October 2020 NCAE News Bulletin

Page 1

NCAE North Carolina Association of Educators

News Bulletin

October 2020

Vol. 51, No. 3

www.ncae.org

Let’s Make a Difference for Our Students and Public Schools on November 3!

OFFICIAL ELECTION ISSUE


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Educators’ Voices Are An Important Part of the Political Process … Make Yours Heard on Nov. 3! Whether you are a political junkie or not, if you are a member of the public education family, you know the role that politics plays in the profession we hold dear. Everything from the number of

schools reopen, which many of our districts are currently experiencing. Supporting and electing pro-public education candidates that listen to the concerns of educators and the community at large is imperative. COVID-19 may have halted many of the activities that we enjoy, but one thing is certain, it is not going to stop the election! That’s why we must voice our support for NCAE’s endorsed candidates by making sure that we engage each other and make our way to the voting booth on November 3. We know what is at stake if we don’t have Tamika Walker Kelly political representatives in place who value our students, President our public schools, and us as public school employees. This election is going to be much different from ones in students you have in your classroom, years past and many of the to funding for schools, to your activities in which we have healthcare and benefits is in some way grown accustomed to “Our voices are powerful and can connected to politics. participating in are going to affect change in a tremendous way. As the countdown to the 2020 look different as well. This election is critically important, Election continues, please be mindful However, if you are looking not only on the national level, but on of the impact that you as educators to volunteer in some the state and local levels as well.” have on the political process. Our capacity, we encourage you voices are powerful and can affect to take part in a phone or change in a tremendous way. This text banking event or host a election is critically important, not only on the national debate or election watch party. There is something that level, but on the state and local levels as well. The each of us can do to get the word out about our pro-public direction in which public education needs to go hinges on education candidates. us exercising our right to vote, whether for the office of Having a plan in place as to how you will vote is equally president, governor, or local school board. From the top of important, whether by absentee ballot (which has already the ballot to the bottom, each candidate has the ability to begun in North Carolina), whether during the Early Voting make a difference in our lives and the lives of our period (with a mask), or on Election Day (with a mask). students. Whichever way you choose, just know that your input is We often use the old adage “all politics are local” necessary and needed. Let’s all get out and VOTE because because before a candidate becomes a state representative we are #InThisTogether! or serves in a federal capacity, he or she usually gets their If you need assistance with finding the NCAE-endorsed political start in our communities. Local races for school candidates in your area, visit the NCAE Votes page at board, city council, and county commission have a direct www.ncaevotes2020.org. impact in determining decisions such as how and when

BCBS to Provide Health and Wellness Cards to NC Subscribers Blue Cross and Blue Shield NC will issue $200 million in health and wellness retail cards to more than 600,000 eligible subscribers, or households, across the state. The cards will be pre-loaded with funds that will help many North Carolinians pay for health, wellness, and household expenses, including food, during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. NOTE: This DOES NOT apply to State Health Plan members, which has a state self-funded plan. It could, however, apply to members who have family members enrolled in Affordable Care Act health plans. Click here for more information. BCBS is a third-party claims processing administrator for the Plan.


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Voting Has Begun … Make Your Plan NOW! If you have not already made a plan for how you are going to vote, NOW IS THE TIME! There are three options for voting: Vote by Mail, Early Voting (in person, and register to vote on the same day), and Vote on Election Day (in person). Any of these strategies will work, but you need to choose the one that will work best for you. Below are a few tips for making the most of your plan. Whichever way you plan to vote, you need to educate yourself on the candidates! There are dozens of candidates running for office, and it is important that you make your decision before you vote. Luckily, NCAE and NEA have been hard at work for months researching, interviewing, and endorsing candidates up and down the ballot to help you make more informed decisions about which candidates share our pro-public education priorities. A quick visit to www.ncaevote2020.org will get you the NCAE-endorsed candidates in your county. There is also a link to the NC NEA Votes page with our presidential and congressional endorsements. Vote By Mail In order to vote by mail, you must request an absentee ballot (Formulario Estatal de Solicitud para la Boleta del Voto en Ausencia). The deadline to request an absentee ballot is 5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 27. Note that the State Board of Elections (SBOE) or your county BOE must receive it by October 27. They will not accept it if it is received after this date, even if it is postmarked on October 27. • Complete your voting ballot with your choices in the presence of one adult witness (can be a notary public) who is at least 18 years old and who is not a candidate in the election. *The voter and witness must each complete and sign the certificate on the return envelope and provide their addresses. Ensure all parts of the certificate form on the envelope are filled out, including your signature. • There are different options to return your absentee ballot: *You may return your completed absentee ballot by mail to your County Board of Elections. It must be postmarked by 5 p.m. on Election Day (November 3) and received by 5 p.m. on the third day after the election. *You may also return your completed absentee ballot to any Early Voting site during operating hours. Early Voting (In-person -- You Can Register to Vote and Vote at the Same Time) You can Early Vote in North Carolina from October 15 to October 31, 2020

*Find your early voting location and operating hours *Did you miss the deadline to register? You’re in luck because you can still register to vote and vote at the same time, which is called same-day registration. • To use same-day registration at an Early Voting site, you will need one of the following: <NC driver’s license <Other government photo ID with name and current address <Utility bill, bank statement, or payroll stub with name and current address <Student photo ID with a school document showing the student’s address <Any document from any government agency with the voter’s name and current address Vote on Election Day (In Person) Election Day this year is Tuesday, November 3, 2020. If you plan to vote in person on Election Day, there a few things you should consider: • Check your polling location: https://vt.ncsbe.gov/ PPLkup/ • Wear a mask, and bring you own pen. • Polls are open from 6:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. If you can, please try to arrive early. And dress appropriately for the weather — if it’s raining or cold, you may be standing outside in a socially distanced line for some time before getting inside. There is a lot to think about but making a voting plan NOW will make sure your vote counts in November!

Remember These Dates! October 9: Voter Registration Deadline September 27 - October 27: Absentee Ballot Submissions (must be received no later than 5 p.m. on Oct. 27) October 15-31: Early Voting (same-day registration allowed)

November 3: Election Day


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Who Is Better for Public Education?

How the Presidential Candidates Compare: The Facts Speak for Themselves!

Joe Biden

vs.

Donald Trump

EDUCATION FUNDING Biden – Believes in fully funding public education Joe Biden’s K-12 plan invests more that $800 billion to triple Title 1 funding for schools in low-income areas; fully funds the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to serve special needs students; and doubles the number of mental health professionals in schools. He backs community schools, which provide health services, job training, and language supports to students and their families. Trump – Public education is not a priority The Trump administration’s 2021 budget would cut education by nearly 8 percent, while dedicating $5 billion in tax credits to private school vouchers. Their proposal would fundamentally change 29 education grant programs – including the federal afterschool program, educator recruitment and retention, and community schools – making it uncertain that schools and students who need those programs would have access to them.

SECRETARY OF EDUCATION Biden – Says Betsy DeVos is unqualified “The first thing I will do [as president] is to make sure that the secretary of education is not Betsy DeVos, it is a teacher,” Biden said. He believes “it’s really important that we have someone who’s actually been in the classroom … and include educators in the making of policy.” Trump – Supported DeVos from day one Trump nominated DeVos, an ardent supporter of private school vouchers, as his secretary of education, calling her “brilliant and passionate” and pledging that together they would “reform the U.S. education system.” Vice President Pence cinched her confirmation, breaking a tie in the Senate following a contentious all-night hearing.

RESPECT Biden – Believes teachers should have a voice “Teachers should have the ability to have input … on deciding what the curricula is, what you’re going to teach, because you know better,” Biden said. “We have to elevate teachers as professionals … it’s all about being treated with dignity.” (Continued on page 5)


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Comparison of the U.S. Presidential Candidates (Continued from page 4)

Trump – Does not support educators The Trump administration cut funding for educator professional development and mentoring. As the pandemic death toll neared 100,000, he tweeted, “Schools in our country should be opened ASAP,” with no plan to protect educators’ and students’ health.

UNION RIGHTS Biden – Supports every worker’s right to organize Biden believes the federal government should defend workers’ right to organize and bargain collectively – and even encourage collective bargaining. As president, he plans to make it easier for all workers to unionize and supports educators’ right to bargain for better pay and benefits. Biden also believes educators should have a voice in decisions affecting their students. Trump – Opposes unions and the rights of workers Trump has decreased labor protections, rolled back worker safety, and weakened federal unions. His administration also has sought to challenge workers’ rights across federal agencies. Secretary DeVos has expressed hostility toward educator unions, calling them “defenders of the status quo.”

PROFESSIONAL PAY AND LOAN PAYMENT FORGIVENESS Biden – Will work to increase teacher salaries and eliminate student debt “I want the American people to understand that it is overwhelmingly in their best interest that we pay teachers fairly,” Biden said. He also believes that teachers shouldn’t be burdened with student loans “while they are busy educating the next generation.” Trump – Wants to cut funding for educators and eliminate loan forgiveness Trump supports small, competitive grant programs that increase compensation for a small portion of teachers in STEM fields. He has proposed cutting $2.1 billion in federal funding for educators and wants to eliminate loan forgiveness for educators and others in public service. (Reprinted from NEAToday August 2020)

This year marks a critical time to elect pro-public education candidates in order to stop the dismantling of public schools. There are so many things at stake — school funding, student resources, reduction in school positions, educator salaries and benefits, and much more. North Carolina is better than being mired in the bottom tier of states in per-pupil spending and average teacher pay. Visit www.NCAEVotes.org to stay informed about volunteer opportunities with NCAE and to find out who your NCAE-endorsed candidates are. Let’s Remember in November!


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates Each candidate was evaluated on his/her voting record and level of support for public schools, public school employees, and children. NEA/NCAE recommends these candidates as a step toward preserving public education as the cornerstone of democracy. The slate of judicial candidates and those for the N.C. General Assembly appear on pages 7-11.

Joe Biden President

Kamala Harris Vice President

Roy Cooper N.C. Governor

Yvonne Holley N.C. Lt. Governor

Josh Stein Attorney General

Jen Mangrum Supt. of Public Instruction

Ronnie Chatterji State Treasurer

Elaine Marshall Secretary of State

Wayne Goodwin Insurance Commissioner

Jessica Holmes Labor Commissioner Beth Wood State Auditor

(Continued on page 7)


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates (Continued on page 6)

United States Senate

N.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

Justice Mark Davis

Justice Lucy Inman

Judge Lora Cubbage

Judge Mark Davis

N.C. Court of Appeals Cal Cunningham

Judge Patricia Shields

United States House of Representatives

G.K. Butterfield U.S. District 1

Deborah Ross U.S. District 2

Patricia Timmons-Goodson U.S. District 8

David Price U.S. District 4

Cynthia Wallace U.S. District 9

David Brown U.S. District 5

Morris “Moe” Davis U.S. District 11

Kathy Manning U.S. District 6

Alma Adams U.S. District 12


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates: North Carolina General Assembly Alamance

House 115: John Ager (D)*

Chowan

House 63: Ricky Hurtado (D)

House 116: Brian Turner (D)*

House 1: Emily Nicholson (D)

House 64: Eric Henry (D)

Senate 48: Brian Caskey (D)

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

Senate 24: J. D. Wooten (D)

Senate 49: Julie Mayfield (D)

Alexander Senate 42: H. Dean Proctor (R)* Alleghany Senate 45: Jeanne Supin (D) Anson

Burke House 112: Ed Hallyburton (D) Senate 46: Edward Phifer (D) Cabarrus

Clay Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D) Cleveland House 111: Jennifer Childers (D) Columbus

House 82: Aimy Steele (D)

House 16: Debbi Fintak (D)

House 55: Gloria Overcash (D)

House 83: Gail Young (D)

House 46: Tim Heath (D)

Senate 25: Helen Probst Mills (D)

Senate 36: Marcus Singleton (D)

Senate 13: Danny Britt Jr. (R)*

Ashe House 93: C. Ray Russell (D)* Senate 45: Jeanne Supin (D) Avery Senate 46: Edward Phifer (D) Beaufort Senate 3: Ernestine Bazemore (D) Bertie

Caldwell Senate 46: Edward Phifer (D) Camden

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

House 43: Kim Hardy (D)

Carteret House 13: Buck Bayliff (D) Caswell

Senate 3: Ernestine Bazemore (D)

Senate 30: Wally White (D) Catawba

House 22: Albert Kirby Jr. (D)

House 89: Mitchell Setzer (R)*

Senate 8: David Sink (D)

House 96: Kim Bost (D)

House 17: Tom Simmons (D)

Senate 42: H. Dean Proctor (R)* Chatham

House 19: Marcia Morgan (D)

House 54: Robert Reives II (D)*

Senate 8: David Sink (D)

Senate 23: Valerie Foushee (D)*

Buncombe House 114: Susan Fisher (D)*

Cumberland House 42: Marvin Lucas Jr. (D)*

House 50: Graig Meyer (D)*

Brunswick

House 3: Dorothea White (D)

House 1: Emily Nicholson (D)

House 1: Emily Nicholson (D)

Bladen

Craven

Cherokee Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D)

House 44: Billy Richardson (D)* House 45: Frances Jackson (D) Senate 19: Kirk deViere (D)* Senate 21: Ben Clark (D)* Currituck House 6: Tommy Fulcher (D) Senate 1: Tess Judge (D) Dare House 6: Tommy Fulcher (D) Senate 1: Tess Judge (D) Davidson Senate 29: Duskin Lassiter (D) Davie Senate 31: Terri LeGrand (D)


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates: North Carolina General Assembly Duplin House 4: Christopher Schulte (D) Durham House 29: Vernetta Alston (D)* House 30: Marcia Morey (D)* House 31: Zack Hawkins (D)* House 54: Robert Reives II (D)*

Granville House 2: Cindy Deporter (D)

Hoke

House 32: Terry Garrison (D)*

Senate 21: Ben Clark (D)*

Senate 22: Mike Woodard (D)*

House 48: Garland Pierce (D)*

Greene Senate 5: Don Davis (D)* Guilford

Senate 20: Natalie Murdock (D)*

House 57: Ashton Clemmons (D)*

Senate 22: Mike Woodard (D)*

House 58: Amos Quick III (D)*

Edgecombe

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

House 59: Nicole Quick (D)

Hyde House 6: Tommy Fulcher (D) Senate 1: Tess Judge (D) Iredell Senate 34: Barry Templeton (D) Jackson

House 23: Shelley Willingham (D)*

House 61: Pricey Harrison (D)*

House 119: Joe Sam Queen (D)*

Senate 4: Toby Fitch Jr. (D)*

House 62: Brandon Gray (D)

Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D)

Forsyth

Senate 24: J. D. Wooten (D)

Johnston

House 71: Evelyn Terry (D)*

Senate 27: Michael Garrett (D)*

House 26: Denton Lee III (I)

House 72: Amber Baker (D)

Senate 28: Gladys Robinson (D)*

Senate 11: Allen Wellons (D)

House 74: Dan Besse (D)

Halifax

House 75: Elisabeth Motsinger (D)

House 27: Michael Wray (D)*

Senate 31: Terri LeGrand (D)

Senate 4: Toby Fitch Jr. (D)*

Senate 32: Paul Lowe Jr. (D)* Franklin

Harnett House 51: Jason Cain (D)

Senate 12: John Kirkman (D) Jones House 13: Buck Bayliff (D) Senate 6: Ike Johnson (D) Lee

House 7: Phil Stover (D)

House 53: Sally Benson (D)

House 51: Jason Cain (D)

Senate 18: Sarah Crawford (D)

Senate 12: John Kirkman (D)

Senate 12: John Kirkman (D)

Gaston House 109: Susan Maxon (D) Gates House 5: Howard Hunter III (D)* Senate 1: Tess Judge (D) Graham Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D)

Haywood

Lenoir

House 118: Alan Jones (D)

House 12: Virginia Cox-Daugherty (D)

House 119: Joe Sam Queen (D)*

Senate 7: Donna Lake (D)

Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D) Henderson Senate 48: Brian Caskey (D) Hertford House 5: Howard Hunter III (D)*

Lincoln House 97: Greg McBryde (D) Macon Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D)


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates: North Carolina General Assembly Madison

Senate 29: Duskin Lassiter (D)

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

House 118: Alan Jones (D) Senate 47: David Wheeler (D) Martin House 23: Shelley Willingham (D)* Senate 3: Ernestine Bazemore (D) McDowell Senate 47: David Wheeler (D) Mecklenburg House 88: Mary Belk (D)*

House 5: Howard Hunter III (D)*

Moore

Pender

House 52: Lowell Simon (D)

House 16: Deb Fintak (D)

Senate 25: Helen Mills (D)

Senate 8: David Sink (D)

Nash

Perquimans

House 7: Phil Stover (D)

House 1: Emily Nicholson (D)

House 25: James Gailliard (D)*

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

Senate 11: Allen Wellons (D) New Hanover

Person House 2: Cindy Deporter (D)

House 92: Terry Brown (D)

House 18: Deb Butler (D)*

House 98: Christy Clark (D)*

House 19: Marcia Morgan (D)

House 99: Nasif Majeed (D)*

House 20: Adam Ericson (D)

House 8: Kandie Smith (D)*

House 100: John Autry (D)*

Senate 8: David Sink (D)

House 9: Brian Farkas (D)

House 101: Carolyn Logan (D)*

Senate 9: Harper Peterson (D)*

House 12: Virginia Cox-Daugherty (D)

House 102: Becky Carney (D)*

Northampton

House 103: Rachel Hunt (D)*

House 27: Michael Wray (D)*

House 104: Bandon Lofton (D)*

Senate 3: Ernestine Bazemore (D)

House 105: Wesley Harris (D)*

Senate 22: Mike Woodard (D)* Pitt

Senate 5: Don Davis (D)* Polk Senate 47: David Wheeler (D)

Onslow

Randolph

House 106: Carla Cunningham (D)*

House 4: Christopher Schulte (D)

House 107: Kelly M. Alexander Jr. (D)*

House 14: Marcy Morgan (D)

Senate 37: Jeff Jackson (D)*

House 15: Carolyn Gomaa (D)

House 66: Scott Brewer (D)*

Senate 38: Mujtaba Mohammed (D)*

Senate 6: Ike Johnson (D)

Senate 25: Helen Probst Mills (D)

Senate 39: DeAndrea Salvador (D)

Orange

No Candidate Richmond

Robeson

Senate 40: Joyce Waddell (D)*

House 50: Graig Meyer (D)*

House 46: Tim Heath (D)

Senate 41: Natasha Marcus (D)*

House 56: Verla Insko (D)*

House 47: Charles Graham (D)*

Senate 23: Valerie Foushee (D)*

Senate 13: Danny Britt Jr. (R)*R

Mitchell House 47: David Wheeler (D) Montgomery House 66: Scott Brewer (D)

Pamlico House 6: Tommy Fulcher (D) Pasquotank

Rockingham House 65: Amanda Bell (D) House 91: Rita Cruise (D)


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NCAE’s Slate of Endorsed Pro-Public Education Candidates: North Carolina General Assembly Senate 30: Wally White (D) Rowan Senate 33: Tarsha Ellis (D) Rutherford House 112: Ed Hallyburton (D) Senate 47: David Wheeler (D) Sampson House 21: Raymond Smith Jr. (D)* Scotland

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

Senate 1: Tess Judge (D)

Union

Watauga

House 55: Gloria Overcash (D)

House 93: C. Ray Russell (D)*

Senate 35: Jose Santiago (D)

Senate 45: Jeanne Supin (D)

Senate 36: Marcus Singleton (D) Vance House 32: Terry Garrison (D)*

Wayne House 21: Raymond Smith Jr. (D)* Senate 7: Donna Lake (D)

Senate 3: Ernestine Bazemore (D) Wake

Wilkes Senate 45: Jeanne Supin (D)

House 48: Garland Pierce (D)*

House 11: Allison Dahle (D)*

House 66: Scott Brewer (D)*

House 33: Rosa Gill (D)*

House 24: Linda Cooper-Suggs (D)*

Senate 25: Helen Probst Mills (D)

House 34: Grier Martin (D)*

Senate 4: Toby Fitch Jr. (D)*

Stanly

House 35: Terence Everitt (D)*

House 66: Scott Brewer (D)*

House 36: Julie von Haefen (D)*

Senate 33: Tarsha Ellis (D)

House 37: Sydney Batch (D)*

Stokes

Wilson

Yadkin Senate 34: Barry Templeton (D) Yancey

House 38: Abe Jones (D)

House 118: Alan Jones (D)

House 91: Rita Cruise (D)

House 39: Darren Jackson (D)*

Senate 47: David Wheeler (D)

Senate 30: Wally White (D)

House 40: Joe John (D)*

Surry

House 41: Gale Adcock (D)*

House 91: Rita Cruise (D)

House 49: Cynthia Ball (D)*

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Senate 17: Sam Searcy (D)*

Senate 50: Victoria Fox (D)

Senate 18: Sarah Crawford (D)

Transylvania House 113: Norm Bossert (D)

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!Cunningham ! ! Majeed Logan 102 ! Carney Belk !! ! Autry

109

Beasley !

Hunt Harris

Senate 45: Jeanne Supin (D)

!

58 60 70

80

Alexander

Bumgardner !

Senate 14: Dan Blue (D)*

Harrison

2

Alamance

Clemmons

!

Faircloth

Jarvis

76 Rowan

Fraley

!

105

Senate 30: Wally White (D)

Terry

Brockman !

81 ! Warren

!

89

! Hastings

Rogers

!

J. Johnson

71

! Potts

Person

50

62 Guilford 57 59 !

75

Montgomery

! 72 ! !

Davidson

! Howard

77

Setzer

Catawba

112 Rutherford

McGrady

Henderson Transylvania

Macon

!

Burke

Ager

!

117

Jackson ! Corbin

120 Clay

B. Turner

119

Graham

Cherokee

74

Davie

84 Iredell

! McNeely

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Caswell

! Carter

Forsyth

Conrad

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Alexander

Blackwell

!

McDowell

65 Rockingham

!

! Zachary

94

D. Hall

115

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! Yarborough

Stokes 91 K. Hall

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87 86

Dobson

114 Buncombe

Haywood

Wray

Stevens

Yadkin 73

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85

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90 Wilkes

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Avery

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Yancey

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Alleghany

Ashe 93 Watauga

Mitchell Presnell

Madison

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200 Miles

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NCAE News Bulletin

12

Members Share Concerns, Suggestions for Successful School Reopenings

S

ince August, schools have had two options from which to choose in order to educate students – Plan B (a mix of in-person and virtual learning) and Plan C (virtual only). A few weeks ago, Gov. Cooper announced that elementary schools now have the option to operate under Plan A, which means students can attend school full time, five days a week. Some school districts, like Gaston County where NCAE member Bill Badgett teaches, have been operating under Plan B for weeks. Out of the 55 schools in his county, there have been 15 COVID-19 cases reported among students and staff. Safety measures such as sanitizing student desks, requiring masks be worn at all times, and daily temperature checks have been put into place, but educators are still anxious and concerned about all of the unknowns. “What causes me the most anxiety is that I will bring COVID home to my immune-compromised spouse,” said Badgett, who compared the sanitizing spray he has been issued to a bleach solution similar to a tablet that would be used in a toilet bowl. “Upon returning home from school, I head straight to the shower before having dinner and walking the dogs. The fact that students de-mask and eat lunch in the classroom with teachers worries me as well.” Padgett said the local petitioned the Board of Education for schools to open under Plan C rather than Plan B. A former teacher who serves on the board had her motion die for lack of a second. And, a former principal who serves said teachers knew what they signed up for when they entered the profession. In the words of General David Farragut at the Battle of Mobile Bay, the response of the principal was “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.” Allison Paysour teaches at Root Elementary School in Wake County where students have not yet returned to school buildings. She is disappointed with the safety measures that have been put into place thus far. “The air conditioner that is supposed to circulate air has broken three or four times in the past several weeks. We have been issued masks that don’t fit properly, and the district has hired nighttime contract custodians who don’t clean; I leave evidence in my room before going home and when I return the next morning, it’s still there,” Paysour said. In the event her school is one that re-opens under Plan A, Paysour has concerns that she hopes are ironed out prior to students returning. “When it comes right down to it, everything about this possibility makes me anxious,” she said. “It worries me the amount of work that will be put on educators to alternate between live and online instruction. It worries me whether students will follow the procedures set by the school that may differ from ones they follow at home. And, my biggest worry is contracting the virus and the aftermath that will follow.” Paysour feels some clear procedures are needed to help

ensure the success and safety of students and educators. She would like to see more custodians hired to clean during the day; not basing the number of students who can return on classroom square footage (which does not take into account furniture placement); installing Plexiglass in classrooms; and grace from parents, administrators, the county, and community because educators are working very hard to keep students on track, she added. As principal of Dabney Elementary School in Vance County, Michael W. Putney, Ph.D., says he is thankful that the Vance Co. Board of Education chose to follow the science and decided students would receive remote instruction the first nine weeks of school. However, he has still encountered challenges. “The most difficult part of this year has been trying to reach all students and make sure they are online, in class, and completing assignments,” Putney said. “I try to encourage the teachers to do what they can within their reach of influence to give their best each day.” Although the school year seems to be going well thus far, Putney said he has some genuine concerns as a school leader. “I am concerned about the social and emotional needs of our students, staff, and parents. This pandemic has caused us to rethink how we educate students and things will never be the same. I worry about the students who are home alone and are expected to complete their work while parents are working. I worry about parents who are struggling with meeting their basic needs and trying to make sure their children stay engaged in learning. I worry about the teachers who are tasked with contacting all students when their numbers and addresses have changed. I worry about the staff who must make home visits to locate missing students. And I worry about the staff who must prepare meals for students and the students who may not get a meal.” Putney said reopening schools is vital to everyone affected but the pandemic, science, or the development of a vaccine can’t be rushed. “We cannot allow the decision to be driven by politics or the economy. We need to do what is best for students, staff, and parents.”


NCAE News Bulletin

13

Member Wants Name of Slaveowner Removed From School in His Native County

Citing William Richardson Davie’s enslavement of Africans, social studies teacher Rodney D. Pierce launched an online petition to remove the name of the UNC-Chapel Hill founder and former North Carolina governor from a middle school in his school district. A member of the Nash/Rocky Mount Association of Educators, Pierce’s petition, which has been signed by more than 2,000 people, supports stripping Davie’s name from the William R. Davie Middle STEM Academy in Roanoke Rapids (Halifax County). The call was to rename the school after Dr. James Cheek, a native of the city and respected educator who served as president of Howard and Shaw universities. “The name of a prominent Black educator, who was a titan in Black higher education, is better suited on a building where Black children learn and Black adults work than the name of a slave-owning White supremacist who exploited Black people for wealth and political power, Pierce said. Pierce, a native of Halifax County and who attended Davie Middle as a child, had no idea who Davie was while a student. He later learned while studying Halifax County’s history that Davie was a slaveowner who pushed for a ThreeFifths Clause in the original U.S. Constitution that counted blacks as three-fifths of a human. The clause gave the South disproportionate representation in the U.S. House of Representatives. “When I taught there [Davie Middle], I made sure that the children that I taught knew the person whose name was on the school engaged in trading, selling, and purchasing people who look like you and I,” Pierce said in an interview. He now teaches in the Nash-Rocky Mount Schools district. Pierce’s petition comes at a time when statutes and monuments across the nation that honor white supremacists and racists and Confederate heroes are tumbling like dominoes. His petition also comes amid civil unrest caused by the death of George Floyd, which sparked outrage across

the nation. While researching the U.S. Census from 1790, Pierce found that Davie enslaved 36 Africans while living in Halifax County. By the time of his death in 1820 at his Tivoli plantation in Chester County, South Carolina, Davie enslaved 116 Africans valued at $32,050 (more than $702,000 in 2020). He owned several plantations and other tracts of land in Halifax, Chatham, Craven, Northampton, and Tyrell counties and profited from the free labor of Black people. UNC-Chapel Hill, founded by Davie, has spun into a 17campus system that is a major economic engine for North Carolina. He was also a Founding Father of the nation, serving as an officer in the Revolutionary War and a delegate from North Carolina during the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Pierce reviewed the deed for the school property and found no provision that prevents the name from being changed. He contacted members of the Halifax County School Board about renaming the school and was told that a committee would review the process for changing a school’s name. He is still waiting for an answer from the superintendent and School Board. In addition to trying to get the school’s name changed, Pierce is also leading a campaign to have Confederate monuments in Halifax County taken down. Removing Davie’s name from the school is the right thing to do for the children of Halifax County, Pierce said. “This year, I’ll have two children at Davie. I don’t want my children going to a school named after someone who would have looked down on them and not even recognize them as human. As a history teacher, I use the example of history in terms of people challenging things they felt were unfair and unjust. And that’s what I’m trying to do!” Portions of the article were reprinted with permission of NC Policy Watch.

Wayne Co. Members Picket Against Reopening of Schools “Events like this are important because all too often in the hyper political rhetoric of the times, the public has the tendency to not see educators as individuals, but as a monolith. Sometimes it takes activities like this to create conversations and help change minds and gain new understandings.” — Nick Green, event organizer, Lenoir Co. Association of Educators


NCAE News Bulletin

14

How a Change in Policies Made One School a More Comfortable Place for Students of Color

Our public schools are the cornerstone of democracy. They afford our children a place to learn, grow, and become productive citizens. There are more than 2,500 traditional public schools, close to 150 charter schools, and three residential schools in North Carolina and each of them should be a place where students feel comfortable. Unfortunately, sometimes they are not. Sometimes school policies can make schools feel unwelcoming, especially for students of color. Educators like NCAE member Masonya Ruff often speak out when they witness the effects these policies are having on students because they know that every child deserves to feel comfortable in their learning environment and deserve the same equal chance of getting a good education. Assistant principal of an alternative school in Cleveland County, Ruff said the school has a reputation of being for “the bad students.” That so-called reputation perpetuates for students a sense of not belonging and that they don’t matter, especially students of color. “Last year was my first in an alternative setting so I had to quickly change my mindset from that of a traditional school setting,” said Ruff, a member of the NCAE Educators of Color cadre. “I had to change how I viewed things; I became more self-aware so that I could be a better leader for my students and staff.” As Ruff began to settle into her role at the alternative school, she began noticing issues that could be resolved to make for a better learning experience for students. “All students used to come to the cafeteria upon arrival and sit there until the first block bell rang. Whatever drama took place in the community trickled into the building, and this wasn’t conducive for having a good day for anyone. So, the administration decided to have students get their breakfast as soon as they arrived and take it to class to eat. This change made for smoother mornings.” Another policy change made was to the dress code. Problems occurred because of students not wearing proper

attire. The decision was made by the School Improvement Team to follow the county’s school dress code of no hoodies, nose rings, excessive tight clothing, etc. Students were required to wear shirts embroidered with the school’s logo -- middle school students had to wear burgundy shirts and high schoolers had to wear black shirts. “This change has helped students, especially students of color, by allowing them to feel like they have some control of their school day,” Ruff said. “They don’t have to come to school and have an argument over what they are wearing and they don’t have to worry about posturing when they walk into the cafeteria because everyone is looking at them. It’s no secret that self-expression for most students of color is often viewed as aggressive or threatening. This tends to lead to office referrals, which can lead to suspensions. So, rectifying these two issues, which could be considered triggers, helps control some of the emotional turmoil.” Ruff said changing the policies wasn’t difficult, thanks to an administration that is student-centered. “Our principal truly wants the best for all students,” she said. “She is always open to new things. Some of the staff was somewhat hesitant because they felt their control was being taken away. They were reminded that they only have control over their own behavior. Their decision to come on board with the changes made a huge difference.”

Racist policies have greatly attributed to the huge disparity in suspension rates between Black students and their White counterparts. Click here to read an article recently published by Edutopia titled, “Taking a Stand Against Discriminatory School Policies.”

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NCAE News Bulletin

15

NCAE Center for Instructional Advocacy Fall Offerings National Board Certification Support Seminars

November 21 – 10-11:30 a.m.

The Fall National Board Seminar Series will consist of a deep dive into components 2, 3, and 4. NCBTs will lead candidates through the process of writing to demonstrate evidence of accomplished teaching. Sessions are $5 for members (excluding the introductory session) and $20 for non-members. The Jumpstart Series is $50 and membership will be verified. Confirmation will be sent a week prior to the session, which will be offered via Zoom. Click here to register.

Unpacking Component 4 October 31 – 9 a.m.

Introduction to NB for Initial Candidates (free for all) October 17 – 10-11:30 a.m. November 14 – 10-11:30 a.m. National Board Standards and The Body of Knowledge October 3 – 10-11:30 a.m. December 12 – 10-11:30 a.m. JumpStart Foundations (three-part series) October 19 – 7 p.m. October 24 – 9 a.m. October 29 – 7 p.m.

Unpacking Component 3 October 10 – 10-11:30 a.m.

No-cost classroom resources for teachers Horace Mann is a national sponsor of DonorsChoose, a not-for-profit that connects teachers in need of classroom resources with donors that want to help. H ace Ma offer workshops to help ou navigate the process to improve the chances of getting projects funded.

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Fall 1 (Introduction, Body of Knowledge and Standards, Logistics) October 3 – 9 a.m. – Noon Fall 2 (Writing for NB, Unpacking Components 2, 3, 4) November 7 – 9 a.m. – Noon November 14 – 9 a.m. - Noon

New Educator Mega Conference to Focus on Equity This year’s New Educator Mega Conference will be virtual and is scheduled for October 23-24. “Equipping Educators for Excellence” is the theme and will feature some dynamic guest presenters, including NCAE’s own Michele D. Hicks, Ph.D., of Durham Public Schools, and 2020 North Carolina Teacher of the Year Maureen Stover. Click here for more information and to see descriptions of the sessions being offered.

Unpacking Component 2 November 7 – 10-11:30 a.m. December 5 – 10-11:30 a.m.

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Maintenance of Certificate for Renewing National Boards October 20 – 6:30 p.m. November 7 – 10 a.m. December 5 – 10 a.m.

ca hel make a difference in educators’ lives.

how we ca he ake a diffe e ce i ,c ca H ace Ma ate www.horacemann.com/locator. e e a i e.

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NCAE News Bulletin

16

DEALS

2020

for NEA Members Take Care of Back-to-School Needs at Office Depot Office Depot/OfficeMax offers NEA members discounts on thousands of items: save on every manner of school supplies; PPE such as hand sanitizer, masks, and thermometers; plus everything you need to keep your computer equipment running smoothly. Plus, depending on how much you spend, you could receive an additional percentage off! Visit www.neamb.com/ offidedepot. Save Up to 25 Percent Off Car Rentals Earn $200 Bonus Travel Dollars when you book a rental car through the NEA Travel Program. Office ends October 31, 2020. Offer valid on first car rental only. Travel Dollars will automatically be added to your account – no additional action needed. Visit https:// www.neamb.com/products/nea-travel-car-rental. Enjoy Time With a Good Magazine Fill your break time or after-school hours with some engaging content – read a magazine! The NEA Magazine Service offers more than 800 titles at up to 85 percent off newsstand prices – with selections that are bound to satisfy every age and interest! Magazines make great gifts for birthdays and holidays, too. Visit www.neamb.com/magazine to learn more. Save Money With a Costco Membership Find everything you need for a fresh start to the new year. NEA members obtaining a new Costco membership will receive a $30 Costco Shop Card! It’s easy to join Costco: go online to www.neamb.com/ costco, sign into your account or register, and click “Join Now” to purchase your Costco Membership Activation Certificate. You will receive an e-mail confirmation that includes your certificate, which you can then redeem at any Costco location to start saving.

N C A E

N E W S

Dates to Remember October 2nd

4th 6th 7th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 24th 28th

Kids Music Day National Diversity Day National Custodial Workers Day World Child Health Day American Libraries Day National Forgiveness Day Walk to School Day World Mental Health Day International Day of the Girl Child Columbus Day (NCAE Closed) World Child Development Day Stop America’s Violence Everywhere Day (S.A.V.E.) Global Hand Washing Day Make a Difference Day National Chocolate Day

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Celebrating the Bilingual Child Month Domestic Violence Awareness Month Emotional Wellness Month Global Diversity Awareness Month Health Literacy Month Adopt A Shelter Dog Month

“Education and democracy have the same goal: the fullest possible development of human capabilities.” — Paul Wellstone Follow NCAE events and activities on:

B U L L E T I N

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Positions stated in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official position of NCAE unless so identified. The NCAE News Bulletin, a journal of the Association, is published by the North Carolina Association of Educators, 700 S.Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601, 1-800-662-7924. Linda Powell-Jones, Editor/Designer

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