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Uni

Rye

Uni

Car University of Manitoba

Uni

University of Calgary

McG

University of British Columbia

Lav

Dal

[1]

[4]

[2]

[5]

ENTRANCE PAVILION

[3]

Architecture Portfolio Design and Research 2013 - 2014


FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT ITALIAN PAVILION EXPO 2015, MILAN

MIT SENSEable City Lab Role : Conceptual and Preliminary Design,Extensive Research, Writing, Representation, Documentation


1 / The Local Physical Environment

2/ Objects that Sense and Communicate

We perceive ourselves and our surroundings through the interaction with local objects within a physical environment.

Through technological advances such as data-tagging and sensors, objects are able to collect data - about themselves and their environment - and communicate this to the user.

3/ The Internet of Things

Through the ubiquitous application of these technologies, the Internet of Things is born. Intelligent objects communicate locally between both the user and other surrounding objects, and connect via the Internet to remote objects, people and places, creating a ‘physical Internet.’


Our understanding of the physical world is largely composed of our relationship with objects, and the way in which we interact with and assert value on them.

FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

OBJECTS

While RFID and object ‘tagging’ has not spread as fast as initially anticipated, it is a widespread belief that new technologies will soon bring us to the same IoT endpoint. Not only do tagged objects allow people to constantly gather specific and aggregated information about them, but they enable communication among objects themselves. The consequences of IoT are vast: from logistics to retail to our daily interaction with our homes and everyday objects. It will enable an increasingly reflexive scenario in which objects, environments, and eventually the city, will talk back to the user. The Internet of Things will readdress the notion of context through a heightened level of connectivity. This ‘hypercontext’ of both physical and digital space - in which all ‘things’ and people are situated and connected - will reassert values of place, culture and identity as well as material value. IoT marries the ubiquity of digital connectivity with the locality of the physical context.

The Internet of Things will introduce a new level of connectivity, contextualisation, and understanding of our physical world.

GATHERING

context acquisition

With advances in technology, objects are starting to become digitally recognisable and intelligent. They gather and communicate data regarding their history, behaviour and position, creating databases of object-based information. In a world in which objects can “speak”, everything can be concerned in an analogue and digital context. This phenomenon - known as the Internet of Things (IoT), reformulates our relationship with objects in a disruptive manner.

DATABASE

USERS

COMBINING

context storage & modification

1.1 The Internet of Things

SENSORS

COMMUNITIES

Objects contain invisible information that is not utilised to Individuals, communities and businesses can use and build their maximum extent. What if we could harvest this inforupon the intelligent information available via this cloud. They mation, narrowing the gap between the physical and digital can also create and contribute information that feeds back world? down into the system, closing the feedback loop between obA local data “cloud” is capable of gathering information from jects and people, creating a dynamic system of information. various objects and environments, through of devicObjects contain invisible information that is not an A array local data ‘cloud’ is capable of gathering Individuals, communities and business can utilised to their maximum extent. use and build upon the intelligent information information from various objects and es and sensors. it not only collects information, but enables What if of weintelligent could harvest this information, environments, through an array of devices and available via this cloud. They can also create and the creation applications that combine the data narrowing the gap between the physical and sensors. It not only collects information, but contribute information that feeds back down into in novel ways, revealing previously invisible relationships digital world? enables the creation of intelligent applications the system, closing the feedback loop between between spaces and things. that combine the data in novel ways, revealing objects and people and creating a dynamic previously invisible relationships between spaces and things.

system of information.


SUPERMARKET FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT PAVILION

ENTRANCE PAVILION

OVERALL

-

KITCHEN PAVILION


5

1.1 project milestones closing the loop

internet of things

Closing the loop means rethinking the production chain, making it self-sufficient and and sustaibale in supplying the human needs and demands. It means being aware that any step in the chain has an influence on the following one, therefore it means rethinking the chain entirely.

One of the main concepts behind the Future Food DisFUTURE FOOD DISTRICT trict is to translate the “Internet of things“ into real life.

1.2 1. 2

Project Concept Milestones

Closing the loop

Closing the loop Closing the loop means rethinking the production chain, making it self-sufficient

sustaibale in supplying the human needs and demands. being Closing and theand loop means rethinking the production chain,It means making aware that any step in the chain has an influence on the following one, therefore it it self-sufficient andtheand in supplying the human means rethingking chainsustaibale entirely. needs and demands. It means being aware that any step in the chain has an influence on the following one, therefore it means

the smart grid In the Future Food District we will simulate a perfect system integration and smart grid, that will be able to provide additional information to the visitors directly on every device, connected together.

PROGETTO ALLESTITIVO - CONSULENTI

Thanks to RFID technology, in a not-so-distant future, all the products will be able to communicate to the consumers about their history, their origin, the producFUTURE DISTRICT the full contemporary food tion process, etc,FOOD narrating chian’s efficiency. Inside FFD the Internet of Things can expand the experiences ofthe visitors. Tracking the food products sold in the supermarket pavillion will create new interactions and show innovative concepts never experienced before.

Internet of Things

Internet of Things and RFID One of the main concepts behind the Future Food District is to translate the

“Internet of things“ intoconcepts real life. One of the main behind the Future Food District is to Thanks to RFID technology, in a not-so-distant future, all the products will be able translate the to“Internet of things“ realtheir life. to communicate the consumers about theirinto history, origin, the production process, etc, full contemporary chian’s efficiency. future, all the Thanks tonarrating RFID the technology, in afood not-so-distant products will beof Things able to to the about Inside FFD Internet can communicate expand the experiences of theconsumers visitors. Tracking

On a server shared with the smart grid there will be the - products, and every customer will OVERALL database of all the be able to interact with it in different locations of the district. On the other hand, the system will collect data about the visitors and their interaction with the system, providing an extensive layer of information to Coop and Expo.

The smart grid System integration and smart grid In the Future Food District we will simulate a perfect system integration and smart grid, that be able to provide additional information to the visitors directly on Inwillthe Future Food District we will simulate a perfect every device, connected together.

system integration and smart grid, that will be able to provide additional information tosmart thegrid visitors on every On a server shared with the there willdirectly be the database of all thedevice, products, connected together. and every customer will be able to interact with it in different locations of the

4


BEFORE EXPO 2015

Coop is the Italian leader in the field of food distribution and production. Maintaining a fundamental interest in the fields of innovation, ecological and social sustainability in the food chain, Coop will collaborate with MIT Senseable City lab in order to develop the Future Food District during Expo 2015. The team will develop innovative ideas surrounding the application of new technologies, making it possible to study the future scenario of tomorrow’s supermarket, combining the experience and expertise of both Coop and MIT. The collaboration will create a unique opportunity for Coop to transform the Supermarket Pavilion into a real lab of experimentation, conducting research by collecting and studying visitors’ behaviour, leading to a model for the future that can be applicable to the global food chain.

PRELIMINARY STUDIES

PROTOTYPING

DESIGN OF THE TOMORROW’S VISION FOR THE SUPERMARKET

DELEVOLPEMENT OF THE TOMORROW’S MODEL

STUDIES OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS

DURING EXPO 2015

Unique enviroment of experimentation

Expo 2015

Studies on human behaviour Application

World wide

Real experience

of new solutions

STUDIES ON THE VISITORS BEHAVIOUR

APPLICATION OF INNOVATIVE PROTOTYPE

DATA COLLECTION FROM THE VISITORS INTERACTION

EXPERIMENTATION OF THE VISION

visibility

Data collection A unique enviroment

Real experience

for experimentation

Leader in the distribution

Values

Concept design

Application of new technologies

AFTER EXPO 2015

Social activities

FFD

Coop Experience in the food chain Experience in technologies applied to the food chain

Coop and MIT Senseable City Lab in Expo 2015 - FFD Lab

Experience in innovative solutions

MIT

Development of a new philosophy Innovation

FFD legacy

ARCHIVE OF DATA FROM THE EXPO EXPERIENCE

APPLICATION OF EXPO EXPERIENCE IN THE REAL FOOD CHAIN

APPLICATION OF THE MODEL STUDIED IN COOP’S CHAIN


1.2 The Internet of Food and People In the field of food, IoT promises to bring widespread consequences and effects throughout the supply chain, from production to waste management, via packaging, logistics, distribution (including advertisement, services, payment..), and consumption. Our proposal is to use Expo 2015 as a unique test bed for exploring the consequences of IoT in the food chain. Its unique value would come both from the international 2.3dimension of the Expo with the millions of expected visitors, and the central role played by Italy in the food sector, with its worldwide excellence award. In particular, the Future Food District will focus on new dynamics that will increase individual participation – an increased exchange with objects to foster an increased exchange with humans: the Internet of Food and People. What kind new connections will arise from the simultaneously analogue and digital interaction between people and food? How will it influence our lifestyle, in the way we produce, sell, buy and cook food?

The World Market

Thinking about communities and connections between people, how would the phenomenon of the Internet of Food FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT and People enable new forms of interaction? What new forms of food-related services will affect the current network of customers and retailers, and how? The Internet of Food and People can be understood through three main concepts: the traceability and inteconnection of food; new social interaction inside the food supply chain; and new techniques of food design and production.

VISITOR EXPERIENCE

-

Food and People

Traceability

The World Market

Expo will attract a large number of people, and food, from all over the world.

The opportunity to trace each product, through RFID technology, allows new kind of interactions beetween food and users, and between the users themselves.

The second step is to create a unique market, made up of products from all over the world (national pavilions) and with the goods of individual local suppliers.


1 .1

Co

The Futu stand in site, loca of Cardo Based on Internet district w represen of the fu of the fu square in will inclu and a ve new way energy i Internet rethink t supply c closed lo the food the Inter is based the obje products informat including and cons of intera within th distribut


OVERALL

FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

-

22

1.3

District oncept Program 1.3 Program Concept

The Future Food District will stand in the heart of the EXPO site, located near the crossing of Cardo and Decumano streets. Based on the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT), the district will consist of two pavilions, representing respectively the house of the future, the supermarket of the future and the public square in-between. The District will include both an algae farm and a vertical farm, envisioning new ways of producing food and The site can be dividedallows into us a to our future cities. The Internet of Things ure Food energy Districtinwill of distinct tematic areas: a current linearnumber food supply chain, and move towards the heartrethink of thetheEXPO ated nearclosed the crossing loop connecting people the food network. The concept of • ThetoSupermarket Pavilion o and Decumano streets. the Internet of Food and People is based on the possibility that • products The Piazza n the concept of the(specifically the the objects of Supermarket) provide of Thingsinformation (IoT), theabout themselves, • The KitchenforPavilion including, example, traceability will consist ofconsequently two pavilions, and new possibilities of interaction with the products The distinct design elements that nting respectively the house within the chain of production and and distribution products. connect encloseof these areas

ALREADY TENDERED BOX PAVILION

ALREADY TENDERED BOX PAVILION

3

3

Program overview

uture, the supermarket are: uture and the public TheThe siteDistrict can be separated intoareas a number of distinct areasbeand The three distinct of the Future Food District Supermarket Pavilion n-between. • The Canopy (Algae andwillBugs) divided into a series of smaller that architecturally elements. The main distinct areas are: spaces ude both an algae farm curate the•envisioned experiences. The exhibition path The Facades 1. Entrance / Check-in ertical farm, envisioning begins from entry into the supermarket pavilion and ends by • The Supermarket Pavilion 2. PaleoFuture Exhibition ys of producing food andexiting • The Hydroponic Farm through the kitchen pavilion. The path’s logic follows • The GardenThe that of the food cycle, from production, to distribution, to in our future cities. 3. Automated Warehouse The cohesive design of these areas Table of Things• The allows us to consumption and finally exiting through waste, closing the 4. Inhabitable Screen and elements, and their connection the current linear foodPavilion • The Kitchen loop. 5. Valley of Products to the surrounding context, chain, and move towards a represent the design of thethese Future 6. Supermarket of the Future oop connecting people to elements The distinct design that connect and enclose 7. Check-out d network.areas The are: concept of Food District. 8. Meeting rooms rnet of Food and People • The Canopy (Algae and Bugs) 9. Cooking Tree d on the possibility that • The Facades ects (specifically the Lifted Piazza s of Supermarket) provide 10. Public square tion about themselves, 11. Recipe Tree g, for example, traceability sequently new possibilities Kitchen Pavilion action with the products 2 3 12. Kitchen For All he chain of production and 13. Community of Food Display tion of products. 1

4

Algae Lab

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GY LO O N

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15.

Removal Chain

2

16.

Exit

4

17.

Hydroponic Farm

18.

Digestor

19

Piazza

Food Chain Path 1 - Production 2 - Distribution

14.

GY LO O N

8

3 - Consumption 4 - Waste

19.

Services

20.

Phytodepuration Pool

21.

Bugs canopy

22.

Dynamic facades

23.

Algae canopy

THE SUPERMARKET

THE PIAZZA

THE KITCHEN N


1. 2

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FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

PROGETTO ALLESTITIVO - HANDLING SYSTEM

1.4 Parameters

2

• The FFD will be philosophicaly considered as a unique place and a unitary system, ruled by the concepts of the Internet of Things (the possibility that the objects can provide information about themselves enabling traceability, the consequently new possibilities of interaction with the products within the food chain) and of Closing the Loop of the food supply chain. • The Supermarket is an innovative place: a real supermarket, with real sales and logistic challenges, but an exhibition space at the same time. The visitor will have a direct experience relating to the sale and the interaction with the product in order to discover the new Supermarket enviroment. • The Kitchen, on the same page, will consitute an exhibition space and a real place to cook, eat, and socialize. The FFD will be philosophicaly considered as a Piazza will bypresent the production and waste unique place and• aThe unitary system, ruled the phases concepts of the management Internet of Things (the possibilityof the food supply cha hat the objects in. can provide information about hemselves enabling traceability, the consequently Dimensions new possibilities of interaction with the products • square metres: within the food chain) and of Closing the Loop of he food supply chain. lot area 9800 sqm The SupermarketSupermarket is an innovative place: a pavilion area 2496 sqm eal supermarket, with real sales and logistic of which exhibition 1580 sqm challenges, but an exhibition space at the same pavilion area 2496’ sqm ime. The visitorKitchen will have a direct experience elating to the sale the interaction with the of and which exhibition 1765 sqm product in order to discover the new Supermarket • no. visitors per day: 30000 enviroment. • opening hours: 10 am - 9 pm The Kitchen, on the same page, will consitute an

District Overview

arameters

Kitchen storage and service spine

Loading and service spine

Large screens above kitchen Auditorium

Kitchen Experience Food court

Interactive Tables

exhibition space and a real place to cook, eat, and socialize.

Public Toilets

The Piazza will present the production and waste management phases of the food supply chain.

mensions

Automated Warehouse

Piazza Hydroponic Farm

square metres: lot area

9800 sqm

Supermarket pavilion area of which exhibition

2496 sqm 1580 sqm

Kitchen pavilion area of which exhibition

2496’ sqm 1765 sqm

no. visitors per day:

30000

opening hours:

10 am - 9 pm

Algae Canopy Supermarket

District overall

N


FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

1.3

PROGETTO ALLESTITIVO - HANDLING SYSTEM

Architectur Brief 1.3.2 The Supermarket

1. Entrance

4.

• • •

square meter: 50 sqm Represents the entrance to the pavilion A place where the old vision on the past are on display.

square

in the ” opport their p as inno

2.

Check-in

no. su

square meter: 125 sqm In the check-in area, a place at the entrance of the pavilion under the event space, the visitors will learn about their future experience in the supermarket and interact with the technology they will use in the space for sale

In the space These provid

3.

Innovative space for sale

• • • • • •

exposition area: 1375 sqm fast route: 250 sqm no. products on show: 1200 SKU no. visitors: 30000 people per day no. receipts: 5000 / day Products provided from Coop will be in line with the concept of the Future Food District. All products within the supermarket are required to be tagged. This will allow for all products to be tracked and traced in realtime. Data visualisations required of traceability of information. Spaces for the delivery of products to the visitors are sprawl in all the slae area.

• •

Supp

5. Loadi •

Dimen

Service wareho In the s people In the s elevato ground

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6.

Chec

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10

ral

1.5 Supermarket

1. Entrance • square meter: 50 sqm • A place where the old vision on the past are on display. 2. Check-in • square meter: 125 sqm In the check-in area, a place at the entrance of the pavilion under the event space, the visitors will learn about their future experience in the supermarket and interact with the technology they will use in the space for sale 3. Innovative space for sale • exposition area: 1375 sqm • no. products on show: 1200 SKU • no. visitors: 30000 people per day • no. receipts: 5000 / day • All products within the supermarket are required to be tagged. This will allow for all products to be tracked and traced in realtime. • Data visualisations required of traceability pliers 7. ControlofRoom information. e meter: 180 sqm • square meter: 10 sqm 4. Suppliers ”innovative place for sale” there will be the square from meter: 180 sqm tunity to show• products the suppliers, using 8. Waste Room • in within the ”innovative place for sale” there will be the physical presence the supermarket as well • square meter: 20 sqm ovative technologies to highlight their visibility. opportunity to show products from the suppliers, using uppliers: ~6their per fortnight, physical presence within the supermarket as well 9. Handling system 72 suppliers fortechnologies entire as innovative to highlight their visibility. • no. suppliers: ~6Expo per fortnight, 6-months of 10. Automated warehouse suppliers for space of the72supermarket we entire will provide 6-months of small Exposuppliers. es for the exhibition of the In thethe space the supermarket11. we will provide e spaces will•follow sameof guidelines Auditorium spaces for the exhibition of the small suppliers. ded for the large suppliers. 5. Loading dock • Dimensions: 54 sqm ing dock • Service spaces will be required to cater for cleaning, nsions: 54 sqm warehouse / storage equipment, and staff restrooms e spaces will be required to cater for cleaning, Check-out ouse / storage6.equipment, and staff restrooms meter: 80 sqm sevice space •wesquare will provide restrooms for 25-30 Control Room e of the Coop 7. staff. square meter: 10 logistic sqm service spine •will be provide also the ors for the movement of the goods from the 8. Waste Room dfloor to the top floor meter: 20 sqm • square 9. Handling system ck-out 10. Automated warehouse e meter: 8011. sqm Auditorium heck-out works as a place where the people ave the automated cart used inside the e for sale, will learn how to use the food they ht and will try new seamless way for pay.

7

5 8

11

10

9

2

1

3 4 6

The Supermarket, axonometric view


Architectural brief 1.3.3 The Kitchen

1.

Entrance / Tree of Recipes

• • •

square meter: 50 sqm Represents the entrance to the pavilion An explanation of the experience is given in the left side of the entrance.

kitchens. Data is fed by the interaction o the temperature area.

6.

Digestor

2.

Temperature areas

To close the loop a bio-digesto waste of the pavillion, producin gas, and nutrients for plants an

The experience inside the kitchen is divided by temperature, and include several different automated experiences where the customers can test, buy and consume products.

7.

Service area

The back area is used as stora in the kitchen.

3.

Interactive tables

A raw of interactive tables divide the temperature area from the experience area in the kitchen. Visitors needs to check in at the table using products bought at the supermarket as a ticket. Tables incorporate RFID readers.

4.

Kitchen experience

Once checked in, visitors will be involved in a cooking experience, where they will be able to prepare food assisted by chefs, using the most advanced technologies.

5.

Tree of recepies

Infographic projected on the area above the


1.6 Kitchen

1. Entrance / Tree of Recipes • square meter: 50 sqm • Represents the entrance to the pavilion • An explanation of the experience is given on the left side of the entrance. 2. Temperature areas • The experience inside the kitchen is divided by temperature, and include several different automated experiences where the customers can test, buy and consume products. 3. Interactive tables • A row of interactive tables divide the temperature area from the experience area in the kitchen. • Visitors needs to check in at the table using products bought at the supermarket as a ticket. • Tables incorporate RFID readers. 4. Kitchen experience of the customers in • Once checked in, visitors will be involved in a cooking experience, where they will be able to prepare food assisted by chefs, using the most advanced technologies. 5. Tree or will process the of recipes • Infographic ng hidrogen, natural projected on the area above the nd algae. kitchens. • Data is fed by the interaction of the customers in the temperature area. 6. Digestor age for the •food used the loop a bio-digestor will process the To close waste of the pavillion, producing hydrogen, natural gas, and nutrients for plants and algae. 7. Service area • The back area is used to service the area.

7

6

5

4 3 2

6 5

4 3 2 1

Kitchen pavillon spatial concept


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Pavilion Guidelines 1.7 Expo Guidelines

1

10

CONCEPT

CONCEPT DESIGN

FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

1

CONCEPT DESIGN

CONCEPT

11

1.2

The Internet of Food & People 1.2.1 Overview

1 - A domestic landscape

The phenomenon of the Internet

Its unique value would come both from the international dimension of the Expo with the millions of expected visitors, and the central role played by Italy in the

food sector, with its worldwide excellence award. 2 - Everybody cook - everybody eat 3 -The of Things pledges to redefine manyInternet of Food and People

4 - The connected kitchen

5 - Closing the loop

In particular, the Future Food District will focus on new dynamics that will

A confortable and domestic enviroment, in which the visitor can have a taste of the future everyday life , will characterize the pavillon. A domestic landascape where the user will be able to explore the future of the food, through new and differents experiences.

increase individual participation – an increased exchange with objects to foster paradigms, from social behaviour to an increased exchange with humans: the Internet of Food and People. What will arise from the simultaneously analogue and digital logistics, including interaction with kindofnewtheconnections The Kitchen pavilion will be a perfect experiment to map,our track, The phenomenon Internet of Things pledges to redefine The kitchen will make visitors aware of both new ways of interaction between people and food? How will it influence our lifestyle, in the we produce, sell,behaviour buy and cook to food?logistics, Thinking about communities and food. trace and visualise the ways in which people use their kitchens many paradigms,wayfrom social including physically cooking food, and the digital world of crowdsourced connections between people, how would the phenomenon of the Internet of

and create cultures of food. The pavillon a place where our interaction food. In the field ofwill food, be IoT promises to bring widespread consequences and effects with Food and People enable new forms of interaction? What new forms of foodthroughout the supply chain, from production to waste management, via related services will affect the current network of customers and retailers, and is possibile to have a social and interactive experience. packaging, logistics, distribution (including advertisement, services, payment..), how? The Internet of Food and People can be understood through three main and consumption. Our proposal is to use Expo 2015 as a unique test bed for exploring the consequences of IoT in the food chain.

From the production to the storage; from the storage to the preparation; from the preparation to the consumption; from the consumption to the disposal. The FFD will describes a complete process. The Kitchen Pavillon can help the visitors to understand how it can be real in their homes.

information being generated from the tagged food products, the recipes they make, and the kitchens they cook in.

concepts: the traceability and inteconnection of food; new social interaction inside the food supply chain; and new techniques of food design and production.

FUTURE FOOD DISTRICT

OBJECTS

DATABASE

GATHERING

Preparation COMBINING

USERS

PEOPLE

context storage & modification

Production

context acquisition

THE PEOPLE NETWORK

Consumption

nd

5.5

THE GOODS NETWORK

SENSORS

COMMUNITIES

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Disposal /Reuse

THE EXPO SITE

%

70

Objects contain invisible information that is not utilised to their maximum extent. What if we could harvest this information, narrowing the gap between the physical and digital world?

A local data ‘cloud’ is capable of gathering information from various objects and environments, through an array of devices and sensors. It not only collects information, but enables the creation of intelligent applications that combine the data in novel ways, revealing previously invisible relationships between spaces and things.

Individuals, communities and business can use and build upon the intelligent information available via this cloud. They can also create and contribute information that feeds back down into the system, closing the feedback loop between objects and people and creating a dynamic system of information.


MAISON ALCAN PUBLIC DOMAIN STRATEGIC ANALYSIS

The mandate for the following project covered the development of a strategic masterplan for the public domain of the Maison Alcan complex. This domain is defined as the internal and external open/circulation spaces, and the cultural and retail spaces of the complex accessible to the public. The purpose of this work is to identify and validate alternative uses for the project. The Alcan complex, formerly the headquarters of Alcan Aluminum, was recently bought by entertainment giant Guy Laliberte, head of Cirque du Soleil. This places the complex in a strategic position, as the new ownership implies a strong identity shift, one with tremendous civic potential, in the wake of the complex’s 30th anniversary. The research team carried out an extensive research and analysis on the history, uses and cultural significance of the complex, urban context, contemporary trends, and relevant precedents towards the identification of key opportunities and potentials. New ideas were explored, and existing ones validated, through a restrospective research and projective analysis.

The Commons Inc Role : Lead Designer / Researcher,Writing, Representation, Documentation

1912

Michel and Renata Ho


CENTRALISATION & DECENTRALISATION

PAVILISATION

EXPANSION?

MFA 1380 Sherbrooke St W

MAC 185 St Catherine St W

ornstein pavilion

PARISIAN LAUNDRY 3550 St-Antoine Ouest

DHC/ART 451& 465, St-Jean St.

ARSENAL 2020, William St.

PHI Centre 407, Saint-Pierre St.

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL HEADQUARTERS

2012 2012 2007 2005

1964

1992

1

2

1939

1976

Annexe Norton

Liliane & David Stewart pavilion Desmarais pavilion 5 4 6

1991

3 MAISON ALCAN PERMANENT & TEMPORARY

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL CHAPITEAU TEMPORARY CONTENT

2008

2017

Erskine Church pavilion 5th pavilion


XT

``The 1983 construction of Maison Alcan marked a shift in attitude, a shift towards a respect for the city and a connection to it that was for the most part absent in the 1970s. A greater public consciousness of Montreal as a whole emerged in the 1980s``.


MAISON ALCAN Historic legacy ExtERIoR pubLIC SpACES

From the moment of its conception, the Maison Alcan has proven to be of significant influence on architectural thought and cultural support. Abandoning the formerly praised modernist “ object in the field” model for major corporations, Alcan’s CEO, David Culver, was in favour of the post-modernist porous constellation of buildings as a complex, skillfully combining the old and the new. Through Alcan seminars, Mr.Culver attracted internationally acclaimed architects yearly in order to educate the public and express current views on architecture in the city, making Maison Alcan an important hub for the exchange of architectural knowledge. A corporation interested in the arts, Maison Alcan constantly hosted temporary exhibitions and displayed its permanent and growing collection to the public.

gf pERmEAbILIty

The Commons Inc therefore recognizes the significant role the complex has played in the cultural nourishment of the city and seeks to reinvigorate the civic presence of the complex as Cirque Du Soleil’s cultural hub in downtown. Meta-identity

mAISon ALCAn

Given the historic and cultural significance of the complex since its conception, specific interest is focused on the reinforcement of the meta-identity of the project, seeking to reinvigorate the civic potentials of Maison Alcan under the new supervision of Cirque du Soleil, towards the rebranding and reshaping of the latter’s public identity within the sphere of Alcan’s established public influence.

“After a quarter century it seems only fitting to recognize the important role Maison Alcan has had in the ongoing economic and cultural vitality of Montreal. And the even bigger part it has played in the emergence of Quebec as a major international force for business innovation and growth. Maison Alcan is our house, and for 104 years Quebec has been our home”. - Alcan Headquarters, Montreal SALVATION ARMy

DAVIS CITADEL

BeIqUe ATHOLSTAN

BeRKeLey

HOLLAND


pHASE 1A - CREAtIng IdEntIty eSTABLISHING THe PUBLIC DOMAIN, POROSITy THROUGH ReINFORCING THe ATRIUM


PHASE 1A hybridity

10%

An initial research into the existing material reveals that the complex is as much a constellation of its parts with unique facets as it is a consolidated whole with a unifying personality, opening multiple avenues into relevant programmatic interventions in the upcoming phases of the project. What remains clear is that the complex is essentially a hybrid, a celebration of complexity, diversity and variety of programs. This hybrid building will also feed on the meeting of the private and public spheres. The intimacy of private life and the sociability of public life will find anchors of development in the hybrid building.

Permeability Throughout the years, as Alcan’s ownership and thus its public strategies shifted, the public spaces of the complex also became increasingly privatized. Re-invigorating the permeability of Alcan will make it accessible from the city and the private use of its services will extend its timetable to 24 hours a day. In this way, the analysis of the Alcan complex has been carried out from an urban perspective, rather than an architectural lens. This approach analyses the complex based on a synthesis of opportunities, problems and constraints, measuring the degree of permeability, fit of activity patterns to physical configurations, variety,complexity, richness ( as in a hybrid complex), robustness and environmental justice ( through democracy of access,exclusion, discrimination). 8TH 7TH

5TH 4TH 3RD 2ND 1ST

URBAN SPACE approx. 200,000 SQ. FT.

SOCIAL

ENVIRONMENTAL

Making/reinforcing connections Create porosity between the city and the complex Create a diverse milieu : the right tenant mix and the right complementary programmatic elements

FINANCIAL

Ownership in direct relationship to public spaces throughout Maison Alcan’s history

PUBLIC

Interior spaces accessible to the public

?

60%

Interior spaces accessible to the public

PUBLIC

2007 1983

PRIVATE

2017

PRIVATE


PHASE 1B establishing the public domain reinforcing the atrium by expanding the porosity to higher levels of the complex

PHASE 1A establishing the public domain reinvigorating the porosity on the ground floor by expanding the public spaces throughout the complex


THE PROCESS Upon extensive research into the potential avenues to follow for the redevelopment of Maison Alcan, major themes to consider in the process became contuinity and reinvention, resilience versus solution, urban lifestyle versus building proposal and urban system versus architectural gesture. In this sense, the building becomes an “anti-project”, by favoring the process of evolution and resilience throughout the roadmap of the proposal, aiming for maximum flexibility and plasticity in each stage of the process.

PHASE 1A

SOCIAL

eNV.

ECO.

PHySICAL

Phase IA The initial phase of the project will encompass re-invigorating the public domain of the complex through re-establishing the porosity and public access on the ground level. This implies the re-definition of public programs on the ground level of the complex, opting for maximum porosity and permeability. Phase IB The following phase will infuse the public sphere to upper levels of the complex, creating a public loop within the complex, in which exhibitions will be hosted and service will be provided to the public. This phase also establishes a strong connection between the indoor and outdoor spaces within TENANT -DRIVENon all levels. the complex AD-HOC Phase II

IDENTITY

PHASE 1A

PHASE 1B

SOCIAL

eNV.

ECO.

PHySICAL

PHASE II

Following Y1

the completion of Phase I, Phase II will entail theY3 Y2 development of the lot located in the South section of the complex, allowing for public access to move further into all four corners of the block, maximizing the sociability of public life, while also leveraging on the project’s full potential. IDENTITY DRIVEN TENANT-DRIVEN AD-HOC

PHASE 2

Y1

Y2

SOCIAL

Y3

eNV.

ECO.

TENANT-DRIVEN AD-HOC Y1

IDENTITY Y2

PHASE II Y3

PHySI-


February week 1

week 2

Workshop preparation

week 3

April

March week 1

week 4

week 2

week 3

week 4

week 1

week 2

Identity and positioning charrette Content synthesis

IDENTITY

‘Brand book’

marketing strategy/material

Definition of objectives

DEVELOPMENT

Value creation charrette

Workshop preparation

Final Candidate Architects Final interviews & selection schematic designs

Site survey and data validation Functional & Technical programming

Financial eva

Precedent analysis Operational model analysis

OPERATION

Candidate tenant list

Meetings & Events Charrettes

Reconnaissance trip (NY)

Client Meeting

Identity and positioning

Client Meeting Value creation

tenant meetings & interviews

Client Meeting

Client Meetin


week 3

week 4

May week 1

week 2

week 3

Final Synthesis & Production

week 4

Review & Completion

THE STRATEGIC MASTERPLAN & ROADMAP month 6

week 2

week 3

week 4

week 1

This roadmap will articulate a clear vision - qualitiatvely, quantitatvely and technically - for the redevelopment of Maison Alcan. Essentially the DNA of the project, it will serve as critical groundwork for the coordinated integrity and efficiency of the project’s multi-phase development, according to the essential dimensions of its success - its identity (& marketing); physical development & phasing; and operation. The Masterplan and Roadmap will be produced as a graphically sophisticated and technically detailed booklet appropriate for a range of audiences - from politician to tenant to engineer.

Identity

marketing material

Maison Alcan is a complex project in that it carries the weight of its legacy, specificity and identity. While this represents a challenge, it also represents tremendous opportunity for differentiation and cache if leveraged correctly. However, this demands sensitive and intelligent evaluation of the complex’s latent potentials in light of contemporary trends and market/ urban opportunities.

Physical development & phasing

The identification and definition of the project’s objectives, potentials and limitations represents a critical first step in the planning phase of a project. Furthermore, optimizing value through the synthetic evaluation of qualitative and quantitative interests at this stage will embed important efficiencies into the development and operation of the complex.

Operation

The analysis of contemporary trends and market/urban opportunities pursued towards the definition of the project’s Identity will inherently lead to candidate tenants and markets, which will be actively compiled and provided to the client for continued pursuit, as appropriate.

aluation and phasing

ng

month 5 week 1

Development Framework

Understanding the time constraints of the project, the Strategic Masterplan & Roadmap is planned for rapid development. Concentrated internal development will be ensured so as to acheive the proposed ambitions. And key events are proposed within the process as a means of rapidly acheiving rigor and depth. Client Meeting

Client Meeting

Client Meeting


PLAGE DE L’EST GRANDEUR NATURE VILLE DE MONTREAL, UNESCO CITY OF DESIGN COMPETITION, FINALIST

The Commons Inc Role : Design,Research, Development, Representation Methodology, Team Management, Presentation, Documentation


Connectivité Le projet maximise le potentiel connectif du site à l’échelle macro aux systèmes naturel et sociaux en place. La proposition s’intègre au réseau bleu, au sentier maritime et contribue à la continuité du réseau vert.

marcher jusqu’au parc

pêcher sur glace

pêcher à la mouche

Le quai des pêcheurs

faire du canot

5) 0,00 (5,2

+0,75

+2,75

Le versant

+1,75

relaxer dans un hamak

+2,75

être au soleil bronzer

regarder les activités

1. Condition topographique existante

+2,75

+3,7

regarder l’île aux Asperges

faire la sieste

L’étang aux grenouilles

0ans

+4,75

5 (2

C

)

patiner

La clairière

faire du kayak

jouer au hockey

pique niquer

jouer au frisbee

2. La poussée Une poussée conceptuelle sur la berge fait entrer l’univers fluvial sur le site, créant une dune, générant par le fait une condition de plage en baie. La matière ainsi excavée est redistribuée sur

faire voler un cerf-volant jouer au volleyball lire

faire une cabane

Le pré marcher sur la plage regarder le fleuve

cueillir des champignons

jouer à la pétanque prendre une marche

A B faire un pique nique

promener son chien

+5,75

Le boisé

faire du tai chi

L’éclaircie

faire la sieste

pique niquer jogger

jouer au frisbee

3. Strates La poussée conceptuelle réorchestre le site en une succession de strates paysagères : la rive, la dune, le milieu humide, le pré, le boisé.

bronzer faire du kitesurfing

regarder le fleuve

jouer au volleyball

se balancer regarder le lever du soleil faire une fête d’enfant

A

La plage

baignade faire des châteaux de sable

lire

promener son chien +0,75

0,00 (5,25)

+1,75

+2,75

+3,75 (20ans

+4,75

+4,75

+5,75

+5,75

)

regarder une projection

être à l’ombre

Le quai des brumes

La terrasse

4. Systèmes construits La promenade (boardwalk) forme un parcours didactique qui se rendre en kayak à l’île Sainte-Thérèse nous amène à traverser toutes les strates et expériences du projet. Le bâtiment fait partie intégrante du boardwalk et devient une

plonger dans l’eau

BISTRO

DEPOT

BUREAU

NIVEAU DU FLEUVE MOIS D’AVRIL

DOUCHE

accoster

regarder l’île Sainte-Thérèse

regarder le fleuve

5. Habitats et lieux La superposition des conditions topographiques créées avec les strates végétales et les systèmes construits créent des habitats accueillant une faune et une flore variée. De la même façon, des lieux propices aux activités humaines sont générés.


PLAGe URBAINe GRANDeUR NATURe Grandeur nature C’est l’histoire de la rencontre des différentes natures qui oscillent entre le fleuve et la ville. Notre proposition célèbre cette rencontre, l’amplifie et la réorchestre en une série de nouveaux moments et habitats qui régénèrent le site et son rapport à l’eau et ainsi renforce le contact de l’homme à la nature.

Topographie

Les lieux

L’identité du projet est renforcée par la création de lieux clairement caractérisés : le quai des pêcheurs, la clairière, la terrasse, le quai des brumes, l’étang aux grenouilles, la dune.

Poussée Une poussée conceptuelle sur la berge fait entrer l’univers fluvial sur le site. La nature immense et sublime du paysage fluvial est aspirée et concentrée dans le site. Ce geste crée une baie abritée, enveloppée de dunes, et en détermine une plage généreuse et riche. Strates La poussée réorchestre le site en une succession de strates paysagères, interfaces entre la ville et le fleuve, déployées en une série d’expériences, de lieux et d’habitats qui s’unissent pour libérer la plage et la réinventer. Chaque strate a un caractère paysager distinct, à la fois au niveau de son rôle environnemental, de sa matérialité, de sa texture, et au niveau de l’éventail de pentes chorégraphiées pour maximiser la performance technique en plus de la richesse programmatique. Cette approche tire son inspiration de la logique des paysages fluviaux vernaculaires et de la diversité des habitats qu’ils abritent – le pré, la clairière, le boisé, le milieu humide, la dune (talus végétal/minéral), la promenade [boardwalk] et le quai. Connexion réseau vert / Bleu Dans une perspective macro, visant la réhabilitation des berges en réseaux bleu et vert continus et accessibles, le projet se voit comme un chaînon des réseaux macro-paysagers. D’une part, il s’intègre au réseau bleu par l’activation programmatique des berges et la continuation des écosystèmes du bord de l’eau. D’autre part, le projet vise à contribuer à la continuité du réseau vert en liant ses strates végétales au réseau actuel et projeté du bout de l’île tout en créant un parcours piéton riverain du bout de

Système hydrique

Le boisé espace tampon

Les eaux du site sont gérées sur place qui se déploie comme une noue végétalisée qui culmine en un milieu humide.

Le boisé crée un espace tampon qui permet de gérer la transition avec le contexte résidentiel, cadrant judicieusement les vues et atténuant les nuisances sonores pour les résidents.

Habitats

Les percées visuelles

Le projet est articulé de manière à maximiser les percées visuelles vers l’univers fluvial. Les vues sont stratégiquement cadrées à partir des points d’entrées et rythment la traversée du site.

Le projet instaure un réseau de cinq habitats complémentaires qui stimulent la diversité de la faune et de la flore et agissent en continuité avec les rives limitrophes.

Varennes

île Sainte-Thérèse

île aux asperges

Strates et Parcours didactique

L’expérience du site est chorégraphiée par un boardwalk qui nous amène à découvrir la plage en passant à travers les strates.

L’éclairage

La stratégie d’éclairage s’articule autour du boardwalk et se décline sur plusieurs registres lumineux – éclairage indirect intégré aux bancs, points lumineux encastrés au boardwalk, troncs lumineux.


l’entree - été

Le milieu humide - été

La descente - été

La quai des pêcheurs - été

l’entree - hiver

Le milieu humide - hiver

La descente - hiver

La quai des pêcheurs - hiver


Connectivité populus deltaoides, 75 mm en multicellule

Le projet maximise le potentiel connectif du site à l’échelle macro aux systèmes naturel et sociaux en place. La proposition s’intègre au réseau bleu, au sentier maritime et contribue à la continuité du réseau vert. L’entrée de la rue bureau vue en soirée L’éclairage discret sublime les éléments du projet et accompagne le visiteur dans sa traversée, rendant celle-ci accueillant à toute heure de la journée. Le bâtiment agit comme une lanterne qui catalyse l’animation du site en soirée. Coupe perspective vers le sud montrant la plage (b) La poussée conceptuelle sur la rive reprofile le site, générant une plage généreuse, se subdivisant en trois strates distinctes : la plage basse (plage active) , la plage haute (plage passive) et la plage dune (plage contemplative), chacune offrant des conditions programmatiques variées.

populus tremuloides, 75 mm en multicellule

ulmus brandon, 75 mm en pot de 2 gallons

1m

Formule de plantation du boisé

L’approche de la biodiversité proposée par Noss


ESPACE POUR LA VIE HABITAT

2017

COMPETITION, FINALIST

Un réseau vivant de bleu et de vert: Unité dans l’interdépendence Les trois projets sont reliés par cette série de principes architecturaux, variations sur les transformations de la Terre, écotones et peaux creuser, couvrir et envelopper et l’ensemble est lié encore plus profondément par un métabolisme commun de circulation d’eau et de systèmes vivants. Défini par des rencontres directes avec le non-humain, et contrôlé par un flux de données, ce réseau vivant d’espaces bleus et verts révèlera simultanément notre dépendance au monde naturel et l’occasion qui nous est donnée de le maintenir. En déambulant dans le site, d’un musée à l’autre, le visiteur sera à chaque pas conscient de cette « agora interspécifique » un espace social partagé avec d’autres espèces sur la planète. Le visiteur imaginera alors comment cette façon d’être dans la nature pourrait se propager ailleurs, aux parcs,

The Commons Inc Role : Representation, Visualization

cours, maisons. Et de fait, notre vision est que l’Espace pour la vie pourrait effectivement s’étendre à travers un réseau à la grandeur de l’île, à travers rues, ruelles et lignes de métro, un tissu urbain naturellement tissé. Par le moyen de consultations pour en penser le rayonnement, il pourrait ainsi devenir le catalyseur de l’entière communauté de Montréal, pour toutes les recherches ayant à cœur d’intégrer la nature dans nos villes. Et au contact de ce rhizome, nul doute que le visiteur comprendra l’occasion qui s’impose à lui de partager nos villes – résultantes d’une évolution naturelle devenues le foyer de notre espèce − avec nos plus importants hôtes et partenaires : le reste entier du monde naturel.


L’homme et son environnement bâti comme faisant partie intégrante de la nature

L’entrée de l’homme et de son environnement bâti (comme ‘habitat’) dans le spectrum didactique

De la nature à la ville à la ville comme nature


biodôme renouvelé

pavillon de verre

métamorphose de l’Insectarium

Une coquille rigide avec un nouveau paysage enrichi ondule malicieusement à l’intérieur du volume du bâtiment existant, déterminant de nouveaux territoires d’expérience et d’exploration : l’au-dessus, l’en-dessous, l’intermédiaire et le « plus qu’au-dessus »

Le pavillon de verre éveillera l’espoir en une harmonie collective retrouvée avec la nature. Rappelant les formes naturelles liées à l’incubation -chrysalides, nids, fruits, fleurs- il ressemblera à toute échelle à une chose vivante, réceptive et sensible sur le point de s’éveiller et de libérer la vie. Le pavillon sera un incubateur d’une expérience sociale interreliée, une « chrysalide sociale » développant une conscience de notre intime lien avec le monde non-humain.

Une nouvelle forme évolue hors de la structure existante, se fait un chemin en creusant dans le volume pour finalement émerger du centre de la structure vers l’extérieur.

Volet B

Volet C

Volet a

toit

Forêt tropicale

Zones polaires (en-dessous)

Créer de nouveaux habitats nécessite aussi bien de creuser que d’ériger. Cette excavation génère de nouvelles expériences dans le monde des insectes, et de nouvelles jonctions entre le bâtiment et son site.

dessus Parcours immersif

entre-deux relocalisation ou ajout d’espaces à vocation didactique (bibliothèque, salle de classe, salle de conférence, etc.)

dessous espaces fonctionnels existants

implantation du bâtiment

Peau 1

Coque constituée d’une grille paramétrique s’ouvrant à la lumière par compression de sa géométrie

L’esPLanade Le hall d’entrée périphérique du biodôme renouvelé. serViCes Billeterie, boutiques, restaurants, librairie et aires de repos, de picnic ou de rencontre.

La métamorphose de l’insectarium signifie un remodelage de l’ancienne peau. Les anciens et nouveaux segments du musée sont unifiés par une nouvelle enveloppe de bâtiment performante.

Creuser

en haut Belvédère tropical

st-Laurent marin Forêt Laurentienne

nouvelle peau

Modèle physique de géométrie transformable Volière

au cœur de l’insectarium se trouve une série d’écosystèmes et d’habitats d’insectes richement entrelacés pouvant être explorés verticalement et horizontalement.

didactique et expérientiel Peau 2

Membrane faite de lamelles construite pour répondre aux saisons

L’insectarium transformé offre l’expérience de se mouvoir entre le monde des humains et celui des insectes.

s’élever

disque sculpté s’ouvrant vers le ciel

Grouper

assemblages polyvalents de dimension variable

soulever

soulèvement du sol s’ouvrant sur la lisière des arbres

Connexion

L’insectarium devient plus intégré dans son site et le contexte plus large. une réorientation subtile et une circulation plus directe offre une entrée plus claire et évidente. un nouveau langage architectural crée un dialogue entre d’anciens et futurs points de repère.


Biodome


Pavillon de Verre

Insectarium


tHE CIVIC ASSEtS pRoJECt REIMAGINING THE COMMONS

The Commons Inc Role : Lead Researcher, Representation Methodology,Business Development, Marketing, Presentation, Documentation


ABSTRACT The Civics Assets Project is centred upon the recognition, preservation, and repositioning of a particular class of real estate assets that have played a central role in the weaving of our urban fabric and civic society. They are the transit stations, the post offices, the schools, the libraries, the churches, the coffee houses, the sports halls, et al that through their location and primal function have served to crosscut the multiple social strata of a our urban centres, generating places that were open to all, that belonged to all, and that have served to connect all - through both time and place. The value of these assets are often manifold. Because these assets served primary civic functions for instance, they are often historic properties, and because they emerged from and served central needs, they are often strategically positioned within urban centres. While the frameworks that recognize the value of these two particular facets are well established - heritage conservation and the real estate market, respectively - what remains underdeveloped are the frameworks by which to recognize, preserve and perpetuate their civic value, or in other words, the role they played (and might continue to play) within the formation and functioning of our civic society and social fabric. The Civic Assets Project is thus designed to fill this void within our contemporary development frameworks. In the face of rapidly evolving urban change, it challenges contemporary uni-dimensional modes of value attribution, to assert - through both theory and practice - the latent value found within the interconnection of the social, physical and economic dimensions of certain real estate assets. It is a project to create a progressive development model that might leverage each of these dimensions towards a greater whole, and in so doing manifest the unique legacy and potential of our Civic Assets.


Brooklyn Navy yard fabrication hangar reconceived as New Lab, a site for 21st c collaborative design and manufacturing Image courtesy of New Lab


INTRODuCTION The maps of most Western cities carry the legacy of a fundamental tenet: building communities requires community buildings. Long before cities began to zone for land use, or craft comprehensive plans, people came together to build the collective infrastructures necessary to support their evolving needs. Social innovators and urban reformers of the day tackled poverty, poor health and social isolation by creating places of learning, engagement and support. These central amenities laid the groundwork for urban growth, and with urban growth came their expansion and extension into networks and into new facilities, critical to the cities’ capacity to compete economically, and to educate, care for, entertain and assimilate their growing number of inhabitants. From recreation clubs to churches to public libraries to post offices, whether developed by civic-minded citizens or constructed and operated through the public coffers, these “civic assets” founded the physical, social and financial fabric of a city and often still remain the emotional heart of the neighborhoods in which they reside. However, changing demographics, aging facilities, and declining public investment has meant that many of these assets are no longer viable in their original form - whether it be due to economic, urban or social pressures. Owners and users are generally left in the position of strategizing new lives for them or leveraging their remaining value towards maximal financial return. This burden of choice is especially difficult for municipalities with whom much of the public sector ownership of civic assets rests. When faced with buildings with capital backlogs, negative operating revenues, shifting liability and risk challenges, and obsolete or oversized building layouts, officials must either imagine and prove that another use will meet city goals while still supporting fiscal responsibility, or extract the highest price for the asset.

Given the character of the pressures, the latter is in many cases the most natural of paths - easing deficits in both the capacity for imagination and for financing in one fell swoop. In most cases however, the unfortunate cost of such an exchange, is the integrity of the civic function of these properties. If we understand the coherence of our urban fabric to be founded upon these assets, then the loss of their civic function represents its erosion. Though felt implicitly and explicitly depending, community expectations to be at the table when the fate of a local asset is being determined have never been higher. The steady proliferation of “Friends of...” and “Save the...” groups is proof of the passion that residents have when a longstanding facility is threatened. Neighborhood self-esteem and confidence in the future take a collective fall when a local asset disappears – physically or functionally. Moreover, as evidenced by recent work such as the extensive Soul of the Community survey (funded by the Knight Foundation), there are measurable connections between a city’s local economic growth and its residents’ emotional attachment to its social networks and perceived beauty.[http://www.soulofthecommunity. org/overall-findings/] While there are examples and policy precedents in Canada for leveraging public assets to serve community needs and facilitate investment in their sustainability and civic function, these efforts remain disconnected and are often impeded by cumbersome bureaucratic processes like surplus property procurement and approvals across different levels of government. Most problematic is that the transfer or disposal of a public asset is often catalyzed by the obsolescence of its use rather than driven by the potential of its next generation use, leaving very little time or opportunity for imaginative repositioning or the mobilization of support.

There are instances however, where enlightened stakeholders and local coalitions have come together to successfully redevelop a civic asset with new purpose - building pride, reinvigorating the community with cultural, social or educational services, and providing for long-term stewardship. The success of many of these efforts is often rooted in their ability to mobilize local activism and attract funders connected to the building’s purpose or the neighborhood or city where it is located. This model is limited however, as communities such as low-income neighborhoods or areas undergoing rapid change often lack the coordinated political power or financial wherewithal to mount this kind of effort. These are often the communities in most need of sites of service, engagement, and pride, and it is these residents most likely to be excluded from determining the future of the buildings in their neighborhoods. Conversely, sites of rapid growth and high urban pressure often make for real estate values that dwarf the recognition of the more abstract values inherent in an asset. Certain values such as architectural heritage have the legislative mechanisms to protect them, however civic legacy, if not the asset itself, remains unprotected and vulnerable in the face of such forces. However, just as in the impoverished neighborhood case, the imperative for the presence and continuity of civic functions and assets is equally critical within economically booming districts, for they are essential to the balanced growth, health and integrity of a city and its people. Whether ‘top-down’ or ‘bottom up’, public or private, impoverished or booming, ultimately what is missing is a thoughtful collective discourse that recognizes that while civic assets are locally rooted and of many varying species, they are nevertheless a family: an asset class essential to urban vitality that encompasses multiple building types, ownership and jurisdictions. This is a proposal to both launch and shape that discourse by creating a framework to identify, evaluate, and reinvigorate our civic assets.


PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

[ 4 months ]

[ 4 months ]

[ 4 months ]

Knowledge Mobilization

Knowledge Mobilization

Knowledge Mobilization

ESTABLISHING THE DISCOuRSE & KNOWLEDGE PLATFORM

TARGETED EXPOSuRE & OuTREACH

PARTNER & COMMuNITY ENGAGEMENT

MODELS & METHODOLOGIES

MODELS & METHODOLOGIES

MODELS & METHODOLOGIES

Classification & Policy

Financing & Programming

Operation & Sustainability

Pilot Projects

Case Studies

Case Studies

AQuISITION & COMPARITIVE ANALYSIS

STRATEGIC PROGRAMMING & FINANCIAL MODELLING

TENANT STRuCTuRE & SPATIAL DESIGN

Classification methodology and policy development strategy

figure 1 Development & Deliverables Overview

financing models and articulated programming methodologies

operational models and methodologies for sustaining civic performance

Civic assets knowledge platform & network of key partners

Replicable & scalable development frameworks

Implementation-ready pilot projects


The Project

The Civic Assets Project The long term intention of the Civic Assets Project is to establish a robust construct for the ongoing financing; development; and management of civic assets, within an increasingly aware and participatory cultural climate.

This of course demands incremental development, and the following proposal is for the first phase of a one-year gestation period to articulate the development frameworks for the project, and to establish a platform for continued outreach and knowledge mobilization.

Approach & Objectives Though the proposal that follows centred only on Phase 1, the Civic Assets project will be established through a one-year gestation process, comprised of three sequential phases. The primary objectives of the one year project are: 1.

2.

3.

to pursue extensive precedent and contemporary case study analyses in order to explore and define the many facets of the project; learn from innovative and best practices, and ground the project within appropriate policy; process and development contexts to assert the notion of Civic Assets into public discourse, and mobilize a network of affiliate institutions, experts, communities and partners around the project to develop targeted pilot projects as a means of generating and testing foundational and replicable methodologies for the classification, programming, financing and operating of Civic Assets

PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

Classification & Policy

Financing & Programming

Operation & Sustainability

Knowledge Mobilization

white papers: models & methodologies

pilot projects

figure 2 Development Framework

Deliverables the White papers

the pilot projects

Out of the research and development of each phase, we will produce a white paper articulating the findings and asserting best practice models and methodologies. These will inform subsequent phases and at the end of the gestation period, be revised and compiled into a definitive set upon which the next chapter of the project will be founded.

A series of identified pilot projects (see Appendix 1) will be under constant development throughout the one-year period (see #3 in Appraoch & Objectives). Our ambition is to have 2-5 of these development ready by the end of the gestation process.


Pilot Projects art & society 1

2

3

4

Bibliotheque Ste Sulpice Location: Montreal Type: Educational Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Redundancy Owner: Public

3

The Empress Theatre Location: Montreal Type: Cultural Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Physical Owner: Public

1

5 3

4

NDG Post Office Location: Montreal Type: Governmental Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Social Owner: Public Negro Community Center Location: Montreal Type: Religious Type of Obsolescence: Physical Owner: Not for Profit Private

city-scapes

2

6 4

1

5

7

new economies

civic engagement

Contemporary Case Studies

5

Chateau Viger Location: Montreal Type: Commercial Type of Obsolescence: Economic, Physical Owner: Private

1

Montreal Velodrome / Biodome Location: Montreal Type: Olympic facility Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Museological Developer: Espace Pour La Vie

4

The Merchants Hotel Location: Winnipeg Type: Hotel Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Social Developer: Community-based coalition

6

The Biosphere Location: Montreal Type: Institutional Type of Obsolescence: Functional Owner: Public

2

St Joseph Church Location: Montreal Type: Religious Type of Obsolescence: Functional, Social Developer: Quo Vadis

5

Maison Alcan Location: Montreal Type: Commercial Office / Public Type of Obsolescence: Ownership, Tenancy Developer: Cirque de Soleil / Yale

7

Metropolitan News Agency (former) Location: Montreal Type: Commercial Type of Obsolescence: Functional Owner: Private

3

The Royal Victoria Hospital Location: Montreal Type: Hospital Type of Obsolescence: Functional / Physical Developer: Consortium

figure 2 Overview of Pilot Projects & Contemporary Case Studies (see Appendices 1 & 2 for details)


PHASe 1 - KNOWLeDGe MOBILIzATION Knowledge mobilization during Phase 1 will be pursued through a series of rigorous precedent analyses that touch upon the many dimensions.

2.

We will work with the Founding Partners and Expert Council (see ‘Team Structure’) to develop a discourse on the subject and identify examples that can stimulate learning and generate tangible options for the development, financing and operation of civic assets in North America. Our research will draw from Canada, the United States and internationally but will be aimed at informing the development of the pilot projects located in Montreal and across Canada. precedent Analyses The precedents will be grouped into the following categories and will be pursued through literature review and informational interviews: 1.

Successful development projects (see Appendix 2), selected for their contribution to key city-building and community goals such as culture, environmental stewardship and inclusive economies will be analysed for the lessons they can yield on the role targeted classification and incentives played – or did not play – in their evolution and success. These will include:

3.

Contemporary Case Studies (see Appendix 3)that will be continually monitored and analysed. These are projects currently under development contemporaneously to the project, but by other parties engaged in the Civic Assets Project. They will offer unique insight into different project development methodologies and policy navigation strategies. These will include: -

The Montreal Velodrome / Biodome

-

St.Joseph Church

-

The Royal Victoria Hospital

-

The Merchants Hotel

-

The Maison Alcan

Precedent Classification/ Engagement/Development platforms (see Appendix 4), i.e. existing models for the orchestrating the awareness and/or development of certain analogous asset classes, such as: -

[Im]possible Living

-

Tutur Urbact

-

Brickstarter

-

Multimodal Center

-

Re-cycle Italy

-

Chelsea Market

-

Renew Newcastle

-

Dominican Church Library

-

Tate Modern

-

The Belgo Building


Saint-Sulpice Library Silo No.5 Van Horne Wareouse Chateau Viger Canada Malting Silos Caserne Letourneux Manege Militaire de Cathcart The Biosphere Metropolitan News Agency The Empress Theater NCSM Donnaconna 2055 The Black Watch of Canada The Royal Montreal Regiment Dickson Incinerator Des Carrieres Incinerator Hotel-Dieu Hospital Royal Victoria Hospital NDG Post Office Hopital de la Misericorde Redpath House Sir Louis Hippolyte La Fontaine Negro Community Center

Edmonton

Regina

Moncton Winnipeg Montreal Toronto

Eglise St-Clement de Viauville Tres-St-Nom de Jesus Church Bain Public Hushion Bain Public Schubert Maison Alcan

Bayfield Moncton High School

The Loblaw Groceteria Company Guild Inn Park and Gardens William Dineen House

Cape Jourimain Lighthouse Merchants Hotel Connaught Community School Rossdale Power Plant


Warehouse Silos Fire Stations Incinerators Libraries Research Centers

Theaters Sports Halls Hotels Armouries Hospitals Shops

Post Offices Houses Schools Churches

PHASE

1 - PILOT PROjECTS

the pilot projects, a series of real-world, real-time civic assets that are either currently threatened, in question, or slated for repurposing will be initiated as active development projects in Phase 1 (see Figure 4 and Appendix 1 for detail). Pursuing their (programmatic, financial and physical) design and development throughout the project will provide an important channel by which to investigate the real world challenges they imply, and validate the body of thinking and methodological approaches in development. These are projects centred mainly in Montreal, for which The Commons Inc has been, or is in the process of being professionally engaged. It is our goal to evaluate and refine/extend this list through active discussion with our development partners - particularly the Cities for People and the Re-imagining the Commons initiatives. We believe that there is great potential to strategically align the mutual pursuit of Pilot/Demonstration Projects and pool our collective resources towards the acceleration of their development.

universities Social Innovation Initiative It is our ambition that the Civic Assets Project present a range of opportunities for students throughout its development, mobilization and sustained operation. The Project will provide Social entrepeneurs with an infrastructure of knowledge about how to conceive situating projects within urban centres, as well as a repertoire of actual sites for their possible gestation, application and development. In turn, we hope to enhance the project through the ideas and imagination students and universities represent. For instance, in tandem to our phase 2 efforts outlined above, we have targeted engaging University Architecture and Planning departments. Each university will look at the Civic Assets Fund through a different lens; while some research units will focus on specific case by case project study, others will focus on policy making and macro network building towards the consolidation and reinforcement of the Civic Assets framework.

University of Waterloo Ryerson University University of Toronto

Public baths Office Complexes Lighthouses Power Plants

Carleton University University of Manitoba

University of Montreal

University of Calgary

McGill University

University of British Columbia

Laval University Dalhousie University


MONTH

MAY

WEEKS

1

SCOPE OF WORK

JUNE 2

3

4

5

JULY 6

7

8

9

AUGUST 10

11

12

13

14

SEPTEMBER 15

16

17

18

19

OCTOBER 20

21

22

NOVEMBER 23

24

25

26

DECEMBER 27

28

29

30

JANUARY 31

32

33

PHASE 2 : FINANCING & PROGRAMMING METHODOLOGY

PHASE 1 : CLASSIFICATION & POLICY METHODOLOGY

Establish C.A. Discourse

Mobilize Network of Affiliates and Experts Develop communication plan

KNOWLEDGE MOBILIZATION Reach out to Universities

35

36

37

PHASE 3 : OPERATIONAL & SUSTAINABILITY M

Outreach to Investors

Nationwide Competition Media Outreach

Prepare

Reach out to Associations

Expert Charrette

Expert Charrette Research Units/ Studios

Classification/Archive & Curate

Operation & Sustainability

Finance & Program

Precedent & Contemporary Case Study Analyses MODELS AND METHODOLOGIES

38

Targetted Exposure & Outreach Selection

Contact Experts

34

FEBRUARY

Extra

Policy Development Strategy

Comparative Analysis

Strategic Programming and Financial Modelling Reach out To Potential Clients

PILOT PROJECTS

Tenant Structure & Spatial Design

Feasibility studies

Design Development Programming

Constru Schematic Design

Curriculum

Generic Proposal DELIVERABLES

Proposal for phase ii

Systematized identification methodology and multi-platform dialogue

Presentation Final report

Presentation

Sustainable and replicable financing models and defined programming approches

Final report Funder X

FUNDING

KEY MOMENTS (INTERNAL)

KEY MOMENTS (EXTERNAL)

McConnell Foundation

MaRS ?

Reach out to Potential Funders

Phase 1 starts Reach Out to Universities

Social Innovation Symposium New York The Commons Amidst Complexity and Change Edmonton

City Futures III Paris

Reach out to Associations

International Re-Cycle Italy Workshop New Cities Summit Genova Dallas

Charrette

Lecture on Civic Assets

Phase 1 ends Phase 2 starts

Academic Network Conference Montreal International Re-Cycle Italy Debate Napoli

Phase 2 ends Phase 3 starts

Forum La at IBC Bo event in e Bologna


Y

MARCH 39

40

41

42

APRIL 43

44

45

Y1 46

47

48

49

METHODOLOGY

Expert Charrette

PHASe 1 - STRATeGIC MASTeRPLAN & ROAD MAP

the Civic Assets Road map, This roadmap will articulate a clear vision - qualitiatvely, quantitatvely and technically - for the deployment of Phase I. Essentially the DNA of the project, it will serve as critical groundwork for the coordinated integrity and efficiency of the project’s multi-phase development, according to the essential dimensions of its success - its identity (& marketing); physical development & phasing; and operation. The Masterplan and Roadmap will be produced as a graphically sophisticated and technically detailed booklet appropriate for a range of audiences - from politician to tenant to engineer.

act Replicable Civic Asset Methodology Guideline

Knowledge Mobilization Knowledge mobilization during Phase 1 will be pursued through a series of rigorous precedent analyses that touch upon the many dimensions. We will work with the Founding Partners and Expert Council (see ‘Team Structure’) to develop a discourse on the subject and identify examples that can stimulate learning and generate tangible options for the development, financing and operation of civic assets in North America. Our research will draw from Canada, the United States and internationally but will be aimed at informing the development of the pilot projects located in Montreal and across Canada.

uction Documents

andscape of Re-Cycle ologna and parallel every university

Presentation Final report

Models and Methodologies Out of the research and development of each phase, we will produce a white paper articulating the findings and asserting best practice models and methodologies. These will inform subsequent phases and at the end of the gestation period, be revised and compiled into a definitive set upon which the next chapter of the project will be founded.

Pilot Projects The Pilot Projects, a series of real-world, real-time civic assets that are either currently threatened, in question, or slated for repurposing will be initiated as active development projects in Phase 1 (see Figure 4 and Appendix 1 for detail). Pursuing their (programmatic, financial and physical) design and development throughout the project will provide an important channel by which to investigate the real world challenges they imply, and validate the body of thinking and methodological approaches in development.


Work Experience