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AMY BRANDT

Chief Operating Officer Prospect Mortgage A Powerhouse in the business arena

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budget battle TAKES A HOLIDAY the ROARING TWENTY OFFICE OF MINORITY AND WOMEN INCLUSION (OMWI)

WANTS YOUR COMMENTS VOL. 2 / ISSUE 5

born TO LEAD set yourself apart from THE COMPETITION N Magazine | 1


YOU’RE IN THE KNOW, BRING YOUR NETWORK. BUILD YOUR NAWRB ACCOUNT WITH 10% ON EACH REFERRAL. For more information, visit NAWRB.com or call (949) 559-9800

MY CONO E G IN US US THE HO N IN THE HO I IN N E M ME EN MY WO ONOMY WO Y WOM M O M N O O N C NO GE ECO G EC G ECO U HOUSIN THE HOUSIN E HOUSING IN S E U H T O H HO H IN OMEN Y WOMEN IN WOMEN IN T MEN IN THE MEN IN THE EN W Y M O W MY WO OM OM NO G ECO SING ECON SING ECONO G ECONOMY ECONOMY OMY W NO IN N S O U C U O E ING HO ECO EH ING USIN HOU USING E HO N IN TH MEN IN THE MEN IN THE N IN THE HO IN THE HOUS THE HOUS 2 | NO Magazine E O H M E TH YW WO ME EN WO IN TH EN IN ONOM ECONOMY MEN IN WOME MY WO NOMYWOM NOMY WOM MY WOMEN NOMY O O O W N C E O Y EC O CO ING MY OM ING NO


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Business & Marketing Development

VOLUME 2 | ISSUE 5

THE ROARING TWENTY

Join us for our second annual national awards program as we recognize outstanding women in the Housing Industry and their professional achievements.

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OFFICE OF MINORITY AND WOMEN INCLUSION (OMWI) Wants your comments.

A Powerhouse in the business arena, Brandt elevates Prospect Mortgage to new heights.

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FEATURES

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BUDGET BATTLE TAKES A HOLIDAY How government budget battles affect your business. By Ann Sullivan

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SET YOURSELF APART FROM THE COMPETITION Hiring the right agents for your team starts with knowing why they should choose you. By Judy LaDeur

4 | N Magazine

(SHE) CENTERFOLD: AMY BRANDT

UNLEASH THE POWER THAT RESIDES WITHIN YOU 3 Simple steps to defining yourself as a leader. By Aprille Trupiano REALTORS AND PROPERTY MANAGERS: DON’T LET FOREIGN INVESTORS GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE IRS How to work with foreign investors and navigate income taxation. By James Sexton and Vandana Chima Bhalla


DEPARTMENTS 10

24 HANG TEN AND

SHE IS CHANGING REAL ESTATE The real estate round-up: NAWRB’s newest members, renewals and certifications.

KEEP THE PLATES SPINNING Creating strategies to manage your time effectively and finding opportunities in every situation. By Leslie Hayes

12 INFOGRAPHIC:

A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS BY THE NUMBERS

40

14 APP MAPP

Face the holidays with these apps to keep yourself prepared, organized and ready to enjoy the festivities of the season.

22 GETTING AHEAD BY

KEEPING UP Flexibility in marketing helps one agent to stay viable in an ever changing market place. By Sara Bonert

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SWAN Out of their offices and into the field, where NAWRB members can be seen and heard.

N CROWD Join the conversation: What is your favorite family tradition during the holidays?

41 DEAR DESIRÉE

From business to fashion, ask the 20-year real estate veteran your pressing questions.

42 WHAT WOMEN WANT Health, fashion, recipe and review: The go-to guide into a woman’s world.

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nawrb STAFF & BOARD

JOYCE ESSEX

CEO CENT

ER(FOLD A Leadin ) g Lady of Real Est Luxury ate

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Publisher/CEO Desirée Patno Desiree.Patno@NAWRB.com Editor-in-Chief Lauri Howell Lauri.Howell@NAWRB.com

A SELLER COAST-T ’S MARKET FRO O-COAST M

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WOMEN BUSINESS OBSTACLE S, BUT COOWNERS FACE 18 NTINUE TO THRIV E RESERVA AND DE TION PRICES, FLATING RE BUBBLE STRICTED SUPPL 24 RISK Y THE HIG

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Office and Member Relations Coordinator Olivia Frick Olivia.Frick@NAWRB.com Graphic Designer Samantha Cauguiran Samantha.Cauguiran@NAWRB.com Photographer Homeyra Hamidi Homeyra.Hamidi@NAWRB.com

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CONTRIBUTORS Ann Sullivan Judy LaDeur Sara Bonert Leslie Hayes Aprille Trupiano James Sexton Vandana Chima Bhalla N Magazine,the official publication of NAWRB, a monthly magazine featuring unique content for women in real estate, exclusive interviews with industry professionals, business development tools, book reviews, feature stories and more. N Magazine welcomes comments from all readers. All materials submitted to N Magazine are subject to editing. The articles, content, and other information in this publication are for information purposes only. Articles, content, and other information in this publication without named authors are contributed by the publication’s staff, but do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of NAWRB. NAWRB assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information, nor for any actions taken in reliance thereon. www.NAWRB.com (949) 559-9800 • NMag@NAWRB.com 34 Executive Park, Suite 260, Irvine, CA 92614

6 | N Magazine

SUBSCRIBE NOW Call (949) 559-9800 or email info@nawrb.com today!


WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNEDOF BUSINESSWOMEN OWNED BU NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WO N OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNE USINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINES OMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME IN REAL ESTATE BUSINESSES WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESSWOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESSWOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESSWOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WO I FORMING WOMEN SPECIALIZING N OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNE IN THEBUSINESS HOUSING WOMEN ECONOMY USINESS WOMEN OWNED OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINES OMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNEDNAWRB BUSINESS WOMEN WOMEN OWNED BU is the only OWNED providerBUSINESS of Women-Owned ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME Business (WOB) and Minority Women-Owned WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESSWOMEN OWNED BU Business (MWOB) certifications specific ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WO to real estate. N OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNE USINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINES OMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS BUSINESS OWNED BU 34 EXECUTIVE PARK, SUITE 260,WOMEN IRVINE,OWNED CA 92614 • (949)WOMEN 559-9800 ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU ESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOME N Magazine | 7 WNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BUSINESS WOMEN OWNED BU

WOMEN

Are you a woman in the housing economy?

THERE’S NO TOOL MORE EFFECTIVE THAN THE EMPOWERMENT OF A WOMAN

CERTIFY YOUR BUSINESS AS WOMEN-OWNED TODAY


letter from the publisher 8 | N Magazine


Dear Readers, As we move through the holiday season and prepare for 2014, I look forward to the traditions we follow each year. Traditions bring significant meaning to our gatherings, build and strengthen our relationships and create memories that last us a life time. While personal and family traditions are a main stay of our personal lives, we also honor traditions in our professional lives. From holiday office parties, to sending out thank you’s to our clients, business partners, and staff, we follow timehonored conventions and commitments year after year. These customs continue to bring everyone together to build and expand business opportunities with focus and direction for our cause. This is the time of year while we honor our past, we must also be thankful of our community that surrounds and supports us. Our communities strengthen us and allow us to continually move forward. I am encouraging my family, staff and members alike to begin a new tradition in giving back to their local community. It is important that we recognize and give back to those who are there for us day in and day out. Throughout the year it is easy to lose touch with what is important as the demands of day-to-day life can be overwhelming. The holidays, allow us to collectively take a deep breath, relax and recharge as we prepare for 2014, the Year of Women in Business. Spend time with those who make a difference in your life, energize your

relationships, and enjoy the simple things, as well as those traditions that bring joy. On a professional level, I urge all of our readers to be proactive in renewing, engaging, and supporting their connections, especially those they have within the Housing Industry as their commitments are needed more than ever. NAWRB is a professional community devoted to women and Women-Owned Businesses continually championing for our member’s success. As such, NAWRB is dedicated to the access and advocacy of professional women and women business owners Specializing in the Housing Economy, SHE is Changing Real Estate™. We represent and voice the needs of professional women and women business owners in the housing industry through media coverage, education, support, training, and industry specific WOB and MWOB certifications. We have seen new opportunities, expanded growth and accountability for professional women and Women Business Owners through the enactment of the Dodd Frank Act of 2010. This piece of legislature created the Office of Minority and Women Inclusion and requires the Small Business Administration (SBA) to conduct a study every five years to determine if there is an under representation of contracts awarded to women owned businesses. Through the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) report the 83 NAICS codes are showing growth of federal contracts being awarded to Women Owned Small Businesses (WOSB)s as well as the removal of dollar contract caps. We

are seeing a larger commitment from employers in the Housing Industry employing more women, in addition to more companies qualifying as a women owned business (WBO). In the past year we have seen an increase of women in high ranking positions join forces with NAWRB to collectively support professional women, and women business owners. NAWRB has exciting new growth and expansion planned in 2014, and are committed to assisting our members in elevating their business to the next level. Working together within each community, and joining forces will only strengthen and drive our industry to a higher standard with greater opportunities. Make a commitment and a tradition to yourself, your business, your community and all women in the housing economy to stay connected, engaged and use the benefits of membership to NAWRB’s network of professional women. Thank you to our advertisers, sponsors, partners and especially loyal members as we strive to make a difference.

Desirée Patno Publisher/CEO Desiree.Patno@NAWRB.com

N Magazine | 9


shePAGE MARY MURRAY

Owner/Attorney Mary F. Murray mary.murray@attorneymurray.com 773-792-2577

ANN-MARIE VILLICANA Dilbeck Real Estate annmarievillicana@earthlink.net 626-319-0585

HEATHER STOTLAND

Vice President/Director of Acquisitions American Commercial Equities, LLC. americancommercialequities.net hstotland@acemalibu.com 310-774-5315

SANDRA VERDUGO Executive Vice President First Team SnS adynamictrio.com sandra.verdugo@gmail.com 626-829-4199

1st Source Texas Realty 1stsourcetexasrealty.com susanna@1stsourcetexasrealty.com 512-785-4568

Ruspini Realty ruspinirealty.com jennifer@ruspinirealty.com 203-410-9484

Corporate Broker/Owner EXIT Realty Platinum Group realtorvandana.com vandana@realtorvandana.com 702-220-3948

10 | N Magazine

MONICA VACAS

Realtor RE/MAX Grand Central monicavacas.com monica@monicavacas.com 818-771-1352

CATHERINE MELISSA JUSTICE Broker Home Buyer Marketing II, Inc. melissajustice.com melissajusticebroker@gmail.com 205-648-5195

DARNELLA BARNES Owner/Broker Darnell Barnes Real Estate Services dbarnesrealestate.com

Chief Operating Officer Prospect Mortgage myprospectmortgage.com

SUSANNA BOYER

JENNIFER RUSPINI

VANDANA CHIMA BHALLA

AMY BRANDT

LINDA MITTON

Account Executive Avatar Green avatargreen.net lmitton@avatargreen.net 888-776-9910


shePAGE TERESA RYAN

BRENDA MCKINNEY

Owner/CEO Ryan Hill Realty www.ryanhillrealty.com tryan@ryanhillrealty.com 630-718-0424

COLLEEN CALNAN Stepping Stone Real Estate Services Inc/DBA Calnan Real Estate calnanrealestate.com ccalnan75@earthlink.net 781-983-4852

Broker/Owner Touch of Sold Realty thetouchofsold.com bmckinney@mris.com 540-322-4500

SHERRI SAAD

Broker/Owner Re/Max Leading Edge Detroit sherrisaad.com sherri.saad@comcast.net 313-730-6554

LISA HENRY-WEAVER

Owner/Broker Coldwell Banker Jane Henry Realtors LisaHenryGroup.com lwlisa@aol.com 972-839-7227

CATHIE MARPLES

Owner/Broker Marples & Associates marplesteam.com Cathie@marplesteam.com 925-634-8040

GAIL MAYO

Burley Properties burleyproperties.com lynncburley@aol.com 321-427-6788

Owner/Broker Regency Real Estate regencyrealestate.info irenegwoods@yahoo.com 209-321-1834

CARLOTTA DIAZ

Sales Realty World Westcamp Realty soldbycarlotta.com homes@westcamprealty.com 916-348-6000

Managing Broker Thunderbird Real Estate thunderbirdrealestate.com gmayo@got.net 831-332-3901

LYNN BURLEY

IRENE WOODS

LYNN RHINEHART Owner/Broker Quest Realty Solutions

rhinehartandson@earthlink.net

239-541-3965

LAURA HARBISON

Realty Executives lauraharbison.com reomanager@lauraworthington.com 702-321-2888

N Magazine | 11


infoGRAPHIC

Christmas BY THE NUMBERS

466

The number of pounds of the largest gingerbread man in the world, completed by a bakery in Minnesota in 2006. The average number of people who wind up

5800 in the ER after receiving injuries from holiday decorating.

7

The average height of a live Christmas tree.

1510

The first year where a live Christmas tree was decorated and recorded, in Latvia.

1883

The year the first artificial Christmas trees were put up for sale, by Sears, Roebuck & Company.

1907

The year the first New Year’s Eve Ball dropped, made out of 700 lbs of iron and wood adorned with one hundred 25-watt light bulbs.

12 | N Magazine


infoGRAPHIC

832

The number of homes per second Santa would have to visit, in order to deliver presents around the world on Christmas Eve.

25

The average percentage increase of household waste between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. In the United States, trash from wrapping paper and shopping bags total four million tons.

20

The number in billions of holiday cards and packages delivered by the U.S. Postal Service between Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve.

1939

4,334

The year Rudolph first appeared on the holiday scene, after being featured in the booklet “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” by Robert L. May. 2.4 million copies were distributed through Montgomery Ward department stores. The number of nutcrackers in the world’s largest nutcracker collection-owned by the Löschner family in Neuhausen, Germany.

1670

The year the candy cane made its debut. Legend says that a choirmaster distributed the candy, bent to resemble a shepherd’s crook, to quiet the young singers during the long Christmas services.

1834

The year Charles Dickens wrote “A Christmas Carol.”

The number of copies “A Christmas Carol” sold as of

6,000 Christmas Day the same year it was released.

N Magazine | 13


appMAPP XmasRADIO It’s beginning to sound a lot like Christmas. Spread Christmas cheer for all to hear with this collection of more than 50 unique stations dedicated to playing the sounds of the season. This app features a vast collection of holiday music formats from Country, Jazz, and the Classics, as well as a station broadcast directly from the North Pole. Now you can access Christmas music from anywhere with the help of this app via both cellular and WiFi networks for free. WrapItApp

FACE THE HOLIDAYS WITH THESE APPS TO KEEP YOURSELF PREPARED, ORGANIZED AND READY TO ENJOY THE FESTIVITIES OF THE SEASON.

Gift wrapping presents is an art form that everyone strives to master, and now you can too. With the help of this app your IPhone or ITouch will measure the item you wish to wrap, and determine how much gift wrap and ribbon you will need. If you are a complete novice at wrapping this app can also guide you through the process with step-by-step tutorials. Present your gifts with pride as using this app will make your presents look polished and professionally gift wrapped. GoodFood Looking for a great recipe this holiday season? This app can help you find the perfect dish to serve at your next festive gathering. Featuring more than 180 recipes that have been tried and tested to ensure each will produce a beautiful dish. Helpless following recipes? Never fear, this app features clear instructions complete with photos to ensure your efforts turn out perfectly. Concerned about over-cooking your turkey? This app has a built in turkey timer as well as tips and tricks to help your main dish achieve best results. VideoCallWithSanta Visiting Santa at the mall to give him your Christmas list is a thing of the past with this new app. Never worry about standing in line or dealing with crowds again. Hate having your quality time with Santa cut short? Wish you could talk to Santa in July? Now you can have Santa at your disposable all year long when you use “Video Calls with Santa”. This interactive application allows you and your children to have a realistic experience with Santa by video. Whether your child is naughty or nice there are pre-recorded options you can choose to ensure your child’s time with Santa is an event they won’t soon forget. TheChristmasList

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If you make endless lists trying to keep all of your holiday shopping organized this is the app for you. However, this app features more than just list making capabilities. It also provides options to sync all of your lists via email, allows you to track your spending per person, as well as monitor shipping and receiving of all your gifts. This app can be password protected keeping your Christmas purchases secret from prying eyes. At $0.99 you get a bargain in keeping everything you need at your disposal in one convenient and secure location.


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N Magazine | 15


Government

We are all familiar with the budget and spending confrontations that have gridlocked Washington for the last couple of months. So I am encouraged by a mid-December deal that means, for at least the next two years, we will have to find our political drama elsewhere. Tuning out the “crisis” headlines has been easy to do, but here is why avoiding another one with this deal matters. The budget is the blueprint for government spending and I cannot understate the economic impact government spending has on our economy. For the fiscal year that just ended, the government spent a whopping total of $3.4 trillion. Despite the compromise that was just announced, it is important to understand the process.

How government budget battles affect your business. BY

ANN SULLIVAN

16 | N Magazine

The battles over government spending, which began in earnest in 2011, have cost the economy 900,000 jobs or about 0.6 percent increase in unemployment, according to the Peter G. Peterson Foundation. That is pretty significant and had a big ripple effect across the country, affecting business investments, cost of money, and services to mention a few. The government’s fiscal year begins on October 1st of every year. Because the Congress did not agree to a spending plan for FY2014


Government before it began, it was forced to pass what Washington insiders call a “continuing resolution,” which is simply another way of saying that government funding continues at last year’s levels. The continuing resolution expires on January 15, 2014, so Congress needs to take action before that date to keep the government from shutting down early next year. One step in the right direction came mid-December when Senate Budget Committee Chair Patty Murray (D-WA) and House Budget Committee Chair Paul Ryan (R-WI) hammered out a two-year compromise on what the government’s spending numbers should be. The deal would also do away with the harmful effects of automatic spending cuts for two years, and replace them with targeted spending cuts. These two Congressional leaders chose to lead rather than follow the confrontational budget path, which preceded them. What makes these kinds of agreements difficult is that in order to increase spending, new revenue has to be found to offset it. That is never a task a politician looks forward to performing. This requirement comes out of the 2011 budget deal, which specified government spending levels for a decade. If Congress wants to spend above those levels, it needs to cut spending elsewhere, or face the dreaded “sequestration” (automatic, across-the-board spending cuts) which forces government agencies to give the difference back to the Treasury. Both Houses of Congress now have to pass this budget agreement. With the January 15th deadline looming, the task falls to another group of Representatives and Senators known as Appropriators. Appropriators are charged with taking the spending numbers proposed by Senator Murray and Representative Ryan and divide among all of the government’s agencies – a cumbersome task fraught with competing interests and ideologies. Normally they have six months to complete this task, but will have less than a month to do so now. Had the group of Budget Committee members not agreed to a compromise, or if the Congress as a whole does not like the proposal, the task of coming up with an

agreement would likely fall to Congressional leaders such as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Speaker of the House John Boehner and their respective counterparts Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. In that scenario, government spending is simply extended for another year. But there is a glitch. Since the government spending level for FY2013 is above the level for FY2014, the Treasury would be forced to require federal agencies to return the difference. Circling back to the question how do these policies affect you? Because they affect all aspects of the US economy. It affects those who want to invest, and it affects business planning, which ultimately all trickles down to the consumer. An S&P analysis of the last impasse over government spending, which led to the first government shutdown in 17 years, cost our economy $24 billion. For an economy that is lurching toward prosperity, that is a big hit. The effects of a jittery economy weigh heavily on small businesses. Even if you do not own a business, there are plenty of people in your neighborhood who own a business or are employed by a small business. Virtually every business in the United States is a small business, whose owners have to meet payroll and make payments on their loans. It is precisely these businesses that create nearly two-thirds of all new jobs and employ millions of Americans. The nation’s smallest businesses, known as microbusinesses, which have five or fewer employees, represent more than 90 percent of all businesses and employ more than 41 million people. According to the National Women’s Business Council, 36 percent of those are owned or led by women. I hope that the bipartisan deal struck by the two Budget Chairs sets the tone for 2014 and beyond. The work is just beginning but the pathway is clear. Leadership requires a will to find solutions to our nation’s challenges, and the willingness to talk to others who do not necessarily see the world the same way.

We can start that trend by practicing it outside of the Halls of Congress. We can start a dialogue among our neighbors, friends and family. Discussions about politics and public policies should be encouraged around the dinner table. We need to get back to the model of discussing rather than shouting our opinions. Perhaps the time to make that change is in this season of cheer and goodwill. Happy Holidays.

Battles over government spending, have cost the economy 900,000 jobs or about 0.6 percent increase in unemployment, according to the Peter G. Peterson Foundation

The current Government deal to be passed by Congress would do away with the harmful effects of automatic spending cuts for two years, and replace them with targeted spending cuts.

The nation’s smallest businesses, known as micro-businesses, which have five or fewer employees, represent more than 90 percent of all businesses and employ more than 41 million people.

According to the National Women’s Business Council, 36% of micro-businesses are owned or led by women.

Ann Sullivan WIPP Government Relations 1156 15th Street, NW, Suite 1100 Washington, DC 20005 202-626-8528 N Magazine | 17


Profitability

set yourself apart FROM THE COMPETITION Hiring the right agents for your team starts with knowing why they should choose you.

W

henever I am working with the company, the first thing I always ask the broker is this; Why should an agent choose your company over one of your competitors? Most brokers have a tough time answering that question, but if you are serious about growth and profitability, it’s the first thing that you need to address. The most important asset within your real estate firm are your people. Your profitability each year is directly tied to your ability to recruit and retain the right agents. Attracting the right people means attracting those aligned with your values and your vision. When you hire the right agents, you have an opportunity to 18 | N Magazine

BY

create a flourishing environment which translates into an improved bottom line, or more profits. Many of the most profitable brokers today are those who decided they did not need all the agents, they just needed a few of the right agents. Putting a strong team in place will require you to do some research and get some answers first. You must be able to present your systems in a “what’s in it for them” format. They need to see the results that other agents have experienced when they made a move. You should also be able to explain how a move would benefit them both personally and professionally. Because let’s face it, switching companies is a very scary decision for most people. Diffuse fears by accurately and

JUDY LADEUR

effectively sharing the “WHY” which sets you apart from your competition. What does this look like? You must define: • What you do better than your competitors • What you are doing that your competitors are not • How you can help your agents and your potential recruits earn more money through your systems and tools • How you can enhance the working environment of your agents as well as potential recruits • What are the real results that other members of your team have seen since making a move?


Profitability Once you answer those questions, the next step is spelling out the reasons any agent would want to join your team. In my training, I ask each broker to come up with their 12 most compelling reasons for an agent to join their team. I have created a blueprint that you can follow to begin crafting your own list. 12 Compelling Reasons Recruits Will Say YES to Joining Your Company # 1: Strong Leadership: Vision, support with problem solving, and leaders who are acting like leaders. Take it one step further and determine what specific value you and your expertise bring to your team. #2: Lead Generation: Agents need to prospect, but they want companies that are working to generate leads for them as well. There are lead generation companies out there that are charging agents up to $1000 a month for leads and believe it or not, agents are paying. Why? Because agents want those internet leads, or any leads that the company can provide. What are you willing to provide? #3: Brand Awareness: Companies with a strong presence in the market, locally and nationally, are doing well with their recruiting efforts. Brand awareness is tied to market share. The best agents understand that the stronger the name/market share, the easier it is to compete for business. #4: Education/Training: Agents are looking to fine-tune their skills. Many agents know they need to get back to the basics and most realize the value of staying current in an ever changing real estate industry. The best agents also understand the value of securing specialized training or securing certain designations for areas of specialization. Such areas might include: Luxury market training, working with seniors, working the condo market, working with various ethnic groups which are moving into the country, and working the short sale and foreclosure market. There is also a lot of interest in becoming a global agent these days. #5: Positive Attitude and Healthy Environment in the Office: Agents want a positive work environment with competent and positive peers. It is easy for me to see that the offices with the best production have brokers with a great attitude. Many of those

same brokers spent the last 5 years getting rid of their dead weight and many are more profitable today than they have been in years. #6: Mastermind Groups and networking opportunities with other top producers: Many of the best agents enjoy connecting with other successful agents. Their needs approach to the real estate business is different from those just getting started, so why not give them the opportunity to grow and play together? Agents who work hard, play hard. Those who spend time together are more likely to stay together.

“Identifying the why is the foundation for any strong and effective recruiting system.” #7: Marketing Support/Tools: Marketing is the first thing that agents need to stay in touch with their sphere and past customers. What can you do to assist or support their marketing efforts? #8: Client/Data Management Tools: Many agents struggle when it comes to managing their data and client info. Do you have an easy-to-use customer relationship management tool that allows them to input their data, send out marketing, and locate client data quickly? A hot topic today is helping your agents sell their real estate business at the end of their career. However, you must first teach them how to build a business that they can sell, and that requires a client/data management tool. #9: Coaching and Accountability: We see many companies implementing very successful coaching programs, with some great results. If the company does not provide coaching, the agents might hire outside the organization. The cost can range from $500 -$1000. What

that tells me is this: if they want it and it has value to them, they will pay for it. Your agents need accountability and sometimes a third party is the best way to keep them on track and accountable. Your best option is to coach them yourself or have someone else in house that can effectively coach them. If this isn’t possible, seek out a good coach and work out an agreement with them to coach those agents who want it. #10: Administrative Support: Agents are working harder, but most are not working smarter. What can you do to support them behind the scenes? What can you take off their plate to give them more balance in their life and work? #11: Proven results with proven systems: It’s not enough to have systems and tools. You need to know what the results are from each of the systems and tools you offer. Use exact results, NAR survey results, national brand results, testimonials from your agents as well as success stories. Bring those results into your interviews. Everyone says they can help potential recruits, but those who can prove it are winning in today’s market. #12: Security: The bottom line for any agent making a move is whether or not they will feel secure at their new location. The more answers you can provide on the above list, the better they will feel, and when they feel good, they join! Identifying the why is the foundation for any strong and effective recruiting system. Once you have identified why they should join, the next step is to create and implement an effective marketing campaign to educate the agents in your marketplace about what you have to offer. If you take the time to implement these two steps, you will find that recruiting the right agents to your firm gets much easier!

Judy LaDeur President of Judy LaDeur International info@JudyLaDeurInternational.com

N Magazine | 19


state OF THE INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF MINORITY AND WOMEN INCLUSION

wants your comments

A

s a business owner you seek opportunities to boost profit and the visibility of your business and no opportunity is greater than being awarded a federal contract. Federal contracts offer professional notoriety on a large scale can potentially earn substantial profit for your business. However, the granting of federal 20 | N Magazine

contracts is unbalanced when it comes to demographics. Unfortunately women-owned and minority-owned businesses are underrepresented in comparison to men-owned businesses granted federal contracts. This article will examine the Dodd-Frank Provision for the inclusion of women and minorities into federal contracting through a before and after view.

In 2010 the CEO of the National Association of Women in Real Estate Businesses and a certified woman-owned business owner, DesirĂŠe Patno discussed the prospective boost for women-owned businesses. “Over the years there have been directives and legislation to overcome decades of


state OF THE INDUSTRY underutilization in federal contracting,” said Patno. “Women remain underrepresented in federal contracts. Women surpass men at twice the rate concerning starting new businesses, and with 40 percent of small businesses owned or controlled by women, they deserve greater representation.” As the number of women-owned businesses continues to grow and more women ascend professionally, there needs to be a renewed attention to ensure equality. Federal contracts should fairly consider both minority and women-owned small businesses; this assertion is supported by the Dodd-Frank implementation of the Office of Minority and Women Inclusion, or OMWI. The Dodd-Frank is the most significant financial regulation in the United States since the reform following the Great Depression and affects all federal financial regulatory agencies. The creation of the OMWI signified a turning point for women-owned businesses within key federal agencies, providing representation that previously did not exist. These agencies include The Treasury, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Federal Housing Finance Agency. “The OMWI acts as the catalyst for change,” said Patno. “It calls for a certain level of standardization on OMWI actions within each agency to reach balanced growth of women receiving contracts.” In order to ensure there are a set of guidelines for the role of the OMWI within federal agencies, the Dodd-Frank created Provision 342. The Provision states federal institutions must meet certain standards for the inclusion of minorities and women owned businesses in prime and subcontracting opportunities. A main point highlighted in the Provision deals with the OMWI ability to ensure to the maximum extent inclusion is fair among all the federal agencies. For comparison Patno refers to the civil rights amendment of 1972, Title IX, which deals with athletic opportunities among men and women undergraduates. Title IX determined that if a university’s student population is 40 percent female, then the athletic department must reflect that percentage equally. Provision 342 declared women and minority owned businesses must have an equal opportunity at contracts, as well as

stating the providers of these contracts must make a good faith effort to fairly include them. The Provision goes on to state that if the OMWI office feels a contractor failed to make a good faith effort, then the OMWI can recommend the contractor be terminated. Although the OMWI do not have the power to actually terminate the contractor, their ability to suggest a termination is a major step for women business owners fight for fair inclusion. The Dodd-Frank Provision 342 is a leap forward for women business owners who historically are at a disadvantage when seeking to do business with the federal government. “The success of Provision 342 will directly depend on the degree to which women business owners educate themselves and how they make the most of the opportunity,” said Patno. “Women business owners must unite more than ever and become advocates for the standardization of how the Dodd-Frank provisions are implemented.” Since the creation of this provision, the OMWI have continued to make progress in obtaining and regulating government contracts for women owned businesses. One agency with an OMWI presence is the Office of the Controller of Currency, or OCC, which is monitored to ensure compliance with section 342 of the Dodd-Frank Act. In their annual report for 2012, they recorded and the reported the following data to Congress. In the 2012 fiscal year, the OCC awarded 457 contracts to minority and women-owned businesses, accounting for 34.3 percent or $40,362,428 of the OCC’s total awards. Amongst those awards, 12.5 percent were given to women-owned businesses. This is a significant increase in comparison to the pre-Dodd-Frank provisions and in the utilization of women businesses in federal contracts. In addition to increasing the use of women-owned businesses on federal contracts, the OCC also exceeded its Small Business Program goals by supplying the OMWI the opportunity to collaborate in efforts to increase participation of women-owned businesses in the agency’s contracts. According to the report, women-owned businesses accounted for 10.8

percent of OCC’s total awards. As OMWI works with the Small Business Programs it is in turn increasing the diversity in the business activities of OCC and propelling women forward in the federal realm. Expanding on their collaboration efforts, six different OMWI financial agencies developed standards together “for assessing the diversity policies and practices of entities regulated by each agency.” This multiagency organization comprised of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the National Credit Union Administration, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and Securities and Exchange Commission was designed to uphold the provisions of the Dodd-Frank section 342. Each of these agencies is tasked with developing standards for assessing diversity policies and practices in the regulated entities. Each assessment standard is comprised of four key areas: organizational commitment to diversity and inclusion, workforce profile and employment practices, procurement and business practices and supplier diversity, and practices to promote transparency of organizational diversity and inclusion. To guarantee the continuance of collaboration and interagency partnerships, the OMWI plan to publish a Proposed Interagency Policy Statement Establishing Standards to Assess the Diversity Policies and Practices of All Entities Regulated by the Agencies. At this time the OMWI are asking for comment on their Proposed Interagency Policy Statement Establishing Standards to Assess the Diversity Policies and Practices of All Entities Regulated by the Agencies. NAWRB will be submitting a response to this request and encourage others interested in making their voice heard to submit their comments in conjunction with our organization. To access additional information in regards to the proposed joint standards between the six federal financial regulatory agencies follow this link:

www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/press/bcreg/20131023a.htm

Email us at media@nawrb.com to be included in this response. Deadline for submission is February 1, 2014.

N Magazine | 21


ARE YOU GETTING 30% ROIs? Chrimata, Inc. is a real estate investment corporation with more than 12 years of experience in buying, selling, rehabbing and maintaining single-family properties in Southern California. Its team of office and field resources specializes in niche areas to provide maximum acquisition opportunities and returns on investments.

Invest for real profit. Contact Chrimata, Inc.

I

CHR MATA NC.

22 | N Magazine

CHRIMATA, INC. Phone: (714) 396-6622 • Email: chrimatainc@gmail.com


DONATE TODAY & HELP RESTORE LOCAL PARKS

COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT

For families, parks are some of the most valuable resources within a community. Through your involvement with the NAWRB Community Enhancement Program, you can improve the quality-of-life for communities by making a pledge today and giving a tax-deductible charitable donation. NAWRB COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT BRING THE RECOVERY TO YOUR PARK

34 Executive Park, Suite 260 Irvine, CA 92614 (949) 559-9800

Info@NAWRB.com A non-profit 501(c)3

25 YEARS OF HISTORY

CORNERSTONE FALL

2013

| Strong foundations to empower families in Orange County

Photographer: Lauri Reveles

e Avila family begins a bright future with the key to their new home.

Today, everything changes for the Avila family! Photographer: Lauri Reveles

Mom and Dad cut the ribbon to the new home they built and bought for their children.

For years, Pablo and Claudia have struggled to keep a roof over their children’s heads. e four of them lived in a one-bedroom, substandard apartment, where mold and mildew led to several bouts of pneumonia for the kids. Mom and Dad were determined to find better shelter and had been carefully saving for a down payment. It was just so difficult to find a home they could afford. en Claudia discovered Habitat OC and committed to applying to purchase a home. When they qualified, she and Pablo immediately began fulfilling their “sweat equity” requirements, making new friends and learning new skills. eir new home, part of Phase II of Habitat OC’s multi-home build in Santa Ana, allows the children to have their own rooms, a place to study and play, and to be healthy. ere’s a beautiful big yard perfect for a puppy too. Congratulations to a great family!

Another new home built and bought with love and hard work!

N Magazine | 23 www.habitatoc.org

More inspiration inside!


businessPLANNING

getting ahead BY KEEPING UP

W

BY

SARA BONERT

hen Cyndi Lesinski thinks about ways to advance her real estate business, she thinks about middle schoolers.

Lesinski understands that change isn’t always easy, but you need to embrace it. “Remember floppy disks?” she asks. “You’d be hard-pressed to fit those in today’s laptops.”

“I want to be in business 15 years from now, so a current sixth grader could likely be my client,” says Lesinski, an owner/real estate agent at Cobalt Realty Group, a real estate brokerage in California’s Ventura County and Santa Clarita Valley.

Yes, those old eight-inch floppies were replaced by smaller three-anda-half-inch disks, which were replaced by thumb drives and apps – all leaving her asking: “What’s next?”

“These kids are so savvy about technology,” she says. “They’re using computers, tablets, iPods and cellphones. They’re texting and instant messaging and posting photos, and they’ve been doing it for years already. How am I going to serve them as clients if I don’t have the same knowledge of technology? Why would they want to work with somebody who hasn’t kept up with the ways in which they think and live?” 24 24 || N Magazine

That kind of forward thinking has helped Lesinski be a top-producing agent in Los Angeles for nearly 15 years. “This isn’t about writing code or building your own website,” said Lesinski. “It’s about embracing change and being willing to meet your clients or potential clients using means that are comfortable to them. It could be as simple as texting instead of calling or posting home photos on Instagram instead of printing a gazillion fliers.”


businessPLANNING Lesinski leverages her marketing budget by working through multiple online, and offline channels. “I find that within my public conversations about real estate it is inevitable that someone will reference Zillow,” she said. “Thus to me, that has become one of my highest priorities. LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter are all part of my current resources. I do some better than others, and I’m always working on improving my performance.” She also realizes that just because a lead doesn’t come in through an online channel doesn’t mean the client’s decision to call wasn’t influenced by something they saw online.

“What worked last year might not work this year,” said Lesinski. “With the evolution of online programs, you have to be open to trying new things, and next year’s big thing may not even have been invented yet.” Beyond being a smart businesswoman, Lesinski prides herself on her interpersonal skills. During initial meetings with clients she listens far more than she talks, acknowledging that families don’t always come in knowing exactly what they want. Probing questions can lead homebuyers to understanding their priorities; a large lot or tight security may ultimately be more important to them than they first realized.

I

With a degree in sociology and social work, Lesinski previously worked as a social worker NC.and was tasked with placing foster children with families.

Embracing change and use forms of communication that are comfortable to clients, such as texting instead of calling, or posting home photos on Instagram versus printing fliers.

Vary your marketing efforts. From online to direct mail and even co-marketing with local businesses and real estate affiliates will provide the most exposure.

CHR MATA

“About 40 percent of our leads come in through phone calls and of those, about 60 percent tell us they’re calling because of reviews they read about us online. Another chunk of our leads come thanks to referrals from clients we originally met online,” said Lesinski. “So, when people say they don’t want to pay a couple thousand dollars a year to work with Zillow or Trulia, I wonder if they’ve thought about both the direct returns and residual returns they’re missing out on.”

“I was good working with kids and helping them to transition into a stable family home environment,” she said. “It’s not a huge stretch to see how those skills apply when working with families and helping them find a place they can call home. Both fields center around serving people, figuring out what they want, what they need and then guiding them through the transitional process to achieve their goals”

Invest and Find REAL profit with

CHRIMATA, INC. Be the investor in your real estate market

As much as she values online marketing, Lesinski still uses some old-school means to Talk of transitions is fitting for this real estate reach out to potential clients. She sends “just agent. It was, after all, an impending listed” postcards to targeted neighborhoods, milestone birthday that caused her to mails a monthly item of value to her top recommit to staying current. sphere (past clients, friends and business Chrimata, Inc. estate investment andstaying associates), and occasionally invests in ais a real “My vision of staying young and grocery cart advertising campaign. She also current in my business is to stay informed on management corporation with more than 12 years co-markets with other local businesses and the best resources available online,” said ofthat experience in buying, selling, rehabbing, real estate affiliates have advertising Lesinski. “I believe that the revolution of budgets such as insurance agents, mortgage the Internet hit years ago and we are just all maintaining and managing single-family brokers and pest control companies. seeing the small impacts of it in all business residential properties in multiple states. practices. Real estate is changing. Banking is “About 90 percent of my marketing budget is changing. Insurance is changing. “If I want to spent on online services and I can’t imagine help my clients through the process of buying doing business today without those or selling a house, I have to be willing to resources,” she said. “But I don’t want to change too.” completely forget those who don’t spend time online. There are still people out there that LEGAL Chrimata, Inc. nor its employees can predict the actual don’t have Facebook and DISCLAIMER: Twitter accounts.”

Review your marketing

budget on a quarterly and Just closed Sundance annual basis to determine with 21% profit. whichover investments are offering the best return.

Before

After

profit on a future transaction. Past history does not guarantee future performance.

Lesinski reviews her marketing budget on a quarterly and annual basis to determine which investments are offering the best return.

Sara Bonert Vice President of Agent and Broker Services Zillow

Website: www.chrimatainc.com • Phone: (714) 396-6622 • Email: investor@chrimatainc.com N Magazine | 25


I suspect I will one day remember events still waiting for us in seven to ten years that will serve to shake us out of the comfort zones we will have established by then from today’s recovery. Believe what you choose about the economy, but the fact is that markets ebb and flow, and the market belonging to housing and its feeder industries is no different. This is fine for economic theorists, but for those of us in the field, it feels a little like surfing. Waiting desperately for that next wave and then hoping to paddle hard enough to get up and stay balanced long enough to get to shore. Now, to this image of the surfer, add a stick in each hand and one on her nose upon each of which rests a spinning plate. Her job is to ride the wave while balancing the sticks and keeping the plates – family, career, children, education, health, financial management --all spinning. Now you have a good metaphor for a woman in the housing market and perhaps, a fear that as that woman, you are headed for a wipe out. How then does anyone make it work successfully? The truth is that there is no one right answer, but the seemingly dissimilar acts of surfing and plate spinning have three principles in common that point us in the right direction, focus, balance and the ability to let go. Focus. A successful surfer must block out everything except the feel of the board under her feet and the rhythm of the water. You can do anything but you cannot do everything. You can do many things, but you cannot do them all at the same time. Last Thursday, when driving down a city street in Dallas, Texas, I happened to glance into the cars on either side at the stop light. On the left was a man, with earbuds in his ears, doing a Sudoku puzzle book with a pen. On the right was a woman, earbuds in her ears, talking rapidly into the phone and putting on makeup. In a world where multitasking has risen to an art form, focus seems archaic, but it is the only way anything actually gets done.

I

BY

remember the housing bubble in the late 1990’s – when subprime mortgage refinancing was the key to a debt-free tomorrow and home values were

26 | N Magazine

LESLIE HAYES

never going to drop. I also remember the financial crisis ten years later, when people found themselves gasping for tiny pockets of air as they drowned in their underwater homes.

1. Make a list of the top three things that you must do professionally tomorrow. Now make a list of the top three things you must do personally. 2. Schedule in those items for tomorrow tonight. Write or type them into your calendar with times for getting them done and block off those times for other meetings or phone calls. Close


Women out email and turn off text notifications. And consider doing the one you dislike the most first. Balance. Plate spinning is an art. Ask any circus performer how she keeps all of the plates spinning simultaneously while perched precariously on tall slender sticks, and she’ll tell you, “It’s a delicate balance. Each plate must spin fast enough but not too fast, and you have to pay enough attention to all but not too much to any particular one.” What does this mean for you?

buy or make time. You can only spend it. How can you make the most of this minute at this time, regardless of where you are or what circumstances surround you?

about you? Remember why you’re in “the game” in the first place then focus, balance, let go and listen to the cheers from your fans!

Surfers love the waves, the water, the challenge and the feeling they get when it all comes together. Circus performers spin plates to entertain and fascinate and their reward is the amazement and applause the audience gives back when they do the impossible. What

1. Start slow. Successful plate spinners don’t start out with five or six plates. First they practice with one, and then add another, and another. In our lives, the plates we spin are things like jobs, clients, children, partners, bosses, health challenge, the list goes on. 2. Shift intensity. While we cannot usually put one on hold to manage another, we can balance the intensity we have with each one. Work piling up? Schedule two long days in the next five and reward yourself by working reasonable hours the other three. Family dinner impossible? How about picking one meal a week and focus on creating a ritual for that one? Friends giving you guilt trips because you haven’t gotten together? Set up a quarterly lunch and try to send a quick text once a week. Let Go. Try too hard at surfing and you’ll become rigid, overcorrect and fall. Gripping those sticks under the plates too firmly will upset the momentum and they’ll crash. Sometimes the best thing you can do is simply relax and let go. 1. Traffic jams, planes get delayed, people get sick and clients cancel. The next time something changes your schedule, rather than scrambling to fix things, consider whether an opportunity has just opened up. Does the traffic jam give you time to plan out a marketing approach you hadn’t considered? Is there someone in the airport you should meet? 2. You can only control two things: how you invest your time and how you choose to react. You cannot even control your own thoughts. (Don’t believe me? How many times today did a thought run through your mind without your permission?) Despite popular phrases, you cannot save,

Leslie Hayes President of the Hayes Approach Consulting Chief HR Officer at Wingspan Portfolio Advisors lhayes@thehayesapproach.com

N Magazine | 27


sheCENTER(FOLD) 28 | N Magazine

AMY BRANDT Chief Operating Officer Prospect Mortgage


AmyBrandt Amy Brandt shows how to be a powerhouse in the business arena while elevating Prospect Mortgage to new heights. Meet Amy Brandt. A dynamic, resourceful, independent executive who continues to leave her mark on the housing industry. Her success has held no measure, operating as a powerhouse since her first position at WMC. Brandt has created her own path, tirelessly growing and building new business for each entity she has been involved in. Now as Brandt embarks on a new journey, having recently been named COO at Prospect Mortgage, she is tasked with a unique challenge; ensuring clients can easily do business with the mortgage conglomerate, while solidifying their position in the marketplace. “As it stands now Prospect Mortgage is focused on rolling out a comprehensive set of new technology to improve user experience and make it easier for someone to do business with us,” said Brandt. “We want to provide them a seamless experience. However, with any business there is no such thing as a job completed. There are always continuous enhancements to be done. It is a never-ending evolutionary process.” Brandt’s 1997 at she was University. working.

career WMC still in At that

in the industry started in as a sales associate while law school at Arizona State time she put all her energy into

“I had a lot of energy and I didn’t sleep,” said Brandt. “At one point, I had as many as four or five jobs. When you are 22, you can do almost anything.” Her time getting her post-graduate degree was invaluable as it helped establish the direction she wanted to take her career. “Clerking and working for a Federal judge we were always in litigation, constantly cleaning up other people’s messes,” said Brandt. “I wanted to be the one who was in the position to make decisions and not just be a part of the clean up crew.” This insight took Brandt from being a top producer at WMC to being named CEO in 2003. With this step forward Brandt became one of the youngest executives

in the industry, joining an elite group of women who were head of a mortgage finance company. Brandt was able to break barriers and command respect from her male counterparts by operating as a professional, delivering results and continually enhancing her skill set. “As a woman you have to be willing to lean in and deliver, and over deliver,” said Brandt. “I think the key differentiator in creating success is who wants it most? Who is willing to make it happen whatever that means. Realize your strengths, review what you need to change and do what it takes to get yourself to the next level.” Her ability to generate new growth for the company put the organization on the radar of GE Money, which purchased the company from Apollo Global Management in 2004. Brandt stayed with WMC initially after the sale as she felt a sense of satisfaction in helping others and seeing the end result. “The fun thing about Real Estate is the tangible impact,” said Brandt “You can see what you do and see a significant result. Helping someone get into a home is something you see the impact of and it motivates.” At the end of her contract in 2006 Brandt left WMC, deciding it was time to take her career in another direction, starting YMA Music Group. The music industry was familiar to Brandt who grew up in Los Angeles, and she knew several talented musicians struggling to enter the music scene. The creation of this independent label allowed her to develop new talent, and actively sign artists she believed had potential to be successful. “I worked hard for a long time, and wanted to do something I enjoyed,” said Brandt. “It was a fun thing to do between gigs, and rewarding to help artists I believed in get exposure.” Brandt returned to the mortgage industry in 2007, leaving the music label she created to continue on as she focused on new pursuits, founding Vantium Capital. This company was founded

NNMagazine Magazine | | 29 29


sheCENTERFOLD

on the principles of providing special servicing for their clients, and crafting solutions specific to each individual’s needs. “I wanted to get back to the private equity part of the business, and not be a part of such a large corporation,” said Brandt. “It was great having that experience, but I wanted to be a part of something different.” With her recent transition to Prospect Mortgage, Brandt is focused on establishing the company as an industry leader. Her background in building and strengthening the foundations of a business are a perfect fit for the goals Prospect has for the future of the company. Brandt’s ability to bring consistent results and monitor overall company costs will enable the organization to generate growth of their operations platform. As Brandt continues to dominate professionally, she is often sought after by various outlets seeking to learn how to successfully balance both work and home life. However this topic seems like gender bias to Brandt, who would rather discuss market trends than how she keeps all the areas of her life aligned. “No one ever asked Steve Jobs about the work-life balance, so why is it just posed to women?” said Brandt. “I think it is a transitional time. Women make up a fraction of CEO’s in the workplace and this is because a lot of women make choices in regards to their home life and career. Each woman makes the choices that are best for her, but it seems the real issue is that men do not feel the same level of

30 | N N Magazine Magazine

obligation when it come to home life versus career.” While there have been significant strides in women reaching the pinnacle of success, Brandt believes there is a big benefit to women working together and providing foundations for one another. “Women have an advantage as most women have good emotional awareness and can capitalize on that,” said Brandt. “Business is driven by emotion and tapping into that can aid in their success. Men have mastered networking. They have been doing it for years on the golf course and at dinners together. They know how to assist each other in business to help each other succeed. Women tend to be more on their own and are competitive with one another, which only prohibits getting the best results. That is the great part about being involved in a women’s group and/or network. The primary function is to network, provide business opportunities and help one another out. Women’s groups help you to come in contact with other like-minded women and to draw ideas from one another. Everyone needs support.” In addition to finding support in the industry, Brandt also enjoys the mentor role, assisting new talent in getting to the next step. “I love finding women who are up and coming and working with them to help them make it to the top,” said Brandt. “It is important for the industry to take on the burden of new talent, and be willing to develop and invest in new industry talent. There is a certain responsibility to provide leadership for the future.”


TO LEARN MORE ABOUT NAWRB AND OUR SERVICES EMAIL INFO@NAWRB.COM OR CALL (949) 559-9800 N Magazine | 31


theROARING TWENTY

J

oin us for our second annual national awards program as we recognize outstanding women in the Housing Economy and their professional achievements.

Keeping with the spirit of the 1920's we have taken our cue from this diverse and dynamic decade, as it is a distinct representation of the women in this industry. Each award name is featured after a unique individual, theme, or event that transpired during this period of time. We are actively seeking nominations from December 16th through January 15th from our community at large for women in 10 categories. ELIGIBILITY: NAWRB's national recognition program is open to any women who works within the Housing Industry in the country. The awards celebrates the woman, her professional and personal achievements, as well as her ability to inspire and advocate for other women. NOMINATION PROCESS: To nominate a women for one of our categories please submit a word document highlighting your nomination and their achievements. Please be specific on your nominees accomplishments. Nomination entries can focus on business success, overcoming obstacles or personal achievements. In addition to your nomination, you may submit supporting evidence such as press releases, articles, testimonials and any additional items that will enable the judges to make an informed decision. All nominations must be received no later than 5 PM on January 15th to Roaring20@NAWRB.com WHY NOMINATE? A NAWRB Roaring 20's Award is an acknowledgement from our extended network of Women that each recipient has made an overwhelming contribution to their community or overall industry. Each award carries well deserved prestige for the woman as well as her business. This recognition from leading figures in the industry brings with it the attention and support of a number of business and media outlets.

32 32 || NNMagazine Magazine


theROARING TWENTY

TheFlapper:

TheChrysler:

This woman is breaking ties with the traditional way of doing business and has chartered her own course for running a business

Awarded to the woman who has continued to show growth even in times of diversity and strife

TheTalkie:

Awarded to the woman who is a visionary. She can see past existing limitations and strives to build a new tomorrow

TheGatsby:

This woman tirelessly gives back to her community, successfully swinging between her professional and personal life. Never sacrificing the time she donates to charitable organizations and her local community

This pioneering woman is gaining ground and making her mark in the world of Marketing, branding her business to build a successful enterprise

Awarded to the woman who is on the rise, and whose cunning skills and business savvy has put her on the fast track to success

TheSpirit of St. Louis Award:

This woman’s passion for business has led her to break all barriers that cross her path as she creates new roads and opportunities

TheChanel:

This woman is changing the perception of the entrepreneurial woman

TheDisney:

TheCharleston:

TheGershwin:

This woman is writing a soundtrack for success while mentoring fellow members in an effort to foster and grow new talent

TheWomen’s Voice Award:

Awarded to the woman who is continually advocating for the rights of women in business

The runner up from each category will be profiled as a Leading Lady.

N Magazine | 33


theROARING TWENTY

The Roaring Twenties was a decade of prosperity, innovations and social change. As post-war America thrived, the landscape of the country's values, lifestyle and culture completely changed practically overnight. While economic growth helped to drive Americans into the cities, this period of time was predominately influenced by art, music and technology. Taking inspiration from this rebellious era, we have fashioned our awards to highlight key accomplishments and notable figures that defined the Roaring Twenties and left their mark on our Nations' history. The most iconic symbol for this decade is the flapper. This new breed of women were defined by their bobbed hair, short skirts and their brash behavior, as they refused to 34 | N Magazine

conform to the current standards of how women were expected to act. However, this was just the beginning for women of this time period as the 1920's signified the rise of the woman. For the first time there were significant changes made to benefit women. From working in professional positions, to incorporating new household inventions making life easier, to providing educational opportunities allowing for social mobility. Women were moving forward. One individual who made significant strides for women in fashion was Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel. A French fashion designer, she founded the House of Chanel. Commonly known by her nickname Coco, she was a pioneer in women’s fashions. Her designs freed women from the

confines of the corset that was in style at that time, and introduced them to clothing that was casual, chic and comfortable. Chanel went on to create an entire lifestyle brand, with jewelry, handbags and fragrances that are still a part of the fashion world today. While a change in fashion enabled women to be more relaxed, their biggest success came when they were granted equal rights. In 1920, the 19th Amendment granted women the right to vote providing them the political equality the suffrage movement had been continually fighting for. This decade was also the beginning of women balancing both a life in the workplace as well as their home life. As previous generations believed their place was in the home, this era saw women eager to contribute to the household, as well as find a


theROARING TWENTY measure of independence while building a successful career. With the achievements of the suffrage movement, women refocused their efforts from the political arena to working to redefine the traditional definitions of a woman's role. As women were soaring to new heights, so too were the buildings of this time, redefining populated city skylines. Recent advancements in building materials including steel, reinforced concrete, water pumps, and the technological innovation of elevators aided in the development of the skyscraper. These buildings were designed in an effort to effectively utilize land in congested areas such as New York City and Chicago. The Chrysler Building, renowned for its Art Deco style and internal steel skeleton, was the first man-made structure to stand taller than 1,000 feet in New York City. The interior lobby of this building features a one of a kind ceiling fresco by Edward Trumbull that showcases the accomplishments of this time, depicting buildings, airplanes, and the car manufactures' assembly line. While skyscrapers were shaping the city landscape in the 1920's, the advancement of air travel was enabling airplanes to rule the sky. A new breed of daredevils took advantage of the increased capabilities of these aircrafts to test the limits of what was possible in the air, determined to set records for speed, distance, and time. Charles Lindbergh and his single-engine plane, The Spirit of St. Louis gained acclaim with his non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean. His journey took him from New York to Paris in 33.5 hours. This adventure was spurred by the Orteig Prize of $25,000, which was offered by New York hotel owner Raymond Orteig to the first aviator who flew non-stop between the two cultural Meccas. In a bid to capture the prize, Lindbergh worked with a company in San Diego to design and build his aircraft in just 60 days. With the success of his solo flight, Lindbergh generated new interest in air travel, initiating the public masses to begin investing in aviation. Diversity and progression were the key themes of this era, and was most

prevalent in the cultural aspects that thrived throughout the decade. From movies, animation, dance and music, the 1920's was a new frontier filled with neoteric forms of entertainment, luxury and revelry that previous generations had not experienced. During this decade Americans fell in love with the theater. While at the beginning of the 1920's, theaters offered only silent films, as the film making process became more sophisticated and polished, films evolved to include sound, known as talkies. The first talkies were small snippets of film called shorts. However, in 1927, the first full-length feature film to include sound on disc technology was The “Jazz Singer.” With the implementation of talkies in theaters, the film industry boomed with studios averaging 800 film releases annually. The addition of sound to film provided not only a pleasurable experience for the audience but also aided in the creation of an entire animation empire. Walt Disney originally created and distributed two separate animated shorts featuring Mickey Mouse that failed to be distributed to theaters. However, once he developed a talkie titled "Steamboat Willie" with Mickey as the central character, Disney's creation became an instant success. Using sound in all future cartoons enabled Disney's popular Mickey Mouse to become one of the most beloved and recognized animated characters of all time. This initial success was simply a springboard, as Disney's innovative and heartfelt animated films helped create one of the best-known motion picture production companies in the world. While films fascinated American's visually, music enchanted this generation setting an upbeat tempo and jovial tone. Jazz hit the mainstream audience and infiltrated every aspect of American culture. From the airwaves and dance halls to public clubs and Broadway, jazz set the stage and its influence dominated. A pair of composers that set the standard for the sounds and style of the Jazz Age were George and Ira Gershwin. Throughout the decade they created numerous scores for both Hollywood and Broadway, with some of the

composer’s best know works of the 1920’s being “Rhapsody in Blue” (1924) and “An American in Paris” (1928). Several of Gershwin’s compositions have stood the test of time as many have been tailored for the use in television and film, and several have became jazz standards. As music set the scene, dancing in clubs and dance halls became commonplace. The Charleston swept the nation and is synonymous with the 1920s Jazz Age. This dance was originally introduced in the Ziegfield Follies of 1923, in the Afro-American Broadway musical “Running Wild.” The Charleston was an instant sensation, immediately embraced by the younger generations. This dance, which could be done either with a partner, or solo is characterized by the outward heel kicks combined with an up and down movement achieved by bending and straightening the knees in time to the music. The wide spread popularity of this dance inspired a movement of choreographers to create new dances to disseminate to the public to sate the publics hunger for new routines. While the culture of this decade was ruled by decadence, excess, and an overwhelming exuberance for life, the literature of this age provided a window behind the themes of the time. One novel that paints a picture of the Roaring 1920’s is “The Great Gatsby”, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. While showcasing the political unrest, social changes, and idealism of this time, Fitzgerald’s iconic story encapsulates the American Dream, while providing a portrait of the downfalls of wanting it all and how it can lead to tragic results. Published in 1925, this piece of literature is considered a classic, and is ranked among the greatest works of American literature. Much of what exists in our culture today can be traced back to the monumental social and cultural changes of this tumultuous decade. As it is imperative to recognize the innovations of the 1920’s,we honor this period in our nation’s history by highlighting iconic elements and integrating them into our national awards program. The Roaring 20’s live on as we embrace their contributions, and embody these core elements into celebrating the women who made their mark in 2013. N Magazine | 35


Motivational

unleash the power that RESIDES WITHIN YOU 3 simple steps to defining yourself as a leader.

BY

W

omen are designed to be better leaders. It’s been proven over and over that women are better leaders. In a highly publicized study conducted by the Pew Research Center, Americans ranked women higher (as much as 75%) for 8 out of 10 important leadership traits. Over the last decade, I’ve witnessed this with ever increasing clarity and I believe it to be undeniably true. Why? Because women are natural born leaders. It’s a fact that:

solutions to seemingly insurmountable challenges. We aren’t hesitant to hunt down resources or people who can help us with resolution. We neither give in to obstacles nor fear risks. Upon hearing “no” to something we fervently believe in, we’ve come to disregard it and plunge forward in the face of conventional reason. Women leaders don’t just look at the proverbial “box” and accept it as is. We look for ways to make it work – for the good of all. We tear that “box” apart and find new ways to put it back together that will serve even more people than it was originally intended to serve.

Women Leaders dare to Question. Throughout time, women have been obliged to manage, cope with and reconcile great struggle – personally, and in today’s world, professionally. Women have historically been resourceful and determined in finding

Women Leaders seek to Connect. Gallop polls show over 67 percent of all Americans trust small business more than they trust big businesses (only 19 percent). That tells us that Americans want to do business with people they trust. And to trust

36 | N Magazine

APRILLE TRUPIANO

someone, there must be relatedness. Several business resources state a belief that women are the key to rebuilding the economy – and with good reason. While male counterparts build stuff, female leaders build relationships. Women build authentic, genuine, deep rooted, lasting relationships. Today, especially with obscure, voiceless, touchless online networking people want to experience knowing the person with whom they’re spending their time and money. Women form connections – founded on understanding, service, contribution, compassion, trust, and honor. They create communities of support and collaboration. Women Leaders create Meaning. Having been created as the gender to bear and raise ongoing generations, we’ve been genetically engineered to be future oriented by the powers that be. We’ve been designed


Motivational with the intention, and the gift to bring forth the promises of the future. Women instinctively see the future, the vision of what’s possible. We also understand that what people want is a bigger purpose, something to fulfill their own why in life. Women leaders are brilliant in recreating the vision for others with so much conviction and passion that it inspires them on a deeper, more personal level. When we align that with their purpose, it ignites their fire. They move forward alongside us, bringing the vision to fruition, giving meaning to their efforts as well as ours.

“How do you create a vision so fascinating, it pulls you through the daily grind, the disctractions, the distressful moments, the daunting workload? Daring to question. Seeking to connect. Creating meaning. These are the best practices of women leaders that give us a leading edge. Of all these, meaning & purpose rank first and foremost. It is the foundation against which we tune up all the other behaviors of great leadership. In my L5 Institute™ I teach the “5 C’s of Leadership” and yet none of them will hold water or withstand adversity without first creating a strong and compelling vision. In fact, it’s said that Walt Disney insisted they build the castle first when constructing Disney World, never doubting that vision would serve as the greatest motivation throughout the project. When women fail to achieve what they want in life, it’s either because their vision isn’t clear enough or it isn’t strong enough. We need to understand the why, as well as the what, when, where and how behind a decision. As a leader, we must communicate that why in a way that engages our passion

and the passions of others on our team and in our community and captivates them so they take up the charge. Additionally, creating a vision allows us the ability to establish a course of action to fulfill that vision. With a clear vision in front of us, we can set the pathways or catch potential problems then handle them proactively. How do you create a vision so fascinating, it pulls you through the daily grind, the distractions, the distressful moments, the daunting workload? Using 3 Simple Steps. Of course being a powerful leader comprises more than this however, it is this process that truly unleashes your own personal brand of powerful leadership. I see it every single time I work with clients, whether in private executive coaching or in team trainings. Every. Single. Time. I don’t ever like to preach platitudes and share theories without some good, solid yet simple how to so let me outline it for you briefly. 1. Create your Vision Board You can create your vision board using online tools or with real paper, scissors, glue, markers and whatever else you’d like. Get creative. Don’t judge it. Work instinctively. Be inspired. You can use images or words from magazines, the internet or your personal photo cache. I have a very specific process I lead people through that reveals this differently than people imagine so that it’s an impactful and effective tool. For now, keep in mind, it is not a goal board, though goals may become apparent as well. 2. Define your Values Once you’ve completed your vision board, stand back and ponder your creation for a bit. Seek to extrapolate what you see out of it in words or phrases that describe the feeling or experience of what you created. What will become apparent to you are your non negotiables. These are the things you will fight for, bleed and sweat for, sacrifice other things for and ultimately what will feed your soul. 3. Generate your Values Statement™ Write down three to five words that

you can sense strongly from your vision board. For example, when I looked at my vision board, what popped out was having fun, being passionate, family, an appreciation for art, and a few other critical concepts. I took those and created my values statement™ Now here’s a Bonus Tip: Once you’ve done the above 3-Step creation process, align everything – yes everything – in your personal and professional life with your vision and your values statement™. Design your business so it fulfills your vision. Set up your business in every way so it naturally supports your life as a living, breathing illustration of your vision. And when you feel drained, overwhelmed or just plain cranky, check in with your vision board, your values statement™ and simply tune up any areas that aren’t fully aligned with these pieces. Action Steps: • Create your vision and your values statement™. Most importantly, put them on display where you and others, including your team and your clients can see it daily. • Read books and attend workshops to develop your own personal brand of leadership. • List the characteristics of leadership that are important to you and make an effort to embody them. (Check out Aprille’s “5 C’s of Leadership” from her L5 Institute.™)

Aprille Trupiano International Expert on Leadership Aprille@AprilleTrupiano.com N Magazine | 37


Government Why are foreign investors so interested in residential property in the United States? • Homes are priced lower than in other countries • A depressed dollar • College/University towns attract buyers for properties to house students • Foreign executives with families working in the country perfer purchasing a home as opposed to renting • Need for foreigners to establish themselves in the United States. • Investment or recreational properties • Opportunity to start or grow businesses • Hiring of international employees by national companies Generally when meeting with prospective buyers, as a REALTOR®you may focus on properties that fulfill the particular needs of the clients. As is evidenced above, foreign investors may have additional long or short-term goals that you need to address.

A recent report from Jones Lang LaSalle’s Capital Markets group claims that foreigners invested $163.7 billion in U.S. real estate in 2012. Just a year ago the National Association of REALTORS®reported that during a 12 month period ending March 2011, foreign clients purchased an approximate $41 billion share of homes.

How to work with foreign investors and navigate income taxation. BY

JAMES SEXTON

& VANDANA CHIMA BHALLA 38 | N Magazine

What these numbers tell us is that the foreign client real estate market is growing rapidly. While this is likely good news for you as a REALTOR®, it also presents a number of unique challenges. In order to effectively attract and sell to this market segment, it is critical that you understand why foreigners are investing in properties in the United States, how to identify a foreign investor, and what tax issues apply to foreign investors. Property managers working with foreign landlords need to be especially careful to comply with tax laws affecting foreign investors as they could be held liable for the foreign investor’s tax.

How do you know who a “foreign investor” is? Determining who is a foreign investor is an important consideration for you since the foreigner’s resident or non-resident status will directly affect the buyer’s tax considerations and responsibilities. A nonresident alien is a foreign investor who is identified by the following criteria: 1. Not a U.S. citizen 2. Does not have a green card 3. Does not meet the substantial presence test The substantial presence test exists when the foreigner has been present in the United States 183 days in a three year period including the current year and the previous two years. For example, if the foreigner has been present in the United States 31 days or more in the current year, you would add up all the days in the current year, 1/3 of the days for the year before that, and 1/6 of the days for the year before that. If that number is 183 or more days, they meet the substantial presence test.If you believe that a client is potentially a foreign investor, a few tactfully worded questions should be asked at the first meeting. The investor should be reassured you are inquiring about the issues affecting


Government foreign investors in order to send them to an international tax professional. What tax issues may apply to foreign investors? Foreign investors are subject to United States income tax only on U.S. source income. Rental income and gains from the sale of real estate located in the United States is considered source income. Essentially there are two ways a foreign investor can be taxed on their U.S. source rental income: 1. Gross Basis Taxation 2. Net Basis Election Gross Basis Taxation This is the default method of taxation and applies to passive rental income. Commercial property or real estate developments are generally considered a U.S. trade or business and are not subject to gross basis taxation. If the investor is subject to gross basis taxation, they will need to obtain an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) or Employer Identification Number (EIN) and file a U.S. tax return. Which number they apply for will depend on whether the foreign investor is an individual or an entity. At this time, the default withholding for gross taxation is 30 percent (unless reduced by treaty) of gross rent—no deductions for expenses, such as mortgage, property taxes, repairs, insurance, or operating expenses. Gross Basis Taxation requires the withholding agent to withhold tax and pay it to the IRS. A withholding agent is anyone who pays, controls or has custody over the funds paid to the foreign investor; generally a property manager or tenant if there is no property manager. Stiff penalties apply if the required withholding tax isn’t paid or forms aren’t timely filed. A U.S. tax return must be filed by the foreign investor. Net Basis Election If the foreign investor chooses, they can elect to treat the rental activity as effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business which makes it effectively connected income (“ECI”). This election is made on a timely filed U.S. tax return. By making this election the foreign investor can generally achieve a lower effective tax rate because it allows the

investor to deduct depreciation, real estate taxes, and other expenses related to the property or properties. If the deductions exceed the income, no tax will be due. As in the case of Gross Basis Taxation, the foreign investor will need to obtain an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) or Employer Identification Number (EIN) depending on if they are an individual or entity. If timely U.S. tax returns are not filed, the foreign investor can lose all their deductions and be subject to 30 percent tax on gross rent. Where does the property manager fit into this tax equation? This part is critical. A property manager who collects rent for the foreign owner of real property is considered a withholding agent. A withholding agent is personally and primarily liable for any tax that must be withheld. This means if the property manager or tenant fails to withhold they are liable for 30 percent gross withholding tax, not the foreign investor. The liability of the withholding agent includes amounts that should have been paid plus interest, penalties, and where applicable, criminal sanctions. So it is imperative that property managers and renters know if they are dealing with a foreign landlord. Having a fundamental understanding of the tax implications, as well as tax referral resources is beneficial when guiding prospective investors and property managers through the foray into U.S. real estate.

Determining who is a foreign investor is an important consideration for you since the foreigner’s resident or nonresident status will directly affect the buyer’s tax considerations and responsibilities.

Essentially there are two ways a foreign investor can be taxed on their U.S. source rental income: 1. Gross Basis Taxation 2. Net Basis Election

Stiff penalties apply if the required withholding tax isn’t paid or forms aren’t timely filed. A U.S. tax return must be filed by the foreign investor.

A property manager who collects rent for the foreign owner of real property is considered a witholding agent. A withholding agent is personally and primarily liable for any tax that must be withheld.

James Sexton President/CEO Esquire Group

Vandana Chima Bhalla Corporate Broker/Owner, REALTOR Local Listing Broker for US Dept of HUD EXIT REALTY PLATINUM GROUP

N Magazine | 39


nCROWD

IVY MELTON Netco Title

MARILYN SANDERS Burns Search, LLC “Having my traditional holiday party, I invite all clients and friends and family every year to enjoy our beautiful festive home and visit with Santa!”

LAURA SANZGIRI-KELLOGG Sales Associate Keller Williams Realty “Reading How the Grinch Stole Christmas on Christmas Eve was a long held holiday tradition in my household. The rhymed verse story, with illustrations by Dr. Suess, was read by my father every year, beginning with the original publication in Redbook in 1957. My mother a devote Christian, and my father a non-believer could agree on the content and the message in this children’s classic. Later my dad read the same verses to my children and my brother’s children, his grandchildren, each year, until his death. They never grew too old to enjoy his portrayal of the crusty curmudgeon who ends the story with a change of heart. I have continued this with the next generation of grandkids in our household. The book speaks to the commercialism of the season, what is lost, and what can be gained by remembering ‘Maybe Christmas perhaps doesn’t come from a store - maybe Christmas, he thought, means a little bit more.’ In our age of diversity, blended families, and an ever shrinking world, where traditions and beliefs cover a broad spectrum, a story with simple morals, can bring us together. Without preaching, Dr. Seuss uses humor to illustrate how people are more alike than we are different, and that kindness is still a virtue. Something worth remembering, no matter the season.”

40 | NNMagazine Magazine 40

“My granddaughter is now 23 and grandson 16. We still have Santa. Why? Because Santa keeps the tradition alive in all of us. Even now -please don't tell them- they still have that extra excitement that Santa came. Even now they call early and say "guess what Santa brought me, Mimi?" Well Mimi knows because I most likely bought it. I know how it makes me feel when I hear their voices, and for just a moment we are all back in time when they were little. I hope they continue that tradition with their kids. Even a few nights ago, Lauren said, “I want Santa to bring me such and such.” I believe in Santa, the Easter Bunny, God is good and miracles. Hope everyone else continues to believe as it is sometimes what gets us all through life. Maybe I am a Pollyanna but heck it’s ok.”

SILVIA HERNANDEZ Banc Home Loans “When I was a girl in Romania, every year all the little kids would put their shoes in the window and wait for Santa to fill them with little goodies and presents in our shoes. It was also common for our parents to put up the Christmas tree on Christmas Eve. It was always a wonderful surprise when you woke up on Christmas morning to see the tree in the house all beautifully decorated. As an adult we have worked to establish new traditions. As we have a large family and it is too many people to buy gifts for, the past few years we have been playing the White Elephant game. We buy presents for the little ones, and then with the adults we set a limit for the cost of the gift and exchange on Christmas Eve. “

CARRIE WATTS Harmony Escrow

CINDY CONRAD Conrad Accounting & Tax Services

“Now that my children are older, our Christmas traditions are different. We spend Christmas Eve at home opening our gifts and on Christmas Day we take a family trip to Big Bear, California to enjoy a day of snowboarding.”

“Baking. Preparing for the holidays with cooking or cleaning seems like such a task or chore to me, but not baking. A couple days before Christmas, I make my favorite shortbread holiday cookies. I love having friends over and having cookies, wine, and hot chocolate.”


Dear Desirée

dearDESIRÉE

“Only you can determine what is the best course of action based on your own unique circumstances involving all aspects that affect you.”

Questions were submitted by individuals working in the industry. You can submit your questions to Dear.Desiree@nawrb.com I’ve noticed how involved you are with the political side of things for women and minority women. How would you suggest other women to get involved? There are several different ways you can get involved. I believe becoming active on a board or committee and engaging are the first steps. Other great ways to get involved are to run as a candidate for a political position, educating school girls on future opportunities in the political realm, or donating your time to a local government agency. More women need to engage and be an active part of a growing network of women supporting women.

What can I as a real estate agent be doing to better increase my visibility in the industry? This is a very important question especially in today’s environment. You must look at your brokerage business structure. It is important to be your own billboard and consider what others will see. You must always dress to impress and ensure your clients are your top priority. Word of mouth is an essential aspect of the real estate industry and should not be taken lightly. Another great way to increase your visibility is through joining organizations and associations that highlight the key aspects you are seeking in the industry. You must also consider whether your current business structure is the best platform for supporting growth. Are you utilizing the assets owf the industry through certification and designations, training, and sharing leads? What unique traits, classifications, services or commitments do you have to offer and are you doing everything to showcase them via social media, networking and marketing? Have you fully engaged in organizations and associations sharing your same ideals? If you have a special niche are you engaging and submitting articles for publication and getting your name out there as an expert? Take advantage of the free quality advertising to gain more visibility. As the CEO of your own company, how do you handle communication issues with employees? A while back, I learned a valuable lesson in the real estate industry from the then 4th nationally rated loan originator Countrywide. Regardless on how close you sit to your employees/assistants put everything in an email. Too many times in this changing industry, we say something and don’t follow up with written communication. If there is no email, it wasn’t addressed. By putting items in an email, you have created a paper trail not only to document the desired communication, you can reference when and exactly what was said, and you have a better chance of keeping your emotions in check.

I feel that I have moved as far up in my company as I can go, but am not sure I want to change companies. Do you have ideas on what my next steps could be? I will use the assumption you are an employee and not an independent contractor. Being comfortable is human nature, we don’t like change. Have you addressed the issues with management in a subtle way by creating your own opportunity for growth or have they kept the same platform for a long time? This is not an immediate response, it takes time to introduce ideas and for management to be open to expansion or new ideas. If you still are not receiving feedback after time, look to see what the competition is doing and determine whether it will add another layer of communication. When all else fails, what are the pros and cons of leaving? Are you bored with the company or your career? Is it time to make a complete change? Only you can determine the best course of action based on your own unique circumstances and considering the aspects that impact your life the most. What do you think is the biggest obstacle for women in the workplace? Perception is definitely the biggest obstacle facing women in the work place. The television show, The Voice, highlights an excellent principle of listening before reaching a conclusion. As women who have been stereotyped for years, we must do our best to overcome those perceptions and prove we should be taken seriously. The women who have successfully made it to upper management positions, are not always willing to step outside their comfort zone and engage and promote other women to expand our community. It is up to us to encourage one another to overcome their hesitations on engagement within the workplace so we can build a strong foundation.

N Magazine | 41


how to stay healthy

DURING THE HOLIDAYS

The Holiday Season is traditionally marked by cooler weather, warmer houses, time spent with family, festive parties, and the most prominent: food. We spend hours, weeks, even months slaving to make the Holidays a time of love, family, and memories, but we often forget to take care of ourselves. We find stuff ourselves based on the desires of our overzealous eyes at Thanksgiving, and somehow always have a Christmas cookie within arm’s reach. As we step onto the scale to assess the impact of the holiday season on our bodies, we have one date in mind, January 1st. This is the day we put down the cookies, release ourselves from the grips of tryptophan, put on our workout clothes and shed those pesky pounds. But there is no reason to wait until the new year to become healthy; maintaining our health during the holidays is achievable. Holiday weight can not only follow you into the new year, but can actually stick with you throughout the years. According to the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center weight-loss program, the average one pound gained from Thanksgiving to New Year’s is never lost, but accumulates over the years. This means weight gain year to year is most likely a product of the Holiday Season. In order to avoid weight gain and remain healthy year round, health professionals suggest getting started immediately. By creating a plan early you give yourself ample time to work it into your schedule, ensuring you can stick to it. Attending a party with a plan helps set limits on food intake and eliminates the stress of party over indulgence. Resolve to begin today. Follow some of these helpful tips to keep you on track during this sweet and decadent season.

42 | N Magazine

steps to STAYING HEALTHY • Weigh yourself twice a week: just enough to determine if you are gaining weight but still allows you to enjoy the holiday festivities. • Trade caloric coffee drinks for seasonal tea sprinkled with cinnamon or nutmeg to add that festive taste! • Don’t avoid eating all day so you can “enjoy” the party. Most likely you will gorge yourself and overeat on empty calories • Workout for at least 15 minutes a day: walk, yoga, jump roping, etc. Just move around. • Water, Water, and more Water: Always opt to drink water in place of soda, this will keep bloating to a minimum. • Chew slowly: this helps your body digest food more easily and makes you fuller sooner. This can prevent you from over gorging on all the holiday fixings. • Most importantly stop and think: do I really want this giant Christmas shaped cookie with frosting or do I just think I want it? Close your eyes, count to 30, and chances are you won’t pick it up.


what WOMEN WANT

As we enter the holiday season sequins will return with a vengeance becoming a staple of any fashionable woman’s party wardrobe. However, sequins are no longer being relegated to just special occasions, they can also be integrated into your look whether it be day or night. These shiny beads can turn a simple blouse into a statement piece, and a pair of shoes into a work of art. As sequins provide instant impact, it is imperative to not over do this trend. Ensure your look stays classic by choosing one piece as the focal point. Whether it is a bedazzled skirt, a sparkly collar, or a statement dress, keep the other elements of your outfit simple. Apprehensive of adding too much shine to your ensemble? Play it safe by incorporating accessories such as a lovely silver scarf, sparkly handbag or a little glitter to your fingernails. These easy add-ons will enable you to bring some fun to your day without worrying about standing out. Whether you go all out or pair it down, sequins can add pizzazz to your everyday life. Enjoy the season for glitz, glamour and extravagance.

N Magazine | 43


INGREDIENTS: 1 Pint of Heavy Whipping Cream 1 Cup of Granulated Sugar 3/4 Cup of Light Corn Syrup Mini Marshmallows 1 Bag of Melting Hot Chocolate

DIRECTIONS:

Carrie Watts Harmony Escrow, Inc.

1. Combine sugar, corn syrup, and whipping cream in a saucepan. Bring to boil on low heat stirring constantly. Continue heating until it reaches the soft ball stage. (candy thermometer has this setting - about 230 degrees) 2. Line an 8 x 8 inch pan with parchment paper and spray with pam. 3. Place the desired amount of marshmallows in pan and pour caramel over them and let set. Note: I put them in the fridge to speed up the setting process, and freeze the marshmallows to keep them from expanding. 4. Melt chocolate in a double broiler and let the dipping begin. 5. Place on parchment paper until set. Enjoy!

INGREDIENTS: 1/2 Cup of Butter 1 Cup of Sugar 1 Egg 1 Cup of Milk 1 tsp. of Vanilla 4 1/2 to 5 Cups of Flour 2 tsp. Baking Powder 1/2 tsp. Salt

DIRECTIONS: 1. Cream butter until light and fluffy. 2. Add sugar and combine well. 3. Add egg, milk, and vanilla, followed by flour, baking powder, and salt. 4. Refrigerate dough at least 20 minutes. 5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 6. Roll dough to about 1/2 inch thick. Cut into desired shapes. 7. | Bake at 350 for 8-10 minutes (depending on 44 N Magazine thickness.)

Emily Crandall Traditional Escrow, Inc.


what WOMEN WANT

Have you read or watched something lately that impacted you? Share your thoughts with N Magazine’s editorial staff and readers. Send reviews to info@nawrb.com

BOOKS LEAN IN: WOMEN, WORK, AND THE WILL TO LEAD By Sheryl Sandberg In this book about the role of women in the working world, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled. Sandberg delves into the root causes of why women, who account for 50 percent of college graduates, are still second to men in leadership positions. Sandberg brings to light the deeper issues halting the progression of working women to top level positions. With hard data backed up by relatable personal anecdotes, Lean In is a must read for women seeking self-growth in a man dominated hierarchy.

I AM MALALA: THE GIRL WHO STOOD UP FOR EDUCATION AND WAS SHOT BY THE TALIBAN By Malala Yousafzai

I am Malala is a riveting story of a courageous girl pursuing her dream of education in a region under strict Taliban rule. This book details the life of Malala Yousafzai and her fight to secure the right to education for girls in the Swat Valley in Pakistan. Her voice for education received the Taliban’s attention, and in 2012 she was shot in the head in an assassination attempt. If you want to be inspired by the harrowing tale of a girl pursuing her dream and beliefs at any cost, I am Malala is a must read.

FIVE DAYS IN NOVEMBER By Clint Hill

November 22 marked the 50th Anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination and former secret service agent Clint Hill commemorates the late president in his book Five Days in November. Hill’s book recounts the aftermath of those fatal shots and his “jump” to protect JFK and the First Lady. With over 150 photos accompanied by personal annotations, an inside look into Lyndon Johnson’s emotional and swift inauguration, and the First Lady’s courage at her husband’s funeral procession, Hill’s book is sure to impact you the way the President Kennedy’s death did a nation 50 years ago.

FILMS CATCHING FIRE

Starring Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson As the much anticipated sequel to the Hunger Games, Catching Fire did not disappoint as it lit up the screen with its powerful cast and storyline. Catching Fire chronicles the struggles of Katniss Everdeen as she faces the aftermath of the Games, from dealing with PTSD, her love triangle with fellow victor Peeta Mellark and friend Gale Hawthorne, and the looming threat of district rebellion sparked by her use of poison berries in the arena. Everdeen and Mellark soon find themselves back in the Hunger Games arena when they are reaped as tributes for the Quarter Quell, a special kind of Hunger Games. With heart retching drama, action, and some humor, Catching Fire is a cinematic must see.

DELIVERY MAN

Starring Vince Vaughn and Cobie Smulders For the usual comedian Vaughn, this heartfelt movie chronicles the life of bakery delivery man Dave Wozniak. Vaughn plays an underachiever who is in over his head in debt, been cast aside by his pregnant girlfriend, and is the biological father to 533 children. Sperm donations given 20 years ago come back to haunt Wozniak when 142 of those children hit him with a lawsuit to undercover his identify. He must decide whether to reveal his identity, and in the process discovers his true self and the father he could be as well.

THE BOOK THIEF

Starring Sophie Nelisse, Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson Based on Marcus Zusak’s book, The Book Thief tells the story of a young girl starting a new life with adoptive parents in Nazi Germany during World War II. Feeling lost in life after the death of her parents and brother, little Liesel, played by Nélisse, finds hope in an old sign painter who teaches her to read. Liesel soon finds a purpose in thieving contraband books from the Nazis and giving them to the Jews her family hides in their house. This micro view into world history is sure to pull on your heartstrings with this human story of humor, compassion, and the will to survive. N Magazine | 45


speak

How to Complete a HUD Sales Contract Package Arizona

EXIT Realty OCT. 17, 2013 Washington, D.C.

Marlene Cerreta is seen here teaching Arizona Realtors “How to Complete a HUD Sales Contract Package”. Her classes are taught frequently to help Realtors become familiar with the HUD Process.

CEO of EXIT Realty and NAWRB member, Tami Bonnell speaks about the future of EXIT Realty at the EXIT Realty Convention in Washington, D.C.

Meet The Broker OCT. 7, 2013 Orlando, FL

Denise LeHeup hosted the Meet the Broker Class at the offices of Keller Williams at The Parks in Orlando, Florida early in October to discuss how she got into the business and how Keller Williams can help business growth.

How To Sell a HUD Home

Tina Estrada shares her expertise on HUD homes in her “How to Sell a HUD Home” class on October 16 in Fountain Valley, California.

OCT. 16, 2013

Fountain Valley, CA

46 | N Magazine


write “BEGINNINGS” RENEE MARIE SMITH OCTOBER 21, 2013 In a blog for Smith & Associates Title Services Inc., Renee Smith takes a positive approach to starting a new beginning in a way we may not have anticipated. Smith looks at the traditional way of creating a plan and following through. However, she discards that thought and urges individuals to create their own unique plan and prepare and welcome any bumps along the way. It is the bumps that are the new beginnings and they make the journey worth it.

“SANTA CRUZ COUNTY MEDIAN HOME PRICE $649,000 IN OCTOBER, HIGHEST IN FIVE YEARS” HEIDI ROBINSON NOVEMBER 18, 2013 Heidi Robinson, agent at Thunderbird Real Estate and a member of NAWRB’s Board of Directors, discusses the changes in homes sales in the month of October in Santa Cruz during an interview with the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

“AGENT REFORM: IS IT A NECESSITY?” DESIRÉE PATNO

Join Other Great Leaders: Be Social Media Savvy B Y D E S I R É E PAT N O

T

he foundation of successful business strategies is centered on brand development, leadership and effective marketing. Social media is now viewed as essential for CEOs to utilize for leadership communications and business intelligence and they are doing so in rapidly increasing numbers. As a women’s trade association dedicated to the promotion of underrepresented women in the housing economy, the National Association of Women REO Brokerages has significantly grown its social media outreach with the implementation of additional platforms, marketing promotions and an exclusive members-only, real-time, interactive discussion forum. Business leaders who use social media increase their brand’s profile and instill confidence in their leadership, according to The 2012 CEO, Social Media and Leadership Survey by the social media

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branding firm BRANDfog. The survey polled hundreds of employees at companies ranging from Fortune 500s to small startups and measured the effect of social media participation by executive management teams. From the survey results, leaders at businesses of all sizes can gain insight into the overall impact of social media. For example, the study showed 71 percent of respondents felt that leadership team participation in social media improved a company’s overall brand image. Social media has become an integral part of the fabric of our culture, not only in the U.S., but worldwide.

In April 2012, Facebook counted 845 million global users who actively visited the site.

Founder and CEO of NAWRB, Desirée Patno, discusses her view on the evolving role of real

Additionally, Facebook page views account for one-fifth of all global page views on the Internet. In the U.S., an estimated 150 million individuals log onto their Facebook accounts at least once per day. Networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google+ allow businesses to interact with customers and potential customers in real time. Obtaining valuable brand feedback in real time via a cost-effective medium is a resource that businesses should not ignore or shy away from. Savvy businesses are expected to have a presence on social networks, especially as users view a social media presence as necessary and relevant.

Use Tools to Grow, Compete Digital technology, websites and social media are now major power tools for growing small businesses and competing with larger ones.

Copyright 2013, Enterprising Women magazine (www.enterprisingwomen.com). All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission from the publisher.

enterprising Women

estate agents in Equator’s October newsletter.

“JOIN OTHER GREAT LEADERS: BE SOCIAL MEDIA SAVVY” DESIRÉE PATNO ENTERPRISING WOMEN MAGAZINE In an era dominated by technology and all that comes with it, the aspects of great leadership have changed. In her article, Desirée Patno credits a deep and savvy understanding of social media as the key factor in becoming a great a leader. Through the article Patno touches on each social media outlet and what each has to offer in today’s business world.

N Magazine | 47


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attend

1. Jan Farley poses with members of the Women’s Council of Realtors San Diego alongside California WRC President Tammy Newland. 2. DesirÊe Patno attends WCR in Orange Couny. 3. NAWRB member Joyce Essex attends the NAHREP 2013 Conference at JW LA Live. 4. Tina Harbin enjoys herself at the 2013 Colorado Real Estate Convention where Bill Rancic was featured as a keynote speaker.

2 5

3

6. NAWRB Board Member, Yuri Blanco, attended the RE/MAX Supercharge Event in October. 7. Tami Bonnell, NAWRB member, attended the EXIT Realty International Annual Convention in Washington, D.C. where she enjoyed numerous networking opportunities and enlightening experiences.

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8. The NAWRB staff, Doug Beckstrom, Jay Jones, Carrie Watts, and Silvia Hernandez pose for a picture at the NAWRB Holiday Cookie Mixer.

6.

7

5. Sharon Molnar, NAWRB member, attended The Five Star Conference and Expo in Dallas, Texas where she had the opportunity to meet NHL stars Mike Modano and Jeff Friesen.

48 | N Magazine

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network

upcomingEVENTS January 17 // The New England Mortgage Expo Foxwoods, CT

January 9 // Women of Strength: Cultivating Leadership in Real Estate Scottsdale, AZ This event will focus on the power of inner strength. Positively impact others and make a difference, as a woman of strength. This community is about like-minded women in the real estate industry coming together, regardless of affiliations to initiate change. The group of women who support these ideals are passionate about cultivating leadership in the real estate industry and other areas in need.

January 13-17 // Mismo Winter Educational Summit New Orleans, LA The MISMO Summits offer you an opportunity to learn more about MISMO and to engage in face-toface standard setting activities. Educational sessions are designed to meet the needs of everyone from those new to MISMO to those with years of experience. Come meet the industry experts. Sit down and participate in the industry work group sessions where the standards are being set.

January 15-17 // Real Estate Connect® New York, NY Produced by Inman News®, Real Estate Connect® is the pre-eminent event for everyone who cares about the real estate industry and where it is going. Each year, thousands of influential real estate leaders gather at Real Estate Connect to network, make deals, explore current trends and technology, and to learn how to embrace and leverage the change that surrounds our industry. www.realestateconnect.com

The New England Mortgage Expo presents a world of opportunity for the entire mortgage community -both residential and commercial. The New England Mortgage Expo has the largest attendee roster, the largest exhibitor lineup, top industry speakers, and 15 event partners - all coming together for a spectacular day at the MGM Grand at Foxwoods

January 18 // San Diego’s SUCCESS Real Estate Expo San Diego, CA Realty411 Magazine produces Large Expos around the country with hundreds of people in attendance. This your chance to mingle with Top Local and Out of State Investors plus Top Producing Agents right in your own area. Come meet local private money lenders who can help you close deals!

January 21-24 // ABS Vegas 2014 Las Vegas, NV The three-and-a-half day program, developed by leaders who represent the most active firms in ABS, will feature coverage of the most pressing issues facing the marketplace. SFIG and IMN will work together to ensure all stakeholders interests are fairly and equally represented at the event, including investors, issuers, financial intermediaries, regulators, law firms, accounting firms, technology firms, rating agencies, servicers and trustees.

January 22-24 // 11th Annual Winter Forum on Real Estate Opportunity & Private Fund Investing Las Vegas, NV The 11th Annual Winter Forum on Real Estate Opportunity and private Fund Investing is the largest event of its kind on the West Coast, and with a topical and engaging agenda that offers real estate investors a strategic approach to the current regulatory and investment environment, there is no better way to kick-start the New Year.

January 26-29 // America Securitization Forum, Inc. Las Vegas, NV ASF’s winter conference has been the premier structured finance conference in the world for a decade, and has a consistent history of being the place where investors want to be. The upcoming conference will look to build off the tremendous success of last year’s conference, which included over 1200 investor registrants, extensive one-on-one client meetings, high-level keynote speakers and deeply substantive panel sessions.

January 28-30 // 2014 Visions, Insights & Perspectives (VIP) Carlsbad, CA As an attendee at this year’s event, you will be able to look forward to: • Advisory Board guided industry-leading content focused on you • Multiple thought-provoking keynotes • Networking opportunities custom built for enhancing relationships and developing market insights • A 3:1 manager to investor ratio – guaranteed • No marketing from the podium – ever!

March 23-26 // REOMAC Annual Education Summit & Expo Palm Desert, CA REOMAC® 2014 Annual Education Summit & Expo isn’t just talk, it’s actionable ideas for today’s business changes. Plan to collaborate and connect with your fellow Summit attendees to learn the latest strategies and ideas to enhance your career.

N Magazine | 49


50 | N Magazine


Enterprising Women is incredible. It leads the way for our growth and success – Barbara Kasoff, president and cofounder, Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) Enterprising Women is inspirational. It touches my heart and my spirit – Sherri Orlowitz, first recipient of the Enterprising Women of the Year Award Enterprising Women has significantly contributed to improving the women’s business community and provided a strong network for women business owners to help one another succeed —Lynne Marie Finn, Superior Staff Resources, Inc. Thank you, Enterprising Women, for ten wonderful years of reaching, teaching and promoting women entrepreneurs – Janice Hamilton, JMH Education Marketing Enterprising Women’s vision is bold and courageous —brave enough to take on the “big boys” Susan Solovic, CEO/Co-Founder, SBTV.com Enterprising Women is making a difference in the world. All of us who are a part of it have grown into a strong community – Pat Laus, The Atlantic Club, Inc. Thank you, Enterprising Women, for your commitment to “going green” and sustainability. Working together, we are taking better care of our planet – Nancy Goshow, Goshow Architects

I’ve belonged to numerous organizations throughout my 20 years in business, but none has matched the experience of being a part of the Enterprising Women community – Harriet Diamond, author and management consultant Enterprising Women’s unwavering support has contributed to the success of numerous organizations, such as the Women’s Business Development Center, that have worked so hard to see to it that women thrive in their businesses. – Hedy Ratner and S. Carol Dougal, WBDC, Chicago Kudos to Enterprising Women for all it has done for women business owners in the United States and around the world! – Julie Weeks, Womeable Thank you to Enterprising Women for bringing together different organizations, ideas and avenues to strengthen the network of support for female entrepreneurs – Patricia May, Tembua: The Precision Language Solution

I look forward to many more years of reading Enterprising Women and taking part in this wonderful community the magazine has nurtured and developed – Karen Kerrigan, Women Entrepreneurs, Inc. Women writing articles for women—what a great concept! —Nicolina Stewart, Capital Management Advisors, Inc. Thank you, Enterprising Women, for your commitment to educating women in business on their road to success – Rosalie Edson, Meadows Office Furniture Company Enterprising Women has been integral to transforming the credibility of women business owners and their enterprises. It has brought together the community that supports women’s entrepreneurship in a collaborative and supportive environment and captured the attention of business leaders worldwide – Sharon Hadary, Sharon Hadary & Company

Enterprising Women is a community of business owners that learn together, succeed together, and grow together. At a time when most women’s publications have failed, Enterprising Women has been a stable and influential force for women’s business enterprises. – Marsha Firestone, PhD, president and founder, Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO) Enterprising Women provides a tremendous network of support to women all over the world – Monique Honaman, ISHR Group Enterprising Women is the heartbeat of economic, social and political news for the women business owner community. This magazine leads the way! – Terry Neese, founder and president, the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women (IEEW) Enterprising Women is a vital source of targeted information for women entrepreneurs, helping them grow and manage their businesses – Linda Denny, president, Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC)

The community of women business owners reads

Enterprising Women has supported women business owners around the globe – Leslie Grossman and Andrea March, Women’s Leadership Exchange Thank you for elevating the status of women in the business and world community. Enterprising Women is an inspiration to me – Elaine Buxton, Confero

I used to say that American women entrepreneurs were the luckiest women in the world because they had their own magazine. Now we in Latin America can read Enterprising Women online! – Yaeko de Hiraoka, Lima, Peru

Enterprising Women Enterprising Women is a global treasure. We mark up every issue as we learn about new people and new areas of interest – Edie Fraser, Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson

Connect today Don’t miss a single issue!

Enterprising Women has forged partnerships, recognized excellence, and brought much-needed visibility to women who are running amazing businesses – Jean Gianfagna, Gianfagna Strategic Marketing

We’ve circulated Enterprising Women at our events around the globe. Women entrepreneurs everywhere find it inspiring. There is nothing else like it! —Irene Natividad, president and founder, Global Summit of Women Enterprising Women has been integral to transforming the credibility of women business owners and their enterprises. It has brought together the community that supports women’s entrepreneurship in a collaborative and supportive environment and captured the attention of business leaders worldwide – Sharon Hadary, Sharon Hadary & Company

Enterprising Women is a strong voice and a champion for women business owners –Sherri Macko, Enterprising Women has made a American Airlines difference in the lives of thousands Enterprising Women is a wonderof business owners across the Thank you for giving a voice to ful magazine—every issue has country, including one small busiand putting a face on successful relevant content! ness owner in Cincinnati women business owners –Diane DiResta, DiResta CommuSubscribe today at www.enterprisingwomen.com. For advertising and marketing partnerships, – Patti Massey, Myca Multimedia & – Beverly Holmes, Center for nications contact Monica Smiley, Publisher/CEO at msmiley@enterprisingwomen.com or call 919-362Training Solutions Women’s Business Research I used to say that American women 1551. Enterprising Women is a women-owned and managed publishing company, celebrating I encourage my clients to not only entrepreneurs were the luckiest our 13th year helping to inspire and grow women-owned enterprises. Being a part of the Enterprising We applaud Enterprising Women’s read Enterprising Women, but women in the world because they Women community has opened up spectacular accomplishments. contribute to its pages and share had their own magazine. Now we in an immense network of women to What the magazine has done is their expertise with colleagues all Latin America can read Enterprisme. I am proud to be a member of akin to ‘going to the moon and over the world ing Women online! the Enterprising Women commuback.’ Bravo! – Patty Briguglio, MMI Public – Yaeko de Hiraoka, Lima, Peru nity – Amy Millman, Springboard Relations N Magazine | 51 —Mary Ardapple, Apple’s Bakery, Enterprises Inc.


index ADVERTISERS

National Women’s Business D Darnella Barnes Real Estate Council.............................…..9, 17 Services.....................................11 Necto Title…..............................40 C Chrimata Inc..............................22 Dilbeck Real Estate…................10 O City of Hope..............................50 E Office of Minority and Women Enterprising Women………........47 Inclusion…......................….20, 21 D Desirée Patno Enterprises, Inc..15 Esquire Group…........................37 Office of the Controller of Dreams Realty…........................23 EXIT Realty….......................46, 48 Currency….................................21 EXIT Realty Platinum Group............................11, 46, 48 P E Enterprising Women…...........…51 Equator……...............................47 Peter G. Foundation……...........16 Pintrest……................................25 F Prospect Mortgage…....10, 29, 30 H Habitat for Humanity...................23 Facebook…................................25 Q Harmony Escrow…......................3 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation…............................21 Quest Realty Solutions…...........10 Federal Reserve System…........21 N National Association of Women in First Team Sns…........................11 R Realty World West Camp Real Estate Businesses.....6, 7, 31 Realty….....................................11 No Paws Left Behind….............31 H Harmony Escrow…..............40, 44 Realty Executives…...................10 Home Buyer Marketing II, Inc. ..11 Regency Real Estate…..............11 S RE/MAX Grand Central…..........11 Safeguard Properties….............15 I RE/MAX Leading Edge Internal Revenue Service……....39 Detroit….....................................11 U Ruspini Real Estate…................10 US Best Repair Services…........54 J Ryan Hill Real Estate…..............11 Jones Lang LaSalle’s Capital COMPANIES Market…....................................38 S Judy LaDeur International…......19 Securities and Exchange 1st Source Texas Realty….........10 Commission……........................21 K Smith & Associates Title Services A Keller Williams Realty….............40 Inc…..........................................47 American Commerical Keller Williams Realty at the Stepping Stone Real Estate…..11 Equities......................................10 Parks……...................................46 Apollo Global Management…...29 T Avatar Green….........................11 L Thunderbird Real Estate…..10, 47 LinkedIn…..............................…25 The Five Star…..........................48 B Touch of Sold Real Estate…......11 Banc Home Loans…..................40 M Traditional Escrow, Inc……........44 Board of Governors…................21 Marples & Associates….............11 Trulia….......................................25 Burley Properties…....................10 Twitter………..............................25 Burns Search, LLC….................40 N NAHREP….................................48 U C US Department of Housing and Cobalt Realty Group……...........24 National Association of Realtors……........................19, 38 Urban Development….........39, 46 Coldwell Banker Jane Henry National Credit Union Realtors…..................................11 Administration.....................……21 52 | N Magazine


index V Vantium Capital…......................29

G Goodchild, Elizabeth…..............52

W Wingspan Portfolio Advisors…..27 WIPP Government Relations….................................17 WMC……..................................29 Women’s Council of Realtors……...............................48

H Harbin, Tina…............................48 Harbison, Laura…......................11 Hayes, Leslie…..........................26 Henry-Weaver, Lisa…................11 Hernandez, Silvia................40, 48

Y YMA Music Group……..............29

J Jones, Jay…..........................…48 Justice, Catherine Melissa….....10

Z Zillow…..........................23, 24, 25

L LaDeur, Judy…....................18, 19 Langston, Dianne…...............…52 PEOPLE LeHeup, Denise….....................46 Leider, Tania…........................…52 B Barnes, Darnella…....................10 Lesinski, Cyndi….................24, 25 Beckles, Ingrid…....................…52 Beckstrom, Doug……................48 M Blanco, Yuri…............................48 Marples, Cathie…......................11 Bonert, Sara…...........................24 Mayo, Gail…..............................11 Bonnell, Tami…....................46, 48 McKinney, Brenda…..................11 Boyer, Susanna…......................10 Melton, Ivy…..............................40 Brandt, Amy….........10, 28, 29, 30 Mitton, Linda…..........................10 Burley, Lynn…............................11 Molnar, Sharon…...................…48 Murray, Mary…..........................10 C Calnan, Colleen…......................11 Cerreta, Marlene........................46 Chima Bhalla, Vandana ................ .......................................10, 38, 39 Conrad, Cindy…........................40 Crandall, Emily….......................44

Smith, Renee Marie….................47 Stotland, Heather…....................10 Sullivan, Ann…….................16, 17 T Trupiano, Aprille…................36, 37 V Vacas, Monica….........................10 Verdugo, Sandra….....................10 Villicana, Ann-Marie…................10 W Wagner, Melva……....................52 Watts, Carrie…..............40, 44, 48 Woods, Irene…..........................11

N Nelson, Brandy….......................52 P Patno, Desirée ............................ ......................9, 15, 20, 21, 39, 48

R D Rhinehart, Lynn…..................…11 Diaz, Carlotta…..........................11 Robinson, Heidi…...............47, 52 Ruspini, Jennifer…….................10 E Ryan, Teresa…...........................11 Essex, Joyce…..........................48 Estrada, Tina…..........................46 S Saad, Sherri…............................11 F Sanders, Marilyn….....................40 Farley, Jan…..............................48 Sanzgiri Kellogg, Laura…...........40 Sexton, James……..............38, 39 N Magazine | 53


a thank you to the NAWRB BOARD OF DIRECTORS

NAWRB could not provide support and impact the lives of our members without the commitment and dedication of our Board of Directors. We wish to thank those women who have served as leaders and volunteered their time to maintain and improve this organization. To these nine women we express our deepest appreciation, as our community would not be as enriched as it is now without them.

melvaWAGNER

Government Relations Chair

dianneLANGSTON

elizabethGOODCHILD N Magazine Chair

taniaLEIDER

ingridBECKLES Regulatory & Policy Chair

Membership & Events Chair

Women-Owned Business Certification Chair

reneeSMITH

yuriBLANCO

brandyNELSON

heidiROBINSON

Board Member

54 | N Magazine

Board Member

Board Member

Board Member


N C O N C L U S I O N

“If you want something said, ask a man; if you want something done, ask a woman .� .

Margaret Thatcher

N Magazine | 55


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Vol 2, Issue 5  

NAWRB Magazine Holiday Issue Vol 2, Issue 5

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