Heritage in Trust August 2013

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NATIONAL TRUST OF AUSTRALIA Heritage in Trust

(ACT)

August 2013

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from Centenary of Canberra Rally newsletter August 2013

Centenary of Canberra Rally As at 20 August, the owners of over 250 vehicles have committed to participating in the Centenary of Canberra Rally which will take place over the weekend of 19-20 October. The route of the Rally has been finalised and vehicles will travel from Jervis Bay to Canberra via Nerriga, Tarago, Bungendore and Queanbeyan. At Tarago, the bulk of the entrants will muster for the journey into Canberra. A steam train from Canberra will meet the vehicles at Tarago where a festival fair is also being organised by the community. At Bungendore participants will do a loop around the town; they’re being encouraged to drop in to browse the shops and have a coffee. On the Sunday there will be a cruise down Northbourne Avenue and a massed display on the lawns of Old Parliament House.

Early-bird entries closed on 30 August but entries are still being accepted. For queries, contact Chris Wain on 02 6230 0533 or chris.wain@nationaltrustact.org.au

The Rally is likely to be the largest Australia has ever seen, a fitting tribute to the Centenary of Canberra and the role of the motor vehicle in developing Australia.

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Inside The state of the Trust- where to from now p2 A new era for the ACT Trust p4 Annual General Meeting p4 The National Trust’s future in 21st Century Australia? p8 Heritage at risk p9 What’s on - Heritage Diary New p10 Travels with the Trust - Book Now p11 Southern Centenary Borders Walk p16 New office hours. The NT (ACT) office’s new opening hours are Monday-Friday from 9.30am – 3.00pm. In addition, from now until Friday 19 September the office will be temporarily closed on Fridays. Page 1


Heritage In Trust

August 2013

From the editors We hope you enjoyed the first on-line edition of Heritage in Trust and that you will find plenty to read in this second edition. As you will be aware, the ACT Trust is going through a difficult financial time at the moment. President Eric Martin and Treasurer Scott McAlister bring you up to date in their contributions. They would both appreciate any ideas you may have for improving the Trust’s position. In the meantime, the work of the Trust continues, and there is good news on the Rally front, 250 vehicle owners having committed to participate in the Centenary Rally over the weekend of 19-20 October. It should be a great event. In addition, the Southern Centenary Border Tours brochure has just been printed. We have not been able to include a heritage suburb article in this edition but we will return to that theme in November. Please note that the Trust’s AGM is on Tuesday 29 October, in the Menzies Room at the National Archives. Members are encouraged to attend. We look forward to hearing your views on the new on-line Heritage in Trust. Please email (info@nationaltrustact.org.au) or write to the Editors with your views and suggestions.

The National Trust (ACT)- where to from now? The future of the National Trust in the ACT is in the balance. The ACT National Trust was founded in 1976 out of growing concerns for the future of Lanyon homestead and its setting. For many years, the ACT Trust ran the volunteer guide program at Lanyon and much of the collection of furnishings at Lanyon is owned by the Trust. One of the main roles of the early Trust, in the absence of government heritage listing, was to classify ACT places of heritage significance. The aim of

Heritage in Trust

classification was to provide sound historical evidence establishing the importance of these places, in both an architectural and social sense, and to use this evidence as a foundation for advocating their conservation for future generations. The classifications were done with advice and recommendations from a small group of professional people who gave their time and expertise voluntarily. This group became the Classification Committee and was responsible for assessing the historic, heritage and cultural values of places in the ACT. At first, the Trust was concerned only with the built environment, but very soon its concern extended more widely to include significant Aboriginal places and natural sites. The Classification Committee continued for many years, until the early 2000s, when it underwent a name change to the ‘Heritage Committee’. Now the Heritage and Grants Committee, this group is composed of experts in various fields of architecture, town-planning, engineering, history, archaeology, natural heritage and heritage assessment. It still guides the Trust in its primary function of heritage protection and conservation. As the Trust grew in membership, other roles were undertaken, including running a shop, which ran for many years with the help of volunteers and made a valuable contribution to the Trust’s finances. As membership grew, other committees were created to provide services to members, including the Volunteers and Members Committee, the Tours Committee and the Publications and Editorial Group. These committees are run by volunteers and are still providing services to today’s membership as the Trust faces major challenges due to lack of financial support from governments. The President and Treasurer talk more about the important work of the ACT National Trust and strategies to survive the current challenges, and the Executive director talks about the change needed to survive in a changing world. First, in his letter to members below, Treasurer Scott McAlister sets out the current situation in terms of planning for 2013/14.

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013

Dear Members National Trust of Australia (ACT) (NTACT) prepared a Strategic Plan in October 2010. Goal 4 of this strategic plan was “to be financially sustainable by 2013”. However, this goal has not been achieved and NTACT has continued to slip perilously close to insolvency.

to either implementation or rejection based on a thorough analysis of all relevant issues, together with a targeted income/saving amount. The final decision on actioning of an idea will rest with Council. Currently at 8 pages, and continuing to grow, the full plan is too large to reproduce here. However a summary of the target areas is as follows:

An extraordinary general meeting of NTACT members was held on 27 June 2013 to seek views about an essential restructuring of NTACT operations. A number of proposals were discussed in detail but only two were seriously considered:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1. Fundraise to maintain a reduced level of operations with one fulltime staff member 2. Become part of NSW National Trust.

Proposal number 1 was overwhelmingly preferred and the following motion was carried: Resolved that the ACT National Trust continue operations within its current financial reserves to 31 October 2013 retaining the services of the Office Manager under her current conditions. In the interim the Council will review comments from members and prepare a plan for the continued operation of the Trust, at reduced levels of operation, to be presented by 31 August 2013. An adjusted 2013/14 budget was prepared on the assumption that the Office Manager position continued in its current form for the entire financial year. This projected a shortfall of just under $20,000. On this basis, the Treasurer of NTACT undertook to develop a Business Plan , taking into account suggestions and comments from NTACT members and Councillors, to address this shortfall through reductions in costs and increases in revenue streams. The plan will be owned and monitored by the Treasurer and reviewed at every Executive Council and General Council meeting as part of the Treasurer’s report.

Notwithstanding the above, we need to be pragmatic and understand that despite the best intentions of all involved, rescuing the financial viability of NTACT may prove unattainable and Council needs to be prepared to move quickly to ensure operations are wound down in an orderly manner in terms of their duties as directors under the Corporations Act. To this end, the last “target” area looks at termination/exit strategies should this be required. If readers would like to discuss the plan in more detail or have some ideas they think would benefit the Trust I would welcome your call on 6120 2201 or 0422 413 469. Scott McAlister Treasurer

The plan outlines a list of key “target” areas with supporting commentary. Each idea will be assigned to a Councillor/s who will further research and progress the idea (enlisting appropriate support where required)

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NTACT Council structure Services Review of expenses Government assistance ACNT Assistance Memberships (including marketing overseas benefits to travel agents) Alliances Sponsorships Properties Centenary Rally of Canberra Church Appeals Donations/Bequests Tours BBQ’s Volunteers School tours.

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Do you have a friend travelling overseas? Tell them about the advantages of joining the National Trust including free entry into over 2000 National Trust properties around the world.

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013

From the President A new era for ACT National Trust I write as we move to a new era for the ACT National Trust. This stems from an apparent lack of ACT Government interest in heritage, the failure of Government to appreciate the contribution of the National Trust, and the National Trust’s need to adjust to a new fiscal model. The members voted overwhelmingly to continue with an independent ACT National Trust, but this will be with a new model including: • • •

One paid staff member: Administrator/Manager. Use of volunteers as much as possible. Focus on members’ activities, tours, Heritage in Trust and the continuing contribution to conserving ACT heritage, as can be managed through volunteer committee work.

We will be looking at a new Business Plan, which will expand the income base by such items as assisting more heritage properties such as churches to conserve their assets by working with the National Trust, undertaking Grant projects with volunteers, using ecommerce for ACTNT initiated products, increasing membership by such initiatives as targeting overseas travellers, and reviewing overhead costs. We are looking at the Lanyon Collection and how the ACTNT can gain maximum benefit from this valuable asset while retaining the collection at Lanyon, as per the members’ directive at the Extraordinary Meeting. Any initiative or suggestions will be looked at, so we welcome new thoughts and contributions from anyone. We also would welcome nominations for Council. A number of existing members have indicated an intention to not continue on Council, so there are a number of vacancies that will become available and I encourage any member to consider nominating.

Eric Martin AM President

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NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The 38th Annual General Meeting of the National Trust of Australia (ACT) will be held in the Menzies Room at the National Archives of Australia on Tuesday 29 October , 2013, 6.00pm for 6.30pm. Council vacancies will be notified in accordance with the Memorandum and Articles of Association prior to the meeting. If you wish to receive an individual notification please advise the National Trust office on 02 6230 0533 or email info@nationaltrustact.org.au. Members are invited to nominate persons for election to Council. Nominations must be made and seconded in writing and signed by current members of the Trust accompanied by signed consent from the nominee. Nomination forms can be obtained from the Trust office and must reach the office 30 days before the AGM. For further information please check our news page on the website www.nationaltrust.org.au/act/news or phone the Trust office on 02 6230 0533.

Australia ICOMOS 2013 National Conference – Centenary of Canberra Early Bird Registration closes 6 September

Imagined pasts..., imagined futures… ‘Imagined pasts, imagined futures’ is an exciting multidisciplinary conference that coincides with the centenary of Canberra. Australia ICOMOS is partnering with the Museum of Australian Democracy in the unique setting of Old Parliament House to explore how heritage participates in the ‘imagined communities’ and ‘imagined geographies’ of nations and communities in a globalising world. Taking the imagining of the city of Canberra as our inspiration, the conference encourages a focus on imagination, innovation and creativity. Conference activities will feature special events that showcase Canberra’s unique cultural, historical and political heritage — from indigenous heritage futures, to the imagined frontiers of science and the heritage of political debate and satire! Pre and post conference activities will explore the heritage and cultural landscapes of the region, including its fantastic cool climate wines and produce. Dates: Thursday 31 October–Sunday 3 November 2013 Venue: Museum of Australian Democracy @ OPH Early bird registration: ICOMOS Members (Full and Associate) $495. Non Members $595 Register at http://www.aicomos.com/2013-canberracentenary/registration

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013 People and Places

Contents Centenary of Canberra Rally ___________________ 1 The National Trust (ACT) – Where to from Now ___ 2 From the President __________________________ 4 Notice of Annual General Meeting ______________ 4 Australia ICOMOS 2013 Conference _____________ 4 People and Places ___________________________ 5 What's On- National Trust events_______________ 7 From the Executive Director ___________________ 8 Heritage Happenings _________________________ 9 Heritage @ Risk_____________________________ 9 Heritage Diary ______________________________ 10 Travels with the Trust________________________ 11 Trust Tour Reports- Ginninderra Falls Walk______ 12 Westlake Walk __________ 13 Donate to the Trust __________________________16 Southern Centenary Borders Walk and brochure __19 The National Trust acknowledges the support of our Corporate Members and Benefactors: Corporate Members: Old Parliament House Library Patinations Conservation Services ContentGroup Slater & Gordon Benefactor: Mr Rob McL. Johnston

Trusted Recipe cont This issue should feature turtle soup. However due to changing times and environmental sensitivities the recipe provided below is for mock turtle soup. Mock turtle soup has been around almost as long as turtle soup, partly to do with the expense and difficulty of obtaining the ingredients. Turtle soup was traditionally made from Green Turtles that had to be imported to England from the Cayman Islands especially for this meal, and was popular in Britain from Regency times to Victorian times. Turtle soup, made from the meat and the green cartilage lining of a Green Turtle’s shell, allowed hostesses to show off at dinner, providing the most expensive and exotic of every dish they could afford. This gelatinous dish suggested opulence and wealth: in fact, it was so popular that it was always included on the menu for a banquet of the Lord Mayor of London, therefore thought fitting for the Duke and Duchess of York at the auspicious opening of the Australian Parliament in Canberra. Heavy harvesting of the Green Turtle caused near extinction and around the turn of the 19th century, “mock” turtle soup became increasingly popular. The recipes below come from the Jane Austen website: http://www.janeausten.co.uk. Adventurous cooks may like to try the traditional version, but a modern version is given on the next page. Mrs. Fowle’s Mock Turtle Soup (from Martha Lloyd’s Household Book)

Trusted Recipe In this issue we return to the lunch menu served to the official party and general public at the opening of Parliament House on 9 May 1927. The official menu comprised turtle soup, poached salmon and Canberra pudding. We gave the recipe for poached salmon in February and will look at Canberra pudding, a special version of summer pudding, in November. February 2014 will feature the public menu (meat pies, sausage rolls, prawns and fish).

Take a large calves head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop’t very small. A 1/4 of a pint of oysters chop’t very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop’t. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.

We would welcome any recipes from members or friends for these culinary delights. Please send recipes or ideas to The Editor, Heritage in Trust, c/o info@nationaltrustact.org.au. The Mock Turtle from Alice in Wonderland http://aliceinwonderland.wikia.com/wiki/The_Mock_Turtle

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August 2013

People and Places New members The National Trust (ACT) warmly welcomes the following new members: Mark Asser Margaret Brand Mark Carmody Vivien Carmona Stephen and Susan Clay Bill and Karen Crawshaw Judy and John Dickinson Pamela and Noel Finger Gail Ford Aylwen and John Gardiner-Garden Arthur and Lorraine Gentle Stephen and Helen Hislop Elizabeth and Peter Kain Maurice and Karenn Layne Leonie Farrant and Richard Lewis Lachlan and Janis McOmish

• • • • • • • • • •

Janet and Paul McCotter Hazel Moir Michael Wood and Janet Rhodes Sylvia Rochfort Renee Robinson Cheryle and Ian Shepherd Peter and Carol Sherman Greg Newlyn and Gloria Shadbolt Monica Stephens Janet Phillips and McComas Taylor Brian and Betty Triglone Trevor Fritzlaff and Jennifer White Jerzy and Olivia Witkowski

Modern Mock Turtle Soup (cont. from p 5) 2 tbsp. butter 1 medium onion, chopped 1 rib celery, diced 1 carrot, diced 2 lbs. cooked, diced beef 2 tbsp. flour 2 cups beef broth 2 cups milk 4 hard-cooked eggs, chopped salt, pepper

Melt butter in a heavy soup kettle. Add onion, celery and carrot. Sauté until tender. Add meat and flour, stirring to mix well. Add broth and milk, stirring until soup thickens. Simmer for 20 minutes. Add chopped eggs, salt and pepper. Makes 4 to 6 servings. For a clear soup, use chicken broth instead of milk and omit the flour.

Past member events: Christmas Drinks at Huntly 2012. Photos Di Johnstone

2014 DESK DIARY – Jenny Phillips’ Australian Botanical Artists $22.50 NT members; $25.00 non members. Available in the office in Civic NOW! These and NT Christmas cards will also be available in the Combined Charity Card Christmas Shop later in the year.

Combined Charities Christmas Card Shop The Combined Charities Christmas Card Shop will be operating again this year, at the Uniting Church Centre, Pilgrim House on Northbourne Avenue, from Monday 28 October until Thursday 12 December. The National Trust will be assisting on three Thursdays during that time. Once the dates are known, details will be provided to members. If you would like to help in the Charity shop please contact the office on 6230 0533 or email info@nationaltrustact.org.au.

Further traditional recipes can be browsed at

janeaustengiftshop.co.uk.

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013

What's on? Member and Friends Events Recent Trust Events Antarctic evening Several of our National Trust members braved a chilly winter's night to attend the recent Members' event on Wednesday 17 July. We gathered at the National Archives for wine and food and to enjoy a beautiful pictorial presentation by Mr John Kemister. This was a perspective not often seen about the work and living conditions of the Australian and NZ team (2011) responsible for the meticulous restoration work conducted routinely on the well preserved huts and fittings of Scott and Shackleton fame. John is a specialist metals conservator from the Australian War Memorial and his restoration work, along with that of his colleagues, ensures that Antarctica's original artefacts are well preserved and repaired in this harsh environment for the benefit of future generations. It is a respectful and privileged way to remember the remarkable explorers who sought protection and comfort from an unforgiving climate in these simple dwellings. John's account brought an orientation to the region geographically, historically and through nature so that we could appreciate the challenges of working in such harsh conditions, the spectacle of a vast and unique landscape, the comedy of the local fauna and the camaraderie of the team and their connection with their explorer colleagues from earlier times. The National Trust (ACT) thanks John and his wife for an informative and pictorially entertaining evening. Lisa Norman

Forthcoming events

The Trust depends upon volunteers for much of its work and will invite personally all current volunteers to a brunch as a thank you. Further information will be sent in e-news and posted on the Trust website. KEEP UP TO DATE Are you up with the latest National Trust happenings? Maybe you have been missing out on our E News bulletins! Make sure you are on the E News list and are kept up to date with events, have access to National Trust media releases and opportunities to contribute to the valuable and important work of the Trust. Email info@nationaltrustact.org.au with the subject heading of: Subscribe to E News

50th Anniversary Dinner The President and Committee invite you to celebrate 50 years of hard work and fun with us. Wednesday 23rd October 2013, 6pm Teatro Vivaldi Restaurant, ANU Arts Centre University Avenue, Canberra. Members: $60 Guests: $70 Dinner will be preceded by drinks and some reminiscences from our founders and former Presidents. More reminiscences may follow between courses. After dinner speaker: Prof. Colin Groves will explain the relevance of October 23 and Bishop Ussher to the field of archaeology. Please bring any memorabilia you could donate to the CAS archives which are held in the ACT Heritage Library. RSVP: Sally Brockwell on 6125 2217 or Sally.Brockwell@anu.edu.au.

Christmas Drinks and Volunteers’ Brunch Look out for details of Christmas Drinks and Volunteers brunch. Each year, the Volunteers and Members committee invites members and friends to end the year with Christmas Cheer and learn a little more about Canberra’s heritage.

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DIRECT DEBIT DETAILS: Commonwealth Bank - BSB 062 919 A/C 0090 4557 If you use direct debit, please email your details to contact@cas.asn.au

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August 2013

From the Executive Director The National Trust’s future in 21st century Australia? To succeed in the 21st century, the Trust must embrace change and become comfortable with the new social, political and economic environments in which we will, like it or not, be forced to operate. To make this change, one of the greatest difficulties will be in shaking off the need for security that has been the cornerstone of the Trust. It has blinded us to the fantastic opportunities that have constantly presented themselves and been missed over at least the last three years. We have been unable to pursue opportunities in education, properties or even accept that we were in financial difficulty, even when it has been staring us in the face.

the times and equip the Trust for all that the 21st century has to offer. The next opportunity for significant change will occur in October at the AGM. The future of the Trust will be in the members’ hands. If you are interested in the Trust’s future I implore you to attend this crucial AGM. Chris Wain Executive Director C100 Rally: Note to National Trust members: If you have any vehicle from 1913 to the present day and you would like join the Centenary of Canberra Rally, as long as the vehicle is registered or has club registration, your National Trust membership qualifies you to enter. We will also need lots of volunteers to help over the weekend of the Rally, 19 and 20 October. Contact chris.wain@nationaltrustact.org.au to volunteer.

This is a paradox for an organisation such as the Trust. We are an organisation whose whole purpose is to celebrate and protect our past. We celebrate risk takers like Hume and Hovell, Campbells and Craces and their achievements. We celebrate and preserve trophies of our pioneers for whom every day was an adventure. The explorers, whalers, convicts, traders, settlers and pioneers who developed this continent had no security system to fall back on. These were people who saw the opportunities offered and had the courage to let go of security and accept the risks that their new land would demand. And they were also willing to accept the consequences of their actions, whether the results were positive or negative. It would never have occurred to them that life could be led in any other way.

Chris Wain

Launch of C100 Rally

The problem of security is that once attained it becomes increasingly difficult to let go. To progress, we have to leave behind our established comfort zones and look to the future. Such a step demands courage and commitment, but once taken will lead to increasing achievement and opportunity or failure but not the slow creeping extinction that we are now heading for. All kinds of things will start to occur that would never have resulted if we allow complacency to continue. The organisation appears to be currently going through generational change. This is the opportunity to hand the reins over to a new proactive group that can change with

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Rally entrants: BMW Isetta and Fiat Bambina

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013

Heritage Happenings From the Heritage and Grants Committee ACT Heritage Act Review The National Trust coordinated a letter to all Members of the Assembly pointing out that the draft amendments to the ACT Heritage Act, which was to be the Government’s response to the 2010 Marshall Review, did not adequately respond to the recommendations from the review and was not the best conservation practice, especially with the Minister’s call in powers and ability to replace a decision of this technical expert committee, the ACT Heritage Committee. The National Trust had a good hearing with Ministerial advisors and the path is now open to provide further comment. The National Trust will call for all organisations to continue the process of promoting a full review and best practice. The organisations involved were:          

Australia ICOMOS ACT Chapter Australia Institute of Architects Conservation Council ACT Region Inner South Canberra Community Council North Canberra Community Council Canberra and District Historical Society Australia Garden History Society (ACT and Region) Engineering Heritage Canberra Residents Association (Kingston–Barton, Griffith– Narrabundah, Cooks Estate–Reid, Yarralumla) Many Canberra citizens.

launching the iPhone App for five walks (North and South Border walks/tours, Commonwealth Park, Reid and Blandfordia). The iPhone App opens up new horizons for extra information on our history and heritage. If you are aware of or have historical photographs that we can reference in this new initiative, please let us know so we can open up more information to participants. Eric Martin AM

HERITAGE AT RISK 2013 The Heritage and Grants Committee invites Members to nominate Heritage Places you consider are at risk. Please submit: − Name of place at risk. − Address or GPS location. − Current owner if known. − Current use. − Why it is considered to be at risk, the degree and likely outcome if action is not taken. − Any photographs or more information welcomed. by 30 September 2013. The Heritage and Grants Committee will then consider the nominations and report on: − Good outcomes from past Heritage at Risk nominations. − Those that are still at risk from past nominations. − Priority list of new places at risk. Appropriate follow up and promotion will occur.

Heritage and Grants Committee The Heritage and Grants Committee now coordinates all National Trust responses and advice on heritage matters and as it is the volunteer members who undertake the work, we will only undertake what we can do and concentrate on critical and major issues. Trust members who are able to assist in any capacity on heritage matters are always welcomed.

Eric J Martin AM President

We will put all our comments and submissions on the National Trust website. 2013 Grants These are now all complete except launching the Southern Centenary Border Tours brochure and completing and

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Former Heritage at Risk place-Ginninderra Blacksmith Shop Photo Linda Roberts

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Heritage In Trust

August 2013 Heritage Diary 2013

A selection of heritage-related events in Canberra Notes: CAS is the Canberra Archaeological Society; CAR is the Centre for Archaeological Research. Details of National Trust (ACT) outings are provided in Travels with the Trust, on page 11 Date and time

Event and location

Until 13 October Until 31 December Wed 18 September 6.30 for 7.00pm Friday 20 September 1-3pm

Glorious Days: Australia 1913 – exhibition C100 National Museum of Australia The Original Canberra House – a model version of the C100 original ‘Canberra House’. Cockington Green CAS/CAR lecture – Noel Tan on the Rock Art of South East CAS Asia. Manning Clark Centre, Theatre 6, Bld 26A, Union Court, ANU Entertainment - Elizabeth Burness on “There’s history in the CAS bottom drawers, or secret women’s business!” All welcome. The Gordon Childe Room, G28 AD Hope Building ANU (14) Early European Historic Sites in Kowen – day trip National Trust

www.canberra100.com.au click on “See events” www.canberra100.com.au click on “See events” Contact Helen 0408 443 243 or Helen.cooke@anu.edu.au

Life on the Limestone Plains: Touring our Sites 2013 – Lanyon, Calthorpes and Mugga Mugga - a 3-program series examining the changing face of life on the Limestone Plains Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology Conference, Towards Ratification – Australia’s underwater cultural heritage, at ANU Goulburn, Taralga & Crookwell Heritage weekend

C100

www.canberra100.com.au click on “See events”

AIMA

www.aimaunderwater.org.au/conference-2013

Sunday 22 September 28 September 1.30-3.30pm Friday 4 – Sunday 6 October Saturday 5 – Monday 7 October Sunday 13 October Wednesday 16 October 6.30 for 7.00pm Sat 19 - Sunday 20 October Wednesday 23 October 6pm

26 October 1.30-3.30pm Tues 29 October, 6.00 for 6.30pm 31 October – 3 November Sun 3 November 7 November – 10 March 2014 Sunday 17 November Wednesday 20 November 6.30 for 7.00pm December Date TBA December Date TBA Sunday 23 February 2014

Organiser

Blandfordia 5 – afternoon walk

The 20th Century Heritage Society of NSW Inc National Trust

Contact

Contact Helen 0408 443 243 or Helen.cooke@anu.edu.au

6230 0533

Booking details at www.twentieth.eventbrite.com.au 6230 0533

CAS/CAR lecture - Alister Bowen on Chinese involvement in Australia’s colonial fishing industry. Manning Clark Centre, Theatre 6, Bld 26A, Union Court, ANU Centenary of Canberra Rally

CAS

Contact Helen 0408 443 243 or Helen.cooke@anu.edu.au

National Trust

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CAS 50th Anniversary Dinner. Teatro Vivaldi, ANU Arts Centre. Talks from founders and guest speaker Prof Colin Groves will explain the relevance of 23 October and Bishop Ussher to the field of archaeology. Your own special invitation is on page 7 Life on the Limestone Plains: Touring our Sites 2013 – Lanyon, Calthorpes and Mugga Mugga (see 28 September) 38th Annual General Meeting of National Trust (ACT). Menzies Room, National Archives of Australia.

CAS

RSVP Sally Brockwell on 6125 2217 or Sally.Brockwell@anu.edu.au

C100

www.canberra100.com.au click on “See events” 6230 0533

Australia ICOMOS 2013 National Conference – Centenary of Canberra – Imagined pasts…, imagined futures… - a four-day conference 8th Reid Open Houses and Gardens – afternoon walk

ICOMOS

http://www.aicomos.com/2013canberra-centenary/registration

National Trust

6230 0533

Mapping our World – Terra Incognita to Australia – display of international and Australian maps that inspired the idea of Australia Magnificent Lake George Bus Tour

C100

www.canberra100.com.au click on “See events”

National Trust

6230 0533

AGM and lecture – Mathieu Leclerc on Ceramics from Vanuatu. Manning Clark Centre, Theatre 6, Bld 26A, Union Court, ANU Christmas Drinks Venue to be confirmed Volunteers’ Brunch Invitations will be sent to Trust volunteers Far South Border walk – details to be advised.

CAS

Contact Helen 0408 443 243 or Helen.cooke@anu.edu.au

National Trust

6230 0533

National Trust

6230 0533

National Trust

6230 0533

Heritage in Trust

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National Trust

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August 2013

Travels with the Trust Early European Historic Sites in Kowen Sunday 22 September 9am – 3pm Luke and Mary Colverwell, both convicts, were the first Europeans to settle at Kowen in 1831. Colin McAlister, a member of the Friends of Glenburn, will lead a tour of the area that will include the oldest marked European graves in the ACT which are those of the Colverwell girls who drowned close to their home at ‘Dirty Swamp’ in 1837. The tour will also include the stone ruin of Colliers Homestead, built for George Campbell of Duntroon, in 1880 on land he did not own; the ruins of Coppins Homestead; the site of Kowen School (1882); and the Edmonds’ Glenburn Homestead, made up of a slab home and pise section, plus more. See the new interpretive signs and the great work the Parks Service and The Friends of Glenburn volunteers have done. Morning tea included. Not a lot of walking involved. Please bring lunch, water and wear closed shoes. Meet: Canberra Railway Station, Kingston for car pooling. 2WD cars are fine on the well maintained dirt roads. Cost: $25 members, $35 non-members Bookings essential: 6230 0533 or online at www.nationaltrust.org.au/act/events

Blandfordia 5 Sunday 13 October 1-4pm Enjoy strolling through the meandering streets of this heritage enclave. Distinctive early Canberra houses are set amidst private gardens and public parks which are at their best in spring. Hear the stories of the area and then join together over coffee and cake. Tour leader: Brendan Priess. Meet: The Lawns, at the Canberra Tracks sign, Bougainville Street, Manuka. Cost: $25 NT & U3A members; $35 non-members Bookings essential: 6230 0533 or online at www.nationaltrust.org.au/act/events

8th Reid Open Houses and Gardens Sunday 3 November 1.30–4.30pm

renovations. There will be an introductory talk on Reid and its heritage significance by a heritage expert and the opportunity to hear the owners provide a short talk on their homes and gardens which can then be inspected at leisure. A delicious afternoon tea will be served at the Reid Pre-school. Meet: Corner of Dirrawan Gardens and Currong St, near the Reid Tennis Club Pavilion. A guided walking tour with a total distance of approx. 1.5 kms . Cost: $25 NT & U3A members; $35 non-members Bookings essential: 6230 0533 or book online www.nationaltrust.org.au/act/events

Magnificent Lake George Bus Tour Sunday 17 November 9.30am - 4pm tbc “Lake George, the largest natural inland lake in New South Wales, is a closed lake in that is has no outlets, whether river or creek. It is also contrary, often being empty or nearly so.” This is Graeme Barrow’s introduction to his recent book ‘Magnificent’ Lake George: The Biography. Graeme Barrow will lead this tour to explore a few of the sites mentioned in his book. We will travel by bus to Weereewaa Lookout on the Federal Highway for a general view of the lake and discussion of the discovery of the lake and its naming. After visiting the Lynch memorial, which commemorates the tragic death of five people on the lake in January 1958, we will travel to Lake Road to view Douglas and a hut ruin and vernacular shearing shed. From here we will drive to Turalla cemetery and on to Bungendore for lunch, then Currandooley to view the house and ruins of Grantham Park. The tour will finish at Ashby, built about 1836, for afternoon tea and concluding comments from Graeme, before the bus returns to Canberra. Meet: Car park behind the Deakin Fitness Centre, Deakin Shops or north side pick up on Federal Highway at Southwell Park. Cost: $80 NT & U3A members; $90 non-members Bookings essential: 6230 0533 or book online www.nationaltrust.org.au/act/events [

This popular event is to be held again in collaboration with the Reid Residents’ Association. The program features a guided walk and visits to three houses and gardens in this heritage-listed residential precinct, which have been selected for their sympathetic restoration or _______________________________________________

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Trust Tour Reports Ginninderra Falls Walk, 5 May 2013 Perhaps more of the 26 participants would have preferred the option of lookouts and a talk by geologist Doug Finlayson rather than the challenging walk down the gorge to Platypus Pool, the lower falls and along the mighty Murrumbidgee River. Our hosts John and Anna Hyles, who own the property, led the way at a brisk pace. Many would have happy memories of picnicking and swimming at the Falls. The scenic landscape has been closed to the public for several years, so this rare opportunity was snapped up. With unmaintained paths and railings caution was the order of the day. As we regrouped at lunch, an easier stroll along the Murrumbidgee was welcomed before heading uphill to a deserved cuppa and cake. The weather was at its autumnal best. There is currently a proposal to establish the Murrumbidgee-Ginninderra Gorges National Park so that ownership would change from private to public and the inherent beauty and amenity of this stunning location can be enjoyed by future generations. Many thanks to John and Anna Hyles and to Doug Finlayson.

Lookout to Falls

Linda Roberts

Ginninderra Falls walk

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Steep downhill walk to Murrumbidgee River Photos: Linda Roberts

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Westlake Walk, Sunday 23 June Led by Ms Ann Gugler The former Westlake settlement is now part of the area known as Stirling Ridge in Yarralumla. It is best approached by starting at the location of the three signs marking part of the settlement at the intersection of Empire Circuit and Forster Circuit, Yarralumla. About twenty participants on a guided walk led by Ann Gugler gathered there on Sunday 23 June to learn about its early history and the even earlier significance of the place for the Ngunnawal people. Ann Gugler, now in her 70s, is well known in Canberra and further afield through her research and publications to record the history of Westlake. The National Trust (ACT) holds at least six books written by Ann on Westlake. Walter Burley Griffin gave Westlake its name. The site was chosen to accommodate workmen because of its proximity to the major construction sites of Hotel Canberra, the Provisional Parliament House and the main sewer outfall. The site had several other important attributes, namely good slopes necessary for drainage, ready-made tracks to link the settlement with construction sites and it was relatively out of sight of permanent Canberra. The majority of those who came to build the city were housed in old farm cottages, tents, cubicles, humpies and a few timber cottages. In the 1920s the settlement consisted of a number of camps and temporary settlements erected near each other, but separate. Contractor Howie’s 25 timber cottages, Hostel Camp and the Tradesmen’s and No 1 Labourer’s Camp were on the eastern side of Haines Creek and on the hillside above Lotus Bay. On the western side of the creek were No 3 Sewer Camp and 62 portable timber cottages designed by H M Rolland and built for the Federal Capital Advisory Committee – the latter being known as “The Gap Cottages” and later “Westlake”. Westlake in 1925 had a population of 700, which was then one fifth of the Territory population. By 1931 only 61 cottages remained and by 1965 the last cottage (number 29) was removed. Many traces of this vibrant community still remain but they are slowly disappearing or being covered over by vegetation. A hand-out on the

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history of Westlake was given to the group and Ann gave a talk, referring to a couple of display boards with photographs which she had set up and some items brought along which had been collected from the settlement dumps – such as old beer and medicine bottles, crockery fragments and the like. After Ann’s introduction, the group walked up the hill to the ridge and along the ridge, then down into the Gap where most of the cottages stood. Many of the places where cottages once stood have markers with the name of the family who lived in the very basic houses. Along the way Ann pointed out a very large gum tree with a prominent scar created by aborigines, a tall brick sewer ventilation chimney, the remains of rock circles also created by local aborigines and other interesting features. There was not time to visit Howie's and the tradesmen's area of the former Westlake settlement.

The first cottages constructed at Westlake- long since demolished or removed (NLA image)

Ann Austin (her maiden name) lived at 27 Westlake with her family from 1941 until 1959. Ann was born in 1937 in Collarenebri NSW and came to Canberra with her parents in 1941. Her father worked at Brodie's garage and later at the Fitters and Turners Shop at the Power House. The family lived for a short time with the Dunn family at Kingston before moving to 27 Westlake in 1941 where the family remained until 1959. Ann attended Telopea Park Infants and Primary School and then Canberra High before going to Sydney Teachers College. Ann later taught at Canberra High and several other Canberra schools and colleges.

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Ann noted that probably because the sites of workmen's camps and settlements were as far as possible hidden out of sight of permanent Canberra, the history of the men and women who came to build the city was neglected. In the early 1990s Ann decided to write the Westlake story. This led to her research on the camps and settlements where the construction workers lived and the publication of her books as well as newsletters and a website: http://hiddencanberra.webs.com/. At the conclusion of the guided walk, the group gathered at the Yarralumla Halal Pide House in Novar Street at the Yarralumla shops. A very good afternoon tea was provided and many of the group, which included at least one lady with a family connection to Westlake, stayed on to chat and ask more questions of Ann. The afternoon tea and event concluded shortly after 4.30pm. The National Trust (ACT) is particularly grateful to Ann Gugler for making her time available to prepare a handout and to lead the walk. There is no one better qualified to do this. John Tucker

A report on the 2013 ACT and Region Annual Australian Heritage Partnership Symposium, held at ANU on Saturday 20 July We had nearly 70 attending. I have received many messages of congratulations and appreciation for the well-run day. It was great to have staff presenting good news stories from our local cultural institutions such as ACT Museums and Galleries and the Museum of Australian Democracy (MOAD), a speaker from the ACT Heritage Unit, heritage practitioners and professionals involved in community groups as well as our valued local historians who share their passion for particular historic places and people. Sadly there is still room for improvement in the identification, protection and conservation of significant historic sites. Some great innovations for presenting history to the uninitiated were shown. The lively and really useful panel discussion will give us some guidance in promoting cultural heritage in the coming year. The program, presentations and a summary of the panel results are at http://www.cas.asn.au/about.php. We are already taking suggestions for next year’s themes and speakers. A big issue is the fate of collections so we will definitely have a substantial section on those next year. Helen Cooke

Westlake children outside the hall. 39 Westlake is in the background. http://hiddencanberra.webs.com/westlakepeople.htm Audience at symposium

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Photo: Helen Cooke

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August 2013 2013 ACT and Region Annual Australian Heritage Partnership Symposium

National Trust of Australia (ACT) Office

PO Box 1144 Civic Square ACT 2608 Telephone 02 6230 0533 Fax Email Net

02 6230 0544 info@nationaltrustact.org.au www.nationaltrustact.org.au

ABN 50 797 949 955 Patron President

The Hon. Margaret Reid AO Eric J Martin AM

Executive Director Chris Wain

chris.wain@nationaltrustact.org.au Liz McMillan info@nationaltrustact.org.au Office Manager

Lunch at symposium

st

Office Location: 1 Floor, North Building [above Canberra Museum & Gallery] Entry from Civic Square, Canberra City Opening Times: 9.30am to 3.00pm Monday to Friday The e-magazine is produced and edited by Maree Treadwell and Wendy Whitham assisted by Dianne Dowling and Helen Cooke.

About Heritage in Trust Heritage in Trust is published quarterly as an electronic magazine in conjunction with the National Magazine of the National Trusts of Australia in February, May, August and November. The editors invite articles and letters from Trust members with an interest in heritage of the ACT. These should be addressed to The Editor, Heritage in Trust, at info@nationaltrustact.org.au The views expressed in Heritage in Trust are not necessarily those of the National Trust of Australia (ACT). The articles in this magazine are subject to copyright. No article may be used without the consent of the ACT National Trust and the author.

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Panel discussion with bloomers Elizabeth Burness’ presentation “There’s History in the Bottom Drawers, or Secret Women’s Business” stole the show and illustrated the positive input that heritage interpretation can give not only to heritage conservation outcomes but to people’s social health. Don’t miss Elizabeth’s talk to the Canberra Archaeological Society on 20 September- see Heritage Diary page 10.

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Volunteer with the Trust Do you have some spare time? Interested in heritage? Do you have skills in administration, data entry or research, natural, Indigenous or cultural heritage expertise, event and/or volunteer management? The ACT National Trust welcomes offers of assistance from members. Call Liz at the office on 6230 0533 or email info@nationaltrustact.org.au.

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National Trust (ACT) First Floor, North Building Cnr London Cct and Civic Square, Canberra ACT 2601 PO Box 1144 Civic Square, Canberra ACT 2608 Telephone (02) 6230 0533 Facsimile (02) 6230 0544 Email: info@nationaltrustact.org.au www.nationaltrust.org.au

You can help us to conserve and safeguard places of heritage significance for future generations by making a tax deductible donation Donations over $2 are tax deductible Name _________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ P/C____________ I wish to make a donation of

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Cheques should be made out to National Trust of Australia (ACT) Please send me information about automatic payments Cash donations accepted at the office.

Southern Centenary Border Tours New Brochure The newly printed Southern Centenary Border Tours brochure is the result of ACT Heritage Grant funding and, with its Northern Centenary Border Walks brochure counterpart, is your invitation to explore and appreciate the momentous task of three teams of surveyors to map out our ACT border. The brochure is available from the Trust office in Civic and can be downloaded from the Trust website.

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What began in 1910 by Percy Sheaffe, Harry Mouat and Freddie Johnston took five long and very eventful years to complete. Along with disgruntled landholders, the surveyors had to deal with government pressure, bureaucracy, treacherous terrain and unpredictable weather. When reviewing the Northern Walks brochure, I questioned the author Dr Peter Dowling as to why the walk along Old Tuggeranong Road to the border at the Queanbeyan–Cooma railway line was considered

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northern. For most locals Tuggeranong always meant the ‘deep south’. The response that if you rule a line halfway across the ACT it would go through Tharwa, certainly put things in perspective! So the destinations on these four ‘tours’ are at Angle Crossing, Smiths Road, Nass Valley and The Far South. Out of these, the last one is a walk which departs from the Mt Clear Campground south to the border. The presence of a number of blazed tree survey markers along this stretch of the border shows one of the many different ways the border itself was signalled. This part of the border was surveyed in 1915. It was the last section of the border to be surveyed by Freddie Johnston and close to where his team met Harry Mouat’s team, who had been completing the western border. The remaining three tours are drives, although Nass Valley would make a lovely cycle. A combination drive and walk provides wonderful views of Clear Range on the Smiths Road tour. Park at the border and walk 800m along the fence line. Time your visit for late January and gorge yourself on the plentiful and tasty blackberries. This part of the border was surveyed by Percy Sheaffe and his team in 1914.

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The only portion of the border to follow the Murrumbidgee River is at Angle Crossing. This can be approached from the Monaro Highway and when the Crossing is open, this drive can be combined with the Smiths Road tour. The border reaches the Murrumbidgee at The Angle (an S-bend in the river) as its course rounds the foot of a low spur. The border follows the bends for a short distance then leaves the river and travels in a straight westerly line to follow the summits of Clear Range. The border was more than just lines on a map; the hard working surveyor teams clearly indicated where the border was by a variety of wooden posts, concrete blocks, galvanised iron pipes, marked trees and lock spits. Markers have been lost in fires and through old age. Our challenge for the future is how do we conserve these ageing and disappearing markers? There will be a walk of the Far South Border on 23 February 2014. So come along and marvel at the mark of these surveyors. Linda Roberts Below: Brochure cover and photos taken on the walk. Photos Linda Roberts

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