Issuu on Google+

connec t ing peopl e, na t u r e a nd communi t y t hrough educ at ion since 19 8 6

08

NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE SPRING& SUM M ER

FA L L A N D W I N T E R

09

JOIN US FOR SKAGIT VALLEY BIRDING EXCURSIONS, FAMILY FIELD TRIPS, NORTHWEST MUSHROOMING, MT. BAKER SNOWSHOEING, ART AND WRITING RETREATS, FLY FISHING, A COSTA RICA ADVENTURE, GARY SNYDER IN SEATTLE AND MUCH MORE!


© PA U L B A N N I C K

The Owl and the Woodpecker: The Photography of Paul Bannick WHATCOM MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND ART, BELLINGHAM Nov 6 (Thurs), 7–9 pm

FREE

Join us at Bellingham’s Whatcom Museum for an evening of stunning bird images and stories from the field with Seattle-based photographer and naturalist Paul Bannick as we celebrate the release of his new book The Owl And the Woodpecker: Encounters with North America’s Most Iconic Birds. Paul will treat us to a slideshow featuring compelling images from the book, which profiles 41 species of owls and woodpeckers across 11 habitats. A book signing and reception will follow the slideshow, with healthful catering provided by North Cascades Environmental Learning Center chef, Charles Claassen. information at www.ncascades.org/events


ONE-NIGHT GATHERINGS AT THE LEARNING CENTER information and registration at www.ncascades.org/speakerseries or (360) 856-5700 ext. 209

© C A R O LY N W AT E R S

SOURDOUGH SPEAKER SERIES

PETER JACKSON AND SAUL WEISBERG Sat, Sept 13 This autumn marks the 40th anniversary of the legislation that created North Cascades National Park, a 684,000-acre wilderness full of cascading waterfalls, towering peaks and lush forests. The cultural history of the Park—its people, politics and preservation—has been vibrant, and often as tumultuous and rambunctious as the tumbling landscape itself. This special evening will feature two people with a backpack full of stories to tell about the Park’s history. Peter Jackson, a Northwest writer and conservation activist, is the son of the late Senator Henry M. Jackson, one of Washington State’s most effective and powerful political leaders. He shepherded passage of much of the significant environmental legislation of the 1960s, including bills that led to the establishment of North Cascades National Park. Peter is currently at work on a book about the environmental legacy of his father and the history of Northwest environmentalism. Saul Weisberg started working in North Cascades National Park more than 20 years ago as its first backcountry climbing ranger before starting North Cascades Institute with a group of like-minded park seasonals in 1986. He remains the Institute’s executive director with deep roots in the natural history of the region. Together, these knowledgeable raconteurs will tell the stories behind the scenery—tales of political wranglings, community conflicts and the stunning victory that resulted in one of America’s most remarkable wilderness parks.

Inspired to Nourish: Eating from the Skagit Foodshed ©NELL THORNE

FALL 2008

in the Sourdough Speaker Series takes place at the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center in our lakeside dining hall and features an informal gourmet dinner of local and organic food prepared by our talented culinary staff. A presentation by our guest speakers will follow, with plenty of time for questions, discussion and getting acquainted with others. Your ticket includes overnight accommodations in our comfortable guest lodges as well as a continental breakfast and optional naturalist-led activities the following morning. Dress is casual, of course. Your ticket letter will include travel directions, checkin information and other details. At only $95 per person, this is an excellent, inexpensive way to connect with the Institute this autumn!

© K E L LY O .

Each gathering

© LAU R I E W E R N E R

America’s Alps: Past, Present and Future in North Cascades National Park

CASEY AND SUSAN SCHANEN WITH ANGELA GARBES Sat, Oct 11 Long before sustainable food choices became household buzzwords, Casey and Susan Schanen were quietly building a following of devoted diners at their popular restaurant, La Conner’s Nell Thorne. Chef Casey, raised on a local farm, is an eloquent spokesperson for the food he does best: fresh, organic and raised by attentive small farmers and growers in the Skagit Valley. Together, the Schanens have carved out a reputation for their award-winning restaurant that reaches far beyond the Northwest, yet they remain passionate advocates for the Valley and its abundance of organically grown food. “For our small family, inspiration starts with intent, care and love,” the Schanens explain. “It makes us happy to know that the menu we offer is inspired to nourish.” This evening will feature a celebration of local foods chosen and prepared by the Schanens in partnership with the Institute’s own talented culinary staff. Following dinner, Angela Garbes, food writer for the Stranger and the Seattle Times Pacific Northwest Magazine, will moderate a salon conversation detailing the joys of eating from our foodshed.


of

impressive biodiversity, friendly people and a legendary rainy season. A landscape marked by steaming volcanoes and bubbling hot springs that is home for a good portion of the year to songbirds like the western tanager, olive-sided flycatcher and Swainson’s thrush. Imagine a locale associated with both stunning natural beauty and a rich cup of coffee. Are you thinking of the Pacific Northwest? How about Costa Rica? Even though they seem worlds apart, separated by more than 3,000 miles as the black swift flies, these two regions are interconnected in some very tangible ways. For years, we’ve greeted songbirds in the Skagit Valley and North Cascades as they make their way north for summer breeding. This spring, we’re heading south to see their winter habitat to gain a better understanding of the natural-history story of these neotropical migrants. Led by Costa Rica’s most talented birders, we’ll visit several handpicked hotspots to experience the astoundingly rich array of flora, fauna and culture offered in a relatively small

area. From the cloud forests of the Monteverde Biological Reserve to the highlands of Arenal Volcano, from the lowland Caribbean forests surrounding La Selva Biological Station to a famed birding lodge in foothills of the Talamanca Mountains, this will be a birding expedition you’ll never forget. Your guide for this trip will be neotropical migration expert and environmental artist Libby Mills, who has been leading birding trips for more than 20 years and has traveled up, down and across the Americas in pursuit of the images and sounds of nature that she records by journal and iPod. A published illustrator, Libby is famous for her entertaining presentations, deep ecological knowledge and warm enthusiasm. Accompanying the expedition will be go-to naturalist Megan McGinty. Fluent in Spanish and seasoned in Latin American travel, Megan has led birding and backcountry expeditions in Mexico, Costa Rica and Patagonia. Dates, itinerary and costs are still to be negotiated. If you are interested in the Institute’s second-annual Costa Rica field excursion, contact us.

CALL (360) 856-5700 ext. 209 FOR MORE DETAILS

©SAUL WEISBERG

EXPLORING THE BIODIVERSIT Y OF A SISTER REGION

©SAUL WEISBERG

COSTA RICA

©SAUL WEISBERG

SPRING 2009

©SAUL WEISBERG

Picture a place

Brian Scheuch holds up an old Montezuma Oropendula nest. These resident icterids are one of many exciting species common in Costa Rica.


© D OU G TOM P K I NS

Finding Beauty in a Broken World: An Evening with Terry Tempest Williams OCT 7

Terry Tempest Williams has been called a “citizen writer,” a writer who speaks out eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life and the natural world. A fierce advocate for freedom of speech, passionate environmental activist and trained naturalist, she consistently shows how environmental issues are social issues that become matters of justice. Terry is the author of the environmental classic Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place as well as An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field, The Open Space of Democracy, Red: Passion and Patience in the Desert and the forthcoming Finding Beauty in a Broken World. She is the recipient of the Robert Marshall Award from the Wilderness Society, Lannan and Guggenheim fellowships and was inducted into the Rachel Carson Honor Roll. Terry teaches in the Environmental Humanities program at the University of Utah. Join Seattle Arts & Lectures and North Cascades Institute at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall to welcome this inspirational writer, thinker and activist to the Pacific Northwest.

An Evening with Gary Snyder MAY 27, 2009

Benaroya Hall, Seattle

Poet, author, cultural critic and Professor Emeritus of the University of California at Davis, Gary Snyder is the author of several volumes of poetry, including Turtle Island, Mountains and Rivers Without End and Danger on Peaks, and collections of essays such as The Practice of the Wild and A Place in Space. 2009 marks the 50th anniversary of his landmark compendium of mountain poetry, Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems. Gary served as a fire lookout on Sourdough and Crater mountains in the North Cascades during the summers of 1952-53, writing some of his most inspired verse on a ridge high above North Cascades Environmental Learning Center. Join Seattle Arts & Lectures and North Cascades Institute in welcoming Gary Snyder back to the Pacific Northwest for a very special engagement at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall.

Tickets at www.lectures.org/boxoffice or (206) 621-2230 ext. 10 ©CHERYL HIMMELSTEIN

Tickets are available to Poetry Series subscribers now and to single-ticket buyers beginning Sept. 22 at www.lectures.org/boxoffice or (206) 621-2230 ext. 10

Benaroya Hall, Seattle


FA L L ’0 8 – W IN T ER ’0 9

LEARNING CENTER PROGRAMS &

FIELD EXCURSIONS

© PA U L B A N N I C K

© CH R IST I A N M A RT I N

© M A R I A CO R Y E L L- M A R T I N / W W W. E X P E D I T I O N A R Y A R T. CO M

Woodstock West: Impressions in Word and Ink Oct 18 (Sat) WITH JUDITH ROCHE | Oct 19 (Sun) WITH REBECCA MELOY 6 PER DAY Woodstock Farm (near Bellingham) $95/ONE DAY OR $180/BOTH DAYS Woodstock Farm, one of Bellingham’s best-kept secrets, sits where the Chuckanut Mountains meet the Puget Sound on a wooded peninsula a few miles south of town. Homesteaded more than 100 years ago by Cyrus Lester Gates and acquired by the City of Bellingham in 2004, the site holds a fascinating blend of natural and cultural history. There is evidence of human use of the area going back 2,500 years. An unusual combination of arid-land plants and coastal natives coexist. Woodstock Creek, once forgotten in an underground culvert, may be daylighted and brought back to life. This unique landscape perched on the Salish Sea stirs imaginations with its stories, mysteries and juxtapositions. Join us for a weekend of printing and poetry at Woodstock Farm with writer Judith Roche and artist Rebecca Meloy. Saturday, Judith will help us translate our impressions of the land and sea into poems. Sunday, Rebecca will show us how to further develop our impressions of the area by creating complementing prints using monotype and linoleum relief printing.

Make the most of the Pacific Northwest’s quiet season by getting outdoors with a community of top-notch instructors, seasoned naturalists and curious people just like yourself. Whether at the North Cascades © R E B E CC A M E LO Y

Environmental Learning Center or exploring the Skagit Valley, Bellingham Bay, Kitsap Peninsula, Mt. Baker area and beyond, you’ll expand your appreciation for the natural and cultural histor y of these special places.

information and registration at www.ncascades.org/seminars or (360) 856-5700 ext. 209

Nature Photography Retreat: High Country in Autumn

Wildlife Tracking: Bears, Cougars and Cascadian Mammals

Toadstools, Fairy Rings and Witch’s Butter: Northwest Mushrooms

Nooksack Snowshoe Excursions

Oct 11 (Sat) LEE WHITFORD | Oct 12 (Sun) LEE WHITFORD AND FRED RHOADES

DAVID MOSKOWITZ AND MEGAN MCGINTY Due to popular demand, we are offering two sessions—choose your date! Jan 24 (Sat) or Feb 1 (Sun) 6 Upper Nooksack Area $95 The Mt. Baker area east of Bellingham is world famous for winter recreation, and snowshoeing in the upper reaches of the Nooksack River is a particularly great way to experience the land. Join the Institute and Dave Moskowitz, a longtime tracker and teacher at the Wilderness Awareness School, to explore this winter wonderland while learning winter mountain ecology, plant and animal survival strategies, wildlife tracking and the natural history of snow. This field excursion will feature low-impact travel on uneven surfaces with two naturalists experienced in backcountry winter travel. Location and activities are weather dependent. Snowshoe rental is included as part of the class. Participants should be prepared for unpredictable winter conditions, but no previous experience is necessary.

PER DAY

$95/ONE DAY OR $180/BOTH DAYS

Baker Lake Area

Some of the planet’s most efficient recyclers, fungi work quietly to return nutrients and minerals to our ecosystems. Autumn rains nourish a proliferation of mushrooms in our region, and this field excursion, offered as either a one- or two-day program, will explore the forest to learn more about the fungus among us. Saturday, the Institute’s own Lee Whitford will teach an overview of fungi and their habitats and introduce helpful identification techniques. Fred Rhoades joins our group Sunday, when we’ll delve more deeply into mycological mysteries and wonders. A local mycologist and biologist, Fred will illuminate fungal structure, biology, evolution and important ecological roles such as mycorrhizal associations and decomposition. Whether for a day or the weekend, we’ll see a wide variety of species and learn the characteristics that make each one unique.

© CH R IST I A N M A RT I N

GARY BLETSCH Feb 7 (Sat) 6 Skagit and Samish flats $95 Birder’s World calls it “one of the nation’s best winter birding destinations,” and the Seattle P-I says, “You don’t have to be a bird expert to enjoy what should be considered one of this state’s premier winter tourist destinations: the Skagit Valley.” Join Institute naturalists for a field excursion designed to celebrate one of the Pacific Northwest’s natural treasures. Traveling together, we’ll survey the area’s myriad avian life, including five species of falcons—gyrfalcons, peregrine and prairie falcons, merlins, and American kestrels—trumpeter and tundra swans, short-eared owls, snow geese, bald eagles and numerous shorebirds. We’ll learn which birds live here year-round and which ones are special visitors. By the end of the day, you’ll have gained strategies for identifying local birds so you can continue to explore the Skagit’s riches on your own and with family.

6

© C A R O LY N W AT E R S

© L A R R Y M O AT S

DAVE MOSKOWITZ Sept 19–21 (Fri-Sun) 18 Learning Center T$195, D$290, S$485 Watching wildlife comes easy in many landscapes, but the Northwest is a different creature. Just like our mountain views, you often have to work to see an animal in the Cascade woodlands, especially reclusive mammals such as bears, cougars, coyotes and bobcats. Learning to track wildlife can help. Such skills hone your senses and help you identify the ever-present thread of animal life woven throughout our wildlands and even our towns and backyards. Join Dave Moskowitz, a longtime tracker and teacher at the Wilderness Awareness School, to study tracking fundamentals such as trailing, timing and identifying diverse signs including prints, scat, tree scrapes and food caches. We’ll spend long days in a variety of North Cascadian habitats while learning about many animals and their complex ecosystems.

Skagit Valley Birding Bonanza

LIBBY MILLS Due to popular demand, we are offering two sessions—choose your date! Dec 13 (Sat) or Jan 10 (Sat) 6 Skagit and Sauk rivers $95 Each winter, hundreds of bald eagles migrate to the Skagit River to feast on the Puget Sound’s most fecund run of chum salmon. Bundle up, grab your binoculars and join Libby Mills, a renowned naturalist who has studied this natural wonder for more than 20 years. The December trip will focus on the Sauk and Upper Skagit rivers as the abundance of chum nears its apex. Moving to Rockport State Park in January, the second trip coincides with the seasonal peak population of bald eagles in the Skagit watershed. Both excursions will examine the interrelated biology of salmon and eagles, their migratory wanderings and conservation strategies for these intertwined species. This wild spectacle is a gift to the Pacific Northwest—join us in celebration and discovery.

Family Birding Excursions MEGAN MCGINTY AND GUEST INSTRUCTORS Feb 14 (Sat) or Feb 21 (Sat) Skagit Valley $75 Birding as a family is a great way to connect to nature as well as each other and provides a route for youngsters to get interested in the outdoors. These field excursions are specially designed for families with children ages eight and older. Institute naturalists will guide us through the bird-rich environment of Port Susan Bay in the Skagit Valley in search of owls, snow geese, hawks, bald eagles and other winter visitors. We’ll provide binoculars, scopes and fun natural history interpretation, as well as a guidebook and other materials you can take home for use on future family outings. Deepen your own understanding of the Pacific Northwest while giving the kids in your life an experience they won’t forget. All adults must be accompanied by a child!

© CH A RLES CLA A SSE N

© M E G A N M CG I N T Y

Experience the North Cascades as autumn takes hold with three expert photographers as your guides. We’ll turn our lenses to all the season has to offer—landscapes, wildlife and people at play in the out of doors—spending long days in the field from Thunder Creek to Washington Pass to Diablo Lake. Covering the basics of nature photography, our teachers will discuss equipment, subject matter, methods for composition and exposure compensation, reading histograms and working with RAW files. Evenings will include slideshows to review the day’s work. A digital camera capable of manual operation is required, SLR preferred. To see photographic work by last year’s participants, visit www. ncascades.org/programs/seminars/media/photo07. Instructor websites: www.paulbannick.com, www.brettbaunton.com and www.bendrum.com.

Cycle of Life: Bald Eagles and Salmon

CHARLES CLAASSEN Sept 21 (Sun) or Sept 28 (Sun) 6 Skagit Valley $125 This farmland excursion will introduce you to some of the Skagit Valley’s leading small farmers and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the practices that sustain the Institute’s farm partners. Our day will start in the gardens of Larkspur Farm where we’ll gather for coffee and a morning pastry. Next up is Skagit River Ranch, where George and Eiko Vokjovich raise chickens, cattle and hogs within an innovative, closed-loop cycle. We’ll head upriver to an orchard providing apples, pears and stonefruits, and on to Blue Heron Farm, where we’ll walk the fields with Anne Schwartz, a talented veteran farmer of the upper Skagit and political advocate for small organic farmers. We’ll provide lunch featuring fresh foods harvested from the farms we’ve visited and enjoy dessert at the Cascadian Farm stand before ending our day with a wine tasting at Marblemount’s Glacier Peak Winery.

© N O RT H C A SC A D ES I NST I T UT E

T$275, D$415, S$695

Skagit Valley Harvest Tour

© S ET H P O L L A C K / W W W. P O L L A C K P H OT O . CO M

18

© BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

PAUL BANNICK, BRETT BAUNTON AND BENJ DRUMMOND Sept 19–21 (Fri-Sun) Learning Center

KURT HOELTING AND HOLLEY HUGHES Oct 24–26 (Fri eve-Sun) 15 Learning Center T$245, D$365, S$595 The attentiveness that writing encourages is similar to the deep presence sought through meditation. Both rely on careful observation. Both move us deeply into the mind as well as the natural world. Experience a nourishing weekend with Zen meditation teacher Kurt Hoelting and writer Holley Hughes. We’ll combine meditation practice with time to write and ponder the works of several reflective authors. Each day will start with sitting meditation and Qi gong movement, sharing poems and short nature essays, before putting our own thoughts into words following the freewriting practices pioneered by Natalie Goldberg. Outdoors, we’ll enjoy hiking and field observations with Institute naturalists as a way to deepen our connection with the natural world. After healthy, organic dinners, our days will end with silent reflection. No meditation or writing experience is necessary.

Hidden Skagit

Avifauna Afloat: Birds of Bellingham Bay

BRIAN SCHEUCH AND MEGAN MCGINTY Jan 31 (Sat) or Feb 8 (Sun) 10 am-1 pm Port Susan Bay Preserve $50 Where the Stillaguamish River flows into Port Susan Bay is an important transitionary zone between marine and freshwater habitats that is stewarded by the Nature Conservancy. Western sandpipers, dunlins and dowitchers swoop over the mudflats. Snow geese gather by the thousands on nearby fields and hundreds of raptors, from peregrine falcons to short-eared owls, come to hunt. A watery network of emergent marshes, mudflats and tidal channels supports salmon, herring, hake, clams and other native lifeforms. The diversity of tidal habitats make Port Susan Bay an important stop along the Pacific Flyway, and biologists have identified the area as one of the finest estuarine ecosystems in the Puget Sound. Join Institute naturalists and local historian Brian Scheuch on a special tour of this private sanctuary and witness the beauty of this radical estuarine restoration project.

Due to popular demand, we are offering two sessions—choose your date! Feb 28 (Sat) LIBBY MILLS | March 7 (Sat) DON BURGESS Bellingham Bay

6 $155

Discover what lies beyond the shores of Bellingham with an excursion on board the hospitable Snow Goose, a spacious 65-foot research vessel that regularly plies the Inside Passage from the Puget Sound to southeast Alaska. We’ve chartered the boat for two Saturdays this winter and staffed it with two of our most popular birding instructors, Don Burgess and Libby Mills. Together with Institute naturalists, we’ll cruise Bellingham Bay from Squalicum Harbor to Lummi Island, searching our local waters for a variety of seabirds, including harlequin and long-tailed ducks, loons, cormorants and grebes. Savoring the whims of weather and tides, we’ll enjoy outdoor observation on the decks and duck back inside for a cup of hot chocolate if the weather turns wet. Tuition includes boat charter.

© PA U L I N E H S E I H

© BENJAMIN DRUMMOND

© J E N N Y C LO U T I E R

PAT BOLTON Sept 20–21 (Sat-Sun) 12 Cady Lake Manor $350 Baffled by flies? Tangled up over the idea of knots? Relax and treat yourself to a weekend of relaxation at Cady Lake Manor on the Kitsap Peninsula while learning how to fly-fish in an atmosphere of encouragement, support and camaraderie. During the weekend, we’ll come to appreciate fly-fishing while exploring a private 15-acre lake that is stewarded for this the contemplative craft. Pat Bolton, an expert guide who has fly-fished for more than 30 years, will cover basic skills, including choosing the right equipment, reading water, selecting appropriate flies, tying knots and landing fish. Last but not least, we’ll dedicate plenty of time to practice the subtle art of casting. In the evening, we’ll relax, listen to presentations and enjoy one another’s company.

© M E G A N M CG I N T Y

Sit, Walk, Write: Nature and the Practice of Presence Women’s Fly-Fishing Escape

information and registration at www.ncascades.org/seminars or (360) 856-5700 ext. 209

LOOKING AHEAD…2009

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

FAMILY GETAWAYS

GATHER YOUR FAMILY IN THE NORTH CASC ADES May 23-25

June 26-28

July 13-15

July 23-26

(4 day/4th of July)

(midweek)

(4 day)

Aug 21-23

Sept 4-7

Nov 25-28

(4 day/Labor Day)

(4 day/Thanksgiving)

(Memorial Day)

Aug 10-12

Aug 17-19

(midweek)

(midweek)

Registration and tuition

July 2-5

DIABLO DOWNTIME A WEEKEND TO RELA X AND EXPLORE May 15-17

June 19-21

July 10-12

Aug 7-9

Sept 18-20

Oct 16-18

information and registration at www.ncascades.org or (360) 856-5700 ext. 209

Register online at www.ncascades. org or by phone at (360) 856-5700 ext. 209. Mail-in registration forms are available online. Online registration is not available for Terry Tempest Williams or 2009 Family Getaways. Tuition is on a per-person basis and includes a nonrefundable registration fee (see below). Tuition at the Learning Center is based on triple (t), double (d) or single (s) occupancy in our guest lodge rooms. Shared occupancy is assigned on a gender-specific basis unless a particular roommate(s)

is requested at the time of registration. Single occupancy is limited and offered on a space-available basis. If you register for triple occupancy, please be prepared to use the top bunk, even though you might not be required to.

Cancellations If a registration is cancelled 21 days or more before a program starts, we will refund the tuition minus a registration fee. Fees are $25 for tuition of $99 or less; $50 for $100–$299; $75 for $300– $799. Cancellations received less than 21 days before the start of a program will not receive a refund. If we are forced to cancel a program, participants will receive a full refund or transfer option.

20 percent first-timer discount Our first-timer discount applies to new participants in adult programs lasting two days or longer. Discount does not apply to Sourdough Speaker Series, Terry Tempest Williams, Gary Snyder or 2009 Family Getaways. Discount is 20 percent of tuition, to a maximum of $75, and cannot be combined with other discounts or scholarships. If registering for multiple programs, discount will be applied to most expensive course. Standard cancellation policy applies.

Scholarships To make adult programs available to a wide audience, we have scholarship

funds available for students, teachers, seniors 60 and older, environmental educators, conservation professionals, low-income participants and others. Scholarships may be applied to programs with tuition of $100 or more per person only and are available online or by phone request.

and pets are not allowed. All Learning Center programs include meals featuring local and organic foods when available. To learn more, visit www.ncascades.org/ learning_center. Participants in Field Excursions are responsible for their own food and lodging unless otherwise specified.

Accommodations and meals

Children and pets

The Learning Center has three guest lodges, each with shared gender-specific bathrooms with showers. Guest rooms contain one twin bed and a set of twin bunk beds and pricing varies according to the sleeping arrangements —see class description for rates. Overnight accommodations are for paid registrants only

Unless noted, Learning Center and Field Excursion programs are for adults only. Youth ages 14–17 may sometimes participate, pending approval by the program coordinator prior to registration. Approved minors must be accompanied by a participating adult. Please leave pets at home.

Teacher clock hours Many of our programs are approved by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to grant teachers clock-hour certification. The number of clock hours available appears with a clock symbol near the title of each program. A fee of $3.50 per clock hour is in addition to tuition and is due, payable by check to the Institute, at the start of the program.

Credits

EDITOR: Christian Martin DESIGNER: Jesse Kinsman/www.kinsmancreative.com PHOTO AND ART CONSULTANT: Carolyn Waters

Artists and Photographers:

Risk and responsibility Participants assume full responsibility for their own safety and are required to sign a health/risk and hold-harmless waiver before the course begins.

Production

Cover Art “Fall Umpqua River” by John Cole. Oil on linen, 1997. Reprinted with permission by Lisa Harris Gallery and Lucille Cole.

We are grateful to have the opportunity to reproduce the artwork of Maria Coryell Martin and Rebecca Meloy, and the photography of Paul Bannick, Benj Drummond, Seth Pollack and Institute staff. Thanks to Doug Tompkins for his photograph of Gary Snyder, Cheryl Himmelstein for her photograph of Terry Tempest Williams and Steven J.

Kazlowski and the Burke Museum for the polar bear image. Copyright 2008-2009 North Cascades Institute. All rights reserved. Art and photo copyrights remain with creators and are used by permission. Printed at Lithtex Northwest www.lithtex.com North Cascades Institute is proud to partner with the National Park Service, US Forest Service, Sustainable Connections and others.


Some kind of Paul Bannick The Last Polar photo Bear: to Facing the Truth promote his deal of a Warming World at Burke Museum BURKE MUSEUM, SEATTLE JUNE 28 – DEC 31, 2008 As part of our ongoing inquiry into the impacts of climate change on the

© S T E V E N J . K A Z LO W S K I

natural world, North Cascades Institute is proud to co-sponsor the Burke Museum’s environmental photography exhibit The Last Polar Bear: Facing

810 State Route 20, Sedro-Woolley,

(360) 856-5700 ext. 209

Washington 98284

www.ncascades.org

PRINTED ON 100 PERCENT POST-CONSUMER RECYCLED PAPER B Y CH OOSI NG R ECYCL ED FI BER W E SAVED 9.37 TREES, 3,982 GA LLO NS OF WAST E WAT E R , A N D 6,640,200 B T U S O F E NE R GY

the Truth of a Warming World. Endearing polar bear images by Seattlebased wildlife photographer Steven Kazlowski document the creature in the wild, bringing to life the urgency of global warming’s impact on the Arctic. Kazlowski spent eight years tracking and photographing polar bears in the Alaskan Arctic—a harsh terrain that is rarely visited and seldom photographed—and the exhibit’s 40 large-format color photographs reveal the plight of the bear as it faces rapid change in its Arctic coastal habitat. more info at www.washington.edu/burkemuseum


Fall/Winter 2008