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NCAE North Carolina Association of Educators

News Bulletin

February 2019

Vol. 49, No. 6

www.ncae.org

Respect for Public Ed Regional Meetings

NCAE Develops Strategies for Next Steps to May 16 March, Rally NCAE members, educators, parents, students, and community supporters inspired by the collective action of teachers in North Carolina on May 16 and across the country last year, participated in Respect for Public Education Regional Meetings coordinated by the Association over the past few weeks. The purpose of the meetings – held in Raleigh, Asheville, Charlotte, and Greenville -- was to plan next steps and become organized to win the schools that North Carolina’s students deserve. “NCAE continues to build from the momentum of our May 16 March for Students and Rally for Respect and the

historic November mid-term elections that eliminated the supermajority in both chambers,” said NCAE President Mark Jewell. “NCAE hosted four Regional Respect for Public Education trainings across the state, organizing educators and communities as we kick off our Spring Campaign of Strong Students. Strong Schools. Strong Communities. As the 2019 General Assembly returns to session, NCAE will continue to elevate the issues and priorities of May 16 that will provide the much needed resources for our students and return NC public schools to first in the southeast and a leader across the nation.”

Members and public education supporters are also encouraged to continue to participate in the Red4Ed movement and wear the color red each Wednesday to show their solidarity for public schools. Take photos and post them on your social media sites with the hashtag #Red4Ed. These events are easy and a great way to get everyone involved. The goal is to build a weekly gathering into the culture of your building and bring awareness that North Carolina needs strong students, strong schools, and strong communities! More details about the Spring Campaign will be unveiled at the NCAE Convention.

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The four regional meetings held across the state were well attended. (1) Asheville, (2) Raleigh, (3) Charlotte, and (4) Greenville. Educators, parents, community leaders, and legislators like Rep. Sydney Batch (5) participated.

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What Does Love Have to Do With Public Education? Everything! Everywhere you turn, advertisements for candy-filled hearts, greeting cards, stuffed animals, and flowers are flooding the airwaves in an attempt to grab your attention in preparation for Valentine’s Day. Love is truly in the air during the month of February, and millions of people will Kristy Moore Vice President spend a lot of money to please that special someone in their lives. While there’s nothing wrong with these displays of affection, let’s think about this for a moment… billions of dollars will be spent in the name of love…in one day! Can you imagine the difference in our public schools if they received some of that love? We could have state-of-the art centers of learning where every child would have an equal opportunity to succeed. Students would have the textbooks and the digital resources they need. Every classroom would be staffed with a highly qualified teacher in the appropriate subject area. There would be ample numbers of school nurses, social workers, counselors, school psychologists, and teacher assistants. And, all educators – from the custodian to the principal – would be well compensated and treated like the professionals you are. There is no question that when it comes to public schools and public education as a whole, love plays a role in the equation. However, that love needs to translate into more funding. The greatest resource we have, our children, in some instances come every day to buildings where love doesn’t seem to live anymore. Buildings in need of repair where ceiling tiles are missing or paint is peeling off the

walls, where necessities such as toilet paper is in short supply, and where class sizes are too large. Our students, and you as educators, are deserving of so much more. However, we must be willing to do our part to ensure North Carolina’s public schools become the institutions of excellence we know they can be! May 16, 2018, was the beginning of it all. I know what some of you may be saying…that was almost nine months ago. Why do we continue to reference May 16? Because, it was the day a movement to propel our state’s education system and schools into greatness began. It was a day of risks, trials, and tribulations, but they all paid off. The momentum that took place was priceless and we can’t afford to let the flame fizzle. When I think about the thousands who wore red and marched in the streets of downtown Raleigh, when I think about the expressive signs held high in the air by many of you and our supporters, and when I think about the powerful messages given by our governor, state president, and other guest speakers, I get goosebumps! Everything associated with the march and rally was born out of love – a love for the students, a love for the profession, and a love for those educators who came before us – men and women who stood strong and fought to change injustices, some which continue to rear their ugly heads today! As we continue the work to keep public education strong, let’s keep our sights set on why we do what we do, let’s remember those who protested and gave their lives for the good of what we do, and let’s use this platform that we have been given to make a lasting change that our children can be proud of! Show and share your love of public education as often as you can because the love we have is not reserved for just one day, but for a lifetime! Be proud of who you are, be proud of the difference you make in the lives of students, and be proud to be a member of the one organization that is here to support you every step of the way!

President Mark Jewell, Vice President Kristy Moore, and the Cat in the Hat encourage you to “Gear Up” for Read Across America Day 2019!

Friday, March 1


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A New Year... A New Beginning... A Time to Reflect Every year as the clock ticks down to midnight… 10, 9, 8, 7, 6… Another year is about to be in the books… 5, 4, 3, 2, 1… Happy New Year. Welcome to 2019. It is only natural at this point in time that you reflect on your accomplishments and assess your surroundings. I know I do. And did this past New Year’s Eve. For me, 2018 represented the beginning of my fifth year of serving as your executive director, leading the staff to partner with members and leaders to move the work of this great Association. Together, we have accomplished great things and elevated NCAE’s voice and influence. So, in true beginning of year fashion, here are a few of NCAE’s accomplishments in 2018. 1) March for Students and Rally for Respect – May 16. Thirty thousand of our closest friends joined us on the lawn of the NCAE building and at the General Assembly to send a strong message. A sea of red took to the streets to lift up our collective voices to let legislators know what educators and students need. Parents and community supporters joined us that day and continue to advocate for the resources all public schools need. 2) Election Day – November 6. Two great things happened. Supermajorities were broken in both the North Carolina House and Senate. This will now allow Governor Cooper to veto bad legislation and not have that veto overridden by a supermajority. Damaging constitutional amendments were also defeated that would have altered the state constitution to severely limit the roles of the executive and the judicial branches. NCAE was instrumental in endorsing pro-public education candidates and getting the word out on who and what aligned with our values. All of you helped get propublic education candidates across the finish line and defeat misleading amendments. We must now embrace our new political reality and work to develop relationships with new and continuing legislators to move our legislative priorities. 3) Renaissance Locals – March 24. Nine local associations achieved Renaissance Local status and were recognized at the NCAE Convention. Forsyth,

Burke, Davidson, Lexington City, Chatham, Chapel HillCarrboro, Mt. Airy, Thomasville City, and Rowan-Salisbury. This program is now named Power Locals. These local associations grew by at least one member Rachelle Johnson and raised their local Executive Director visibility by collecting new educator cards, participating in local and state political and/or organizing events, becoming involved in their communities, and much more. They received plaques celebrating their achievement and a check for $2 for each member in their local to continue their organizing work. This year, many locals are on track to become Power Locals and join the club. 4) New Member Goal of 1,100. The NCAE Board of Directors approved a recommendation from the Membership and Organizing Committee that we recruit 1,100 new members as early in the membership year as possible. NCAE accomplished this goal by the end of 2018. A major step forward for the organization. This was accomplished by raising the visibility of NCAE, reaching out to new educators to hear their needs, sharing major political wins, and lots of one-on-one conversations at the state and local levels. While these are all incredible wins, no reflection would be complete without a look to the future. This month, NCAE launched a new campaign – “Strong Students. Strong Schools. Strong Communities.” This campaign will build on the accomplishments of the last year and strengthen the organization as a whole while empowering members to advocate for themselves and their profession. Trainings have been ongoing and will continue into 2019. I am excited for our Association and look forward to the future. As we continue on our journey together, please remember…We are #Inthistogether and #NCAEStrong.

Action Report on New Business Items Passed at the 2018 NCAE Convention Action has been taken by the Association on New Business Items that were voted on and passed by delegates at the 2018 NCAE Convention in Raleigh. Click here to access.


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Field Trip Provides Lessons on History, Social Justice, and Faith Sandy Young wants his students to become instruments of transformation, but living in a rural area can sometimes make that, well, challenging. The world is a very big place and as an educator, he wants them to be equipped to become global citizens in an ever-changing society. Recently, Young, who teaches eighthgrade science at South Davidson Middle School in Davidson County, coordinated a field trip for his students to the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in Greensboro. It may sound odd that a science teacher, who is also a minister, would choose such a historical site. But Young also has a social studies certification and realized that visiting the museum would be a great opportunity to raise students’ awareness during this African-American History Month. The field trip was made possible through a mini-grant that Young received from the Uwharrie District of the United Methodist Church, funded by the Duke Endowment to raise awareness of racial justice and equity in rural areas. His goal was to expose and educate students and make them aware of the history of racial equity and justice. “I also wanted to use this opportunity as a resource to stimulate hopeful and courageous conversations for the future, and I wanted students to realize that the accomplishments of those four brave young men during the

Woolworths lunch counter demonstration started a movement in this country that began in our back yard,” said Young, Region 2 director on the NCAE Board. “In addition, I wanted the experience to serve as a tool for students as they begin leaving this rural community for the first time and building relationships.” Young added that he also wanted students to recognize and appreciate that secular partners and faith partners can come together to build partnerships that enhance education. He believes that his two professions – educator and faith leader – go hand in hand. “It is my belief that public schools need the church and the church is called to serve the community in whatever capacity is needed. It is the church’s responsibility to extend grace to those who are oppressed and to fight to extinguish injustice in whatever form it presents itself. We are called to be tools for the transformation of the world, reaching out in love to people of all ages, nations, and races.” The field trip provided lessons that have hopefully turned into seeds for the future, said Young. Students learned that the Civil Rights movement was real and it began with young people who were not afraid to stand up for what was right. They also learned that contrary to what they may think, not all people are

Photos courtesy of the Lexington Dispatch and EducationNC.

treated equally. “It became real to the students that things they have learned about were not exaggerated. They are currently studying the Civil Rights movement and I hope it has planted seeds that will allow them to view the world through a new lens and approach life differently without any preconceived notions.”

NCAE Welcomes to the Staff... NCAE welcomes Ana Gomez as a new staff attorney in the Advocacy Center. She worked as an agency legal specialist for the state of North Carolina prior to coming to NCAE. An attorney for 19 years, Gomez said her interest in NCAE stems from a deep respect for the profession and the fact that she is the mother to two school-aged children. Education was an important part of her upbringing in Venezuela.

“Both of my grandmothers placed a lot of emphasis on the importance of getting an education because they themselves did not have a formal education,” she said. In addition to assisting members with legal issues, Gomez said that one of her goals as a staff attorney is to educate members about laws that affect their employment. “If members have that knowledge, they can make the right decisions about their careers. Also, it’s a way they can help make effective policy changes at the local level.” Gomez completed her undergraduate studies at Andres Bello Catholic

University in Venezuela, and received a master’s degree in the study of law from Hamline University in Minnesota. She earned her Juris Doctor from William Mitchell University College of Law, which is also located in Minnesota. She is married and has two sons and a daughter. The family is very involved in volunteer work, serving often as a host family for international students. When not working, some of the activities she enjoys include playing tennis, assisting with coaching tennis through Special Olympics, and attending baseball games.


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Members Share Their Thoughts on the Effects Inclement Weather Days May or May Not Have on Student Learning Last fall yielded two hurricanes that hit North Carolina and an early snow storm that brought things to a stand-still in early December. Because of Mother Nature, students have already missed several days of school for the 2018-19 year. Some of these days will be made up, however, some will not. We wanted to know how you as educators help keep students on track with their lessons when inclement weather strikes. And, if you think those missed days pose a significant academic risk. Here are a few of the responses you shared with us. “To insure my students are not impacted negatively due to Mother Nature, I provide after-school study sessions to reteach standards that were not mastered. I strongly feel that additional time added to the school day or days added to the year are unwarranted. Fellow educators everywhere are consciously providing rigorous academic instruction to insure that students are prepared for promotion.” – Vernita Hill, Jackson Middle School, Guilford County “The multiple missed days forced me to flip my classroom and I asked students to copy notes at home. We did the examples with practice upon our return to school. This allowed me to complete topics in the curriculum. However, this eliminated having any time to spend on topics on which students may have benefited from additional practice. Building 3-5 snow days into the schedule would help with keeping teacher workdays and still meet the set hour requirements for students.” – Melinda Mouzzon, Heritage High School, Wake County “I believe that too many missed days puts students at risk, especially in my school. Many of my students don’t have Internet access so we cannot just have a virtual snow day or weather day. We are given a set number of days for instruction, especially with Advanced Placement students. When we miss days, we have to play catchup and often times we can’t cover everything we were supposed to.” – Amy Burger, North Edgecombe High School, Edgecombe County “I don’t think students show a regression of skills learned during days missed to inclement weather. Durham Public Schools provides a significant amount of learning web-based resources for all students. On these days, I encourage parents to log into their child’s account to help keep them learning.” – Delven Mearis, Spring Valley Elementary School, Durham County “I don’t think that inclement weather days pose any more of a significant academic risk than any other day a student might be out of school. If one plans ahead, especially for snow days, those days could be both fun and instructional. With a little imagination and a year-at-a-glance pacing guide, there could be hundreds of ways to make an inclement weather day more of an educational opportunity than just another day from the books.” – Robert J. Felker, Edward D. Sadler Elementary School, Gaston County

Where Do Teachers Get the Most RESPECT? How educators are respected in relation to other professions can be a key marker in determining their overall status in an individual country. In China and Malaysia, the teaching profession is often on par with doctors. In Finland, the public aligns teaching with social work. Other countries rank teaching alongside librarians. These are just some of the findings in the 2018 Global Teacher Index, a worldwide survey of the general public and educators in 35 countries on the status of the teaching profession around the world. How teachers were viewed relative to other occupations is one of four indicators the index uses to measure overall respect for the profession. The survey also looked at what teachers should be paid and whether parents encourage their children to enter the profession. Click here to read more. Story by Tim Walker, NEAToday


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James Brooks Elected to National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Board of Directors

PROUD MOMENTS

West Wilkes High School English teacher and member James Brooks has been elected to the Board of Directors of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Brooks, a NBCT and the 2007 recipient of the National Education Association’s Teaching Excellence Award, is one of six new members elected. Durham Member Wendell Tab Receives Local TV Station’s Voter Choice Award

North Carolina Continues to Lead in Number of National Board Certified Teachers The ranks of National Board Certified Teachers in North Carolina increased by 557 in the month of December, continuing the state’s lead in the number of teachers holding the credential from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Approximately 22,000 teachers in North Carolina have attained the respected national certification, which is based on a rigorous performance-based assessment that typically takes from one to three years to complete and measures what accomplished teachers and counselors should know and be able to do. North Carolina accounts for nearly one-fifth (18 percent) of all teachers nationally who are certified by the teaching standards organization. Florida ranks second with 13,551 (11 percent of national total) followed by Washington (10,859), South Carolina (9,125), and California (7,065). The state’s school districts also continue to rank among the top 30 districts nationally for numbers of teachers with national certification, with seven: Wake County remained first with 2,745; Charlotte-Mecklenburg is fourth with 2,137; Guilford County is ninth with 756; Buncombe County is 17th with 584; Winston-Salem/Forsyth is 18th with 574; New Hanover County is 24th with 414; and Union County is 30th with 448. North Carolina supports teachers pursuing national certification by providing low-interest loans to pay the $1,900 assessment fee and three paid release days from normal teaching duties for new candidates to develop their portfolios. NCAE also supports candidates and teachers who have received certification by providing a number of workshops and webinars throughout the year. Teachers in North Carolina who achieve certification receive a 12 percent salary supplement to their regular pay, and they also are awarded eight continuing education credits (CEUs). Information provided by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction

Wendell Tabb, an award-winning theater director at Hillside High School in Durham, is the recipient of the 2018 WRAL.com Voters’ Choice Award for K-12 Educator. The award celebrates the best businesses, people, and places in Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. An educator for more than 30 years, Tabb was described as “an AMAZING teacher that encourages his students to do more than they ever dream. Hillside drama has grown under his leadership!” Eight North Carolina Schools Earn National Blue Ribbon Honors in 2018 Congratulations to eight schools in North Carolina for earning National Blue Ribbon status. The recognition is based on a school’s overall academic performance or progress in closing achievement gaps among student subgroups. They are: Clement Elementary in Sampson County, Eastover-Central Elementary School of Arts in Cumberland County, Glenn C. Marlow Elementary in Henderson County, Haywood Early College in Haywood County, Kitty Hawk Elementary in Dare County, the STEM Early College at N.C. A&T in Guilford County, W.J. Gurganus Elementary in Carven County, and Socrates Academy (charter school) in Mecklenburg County. All schools were honored in one of two performance categories based on all student scores, subgroup student scores, and graduation rates. • Exemplary High Performing Schools are among their state’s highest performing schools as measured by state assessments or nationally normed tests. • Exemplary Achievement Gap Closing Schools are among their state’s highest performing schools in closing achievement gaps between a school’s subgroups and all students over the past five years. All eight of North Carolina’s schools recognized for the Blue Ribbon designation were selected as Exemplary High Performing Schools.


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New Educator Weekend February 22-23, 2019

•Social and Racial Justice Issues •Working With Families and

Community •Strategies for Positive

Classroom Management •Personal Wellness

NCAE’s New Educator Weekend is a conference for new educators in their first three years in the profession.

WHERE: Doubletree Hotel, 1707 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, NC TIME: Registration opens at 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 22 General Session begins at 6 p.m. (food, conversation, and networking until 9 p.m.) Concurrent Sessions on Saturday, Feb. 23 (listed above) COST: $10 for NCAE members and $525 for non-members REGISTRATION: Participants must register by February 10, 2019, so hotel reservations can be made and to ensure there are adequate materials and surprises. SPACE IS LIMITED! CLICK HERE

CLICK HERE

The concurrent breakout sessions will provide skills, learnings, and connections for empowering participants. The luncheon and keynote speaker, along with the closing session, is sure to invigorate all of us as participants return to their communities. Questions should be directed to christi.broadway@ncae.org.


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2019 NCAE-ESP Conference February 22 – 23, 2019 NCAE Center 700 S. Salisbury St. Raleigh, NC 27601 The 2019 NCAE ESP Conference is the premier professional development opportunity for Education Support Professionals in North Carolina. The goal of this conference is to enhance the skills and knowledge of ESP members to positively impact student achievement, build community relations, organize members, advocate for educators, build stronger locals, and help our members do their jobs better. The conference offers 3 different sessions.

XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXX COST OF REGISTRATION: Includes conference materials, lunch & dinner Saturday Members $35.00 Non-Members $50.00 The DEADLINE to register for the conference is February 18, 2019. You MUST register if you plan to attend.

SESSIONS OFFERED Sessions begin Saturday morning. We will wrap up Saturday evening with a general session on Racial and Social Justice. GENERAL SESSION: Racial and Social Justice Presenter: Naomi Chisolm Given the rapidly changing landscape and conditions for our students and members, in and out of the classroom, it is imperative that we move from presence to power. The goal of this session is to provide a unique space for educators, students, parents & families, organizers, community members and leaders unite for the advancement of justice in education. COLLEGE READINESS: Prepare Today; Save Tomorrow Presenters: Katherine Davis, Jocelyn Morrison This workshop is designed to inform educators on how to help parents understand the importance of planning for their students education before they get to high school. The participants will also receive the tools needed to aid parents and students in eliminating a lot of out of pocket expenses. WHO ARE ESPs: Family Role Call Presenters: Karen Slade, Tijuana Greene This session consists of making members aware of the nine ESP categories. Our goal is to help people understand the diversity of ESPs in educating our children. HOW TO WORK TOGETHER: It Takes a Village Presenters: Margaret Powell, Ray Riffe This session will introduce educators to 5 steps of organizational leadership. During the session, we will help educators identify how to build the village necessary for engagement educator to the student, educator to educator, and educator to parent. Room reservations must be made no later than February 7, 2019. Reservations made after February 7th, will not guarantee our discounted group rate. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Holiday Inn & Suites Cary XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 5630 Dillard Drive XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Cary, NC 27511 $79.60 per night, double occupancy, hot breakfast buffet included XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX We are asking delegates to bring items for our College Care Packages. Each region will be given a category and asked to bring items in that category. We are excited about this community project and look forward to distributing them to college students who will greatly appreciate them. You will receive an email with further instructions shortly .

If you are interested in being a vendor, or know someone who may be interested, please email Latavia Godwin at Latavia.Mayfield@ncae.org. The fee is $60. It includes a table, 2 chairs, electrical, and lunch.

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DEALS

2019

for NEA Members

Make a Resolution to Travel This Year! Purchase a cruise! Prepare for spring break with hotel and resort deals, or get road trip ready with car rental discounts. Save money on your travel plans with your NEA membership. Get a head start on your vacation plans by booking now! You can find everything you need by clicking here.

N C A E

N E W S

Dates to Remember February 9th 14th

HkonJ People’s Assembly, Downtown Raleigh Race Relations Day International Book Giving Day 17th National PTA Founders Day World Human Spirit Day 18th Presidents’ Day (NCAE Offices Closed) 20th World Day for Social Justice 22nd-23rd ESP Conference, NCAE Center Library Lovers Month National African-American History Month Plant the Seeds of Greatness Month

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“Until we get equality in education, we won’t have an equal society.” -- Sonia Sotomayor, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

B U L L E T I N

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Positions stated in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official position of NCAE unless so identified. The NCAE News Bulletin, a journal of the Association, is published by the North Carolina Association of Educators, 700 S.Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601, 1-800-662-7924. Linda D. Powell, Editor/Designer

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February 2019 NCAE News Bulletin  

The News Bulletin is the official publication of the North Carolina Association of Educators.

February 2019 NCAE News Bulletin  

The News Bulletin is the official publication of the North Carolina Association of Educators.

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