling.com DESIGN & ILLUSTRATION: Jesse Kinsman kinsmancreative.com PHOTO ADVISOR: Carolyn Waters LEAD WRITERS: Jeff Muse and Megan McGinty PRINTING: Lithtex Northwest www.lithtex.com

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Catalog Credits


the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex, a sprawling reserve that includes North Cascades National Park and the Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation areas. North Cascades Institute celebrates this milestone in the ongoing story of these mountains, and salutes the many people who, over the past century, have championed their protection, appreciation and stewardship. The North Cascades were a challenging landscape to protect, in part because of their complexity, ruggedness and remoteness. They were “too big to fit handily into an urban imagination,” wrote Harvey Manning in his history of conservation in the North Cascades, Wilderness Alps:

HAPPY 40TH BIRTHDAY

“A Puget Sounder of the genteel class, which invented and fostered the notion of national parks, could wrap his mind around the compact uplift of the Olympic Mountains and the grand unity of Mount Rainier, but not until far into the twentieth century did the genteel mind expand sufficiently to embrace the 13,000-odd square miles of America’s ‘wilderness alps,’ extending north from Stevens Pass to Canada, and nearly from saltwater to sagebrush.”

NOR TH C A SC A DE S NATIO N A L PA RK!

© N O RT H C A SC A D ES I NST I T UT E

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This year marks

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Besides, with names like Forbidden, Torment and Despair, these mountains suffered a public perception problem, or, in contemporary parlance, “branding issues.” One of the cultural shifts that began to change public opinion of the worthiness of lasting protection for the North Cascades was the rise of “wilderness thinking”—the intrinsic value and integrity of wild nature. In the face of a national religion of progress, resource extraction and industrialism, a few brave voices called out for deeper consideration of how we think of and care for the non-human world. Early visionaries like John Muir, Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson helped to develop an eco-centric American land ethic, and the seeds they planted later bloomed into the poetry of Gary Snyder, the activism of David Brower, and the Wilderness Act of 1964. When President Johnson signed the North Cascades Act on October 2, 1968, flanked by Senator Henry M. Jackson, Interior Secretary Stewart Udall and members of the North Cascades Conservation Council, he did more than create new administrative borders around a landscape. He legitimized the passionate arguments made by those speaking a word for wilderness. North Cascades National Park is special in that it was created and is maintained primarily for the benefit of untamed nature. “It is clear to me that wilderness is the DNA of the park,” observes Park Superintendent Chip Jenkins, “and it is critical to appreciate and understand the value of

this wild nature.” This brings to mind another important achievement worthy of commemoration in 2008: the 20th anniversary of the Washington Wilderness Park Act of 1988. Its passage provided wilderness status to 93 percent of the Complex and 99 percent to the Park proper. North Cascades National Park is the wild heart of seven million acres of protected public lands that span an international border, national forests, recreation areas and provincial parks. The Stephen Mather Wilderness forms “the core of one of the wildest, largest and least altered ecosystems remaining in North America,” according to the National Park Service. Representing more than a beautiful landscape rimmed by political borders, North Cascades National Park is the expression of a culture that honors something more than human, that makes room for other creatures and creates space for ancient processes of the planet to continue their quiet work unhindered. The park is a living monument to the diverse community of environmentalists, mountain climbers, business owners, politicians and nature lovers who struggled to preserve this place, and to those who work to better understand and protect its wilderness today. The efforts to sustain the vision of a North Cascadian land ethic continues to this day. North Cascades Institute salutes those who continue to speak and care for the mountains. Here at the Institute, our work is connecting people to the wonders of this wilderness while reveling in the details of this particular place. Also vital are the boaters, backpackers, day hikers, families, birders, mountaineers, and campers who enjoy it today, “taking only pictures, leaving only footprints.” It is up to an engaged citizenry to voice support for neighboring landscapes and to continue our proud heritage of speaking up for the forces of nature that don’t have a vote. It is up to us to face the challenges of climate change head-on—both personal and political—so that the glaciers of the North Cascades, the Skagit, Sauk, Cascade, Stehekin, and Methow rivers and countless creeks and waterfalls are given the opportunity to continue their slow and vital work. As we celebrate the birthday of North Cascades National Park, we look forward to fostering ever-increasing appreciation and understanding of this singularly special landscape, from the depths of Lake Chelan to the summit of Hozomeen. Working together, we can nurture this intimacy, celebrate these stony spires, forested valleys and cascading creeks and pass them on to our children. ~CHRISTIAN MARTIN


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The east peak of Mount Fury, the Picket Range and a distant Glacier Peak. Photo by John Scurlock, who will be the Institute’s Sourdough Speaker at the Learning Center on April 26-27. See page 9 for details. { 49 }


PEOPLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE FROM THE NORDIC COUNTRIES TO THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

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A multimedia presentation and panel discussion at Seattle’s REI, April 22, 7-9 PM Celebrate Earth Day with us! Join photographer Benjamin Drummond and writer Sara Joy Steele for a multimedia presentation that explores how three Nordic communities are adjusting to climate change. Learn about volunteer glacier monitors in Iceland, Sámi reindeer herdsmen from Norway and fishermen of the North Atlantic. Then, bring it all home in a discussion with local climate experts Nate Mantua, a research scientist with the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group, and Cliff Mass, an UW atmospheric scientist regularly heard on KUOW’s Weekday and author of the forthcoming book The Weather of the Pacific Northwest. Co-sponsored by REI, Nordic Heritage Museum, Blue Earth Alliance and Glazer’s Camera. information at www.ncascades.org/events


Summer 2008