National Trust SA Heritage Living Autumn 2017

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H E R I TAG E L I V I NG AUTUMN 2017

GETTING BACK TO NATURE:

Our magnificent reserves


Your chance to learn stonemasonry and timber conservation with the National Trust Ever wanted to try heritage building conservation? Keen to get your hands dirty and learn some new skills working on a National Trust heritage building? This June we are offering places on a six day heritage skills training program as we commence conservation works on the historic Glencoe Woolshed in the state’s south-east, 25 kilometres west of Mount Gambier.

One of the biggest issues in heritage conservation today is a lack of skilled tradespeople trained in the special requirements of heritage building conservation. Heritage buildings typically use materials and modes of construction that are no longer commonly practised. As the need for maintenance, conservation and restoration of these buildings increases, there is a growing need to develop heritage trade skills in younger generations. Working in partnership with the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB), the National Trust of South Australia is commencing an ongoing program of heritage conservation skills training at our properties around the state. CITB is an industry owned and led, non-government agency responsible for supporting the South Australian building and construction industry in training and skills development. Training in CITB’s heritage skills program is conducted by Keith McAllister and his team from Heritage Stone Restorations. Keith was trained in Stone Sculpting at the Bath Academy of the Arts and in Architectural Stonework and Conservation at Bournemouth University in the UK. The Glencoe Woolshed project is a six day residential program where participants will learn how to undertake a range of conservation activities working on this heritage listed place, built in 1863. Practical work on the Glencoe Woolshed will provide participants with the following hands-on experience: •

Basic stone conservation techniques

Lime washing techniques

Understanding lime mortars: –– Processing procedure –– Gauging and mixing –– Preparation application and finishing

Use of lime mortars and other traditional materials

Natural timber conservation techniques.

HERITAGE STONE / TIMBER CONSERVATION TRAINING PROGRAM Glencoe Woolshed Glencoe Road Glencoe South Australia 7:30am - 4:30pm

18 To JUNE

23 JUNE

Participants are required to fund their own place on the program ($1200) which includes meals and accommodation. Subsidised places are available for those holding a CITB training card. Participants will need to be available for the entire duration of the course and provide their own transport. If you are interested in joining the Glencoe Conservation project as a participant or supporter, please contact us. Registration for places in the training program close on 2 June.

TO REGISTER YOUR INTEREST OR TO FIND OUT MORE email: markg@citb.org.au call (08) 8172 9500 or visit www.citb.org.au/news/heritage-trades


AU T U M N 2 017

Contents 4

from the

President PROFESSOR NORMAN ETHERINGTON AM

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ecent controversy over government plans to reform the Local Heritage system highlights inconsistent practices in local government. Thirty local councils have no registered Local Heritage Places. Most of those are located in rural and regional South Australia. It is hard to say why they have taken so little interest, particularly when they are keen to promote economic development. It may be a matter of indifference. Seeing little threat to known heritage places, they may see no need to mandate protection. Some say – though this is disputed ­– that the problem is a lack of resources. The heritage surveys required to prove that individual buildings or clusters measure up to the criteria laid down for listing are expensive. Councils struggling with staff shortages find the employment of a heritage officer less urgent than other needs. The Trust’s Cultural Heritage Advisory Committee wants to do something to stir the delinquent councils into taking more notice of their irreplaceable heritage assets. Noting that many rural and regional towns have established heritage trails, the committee reckons there are plenty of known buildings and precincts deserving protection as local heritage. At their behest I am writing to National Trust branches and historical societies across the state, urging each of them to nominate 25 or more places as candidates for listing, which are not presently identified on Trust, state or local registers. Our longer term hope is that branches and historical societies take up the cudgels on behalf of local heritage. They are the ones most likely to be noticed when council elections roll around. Action now can also help to scuttle any moves by the Minister for Planning to reduce existing protection.

FORT LARGS PROPOSAL A vision splendid for our amazing Fort

22 IN THE GARDEN Jardin des Plantes de Montpellier

6 ADVOCACY: LOCAL HERITAGE Consulting the South Australian community on the future of Local Heritage

23 SPECIAL PLACES Dalemain Mansion and Historic Gardens, Cumbria, and Martindale Hall, South Australia

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NEWS: PORT PIRIE All aboard at Port Pirie

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SIGNIFICANT TREE The Weeping Wych Elm at Stirling Hotel

24 EDUCATION New directions in heritage: learning with 3D printing technology

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OUR PEOPLE Trevor Conlon, OAM

10 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 12 HERITAGE HEROES Octavia Hill, pioneer of model housing and the National Trust movement 14 FEATURE: NATURE RESERVES Nature Reserves and the National Trust Roachdale Reserve Watiparinga Reserve Engelbrook Reserve

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from the

26 BRANCH SPOTLIGHT Beachport 27 FESTIVAL OF MARMALADE And the winners are… 28 MEMBERSHIP 29 2017 AUSTRALIAN HERITAGE FESTIVAL 18 April – 31 May 39 PLACES TO STAY Collingrove Homestead: leisured luxury

Editor

ROBERT DARE

orking with an Adelaide primary school, the National Trust has been developing a pioneering program in which school children use contemporary 3D design technologies to understand heritage buildings they live among. No doubt the lure of using cutting-edge technologies was strong. But at the end of the project the children themselves took pride in how they had learned to see with new eyes buildings they passed every day. These are skills they will never forget. The children are heritage heroes in the making. We take a close look at their remarkable achievements. We celebrate other heritage heroes too. Octavia Hill was a founder of the National Trust movement in the United Kingdom. The movement had its origins not in the fight to save old buildings but to preserve open spaces of great beauty for future generations. She is the inspiration for the feature articles in this issue on the National Trust’s own nature reserves. We talk to past and present natural heritage managers about their work and their passions, and profile three of our most popular nature reserves, Roachdale, Watiparinga and Engelbrook. Fort Largs is one of a string of coastline fortifications built in the nineteenth century. Land on the city side of the guns, most recently used as a police academy, will be developed for housing by a major builder. The National Trust has ambitious plans to preserve the gun site as both a heritage facility and a leisure centre for the new residents and for the public generally. We outline how the Trust hopes to transform and protect an important part of our heritage that will continue to decay if left untended and unloved. Finally, in this issue we feature the full South Australian program for this year’s National Trust Australian Heritage Festival, which kicks off on 18 April and runs to 31 May. Make sure you get out and enjoy our heritage.

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 F ort L args P roposal

A vision splendid

for our amazing Fort Fort Largs at Taperoo has faced an uncertain future since the State Government announced in 2014 it was selling the site for a housing development. In June 2016 the National Trust was invited to submit its proposal for the future of the site. In December we presented to the Government our vision for a restored Fort Largs as the centrepiece of a major new tourism destination to complement the proposed housing development on the former Police Academy site.

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ort Largs is one of the most significant military history sites in South Australia. Built in the colonial era as part of the first national defence initiative, a chain of forts on Australia’s southern and eastern flanks, it represented the state of the art in defence strategy and technology when it was completed in 1885. The Fort came under Commonwealth control at the time of Federation. It was significantly upgraded in anticipation of World War II and was finally returned to the South Australian Government in 1961, operating as the Fort Largs Police Academy for 50 years until 2011. Over more than 120 years of activity, the Fort has also been home to thousands who have served in both the military and the police. Others enlisted there to serve in both world wars, and some were held as enemy aliens in a temporary internment camp. As a heritage place, this carefully designed structure has stood the test of time, but is increasingly showing the signs of its age and the harsh maritime environment where it is located. There is a backlog of conservation work required to stabilise and restore the fabric of the building. Significant investment is required to preserve the building into the future and to make it fully accessible for the public.

The redevelopment of adjacent land for housing provides an extraordinary opportunity to transform the site from a growing liability into a sustainable community asset which makes an ongoing contribution to the life and economy of the area and the State. The National Trust is proposing to lead a program of capital works to

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realise a new vision for the Fort as a significant heritage-based tourism destination. The successful adaptation of the Fort will also add great amenity to the residents of the new housing development adjacent. Moreover, it offers the people of South Australia a new destination for remembering their past and the contribution and sacrifice of those who served at the Fort. When the capital works are complete, the Fort will pass to the permanent care and management of the National Trust as a sustainable and vibrant heritage destination. The National Trust’s proposal to conserve, adapt and reuse the fort will create a new tourism destination, generating local jobs and economic activity and also relieve the Government of future responsibility for care and maintenance of the Fort. It addresses the substantial backlog of conservation and maintenance works which currently renders the Fort a significant and growing liability for Government.

We believe our proposal presents the best option for the future of the Fort and a significant addition to the proposed housing development, by providing residents with an attractive amenity for recreation, dining and socialising. It also provides a focus for community development through events and volunteering at the Fort.


F ort L args P roposal

TOP TO BOTTOM

Top: Aerial perspective on the proposed redevelopment of Fort Largs by the National Trust. Restoration of the Fort building will open this unique heritage place to the public for the first time. Middle: Fort Denison in Sydney Harbour has been successfully adapted as a tourism and dining destination. Like Fort Largs, Fort Denison was part of the first national network of defences constructed in the colonial era. Bottom: Architect renderings of different aspects of the proposed Fort Largs redevelopment by the National Trust, showing the elevated perspectives available from the proposed viewing platforms.

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 A dvocac y: L ocal H eritage

Consulting the South Australian community on

the future of Local Heritage

On 11 August 2016 an officer of South Australia’s Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) wrote to selected government, industry, professional and community organisations seeking comment on a brief paper titled ‘Renewing our Planning System: Placing Local Heritage on Renewed Foundations’. Following widespread calls for an extension of the initial deadline of 9 September for responses to the paper, the department extended the consultation for a further month. By the 7 October deadline, 183 submissions had been received and have since been posted on the departmental website.

S H OW YOUR S U P PO RT ON FAC EBO O K facebook.com/loveyourlocalheritage

R I G HT

A packed public meeting at the Adelaide Town Hall in September raised many concerns about the directions proposed in the State Government’s Discussion Paper on Local Heritage.

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his is by far the most extensive survey of public opinion ever conducted on heritage issues in South Australia. It is in fact one of the four largest such surveys ever undertaken in Australia. For that reason alone it deserves close analysis and widespread discussion. The 183 submissions include several with associated comment from individuals. For instance, the Adelaide City Council attached 20 hand-written and signed commentary forms filled out at the Town Hall Forum on 26 September. The National Trust conducted an online survey through its Heritage Watch website www.heritagewatch.net.au which attracted a further 177 responses. Even allowing for some duplication, the magnitude of DPTI consultation held over six weeks exceeds that of the 2015-16 South Australian Royal Commission on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (more than 250 submissions received in the course of a year according to www.nuclearrc.sa.gov.au). The Cultural Heritage Advisory Committee of the

National Trust of South Australia has commissioned Norman Etherington to prepare an analysis of the survey as a contribution to further discussion ahead of any legislative change to the established planning system for the protection of Local Heritage. While still incomplete, analysis shows that very few organisations or individuals endorsed the suggestions for ‘reform’ set out in the DPTI paper. What support there was came from a few organisations representing the property industry and committees within the Department. Clearly a very large gulf separates the views expressed by state government agencies and the property industry from the opinions held by local government and community organisations. Some way must be found to bridge this gap ahead of any change to existing mechanisms for the protection of local heritage. When the analysis has been finalised, it will be circulated to National Trust branches and all those who made submissions.


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All aboard at Port Pirie   MELANIE KIRIACOU

Port Pirie has a proud history as a rail hub. The National Trust purchased the former railway station building in 1970. The distinctive 1902 structure is a landmark on Ellen Street in the centre of town. Now there is a new feature attracting attention with the relocation of an iconic locomotive.

Photos: Melanie Kiriacou

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he establishment of silver-leadzinc smelting facilities at Port Pirie in 1889 commenced the flow through South Australia of rich ores from the Line of Lode at Broken Hill. When the smelters were taken over by Broken Hill Associated (BHA) smelters in 1915, efforts were made to acquire their own locomotives as shunting had been carried out by South Australian Railways (SAR) locomotives. Five locomotive engines were built by Andrew Barclay, Sons & Co of Kilmarnock, Scotland for the BHA smelters at Port Pirie. The last of these, the Port Pirie, was built in 1928. It is a shunt locomotive, and spent its life shifting wagons around the smelters before being retired to the National Trust museum grounds. It is a significant piece of Port Pirie’s history and we are very fortunate to have it in our collection.

In 1875, the first railway opened in Port Pirie to the original Ellen Street Station, with the track running down the middle of the main street. In 1937 it became a break-of-gauge station when the broad gauge line from Adelaide to Redhill was extended to Port Pirie. At the same time, the Commonwealth Railways standard gauge TransAustralian Railway was extended south from Port Augusta to the new Port Pirie Junction Station, where it met the broad gauge line in Solomontown. Port Pirie was then home to the largest lead smelter in the world and also had the distinction, from 1937 to 1970, of being the world’s major triple gauge railway station where the broad, narrow and standard gauges met. The Port Pirie branch actively conserves, manages and promotes built and moveable heritage. We own seven heritage buildings and have implemented adaptive re-use to create

sustainable communities and preserve the past. The income derived from them allows us to pay for expensive upkeep and new projects that can be enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. Heritage adds character and distinctiveness to Port Pirie. The railway station museum is the most photographed building in Port Pirie followed by the National Trusts Sampson’s Cottage heritage accommodation, a former butcher shop. H E R I TAG E L I V I NG

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 S ignificant tree

The Weeping Wych Elm at Stirling Hotel The very fine specimen of weeping elm near the Mt Barker Road driveway entrance of the hotel in Stirling is one of the best known publicly visible exotic trees in the Adelaide Hills. It is on The National Trusts of Australia Significant Tree Register.

A B OV E

Stirling Hotel elm from the north. Photo: Robert Dare

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TONY WHITEHILL

ts botanic name is Ulmus glabra ‘Pendula’. Its officially recognised common name is Weeping Wych Elm. Wych is a curious old word meaning pliable, and has been applied to a number of trees. For a long time the origin of this weeping form was unknown until an article headed ‘Arboricultural Notes’ in J.C. Loudon’s Gardener’s Magazine of 1843 reported that the original tree was ‘found in a bed of seedlings in the Perth [Scotland] Nursery, a year or two after the peace [c.1816]’. From it arose the whole stock in Europe. The tree is propagated by top grafting onto a tall young trunk of the normal wych elm to show the impressive weeping habit. A close examination of the Stirling tree reveals the sizeable trunk of the stock wych elm and the clear junction of the top graft. In recent years two growths have arisen from the trunk near the graft union, and their rather upright growths can be clearly seen protruding from the southerly side of the upper canopy.

When such growths occur they should be removed as they will tend to become a dominant feature and sap energy from the rest of the canopy. There are two forms of weeping elm that are often confused. The other is the Camperdown Elm Ulmus glabra ‘Camperdownii’, which arose as a seedling in the park at Camperdown House, also in Scotland, in about 1835-1840. The original tree still exists. Several characterstics help us distinguish between the two forms of the elm. The Camperdown Elm has contorted branches and tends to have rounder pale green leaves, whereas the Weeping Wych Elm has larger dark green leaves that are often twice as long as they are wide and come to a long tapering point. David Jones’ 1999 tree inventory of the garden at ‘Wairoa’ in Aldgate documents the presence of specimens of both trees. The planting dates of these trees and the Stirling Hotel specimen appear to be unknown but are probably the very late 1800s.

Sources J.C. Loudon, Gardener’s Magazine, Edinburgh 1843; David Jones, ‘Wairoa’ garden & landscape conservation & management study, Adelaide 1999.

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O u r P eople

Trevor Conlon, OAM We are pleased to announce that long standing Coromandel Valley branch member and local heritage advocate Trevor Conlon has been recognised for his community service with the National Trust and other organisations in this year’s Australia Day Honour awards.

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revor was awarded the medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for his service to heritage preservation and to the community of Coromandel Valley. He is well known for his commitment to the local history of the Coromandel Valley district, and for his tireless work to conserve and promote National Trust properties. These include Winns Bakery, Gamble Cottage and Garden and, more recently, Watchman House, which has now been restored and opened for public access. Trevor initiated the highly successful Coro Alive! 175 program commemorating the 175th anniversary of the Valley with a year-long community celebration in 2012. His popular local heritage walks led to the printed guide Coromandel Valley: its History, Trails and Tales, published in 2014. Between 2013 and 2016 he served as Chair of the Coromandel Valley branch of the National Trust.

He is a strong advocate for the establishment of a heritage precinct, including a publicly accessible archive of historical material in the former family home of the Watchman family. Outside of the Trust, Trevor has had a 50-year career with the South Australian Country Fire Service, serving as a volunteer and staff member in technical and operational capacities, including volunteer firefighter, radio operator and various committee roles. Past awards include being a recipient in 2013 of the Event of the Year Award from the City of Onkaparinga for Coro Alive! 175, as well as the South Australian Country Fire Service medal for meritorious service over 45 years. Congratulations Trevor on another well deserved honour.

As a sixth generation Coromandel Valley resident, Trevor has been a vigorous champion of local heritage.

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letters to the

Editor

We ASKED and You RESPONDED In the Summer issue of Trust magazine, we told the story of the battle to keep Martindale Hall in public hands. We had an overwhelming response from people across Australia. We share some of their responses here.

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recently read Trust magazine and was astounded by the beauty of the historical icon Martindale Hall. How wonderful it would be to have something like this available for the public to visit and it would be an absolute shame for this to become a privately run business. This should be entrusted to the National Trust in SA to oversee and keep open to the general public to enjoy such a stunning property and preserve its historical features. Thank you for sharing Martindale Hall’s story with everyone. Good luck and you have my full support to keep it open to the public.

Leanne Simpson Victoria

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admire your work and I am a member. The South Australian government must keep its hands off Martindale Hall. It was given in trust for the people of South Australia to ensure its preservation as a place of heritage. I grew up in the Mid-North and many times my father told us of the romantic, somewhat sad story of Edmund Bowman and his fiancee Frances, who remained in England. This is our heritage – and our children’s and grand-children’s heritage! No government has the right to take it from us.

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Ruth McDonald South Australia

Please preserve Martindale H ​ all.

e wish to add our protest and concern that this magnificent building may be sold to developers.

artindale Hall is a South Australian treasure which needs to be preserved so that all South Australians, and interstate and international visitors can enjoy its unique qualities.

Rhonda Speer New SouthWales

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We visited from Tasmania in 2015 and were so impressed with the history and grandeur of Martindale Hall. We believe the home should be open for all Australians to enjoy.

Helen and Nigel Howard Tasmania

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L etters to the E ditor

Have your say

on things that matter to the National Trust.

Send us your letters to the editor on what you have read in the magazine, or on other relevant issues. Keep them to no more than 175 words. Those selected for publication may be edited. Email your letters to publications@nationaltrustsa.org.au or post them to National Trust of South Australia, 631 Glynburn Road, Beaumont SA 5066.

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ohn Mortlock gave generously to South Australia in many ways. He was a generous benefactor to so many worthwhile causes. His final gift to the University of Adelaide of his beloved home Martindale Hall with surrounding land was with the people of SA in mind, education being our greatest gift. Martindale Hall is historically important not just to all of Australia. The National Trust are the best people to understand this and manage its care in the future. As a Victorian resident my memory of visits to Martindale Hall are treasured. It would be tragic for such a gem not to be preserved in a fashion that allowed all Australians and visitors to experience the lessons of our past. Please keep Martindale Hall out of the hands of private enterprise.

Kate Reeve on behalf of Peter, Susan and Simon Reeve Victoria

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s a National Trust member I would like to support the transfer of Martindale Hall to National Trust hands. It is a truly magnificent building which compares well with interstate and overseas mansions. In its setting, it is a unique tourist attraction for the area. Visitors can’t spend all their time wine tasting. I was truly amazed at the layout and furnishings of the building when I first saw it on a short holiday in the Clare Valley, having lived most of my life in WA. It would be disastrous to see the public deprived of this part of our heritage.

Anne Blanchard Western Australia

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ve just been reading my new Trust magazine and the article about Martindale House. I have never heard of this house but am horrified to read that it could be turned over to private, privileged use and no longer be available to the public. I do hope the National Trust can save it from disappearing from us; it is too gorgeous not to be enjoyed by everyone. I then turned the pages to find the story about Labassa, and was so pleased to see that house restored to its former glory. We have so few heritage places in this country that we cannot afford to lose any more of them.

Pamela Robb Western Australia

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Heritage Living

have just been reading and enjoying the Spring edition of the magazine, and I would like to congratulate you on a fine production. The content is highly interesting and the design, with its beautiful photography and artistic layout, is so attractive that one simply has to read every page. Another winning feature for a senior like me is the font size, which is large enough to make reading easy and pleasurable. I appreciate that the jump to a fullcolour magazine is an expensive business, but in my opinion, it is well worth it. I’ve seen The Dressmaker movie and was therefore thrilled to see such a beautiful and appreciative write-up over eight wonderful pages. I shall now look forward to the arrival of each new magazine!

Don Loffler South Australia

Complete and return the form below to register your support for keeping Martindale Hall in public hands. Name............................................................................................................................................................................................... Email................................................................................................................................................................................................ Address........................................................................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................................................ Postcode................................. Your reasons for supporting............................................................................................................................................................. ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ Thank you for your support. It is very much appreciated. Once completed please return this form to the National Trust of South Australia, 631 Glynburn Road, BEAUMONT SA 5066 or email this information to: martindalehall@nationaltrustsa.org.au Show your support on facebook.com/sharethelovemartindalehall H E R I TAG E L I V I NG

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 H eritage H eroes

Octavia Hill, pioneer of model housing and the National Trust movement   ROBERT DARE

From houses and open spaces for the poor to the formation of the National Trust in the United Kingdom

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ctavia Hill was co-founder of the National Trust movement that began in Britain and later spread across the globe.

Her journey to that point took an unlikely route. Octavia’s father had once been wealthy, but in 1840 became bankrupt for a second time and was in failing health. As a result her mother had to earn a living for herself and her five daughters and repay her husband’s debts. She became manager in London of a guild for the employment of poor women, founded by men styling themselves Christian Socialists. Fourteen-year-old Octavia earned money heading a workroom in the guild employing children to make toys. She also taught them to read, write and care for themselves. Here, Octavia met and talked to the founders of the guild. Their leader, the theologian F.D. Maurice, profoundly influenced her spirituality and her awareness of social problems. She also knew his associates Charles Kingsley, author of Alton Locke (which depicted in sordid detail the horrors of sweat-shops in the London garment industry) and The Water-babies, Tom Hughes, author of Tom Brown’s School Days, and the very learned lawyer J.M. Ludlow.

TOP TO B OTTOM

Octavia Hill in 1882. F.D. Maurice. Sketch of John Ruskin c.1857 by George Richmond.

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Coming together after the disastrous years of the hungry 1840s, the Christian Socialists opposed what they saw as the rapacity of free markets that reduced labour to wage slavery and intractable poverty. Their Christianity led them to promote cooperation rather than competition, which is what they meant by socialism (they did not mean common ownership of property). Cooperative workshops would restore workers’ dignity, increase their rewards and make them self-reliant. Octavia absorbed and never forgot the Christian Socialist message. As a teenager Octavia also met John Ruskin, the famous art critic and associate of the Christian Socialists. He agreed to teach her to be an illustrator. She began reading each volume of his monumental Modern Painters as it appeared, sometimes borrowing a copy from Ruskin himself. By her late teens Octavia had decided on her life’s work: she would improve the lives of the very poor, help them to self-reliance, and bring beauty into their lives.


H eritage H eroes

In 1864 Ruskin’s father died, leaving him a large fortune. Octavia saw her opportunity. She persuaded Ruskin to buy three ten-room houses in a wretched inner-London slum. She planned to repair them, make them clean and sanitary, and manage the tenants personally. Ruskin imposed one condition: he must realise five per cent on his investment. That meant a strict enforcement of rent deadlines – pay or be evicted. This regime suited Octavia – so well in fact that by the end of the century she managed hundreds of houses with thousands of tenants. A good return on investment meant she could add amenities to the tenements hitherto unheard of: good laundries, gardens, playgrounds for the children, entertainments for the adults, trips into the country for everyone. ‘The poor of London need joy and beauty in their lives’, she wrote. They had a right to ‘the privilege of space, and light, and air, and beauty’. Octavia soon extended her campaign for space and beauty outside her tenements. She agitated for the preservation of small open spaces in inner cities. Graveyards were ideal for her purpose, she realised: they were, she wrote, ‘capable of being made into beautiful out-door sittingrooms’. She set about transforming as many as she could. The next step in her campaign for space, light and beauty for the poor extended outside cities. She became active in the Commons Preservation Society. She thought of it as work for future generations.

TOP TO BOTTOM

Illustration from a 1927 edition of Charles Kingsley’s The Water-babies, the story of an illiterate, unwashed and ungodly chimney-sweep. Red Cross Cottages, Southwark, in 1913, an example of Octavia Hill’s combination of good housing and open space. The garden at Red Cross Cottages today. The blue plaque on the wall of the hall commemorates Octavia Hill. Hand-tinted view of Derwent Water from Friar’s Crag, Lake District National Park, c.1900. The view entranced five-year-old John Ruskin. A century later Friar’s Crag was bought for the National Trust by crowdfunding in memory of Hardwicke Rawnsley. Images: Creative Commons and public domain

‘Keep these fair, far, still places for your children, and your children’s children, if you can’, she urged. Their preservation for all time ‘will give a share in his country to be inherited by the poorest citizen’. In the late 1870s the Reverend Hardwicke Rawnsley took up his Anglican ministry in the Lake District. He soon became alarmed by plans to push a slate railway from quarries above Buttermere through the lovely valleys of Newlands and Ennerdale. He enlisted the support of Octavia, whom he knew through Ruskin, and Sir Robert Hunter, the solicitor of the Commons Preservation Society, to oppose the railway. They won. But the three knew the threats to precious open spaces would continue. In 1893 they met to form the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest and Natural Beauty. The Trust then set about acquiring large tracts of countryside in the Lake District and the west country. An idea was born and quickly flourished. Octavia Hill acted not out of reverence for the mansions and estates of the rich and famous, but because she wanted to improve the lives of the very poorest and enrich the future for their children. ‘I believe (thank God!)’, she said, ‘more in nobodies than in “somebodies”’. It was for her nobodies that she helped found the National Trust.

Sources Octavia Hill, Homes of the London poor, New York 1875, and Our common land, London 1877; C. E. Maurice (ed.), Life of Octavia Hill as told in her letters, London 1913; C. E. Raven, Christian Socialism 1848-1854, London 1920; Dictionary of National Biography.

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 F eat u re : N at u re R eserves

Nature Reserves and the National Trust

Conserving nature reserves for the people of South Australia is a core purpose of the National Trust. Robert Dare talks to two experienced conservators who explain why and how they do it, and then profiles three of the Trust’s most popular reserves under their care. C L OC K WI S E FROM L E FT

Creek bed at Roachdale. Bushland in Engelbrook. Bushland at Watiprainga. Walking trail in Engelbrook. Photos: Robert Dare

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F eat u re : N at u re R eserves

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he National Trust is custodian of 28 nature reserves in South Australia. Sustaining them requires their managers to be knowledgeable, skilled, patient and dedicated. Carlsa Carter was joint manager of natural heritage for the National Trust from 1996 to 2002. Chris Grant took up the position on his own in the second half of 2016. They are highly qualified by education and experience for their roles with the Trust. Carlsa has a joint degree in zoology and history – an unusual combination noteworthy in itself – and a graduate diploma in environmenal management. She has worked for a generation in education, nature conservation and water management. Chris has a joint degree in science and law ­ – another unusual combination – and an honours degree in environmental biology. ‘I have spent my life in conservation biology’, he tells me, and lists his research in areas as diverse as bilbies, bats, the reintroduction of threatened species and mallee conservation. For both of them, conservation demands passion, learning, a long view, a stout pair of boots, and a willingness to get tired in the field. I ask them how natural heritage fits into the mission of the National Trust, and how in turn the Trust serves natural heritage. Carlsa reminds me that South Australians formed their own National Trust organisation for the same reasons that moved their forerunners in the United Kingdom. Our natural heritage was in danger. Unsightly quarry development visible from the city threatened the hills face, while sub-division for farming threatened the Coorong. The Trust was set up to preserve both, and other places like them. It is driven, Chris adds, ‘by a philosophy that has the depth of vision to think about how our actions will affect what is left for future generations’. It should both conserve and educate, and plan for the long term. Its reserves should set the benchmark for how to maintain places of ‘tranquillity, beauty and biodiversity that are inherently worthwhile in their own right’. Carlsa agrees. We live in large urbanised landscapes, she reflects, and ‘access for very short to longer periods to our open spaces is very important to our

wellbeing’. For Carlsa and Chris, nature conservation and how to do it are core to the Trust’s existence and a major part of its social role. They heap special praise on the volunteers who make this work possible. Chris lists the range of skills and aptitudes they bring to the reserves: they identify plants and propagate them, they understand weed control and seed dispersal, they are proficient at carpentry and stonework, they know how to scrounge free or cheap materials, they make tea and sandwiches, and they work. ‘Most of all’, he says, ‘our volunteers bring with them big hearts and a love of our reserves with a willingness to make a selfless contribution, however large or small’. Carlsa agrees that the most important asset of volunteers, who come from all walks of life, is ‘a readiness to roll up their sleeves and get to work to achieve onground improvement’. ‘All conservation involves people’, Chris adds, ‘so I see all successful conservation being tied to building a sense of ownership of, and commitment to, the environment’. Our reserves are pleasant places to walk the dog, but they have social purposes beyond that.

the recent fires in Trust nature reserves, Chris remembers, started outside them, as the result of negligence or malice. Fire management on reserves, he goes on, is as much about protecting the reserves themselves as it is about protecting neighbouring properties. Carlsa points to the nation-wide, unplanned and apparently inevitable spread of housing toward places of natural vegetation. Chris wonders why we let it happen without thought to the consequences. In South Australia we are not required to be bush-fire ready, however much authorities encourage us to plan. ‘The onus’, Carlsa insists, ‘should be on protecting our own properties against fire by having bushfire readiness plans, fire pumps and hoses and installing sprinkler systems’.

Carlsa and Chris are well aware of public concern over the fire risks posed by the proximity of nature reserves to residential areas, but think this puts the problem around the wrong way. All of

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Carlsa directing business on a National Trust reserve. (Russ Sinclair gets morning tea.) Chris is a manager who thinks and acts. His arms were covered in scratches from blackberry thorns when this photograph was taken. Photos: Robert Dare

Meanwhile, ordinary and unremarkable things happen everday in our reserves, with remarkable results. Volunteers pull weeds, attack blackberries, mend fences, maintain walkways, and make tea. Viewed close up, these activities may look trivial. But they have fostered the natural regeneration of the Trust’s reserves after years of degradation. Pulling a weed rather than planting a tree may seem misplaced effort; but over time less has proved to be more. The following profiles of three National Trust reserves show just how.

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t its first meeting after the formation of the National Trust of South Australia in 1955, the Trust Council learned of the proposed gift to it of two parcels of land. One was from Hilda Roach. She planned to bequeath 44 hectares near Kersbrook in the Adelaide hills. The other, from Alison Ashby, was in Eden Hills for the reserve now known as Watiparinga, the subject of the next article. Hilda Roach was born in Burra in 1885. Her father John was a miller, and Hilda grew up in the open spaces of the mid-north. She became, by her own account, a shy and reserved young woman. Nor should be forgot little Hilda Roach, So quiet, simple, and meek, Who sits in the corner, working away, And listens while other folks speak.

fauna and flora on the site in the years after it assumed full control, the Trust learned just how valuable Hilda’s gift was. It contained one of the last remaining stands of long-leaved box in the Adelaide hills. Experts identified 225 plant species indigenous to the area, 32 of which are of conservation significance, including a species of orchid at Roachdale that is nationally endangered. They found 29 species of native birds, four of which were of conservation significance, a rare ant and a rare cricket. In 1961 the Bushwalkers Association lent a hand in the revegetation by planting a number of tree and shrub species not indigenous to the area. The practice was discontinued in 1962, and in the early 1970s the National Trust decided that in this and similar reserves only selfseeding plants of local origin would be favoured. Now, walking in the Trust’s woodland nature reserves is like stepping back to a time before European settlement.

Under siege from a host of These lines are from verse Hilda introduced pests, treasures such sent back to her father while as Roachdale need help. Trained she was on a European tour in staff plan their management, 1911 – Rome, Florence, Venice, and a host of volunteers do the Paris, London, the usual – where routine maintenance such as she marvelled at what she saw weeding and repairing fences and delighted in the torrent of and walkways. Across the state knowledge that flowed from her willing workers offer their labour tour guides. Her unpretentious at regular working bees, which verse reveals an acute observer always have room for more. Pests who would rather listen than are resourceful and relentless. talk, and walk or ride rather A precious remnant of Hares eat plants, and foxes than sit indoors. Her preferred and dogs prey on native fauna. place was outdoors with plants long-leaved box in the Deer break fences. Kangaroos and animals. In the 1920s she Adelaide hills, a gift to the abound. Vegetable and fungal ran a horse-riding school at the National Trust and the people of pests came in waves through family home, Widcombe, in South Australia, regenerates after Roachdale: first salvation jane, Collinswood. She called one of then broom and three-cornered her horses Burra. At his 21st a devastating bushfire. garlic, then bridal creeper, birthday party in 1931, Burra watsonia, gorse, boneseed, cape cut his own cake with a knife weed and blackberry, then rootstrapped to his hoof. In place rot fungus, soursob, buttercup of candles, the cake sported 21 and monadenia. Staff and volunteers plan and conduct carrots. Even the Governor was invited to the party. assaults on pests like military campaigns. Later, on her land near Kersbrook, Hilda also kept Fire is not an introduced pest, and has been part of pedigreed goats. (When some years later the National our ecology for millennia. But individual fire events can Trust published details of Hilda’s goats, a zealous local be devastating. In 2015 the Sampson Flat fire burned historian demanded a retraction, accusing the Trust through Roachdale. It took Trust staff and volunteers of distorting Australian history.) The Trust came into some time to realise the extent of the loss of vegetation the land in 1957, but on condition that Hilda continue and habitat. Half the large old trees had disappeared, to live in the homestead and graze her animals in the literally vapourised. Infrastructure for visitors had northern half of the land, which she did until her death gone – signs along the walking trail and the boardwalk in 1969. The southern half was left as natural woodland, across low-lying land, for example. Regeneration began also a condition of the bequest. The Trust assumed full at once, partly natural, partly human induced. Shoots responsibility for all the land in 1970. became visible on surviving trees within months; Hilda’s intention in leaving her land to the National Trust within a year the walking trail had been repaired and rewas that it be preserved for the benefit and enjoyment opened. The reserve is now thriving again after a year of the people of South Australia. In a series of surveys of of bountiful rain.

Roachdale Reserve, Kersbrook

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Hakea and native cherry among regrowth following the Sampson Flat fire. Hilda Roach and goat. On the walking trail at Roachdale. Volunteers weeding at Roachdale in 2008. Regrowth after the fire. Photos: NTSA and Robert Dare

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n 1957 Alison Ashby gave the National Trust 32 hectares of land that now form the Watiparinga reserve in Eden Hills. Born in 1901, she moved with her family to Blackwood the following year, where her father Edwin cleared scrub to make Wittunga farm. He transferred part of the land to Alison around her 21st birthday. Three decades later she gave the land to the Trust because she envisioned it ‘re-clothed in Australian trees and shrubs’.

local native plants recolonised the land. Seeds carried by wind and birds moved from inaccessible parts of the reserve into areas once heavily grazed. Control of animal pests such as rabbits and hares aided this regeneration.

The way to regeneration, the management committee now concluded, was through less intervention rather than more: they called it minimum disturbance. Implicit in this preference was the confinement of nonlocal native plants to the two sites planted by Alison Ashby in the north-west, and SGAP in the north-east. In future only these sites would display the diversity of plants found across Australia. Non-local native plants that escaped these areas would be treated as ‘environmental weeds’. Alison’s wish that A National Trust reserve that became a the woodlands be restored laboratory for how to promote natural came true, but at the price of her hope that plants in their regeneration with a minimum of natural state in distant places disturbance to the land. could be seen here.

That was a hard challenge. For a century successive owners, including the Ashbys, had grazed sheep and cattle on the land. They sowed introduced grasses such as rye and sub-terranean clover for the stock, and fertilised the land with superphophate. They cleared trees to open the land for grazing, using the gums as firewood and fence posts, and harvesting the wattle bark for the leather industry. They removed river red gums along the creek to increase the water supply for stock. Railway lines and tunnels built through the land were a further intrusion. Restoring the grassy woodlands to something like their former state would require ingenuity and stamina, and lots of patience.

Watiparinga, Eden Hills

The National Trust entered a management agreement with the Society for Growing Australian Plants (SGAP) to revegetate Watiparinga. A great deal of the Society’s time was spent trying to eradicate weeds, which impeded revegetation and posed a fire risk. The removal of the remaining livestock at the end of the 1960s resulted in a further explosion of weeds. SGAP withdrew in frustration. In 1973 the Trust formed a management committee to oversee revegetation. The committee began its job as we all might. When we establish a domestic garden, we get seeds, take cuttings and buy potted plants. We want to hurry the vegetation by planting and watering; we want visible results as soon as possible, and we assume we won’t get a flourising garden any other way. Initially the management committee took a similar approach to revegetating Watiparinga. A renewed woodland, they thought, was like a new garden at home: it needed the active and intensive intervention of willing volunteers, collecting seeds, taking cuttings, transplanting seedlings, digging holes, watering, and meanwhile constantly weeding, weeding, weeding – big labour for important results. These efforts came to little. Plants raised from cuttings and seeds died, and transplants didn’t take. Success, when it came, was unexpected. As volunteers grubbed woody weeds such as olives, hawthorns, blackberries and boneseed, and slashed and mowed introduced grasses,

Alison Ashby was a remarkable South Australian who loved distant places. She was a gifted botanical painter whose output of around 1500 paintings form the basis of the huge collection held by the Adelaide Botanic Garden. Scores of them were reproduced as popular wildflower postcards. The localities of the native plants she painted attest to her extraordinary energy: she visited hundreds of sites, places throughout Western Australia, as far north as Cairns and Kakadu, in Adelaide and the hills, in western Victoria and in the riverland around and to the north of Albury-Wodonga. She painted offshore in the Indian Ocean near Port Headland, and in areas of south-eastern Tasmania. She painted annually in the Australian Alps. She painted in the remote outback. She collected seeds and cuttings as she went. Mostly she drove alone to the places she loved in one of her succession of station wagons. From a childhood limited by shyness and a severe stutter, she led a very public life: she was a founding member of the National Trust, an active member of several gardening societies, and a lifelong Quaker. She worked on the regeneration of a degraded site near Victor Harbor well into her eighties, supporting herself on her two sticks. Watiparinga, Alison’s gift to South Australians, is a much-loved reserve that is a recreation ground and an educational tool in how to restore degraded sites. Its significance was recognised in its placement on the nowdiscontinued Register of the National Estate in 1996.

Sources Enid L. Robertson, Restoration of grassy woodland: Watiparinga Reserve Management Plan, National Trust of South Australia 2010; Australian Dictionary of Biography; Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria Biographical Notes.

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Train about to enter the tunnel in the reserve. Along the walking trail. Typical woodland. Watiparinga Reserve entrance sign. Native grass among eucalypts. Photos: Robert Dare

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ngelbrook is a compact reserve that contains upland stands of eucalypts, a creek and a wetland bog. It has a looped nature walk, and the bit of the Heysen Trail that runs through it was where the first 50-kilometre section of the trail was launched in 1978. It is home to over two-hundred native plants, a considerable number of which are of conservation significance, and over sixty bird species. It has lots of lowlife, including four different kinds of skink. Engelbrook is a good place to observe the National Trust evolving, over time, principles of nature reserve management and the methodology to implement them. The ideas and the practices emerged from the skills of dedicated conservationists, against the backdrop of three connected problems, weeds, the risk of fire and the proximity of urban development. The reserve was given to the Trust by nurseryman Carl Engel and his wife in 1964. The Trust’s 1972 audit of the work it had by then done on the property found that the weed control program had increased rather than reduced infestations because disturbed soil was re-invaded ‘very readily’. By 1975 neighbouring householders were voicing alarm over the fire hazard the weeds created – and Carl Engel was one of those expressing concern. A fire in 1983 triggered the creation of a bushfire reduction zone in an area closest to residents. Another fire in 1989 led to the establishment of the Friends of Engelbrook headed, as it still is, by the botanist Russell Sinclair.

avoided the mistakes noticed in the 1972 audit, aimed to encourage the natural regeneration of indigenous species. Limiting hand seeding to the most degraded areas, and allowing natural regeneration elsewhere, preserved an uncontrived look to the woodland. The reserve is an endless educational resource. Students who have examined the ecology of Engelbrook extend from primary school children to doctoral candidates at university. One primary schoolboy wrote to the Trust after a class excursion in 1997 to say he ‘had the best time at Engelbrook Reserve’. Another boy with a child’s capacity to notice the unexpected wrote ‘the thing I liked was the termite nest and the willow tree and the most lovely thing I liked was the view from the platform’. The reserve has hosted training sessions in horticulture for local council officers, and research projects of the CSIRO and the Black Hill Flora Centre. The canny Enid Robertson saw opportunity in the presence of the researchers. She encouraged one to pull up the odd weed while he was on site. ‘Every little helps’, she wrote.

Engelbrook Reserve, Bridgewater

The National Trust’s nature reserves are a resource for us all. They preserve important remnant populations of native plants; they are teaching and research sites; and they provide endless pleasure to people who want to wander in them without much thought to their importance beyond that. To keep them for future generations we must continue to be ingenious conservators. More than that, we must learn how to strike the delicate balance between Chantelle Somerville’s letter to the National Trust Working closely with the after a school visit to the reserve. their fragile, often volatile Trust, the Friends developed eco-systems and the expanding strategies that integrated hazard urban populations on their reduction with revegetation: boundaries. In the case of the getting rid of weeds lowered the risk of fire and three reserves surveyed here, the National Trust has favoured the regeneration of native species. They been applying the accumulated wisdom of people like drew on the pioneering work of the botanist Enid Carlsa Carter and Chris Grant to these tasks since it Robertson at Watiparinga. Her minimum disturbance began. approach, using careful hand-control methods that

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Chris Grant (standing) and Russ Sinclair with volunteers on a working bee, February 2017. Natural pond in Cox Creek, Engelbrook. Track through Engelbrook. Carlsa Carter and Russ Sinclair survey the aftermath of the fire, March 2009. Engelbrook burned, March 2009. Regeneration, August 2009. Photos: NTSA and Robert Dare

WOR K I NG B E E DAT E S

Join us in caring for our National Trust nature reserves. Volunteers are always welcome and participate in a range of tasks depending on capacity and experience. Engelbrook Reserve, Bridgewater 1st Saturday of the month, 1pm- 5pm 3rd Wednesday of the month, 9am-12noon Roachdale Reserve, Kersbrook 26 July, 28 October Watiparinga Reserve, Eden Hills 1st Saturday of the month, 9.30am-12.30pm May-November Lenger Reserve, Mannum Last Friday of the month, 10am-4pm H K Fry Reserve, Crafers 1st Tuesday of the month Nurrutti Reserve, Aldgate Last Tuesday of the month, 9.30am-12.30pm Malcolm Wicks Reserve, Forest Range Saturday 9.30am-12.30pm 9 September, 14 October, 11 November Lenger Reserve, Mannum Last Friday of the month, 10am-4pm To find out more contact Chris Grant Natural Heritage Manager 8202 9211 or email: volunteer@nationaltrustsa.org.au

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 I n the G arden

Jardin des Plantes

de Montpellier   MERILYN KUCHEL

Wherever I travel at home and abroad I make a point of visiting the local botanic garden. In September last I visited the south coast of France and stayed in the old city of Montpellier, a few minutes walk from the Jardin des Plantes.

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t is France’s oldest botanic garden, and the second oldest in the world. It was established in 1593 under the leadership of Pierre Richer de Belleval, professor of botany and anatomy at the University of Montpellier. Inspired by the Orto Botanico di Padova, the very first university botanical garden established in 1545 in Padua, it in turn became a model for the botanic garden in Paris established in 1626. As in Padua, the Montpellier garden was established and maintained by the faculty of medicine. It provided the resources for students studying plants used in traditional medicine, and aided the development of the scientific disciplines of botany, medicine and pharmacy. Largely destroyed in 1622 during the siege of Montpellier, the garden was restored in 1629. It underwent further remodeling and expansion in the nineteenth century, with an orangerie added in 1804, an arboretum landscaped in 1810, and an English garden established in 1859. We were disappointed to find that around half of the garden, including the Orangerie, were fenced off with signs indicating that these areas were awaiting renovation. But as we wandered along the paths, past architectural ruins and through shaded avenues of venerable trees, the garden began to weave its magic. It was very clear that this important historic garden is desperately under-resourced. The oldest tree in the garden is a Phillyrea latifolia in the family Oleacea, hence its common name of green olive tree. The deep fissures in the trunk of this 400-year-old tree have been used for centuries by visitors to deposit secrets, prayers and love letters. A mature male Ginkgo biloba, planted from a cutting in 1795, was grafted with female branches in 1830 and later produced the first ever seeds in France. The arboretum contains many other fine old trees. As Montpellier has a climate and topography very similar to that of Adelaide (as noted by Sir Samuel Davenport in his letters home during the 1840s), it is interesting to compare this garden and its collections with our own Garden of Health in the Adelaide Botanic Garden – a visit is highly recommended.

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Lines of Cupressus sempervirens (Italian cypress) line a path leading to the Orangerie beyond. Ruins of the original buildings add to the sense of antiquity. The 400 year old green olive (Phillyrea latifolia) is the oldest tree in the garden. Photos: Merilyn Kuchel


S pecial places

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Top two images: The elegant Georgian proportions of Martindale Hall (top) echo those of Dalemain (below, and lower right).

Dalemain Mansion and Historic Gardens, Cumbria, and Martindale Hall, South Australia Dalemain sits in a very big landscape of rolling parkland, lakes and rugged Cumbrian hills. When the first Edward Hasell set eyes on the Pele tower and mediaeval manor house on a rise in a beautiful valley he fell in love with it.

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alemain has been home to the Hasell family since 1679. They have a strong connection with the Cumbrian landscape. Yet the Hasells also have another, less expected connection with a second Georgian house on the other side of the world. Edmund Bowman from Adelaide was the grandson of the steward of Dalemain. In the 1870s he visited the home of his ancestors and the place where his grandfather had lived and fell wildly in love with Francis Hasell, daughter of the house. When she told him that she would never leave Dalemain, he vowed to build her a house of such magnificence that she would happily leave Cumberland. Bowman returned to Adelaide and created Martindale Hall, a gorgeous Georgian home modelled on Francis’ beloved Dalemain. It was all in vain.

Francis was not swayed, and a heartbroken Edmund returned home, later to marry fellow Australian Annie Cowle in 1884.

Martindale Hall is now owned by the South Australian government, which wishes to divest it. In November 2016 Jane Hasell-McCosh, her two daughters and her son visited the house to see where one of their ancestors might have lived. Hermione, Beatrice and George Hasell made the trip to Martindale Hall to celebrate the inaugural South Australian Festival of Marmalade, another connection between Dalemain and South Australia. The National Trust of South Australia organised the Australian Festival of Marmalade under the umbrella organisation ‘The Dalemain World’s Marmalade Awards and Festival’, based at Dalemain and founded by Jane Hasell-McCosh twelve years ago. The awards have gained a huge international following. The Australian Festival marked the first time a sister event had been launched in another country, a new and exciting chapter in the marmalade world. Jane Hasell-McCosh has always felt a strong connection to Australia, and hopes that the awards can champion the Australian citrus industry. She also hopes they will help to keep Martindale Hall in the hands of the Australian people, by supporting the National Trust, which shares her love for both history and marmalade.

Jane Hasell-McCosh and her family would like to celebrate this shared heritage by offering FREE ENTRY to Dalemain to any visitors from South Australia with an Australian passport. We look forward to seeing you over the season ahead. For more information about Dalemain, visit www.dalemain.com

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 E d u cation

New directions in heritage:

learning with 3D printing technology HELEN LAWRY

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Take one heritage organisation, a cutting edge software company and add a class of inner-city school children.

eritage is all around us, but often goes unrecognised. The stories about what makes a place special and irreplaceable may be lost if they are not passed on between generations. If we don’t learn how to understand and explain our heritage, how will we protect it? Is it possible to nurture an awareness of the importance of heritage in younger generations by helping them to develop a visual and verbal understanding of the heritage places around them? How can new technology help create a deeper appreciation of our heritage? With these questions in mind, we were seeking new ways to engage primary school students with heritage in their local area. We also wanted to extend beyond the traditional humanities curriculum area of history to include elements of the new design and technology curriculum. We found the perfect partner for our explorations in Makers Empire, a cutting edge South Australian company whose 3D design software enables children to design and print out 3D models. Working with Mandi Dimitriadis, the director of Learning Improvement for Makers Empire, we created a real-world design challenge. The pilot project worked with a primary school class to help them to identify and research local heritage places. They then went on to use these buildings as the inspiration for their own 3D models highlighting specific architectural and design features of the buildings they had explored.

Sturt Street Community School agreed to be our host school. Given the rich history of Adelaide’s south-west corner and the significant heritage buildings in the area, the school was a perfect fit. The Year 3/4 class also had some experience using Makers Empire design software. Their teacher, Graeme Gordon, welcomed the opportunity to be involved in a project that combined history and technology. The six-week program started with a walk around the local area. Led by the National Trust Education Presenter, the walk looked particularly at a church, a mosque, a hotel, an old chemist shop and some nineteenth-century row cottages. If possible, the children went into the buildings, where they heard stories about their history. The children made field notes and drew sketches. Every effort was made to avoid the children receiving history passively and to promote active engagement with the design and use of these buildings. The next sessions involved the children annotating photographs, learning vocabulary related to architecture, designing in two and three dimensions and developing design skills such as working to a design brief and giving and receiving feedback. The final session saw the children returning to the building that inspired their design. Here their portraits were shot while they held up their models. They were presented with a copy of their portraits as a keepsake. By creating a model in response to a building the children built a personal connection to one place. The connection was strengthened when the 3D model and the inspirational building met each other in the final portrait walk.

AB OV E

A student refers to his sketch to help him with his 3D design

The aim of the project was to foster an understanding and awareness of local heritage and a sense that it’s worth the trouble to probe, and look and wonder at the environment around you. In doing so, we managed to merge some disparate things: subjects such as technology and history and the work of nineteenth-century stonemasons with twenty-first-century children using digital design technology. With the success of the pilot project, the National Trust is working with Makers Empire to make the program resources available to teachers to run their own local heritage explorations. We can assist teachers to plan a project and provide background information on heritage places in their local areas. We can also offer teachers and their classes an introductory session on reading heritage buildings. As many schools are now using 3D printer technology, this learning program provides a unique way to combine the best design skills from the past with contemporary design technology.

View a short video of the project produced by Ash Starkey on the National Trust website at www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa/education. To find out more email: learning@nationaltrustsa.org.au.

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E d u cation

By creating a model in response to a building the children built a personal connection to one place. The connection was strengthened when the 3D model and the inspirational building ‘met’ each other in the final portrait walk.

PI C T UR E D

Left (top to bottom): Students with their 3D models inspired by St Lukes Church, the Adelaide Mosque, and the Prince Albert Hotel. Top: A busy classroom scene showing collaboration, individual focus and a mixture of traditional and contemporary learning tools. Centre: Using reference material, this student concentrates on his design. Bottom (left to right): Students using 3D design software and visual glossaries to help them annotate photographs.

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Beachport   RHONDA BURLEIGH

On a very wild and windy afternoon last October, the Beachport Old Wool and Grain Store Museum held an opening to showcase their new exhibit.

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ver three years, a team of museum volunteers researched and documented the 77-year history of this narrowgauge railway line from Mount Gambier to Beachport. Much of the information related to Beachport. Researchers Rhonda Burleigh and Kerry Oschar, both avid trainspotters, set off to visit the line’s railway stations. They looked at train museums, interviewed locals who grew up with the steam and diesel trains, and gathered information from many sources. Our museum’s marvellous collection of photographs has been incorporated into the panel work. Leah Hamilton of Beachport illustrated the information we gathered in the nine panels on display. The display is in an area of the museum that still has the railway track entering from the spur line built in 1879. Relics

from the train era are also on display. The original train smoke is still aloft, and two jetty trolleys display trunks and cases that were used by travellers on ships, steamers and the train. The jetty trade relied on the daily train, as did passengers going to and from Adelaide. Trains opened up the lower south-east to settlers, businesses and farmers. It was also the beginning of the township of Beachport. In the official opening in the museum, chairperson Lorraine Williams invited National Trust president Norman Etherington to ring the original Beachport railway station bell. Guest speakers included Frank Corigliano, who discussed the Beachport trains during the 1940s, and Yvonne Sargeant, who talked about her childhood memories of Beachport in the early 1950s. Peter Savage displayed some

of his railway collection just for the day and told us stories of his job as a S.A.R. employee at Kalangadoo. His surprise donation of the original Beachport railway station stamp was gratefully accepted by the museum, where it will be placed in the railway glass cabinet display. Mayor Peter Gandolfi, representing the Wattle Range Council, also spoke in support of the museum’s innovative work. After the formalities, visitors were invited to view the museum and enjoy the afternoon tea museum volunteers served in the old cinema. Visitors were able to use the new audio-visual touch screen unit contained in an original travelling trunk. Museum members were overwhelmed by the support of the public and would like to say thank you.

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Beachport station, 1910. The museum project team with National Trust president Norman Etherington. Graphic artist Leah Hamilton and researcher and writer Rhonda Burleigh are on his right, with Kerry Ocshar on his left. Beachport Old Wool and Grain Store Museum.

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F estival of M armalade

And the winners are…

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Competition was fierce in the inaugural Australian Marmalade Awards run by the National Trust of South Australia.

wards were presented at Beaumont House in November at a special one-day Festival of Marmalade. All entries were on display and winning entries in the artisan competition were available for tasting. Visitors enjoyed talks on growing citrus by ‘Mr Citrus’ Ian Tolley and demonstrations of cooking with marmalade. Our special guest for the awards judging and Festival was Jane HasellMcCosh of Dalemain Estate in Cumbria, UK, home of the World’s Original Marmalade Awards and Festival. ‘We spent a day sampling all the entries (my idea of heaven)’, she said, ‘and we were impressed by the standard and inventiveness of the competitors’. Judges included Stephen Downs, Head Cook from Beerenberg Farm, and representatives from the Country Women’s Association, so there was an immense amount of knowledge under one roof. ‘To me’, said Jane, ‘the judging day and the festival represented all the magic of marmalade. The winners of the homemade and the artisan awards are wonderful examples of great marmalades.’

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Martina Taeker, creator of the overall champion marmalade with her winning entry. Judges Jane Hasell-McCosh and Stephen Downs with overall champion Martina Taeker.

Winners Eleven entries achieved a gold medal award, representing the top five per cent from the more than 250 entries received from across Australia and even New Zealand. The overall champion marmalade came from the homemade competition in the category of marmalade with additions. It was made by Martina Taeker from Wynn Vale in the north-eastern suburbs of Adelaide and became the judges’ favourite because of a superb blending of flavours from a lime base. Other homemade entries to win gold medal awards were: • • • •

Janet MacDonald, for a Blood Orange marmalade (Australian citrus category) Susan Ortlepp for a Cumquat and Lemon marmalade (other citrus category) Georgina Sard for an Australian Orange marmalade (First timer’s category) D’Arcy Rabbitt using mixed citrus (Children’s category)

The artisan competition winner was also a South Australian entry, a number of gold medals were won by entries from Victoria, including several from Gippsland. Dulwitches of Linden Park in Adelaide won the champion artisan made award for their Australian Orange and Whisky marmalade. Larder and Spade from East Gippsland took three gold medals for their Poorman Orange and Seville Orange marmalades, and Tara Valley Foods from Rosedale took gold for their Cumquat Jelly and Seville Marmalade Jelly. After the enormous interest in the awards in 2016, the competition will take place again this year. A special launch event for the 2017 Australian Marmalade Awards will be held at Ayers House on Sunday 30 May, featuring discussions and demonstrations of marmalade making, sharing of recipes and Devonshire Teas (see Events section for details). Entries for the competition will close at the end of August. Visit www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa/marmalade for more details.

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 M embership

By becoming a member of the National Trust you will enjoy a range of discounts and other benefits, including free entry to many National Trust properties around the world, as well as supporting our ongoing work to protect and promote heritage. MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM

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H eritage F estival

NATIONAL TRUST

18 April – 31 May The Australian Heritage Festival is a national celebration of our heritage, a chance to discover and explore our built, natural and cultural heritage. This year’s program includes talks, guided walks, family events, an exclusive day trip, behind the walls tours, food tastings and many other ways to experience our heritage!

Looking up at Ayers House

The painted decoration at Ayers House is considered to be the finest in Australia. Created for Henry Ayers by eminent Scottish decorative artist Charles Gow in the 1870s, some of these works were lost for many years. Heritage conservation architect Dr Donald Ellsmore will introduce these magnificent works and explain their restoration. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Tues 18 April, 5.30-7.30pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OTKR

180th Birthday Celebration: Naming of Adelaide’s First Streets & Squares

The Best of Town and Country

Experience the best of colonial South Australia on an exclusive guided day excursion to two of our most delightful heritage places. Start with a guided tour at Ayers House, one of the city’s grandest mansions, then journey by coach to the beautiful house and gardens of the historic pastoral property, Anlaby Station near Kapunda. Coach, morning tea and a formal lunch included. WHEN AND WHERE:

Join us in raising a toast to those immortalised in the street names of Adelaide on this day in 1837. Enjoy a passing parade of images and engaging talks from author Dr Jeff Nicholas and descendants of those memorialised in our city’s street names. Includes wine, nibbles and door prizes. WHEN AND WHERE:

Tues 23 May, 5.30pm-8.30pm SAMHRI Building, North Terrace Adult: $30, Concession: $25, NT Member: $20 CONTACT:

National Trust of South Australia 8202 9200 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OUIT

Sun 23 April & Tues 2 May, 8.45am-5.30pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $110, NT Member: $100 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OUIP

FIND ALL THE EVENTS AND BOOK AT:

www.nationaltrust.org.au/ahf/sa/

Australian Heritage Festival is presented by the National Trust of South Australia with support from the Australian Government’s National Trusts Partnership Program.

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Family Fun ( L- R )

The Fabulous Gaze, Victoriana: Old Fashioned Day of Play, Ayers House After Dark, and Ayers House Family OpenDay to the right.

Family Fun The Fabulous Gaze: Ayers House Family Ceiling Tour

Victoriana: Old Fashioned Day of Play

WHEN AND WHERE:

WHEN AND WHERE:

Saturday 22 April, 10am-11:30am and 1pm-2:30pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Child: $5.00

Sun 30 April, 11am-4pm Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Road, Beaumont Adult: $5, Child: $2.00

All ceilings aren’t the same. At Ayers House we have low and high ones and ones painted with gold! Explore our ceilings and find out what they tell us about power and purpose. Play CeilingMatch Mystery then take inspiration from their ornate decoration to design your own stencilling. Ages 6+. Bookings essential.

CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

Take the children back to the Victorian era for a day of old fashioned games and play! Enjoy stories, music and dressups, feed baby farm animals and try some parlour and outdoor games from long ago. Refreshments available and Devonshire teas will be served on the veranda of Beaumont House. No bookings required.

CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum

8223 1234

Ayers House Family Open Day

Passed by Ayers House a thousand times? Seize this chance to come inside! Explore the nooks and crannies of Adelaide’s finest Victorian era mansion. Learn what life was like in the 19th century, discover secret treasures and dress up in Victorian garb. Part of the 2017 Dream Big Festival. No bookings required. WHEN AND WHERE:

Sat 20 & Sun 21 May, 10am -3.30pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace By donation CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OUIR

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Glenside Hospital

See the beautiful heritage buildings of the former Glenside Hospital site. Local historian David Buob will take you on a guided walking tour of these significant buildings, including The Elms where the movie Shine was filmed. Spaces limited! Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Sat 6 & 20 May, 11am & 1pm Meet at the steps of the main clocktower building, Glenside Hospital, 226 Fullarton Road, Glenside Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJGE

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On The Dark Side Z Ward: Behind the Walls

Go behind the walls of the notorious Z Ward at the former Glenside Mental Hospital. For almost 90 years it was home to those classified as “criminally insane” on the overlapping edges of criminality and mental illness. Explore the architecture and social history of this remarkable building. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Sun 7 May & Sun 28 May, 2pm Z Ward, Enter via 63 Conyngham Street, Glenside Adult: $15, Concession: $12, NT Member: $10, Child: $8 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJDM

Ayers House After Dark

Step back in time to 1876 and join Butler (Mr Wilkins), Housekeeper (Mrs Galvin) and Cook (Mrs Jenkins) on this special visit to Ayers House. The Master and Lady are out for the evening and staff are ready to show you through as they prepare for an upcoming State Dinner. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Fri 12 & Fri 26 May, 6.30pm-7.30pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $20, Concession: $18, Child: $12, NT Member: $16, Family: $60 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/MAGF


H eritage F estival

Tours, walks and tastings ( L- R )

Old Adelaide Treasury and Tunnel tours, olive oil and marmalade making and tastings, garden tour at Beaumont House, Hahndorf to Beaumont Pioneer Women’s Walk and Adelaide Heritage Walks.

Heritage Garden Tour at Beaumont House Old Adelaide Treasury and Tunnel Tour

Explore the old Adelaide Treasury, one of Adelaide’s oldest and most significant historical sites.. It was here that gold from the eastern states was stored to be smelted into the Adelaide Pound. The tour includes the former Government Cabinet Room, underground tunnel areas and so much more! Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Sun 30 April & Sun 28 May, 11am and 1pm Adina Treasury Hotel, 2 Flinders Street Adult: $10, Concession: $8, NT Member: $7.50, Child: $7, Family: $30 CONTACT:

Join us for a guided tour of one of Adelaide’s finest heritage gardens in its autumn glory. As featured in ABC-TV’s Gardening Australia, this Mediterranean garden dates back more than 160 years. One hour tour and a delicious Devonshire Tea. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Fri 5 May, tours at 10am, 11am and 12 noon Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Road, Beaumont Adult: $15, Concession: $12, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

National Trust of South Australia 8202 9200 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OTMS

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au www.trybooking.com/NSDP

The Pioneer Women’s Walk from Hahndorf to Beaumont commemorates the journeys first made by German pioneer women more than 175 years ago. The walk follows the trail they used to carry their produce to market in Adelaide in the early days of South Australia. The walk ends at historic Beaumont House, where there will be live music, food and refreshments in the beautiful grounds. WHEN AND WHERE:

Sunday 7 May, 8am -4.30pm Walk: $15 per person, children under 16 free. Bus: additional $10 per person CONTACT

0451 030 357, 0417 802 685 hahndorfnationaltrust@gmail.com

The Adelaide Parklands and City layout are an exceptional example of nineteenth century urban design. This tour starts from Light Square, named for Colonel William Light, who planned our city surrounded by parks. Discover the enduring legacy of his vision for Adelaide, recognised on the National Heritage List. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Wed 3 and Thurs 18 May, 2pm Tour commences from Colonel Light’s Monument, Light Square Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJEJ

Edible heritage

BOOK NOW:

Pioneer Women’s Trail Walk: Hahndorf to Beaumont House

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Adelaide Parklands and City Layout

Heritage Harvest: Olive Oil at Beaumont House

Join us amongst the historic olive groves planted by Sir Samuel Davenport in the 1860s for a harvest, pickling and tasting day. Davenport lived at Beaumont House for 50 years and was a pioneer of South Australia’s olive industry. . WHEN AND WHERE:

Sun 21 May, 11am-4pm Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Road, Beaumont Adult: $10, Concession: $8, NT Member: $7, Child: Free CONTACT:

National Trust of South Australia 8202 9200 events@nationaltrustsa.org.au

Preserving Preserves: Australian Marmalade Awards

Making and sharing recipes is one of the key ways we celebrate and enjoy our cultural heritage. Join us for an afternoon of discussion and tasting of South Australia’s favourite preserves (and full Devonshire tea) as we launch the 2017 Australian Marmalade Awards. Bring your favourite marmalade recipe to share! WHEN AND WHERE:

Sun 28 May, 1pm-4pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OPKM

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Adelaide Heritage Walks: Cold Case, Somerton Man Mystery

Adelaide Heritage Walks: East Terrace Promenade

WHEN AND WHERE:

WHEN AND WHERE:

Wed 26 April & Tues 16 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10

Sun 14 & Thurs 25 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10

CONTACT:

CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

BOOK NOW:

BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJFQ

www.trybooking.com/KJGI

In December 1948, a dead man was found on Somerton Beach, southwest of the city. It remains a great unsolved mystery. This tour explores the evidence from the Somerton Man’s final day around the city and allows you to draw your own conclusions about Adelaide’s famous cold case. Bookings essential.

Adelaide Heritage Walks: City of Music

From the beautiful pipe organ in the Adelaide Town Hall, to the 1970s rock legends that graced the stage of the Tivoli Hotel, join us for a guided tour of the history of live music and performance in the City of Adelaide. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Thurs 20 April & Tues 23 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJEY

East Terrance was home to some of the city’s most prosperous residents in the late nineteenth century who used their wealth to build some remarkably beautiful homes. Join a leisurely walk down this promenade and enjoy the preserved legacy of Adelaide’s most gracious decades. Bookings essential.

Adelaide Heritage Walks: East End Discovery

This tour introduces the unique cultural and historical features of Adelaide’s East End, famous for its markets, food, fashion, hotels, cafes and restaurants. Discover some of the hidden treasures and heritage icons on this leisurely tour of one of the city’s most favourite precincts. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Tues 9 and Sat 27 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Adelaide Heritage Walks: City of Pubs

Adelaide has often been described as a city of churches. In reality, the city has always had as many places to buy alcohol as places of worship. This tour will highlight some the best hotels that remain part of the social fabric and architectural heritage of the city. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Fri 28 April & Sat 6 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/NSET

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Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJET

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Henry Ayers’ Adelaide

Explore Victorian-era Adelaide through one of its most prominent public figures, Sir Henry Ayers. From the stately luxury of Ayers House to the seat of nineteenth century political power at Parliament House, Henry’s life is interwoven with the political and economic development of the state we know today. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Wed 19 April & Sat 13 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/OUJU


H eritage F estival

Adelaide Heritage Walks ( L- R )

Cold Case, Somerton Man Mystery, East Terrace Discovery, Henry Ayers’ Adelaide, Heritage Reborn, Hidden Stories, Small Details; In the Steps of Stella Bowen.

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Heritage Reborn

This tour explores sites around the city where heritage places have been carefully adapted to new purposes with an often funky twist. Discover some remarkable transformations of heritage buildings including a former bank, a rogue department store and a building once used by the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Tues 25 April & Fri 19 May, 2pm Electra House, 131-139 King William Street Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJFY

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Hidden Stories, Small Details

Sometimes the smallest details offer clues to the most engaging stories from the past. Discover some of the intriguing and often hidden elements found among the city’s heritage buildings on this tour. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Fri 21 April & Tues 30 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/NSEC

Adelaide Heritage Walks: In the Steps of Stella Bowen

Stella Bowen is a celebrated Australian landscape and portrait painter. Born in Adelaide in 1893, she left the city to pursue her passion for painting, later becoming one of Australia’s first female war artists. Take this tour around many landmark heritage sites and experience Adelaide through Stella’s eyes. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Thurs 4 & Mon 15 May, 2pm Tour commences from northwest corner of Wellington Square, North Adelaide Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJEO

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Adelaide Heritage Walks ( L- R )

Market to Market, North Terrace, Cultural Boulevard and Pennington Terrace, Colonial Gems and Southwest Corner (page opposite).

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Market to Market

This tour will explore past and present market sites in the City of Adelaide. Discover the East End Markets, a once important garden market for the city’s East End population, before finishing at the iconic Adelaide Central Markets, one of South Australia’s leading tourist attractions. Bookings essential.

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Outdoor Art Highlights

From the first controversial installation of public artwork in Adelaide in 1892 to those that caused people to ask ‘what is art?’ more than 100 years later, this tour visits the monuments, murals and sculptures gracing our city spaces and recalls the often lively debates about their merits. Bookings essential.

WHEN AND WHERE:

WHEN AND WHERE:

Thurs 27 April & Wed 10 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10

Wed 24 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10

CONTACT:

CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au

BOOK NOW:

BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJGH

www.trybooking.com/KJFK

Adelaide Heritage Walks: North Terrace, Cultural Boulevard

Explore Adelaide’s political, cultural and educational institutions, as well as grand residences, established along this classic nineteenth century boulevard. Start from Ayers House, Adelaide’s finest Victorian-era mansion and end with the city’s first church. Find out about the people behind and inside our most famous architectural heritage. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Mon 1 & Wed 17 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJEF

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Adelaide Heritage Walks: Pennington Terrace, Colonial Gems

Starting from the landmark St Peter’s Cathedral, enjoy a stroll along this beautiful North Adelaide street to discover the architectural gems of Pennington Terrace and nearby Montefiore Hill. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Mon 29 May, 2pm Tour commences from St Peter’s Cathedral, 27 King William Road Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJFS

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Sacred Glass

Adelaide’s collection of stained glass windows is among the most diverse and interesting in the country. From the precious stained glass that arrived with the first settlers in 1836, to the Stock Exchange’s Federation windows, this trail reveals the meaning behind some of the city’s most sacred glass. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Thurs 11 May, 2pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJEN


B ranch E vents

Local Branch Events National Trust of South Australia and History Trust of South Australia present

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Southwest Corner

Discover what life was like in the nineteenth century in this little known corner of the city. Get to know the people, businesses and organisations that created this fascinating neighbourhood. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Mon 24 April and Sun 7 May, 2pm Tour commences from Queen Victoria statue, Victoria Square Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJGA

Adelaide Heritage Walks: Victoria Square

Victoria Square sits at the heart of Colonel William Light’s plan for the city of Adelaide. Always a contested site, it has been at the centre of the city’s cultural and political life. This tour explores the people, buildings and events of Victoria Square and its evolution. Bookings essential. WHEN AND WHERE:

Mon 8 & Wed 31 May, 2pm Tour commences from Queen Victoria statue, Victoria Square Adult: $15, Concession: $12, Child: $8, Family: $40, NT Member: $10 CONTACT:

Ayers House Museum 8223 1234 bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au BOOK NOW:

www.trybooking.com/KJGG

1837 and All That: Panel Discussion. Mr South Australia, Keith Conlon, hosts a panel discussion exploring the early days of South Australia. Keith will be joined by special guests for this lively conversation about the foundation years of the State. Monday 22 May Time: 6-7.30pm Place: Ayers House, 288 North Terrace, Adelaide. Cost: Free bookings essential www.eventbrite.com.au/e/1837-and-allthat-panel-discussion-tickets-32033232260 Enquiries: (08) 8203 9888 email: bburton@history.sa.gov.au

Adelaide Metropolitan Branch 180th Anniversary of William Light’s District of Adelaide Survey. Celebrate the 180th anniversary of the commencement of William Light’s remarkable District of Adelaide Survey. Tuesday 2 May Place: corner North and West Terraces, Adelaide. Cost: Free. Bookings essential. Children’s Adventure Story Workshop: William Light’s Voyage to School. Explore the world with William Light on his first adventure, sailing around the globe to school when he was six: seeing tea loaded in China, the volcano Krakatoa, and crossing the Equator. This Show & Tell workshop for children discovers William’s multi-lingual story (English, Malay, Chinese, French, Spanish, and Greek). Saturday 6 May, 10.30am-11.30am Place: Adelaide South West Community Centre, 171 Sturt Street, Adelaide. Cost: Free. Bookings essential. Walter Torode’s Dardanelles/Gallipoli Memorial and WWI Wattle League Ambulances Discover connections between Walter C Torode’s 1915 Australasian Soldiers’ Dardanelles Cenotaph and Gallipoli Memorial Wattle Grove, Keswick Military Hospital, and WWI Ambulances sent to the Western Front, and plans for reuniting Torode’s centrepiece Dardanelles Cenotaph (South Terrace, Adelaide Park Lands) with its Gallipoli Memorial Grove (Sir Lewis Cohen Avenue). Saturday 6 May, 1.45 - 2.45pm Place: Adelaide South West Community Centre, 171 Sturt St, (followed by site visit, Dardanelles Cenotaph, South Tce) Adelaide. Cost: Free. Bookings essential. William Light: Son of Kedah. Visit William Light’s birthplace, Kuala Kedah, the Kedah river and fort and explore its history on this virtual tour. The Sultanate of Kedah (Queda) in northwestern Malaysia dates back to 1136, and in the 1770s sent the trade envoy to Aceh (Sumatra) that brought William’s father Francis Light to Queda. Saturday 6 May, 12.15 - 1.15pm Place: Adelaide South West Community Centre, 171 Sturt Street, Adelaide. Cost: Free. Bookings essential. All Adelaide Metropolitan Branch event enquiries: Kelly Henderson 0432 989 676, email:khenderson002@gmail.com

Ardrossan Museum A horse drawn vehicle popular in the late 18th & early 19th centuries and made locally at Maitland is being restored. It will be on display in the former Clarence H Smith Plough Factory (Ardrossan Museum) along with the SA icon the stump jump plough, several other modes of transport, a whale jaw from one of the whales stranded in 2014 and much more. 2, 4, 9, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, 25 May Place: 16 Fifth Street, Ardrossan. Contact: (08) 88373939 or (08) 88374142, email: atpink@bigpond.com

Barmera Branch Local History Display. A comprehensive display of exhibits, comprising local history, irrigation, internment camps, information and artefacts. Light afternoon tea included. Every Saturday in May, 1 - 4pm Place: Cobdogla Steam & Irrigation Museum, Trussell Terrace, Cobdogla. Cost: $5 per person. Transport Yourself Back inTime at the Barmera Hotel. Informative display of Barmera history showing local identities, locations and historical objects. Every day in May during hotel hours. Place: Barmera Hotel, Barwell Ave, Barmera. Cost: Free. All Barmera Branch enquiries: Kent Barney 0428 843 240

Burra Branch Opening of Warnes’ Memorial The unveiling of a memorial seat and table next to Market Square Museum, dedicated to the late Les Warnes, a long-time member and benefactor of the Burra Branch. Thursday 25 May, 2 - 4pm Place: Market Square Museum, Market Square, Burra. Cost: Free. Group bookings essential. Contact: Geraldine Smedley (08) 8892 2583, email: rastus39@westnet.com.au

Coromandel Valley and Districts Branch ‘See the Places, Hear the Stories’ Bus Tour Unlock the community’s stories on this interactive tour where you will discover aspects not commonly known and fascinating stories of people who shaped the community. Sunday 2 April, Wednesday 12 April and Sunday 7 May, 9.30am - 4pm Place: departing from Gamble Cottage, Dorham Road, Blackwood. Cost: $30 per person (includes morning tea and lunch) Bookings essential. ‘Walk the Trails, Hear the Tales’ Guided Walk (Northern Valley) a great experience for the senses while you encounter history. Tuesday 4 April and Sunday 30 April, 1pm-4pm Place: Walk begins and ends at Frank Smith Park Magarey Road, Coromandel Valley. Cost: $10 per person (afternoon tea included). Bookings essential. ‘Walk the Trails, Hear the Tales’ Guided Walk (Southern Valley) - take a pleasant walk along the trails and hear the tales exploring local history first hand. H E R I TAG E L I V I NG

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Wednesday 5 April and 3 May, 1pm - 4pm Place: Walk begins and ends at Coromandel Community Centre Car Park, 442b Main Road, Coromandel Valley. Cost: $10 per person (afternoon tea included). Bookings essential. Gardening & Heritage Meet – Open Garden weekend The garden of Open Garden Scheme participants Chris and Barry Long, which adjoins the Winns Bakehouse Museum, will be open to the public. Tea, scones, wine, produce and plants will be available, with live music. Proceeds will benefit the Hills Circle of Friends in support of refugees. Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 April, 10am - 4.30pm Place: Winns Road and adjoining garden,. Cost: Entry to garden $8 per person, concession $6, under 18 free. Bakehouse Museum and Watchman House entry free. Gamble Cottage A double delight to catch a glimpse of early life. Afternoon Tea available. Sunday 16 April and 21 May, 1pm – 4pm Place:Corner Dorham Road & Main Road, Blackwood. Winns Bakehouse Museum A window to the past and stories to explore. Sunday 16 April and 21 May, 1pm – 4pm Place: Winns Road near the ford – parking available at Watchman House. ‘Spotlight on History’ evening A special event with Keith Conlon taking a fresh look at heritage matters and telling some stories in his usual entertaining way, and Anthony Presgrave talking about “Passing Through” with the early roadways and travel between Adelaide and Goolwa. Wednesday 10 May, 7.30 pm Place: Blackwood Uniting Church Hall, Coromandel Parade, Blackwood. Cost: $5 per person includes supper. All Coromandel Valley and Districts Branch enquiries or bookings: Coromandel Valley & Districts National Trust Branch Liaison Officer 0474 066 776, email:nationaltrustcoro@bigpond.com

Gawler Branch Gawler Migration Book Public Pre-Release: Meet the author Public pre-release of the Gawler migration book This’ll Do with stories of the Eastern European migrants of 1948, and the UK migrants of 1956. Copies of the book will be available for sale. Every Wednesday in May, 1pm - 4pm Place: Gawler National Trust Museum, 59 Murray Street, Gawler. Cost: Adult $3, Concession $2.50, Child $1.50. Contact: Graham Tucker (08) 8523 1082, email: tucktwo@adam.com.au

Hahndorf Branch Imagine the Past: Schmidt-Rodert Farm & Bake Oven Explore the only surviving complex of farmyard buildings in the Hahndorf Main Street. Imagine the life of the early Prussian settlers at this humble conservation site dating from 1840. Taste

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and buy traditional Kuchen and bread baked in the 19th century corbelled oven fired up for this family open day. Sunday 21 May, 11am - 3pm Place: Schmidt- Rodert Farm Complex, 20 Main Street, Hahndorf Cost: By donation. Contact: Lyndell Davidge 0417 802 685, email:hahndorfnationaltrust@gmail.com

Jamestown Branch Jamestown National Trust Museum Visit the themed rooms including schools, churches, sport, medicine, home activities, farming and the railway story room. Learn the origins of the South Australian Farmers Union, check out the Both Iron Lung and JJ Christie paintings. Sunday 21 & 28 May, 2pm - 5pm Place: Jamestown National Trust Museum, Irvine Street, Jamestown. Cost: Adult $5, Child $1. Contact: Mervyn Robinson (08) 8664 1838, email: mervynnaileen@bigpond.com.au

Moonta Branch Discover Moonta’s History Step back in time as you explore the Moonta Mines Museum. A fascinating collection which details the discovery of copper, the heady days of the mining boom, and Cornish settlement in Moonta. Comprehensive displays over 13 rooms covering many aspects of the pioneering days in the region. Every day in May, 1pm - 4pm Place: Moonta Mines Museum, 150 Verran Terrace, Moonta Mines. Cost: Adult $8, Child $4. Group bookings by appointment. Explore Your Connections Visit the School of Mines in Moonta, the home of the Family History and Resource Centre. There are static displays on view, with a comprehensive medical and apothecary collection. There are also researchers available to assist with local family history and a vast array of research material. Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday, throughout May, 1pm - 4pm Place: School of Mines, Ellen Street, Moonta. Cost: $1 per person. Step Back in Time Wander through time as you explore the timeless Miner’s Cottage at Moonta Mines. Furnished lovingly in the style of the late 1800s, at the height of the mining boom in Moonta and surrounds. The stunning garden is testament to the care and dedication of our wonderful volunteers. Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday, throughout May, 1.30pm - 4pm Place: Miner’s Cottage, Verco Street, Moonta Mines. Cost: Adult $4, Child $2. Group bookings by appointment. Tour the State Heritage Area by Train Ride the legendary Moonta Mines Railway. An exceptional tour through the Moonta Mines State Heritage Area. A fully guided 50-minute tour which covers the discovery of copper in the area and the settlement by Cornish miners. An entertaining experience for the whole family.

Throughout May, Wednesday 2pm, weekends 1pm, 2pm and 3pm Place: Moonta Mines Railway, Verran Terrace, Moonta Mines. Cost: Adult $8, Child $4. Group bookings by appointment. Visit the Moonta Mines Old-Fashioned Sweet Shop Visit the Moonta Mines precinct and all of the wonderful attractions and pop across the road to the old fashioned sweet shop. Originally the Moonta Mines Post Office, the tiny building is filled with charm and character, as well as delicious sweets and South Australian soft drinks. Every day in May, 10am - 4pm Place: Moonta Mines Sweet Shop, Verran Terrace, Moonta Mines Cost: Free. Group bookings by appointment. All Moonta Branch enquiries: Linda Thatcher (08) 8825 1891, email: info@moontatourism.org.au

Mount Barker Branch Meeting of National Trust and local historical societies, hosted by Forest Range/Lenswood History Group Tuesday 4 April, 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Place: Uniting Church, 13 Mann Street, Mt Barker. Speaker: Mark Randell Topic: “Early Flour Milling in South Australia”. Mark is a descendant of W.B. Randell who was the first miller for the South Australia Company. Tuesday 2 May, 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Place: Uniting Church, 13 Mann Street, Mt Barker. All Mount Barker Branch Enquiries: Triss Wales, Secretary (08) 8389 9281 email:wales.tony@gmail.com

Mount Gambier Branch Mount Gambier through the Lens Mount Gambier History Group, in collaboration with the Les Hill Collection - City of Mount Gambier; and the National Trust present an historic photographic exhibition, featuring a ‘Lakes’ collection and a display about local photographers and their equipment. School groups particularly welcome. Friday 26 - 31 May, 10am - 4pm Place: City Hall, Watson Terrace, Mount Gambier. Cost: By donation. Contact: Lynn Lowe 0438 370 298, email: lowelk@dodo.com.au

Mt Lofty Branch Sculpture for Interiors and Gardens II - in conjunction with Rotary Club of Stirling Friday 28 April to Sunday 7 May, every day, 11am - 5pm Cost: Free. Open Day as part Sculpture for Interiors and Gardens II Sunday 30 April, 12 noon - 4pm Cost: Free with refreshments available for purchase. Open Day with autumn colours and plant sale Sunday 28 May, 1pm - 4pm Cost: $5 entry, children under 14 free with


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Cornish tea available. All Mount Lofty Branch Enquiries: 0408 081 124, email: enquiries@stangatehouse.org.au

Penola Branch 25 Years of Southern Heritage Singers Performances 25 years of performances by local choir, Southern Heritage Singers will be on display in the John Riddoch Centre. The choir was created by Penola’s Pamela Walker, OAM, and has experienced numerous successes in local, state and interstate performances and with the Co-Opera Company of South Australia. Every day in May, Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm, weekends 10am - 4pm Place: John Riddoch Centre, 27 Arthur St, Penola Cost: By donation Enquiries: Barbara Smith 0407 326 000 Tombstones and Tales. Discover how the lives led by some early citizens impacted on the town of Penola. Saturday 20 May, 2pm - 3.30pm Place: Penola South Cemetery, Penola. Cost: $5 per person. Bookings essential. Enquiries: Christine Dohnt 0427 372 687, email: cmdohnt@hotmail.com

Port of Adelaide Branch Port Adelaide Heritage Poster Wall: a Story to Tell Display of posters illustrating advocacy campaigns and events from the 10 year history of the Port of Adelaide Branch of the National Trust. Every day in May, 10am - 4pm Forum with speakers Saturday 20 May Time: 3 - 4pm Cost: Free group bookings essential for afternoon tea on Sat 20 May Place: Sarah’s Sister’s Sustainable Café, 117 Semaphore Rd, Semaphore All Port of Adelaide Branch Enquiries: Pat Netschitowsky 0402 008 589, email: pat@pnetschi.com

Renmark Branch Olivewood: Women of the River Country This exhibition tells the stories of 19 unique women from three states with powerful connections to the river. Captain Pearl Wallace, Indigenous singer/songwriter Ruby Hunter and pioneer/writer Ella Chaffey all have links to Renmark. Also tributes to ten other Riverland women. Exhibition closes 19 June. Throughout May, Thursday to Monday 10am - 4pm. Tuesday & Wednesday by appointment. Place: Olivewood Museum, Twentyfirst Street, Renmark. Cost: Adult $7, Concession $5, Child $3, Family $15, National Trust member free. Group bookings essential. Contact: Heather Everingham, (08) 8595 5420 Email: historylink@tpg.com.au

Tea Tree Gully Branch Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum Chocolate Coated History A chocolate adventure like no other. This display is a must see with every room

depicting all things chocolate. See the historical timeline, weird and wonderful facts and enjoy many fun activities. Excite all your senses and enjoy the chocolate buffet. Unique gifts available. Wednesday 17 - 21 May, 10am - 2pm Place: Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum, 3 Perseverance Road, Tea Tree Gully. Cost: Adult $5, Concession $4, Children Free. Contact: Gill Starks (08) 8251 3499, email: starksg@adam.com.au

Wallaroo Branch ‘Shackleton- Escape from Antarctica’ exhibition The enthralling story of Shackleton’s 19141917 expedition to Antarctica is direct from Sydney’s Australia National Maritime Museum. This display thrilled thousands during its run at Sydney’s Maritime Museum in 2016. Showing until Sunday 30 April, 10am – 4pm daily Cost: Adults $6, Child $3, no concessions. Copper to Gold A special display highlighting our Welsh and Cornish heritage, celebrating the copper smelting history of the Wallaroo Copper Smelters 1861-1923. Features rare photographs and items once used at the Wallaroo Smelters, which employed over 1000 workers during its heyday. Every day in May, 10am - 4pm Place: Wallaroo Heritage and Nautical Museum, Jetty Rd, Wallaroo. Cost: Adult $6, Child $3. Group bookings by appointment. Wallaroo Historical Walks and Ghost Tour Discover the town’s unique Welsh heritage buildings, sites and its haunted tales on a 2-hour walking tour. You may see the ghost of Captain Burge who accidentally drowned at the foot of the jetty over 100 years ago! Thursday 18 - 21 May, 2pm - 4pm Place: Wallaroo Heritage & Nautical Museum, Jetty Rd, Wallaroo. Cost: Adult $6, Child $3. All Wallaroo Branch enquiries: Colin Boase (08) 8823 3015, email: whmn@adam.com.au

Willunga Branch Willunga History Since 1839 The Courthouse Museum enables visitors to enter the past, with material on law and order, life in the Township, education and family history since 1839. The Slate Museum tells the story of Willunga slate from 1840. Our volunteers will be pleased to provide visitors with information and insights. Tuesday 2, Saturday 13 & 27, Sunday 14 & 28 May, 1pm - 4pm Place: Willunga Courthouse Museum, 61 High St, Willunga Cost: By donation. Group bookings essential. Ghosts of Willunga Past. Join us at Willunga’s St Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery to find out more about Willunga’s slate gravestones, and discover the characters and conflicts of Willunga’s fascinating past. Saturday 6 May, 2pm - 4pm Place: St Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery, Aldinga Road, off Victor Harbor Road,

Willunga Cost: By donation. Group bookings essential. Willunga Slate Carvings: Solving the Mysteries. Come back in time to 19th century Willunga when local slate carvers created today’s rich legacy of slate carvings - gravestones, mantelpieces and decorative arts. Learn about society, religion, and the slate carvers themselves. Find out about mishaps, a German influence, and how we identify unsigned gravestones. Saturday 6 May, 11am - 12.30pm Place: Show Hall, 7 Main Rd, Willunga Cost: By donation. Group bookings essential. Willunga Slate: How it was Quarried, How it was Worked. Willunga slate, discovered in 1840, has been quarried locally ever since. Combine a visit to the National Trust’s Slate Museum with a guided tour of an historic slate quarry (weather permitting). Sunday 7 May, 1.30pm at Museum, 2.30 - 4pm at Slate Quarry Place: Willunga Slate Museum, 61 High Street, Willunga. Cost: Adult $10. All Willunga Branch Enquiries: Brian McMillan (08) 8556 2195, email:willunganationaltrust@gmail.com Place: Willunga Courthouse Museum, 61 High St, Willunga Cost: By donation group bookings essential Ghosts of Willunga Past. Join National Trust members at Willunga’s St Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery. Find out more about Willunga’s slate gravestones, and discover the characters and conflicts of Willunga’s fascinating past. Saturday 6 May Time: 2 - 4pm Place: St Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery, Aldinga Rd, off Victor Harbor Road, Willunga Cost: By donation group bookings essential Willunga Slate Carvings: Solving the Mysteries. Come back in time to 19th century Willunga when local slate carvers created today’s rich legacy of slate carvings - gravestones, mantelpieces and decorative arts. Learn about society, religion, and the slate carvers themselves. Find out about mishaps, a German influence, and how we identify unsigned gravestones. Saturday 6 May Time: 11am - 12.30pm Place: Show Hall, 7 Main Rd, Willunga Cost: By donation group bookings essential Willunga Slate: How it was Quarried, How it was Worked. Willunga slate, discovered in 1840, has been quarried locally ever since: combine a visit to the National Trust’s Slate Museum with a guided tour of an historic slate quarry (weather permitting). Sunday 7 May Time: 1.30pm at Museum, 2.30 - 4pm at Slate Quarry Place: Willunga Slate Museum, 61 High Street, Willunga Cost: Adult $10 group bookings essential All Willunga Branch Enquiries: Brian McMillan (08) 8556 2195, email:willunganationaltrust@gmail.com

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 T he N ational T ru st of S o u th Au stralia

your Trust PUBLISHER

National Trust of South Australia Beaumont House 631 Glynburn Road Beaumont SA 5066 T: 08 8202 9200 F: 08 8202 9201 E: publications@nationaltrustsa.org.au W: www.nationaltrustsa.org.au DESIGN

Dessein T: 08 9228 0661 E: tracy@dessein.com.au DISTRIBUTION

Heritage Living is published four times a year. PP 536155/0036 ISSN 0815-7871 FRONT COVER:

A stand of eucalypts at Engelbrook Reserve, one the National Trust reserves profiled in our feature. Photo Robert Dare

PRESIDENT

PATRON IN CHIEF

Professor Norman Etherington AM

His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le AC Governor of South Australia

VICE PRESIDENT

Mr George Hobbs COUNCILLORS

Dr Liz Burge Mr Bob Cornwell Dr Robert Dare Dr Walter Dollman Ms Melanie Kiriacou Mr Brian McMillan Mrs Caren Martin Ms Deborah Morgan Mr John Northwood Ms Kath Rayner Mrs Sue Scheiffers Mrs Robyn Wight

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Dr Darren Peacock Chief Executive Officer Ms Helen Cartmel Executive Administrator Ms Ellen Martin Finance Manager Mr Christopher Grant Natural Heritage Manager Dr Jill MacKenzie Public Programs Manager Mr Mario Russo Assets Manager Ms Joseanne Visentin Senior Administration Officer COUNCIL COMMITTEES

Audit, Finance and Governance Collections, Regions and Branches Cultural Heritage Advisory Natural Heritage Advisory

Adelaide Metropolitan, Ardrossan, Burnside, Coromandel Valley, Gawler, Port of Adelaide, Tea Tree Gully, Ceduna, Cleve, Koppio, Streaky Bay, Tumby Bay, Whyalla, Auburn, Burra, Clare, Jamestown, Port Pirie, Barmera, Overland Corner, Renmark, Waikerie, Beachport, Glencoe, Keith, Kingston SE, Millicent, Mount Gambier, Naracoorte, Penola, Robe, Goolwa, Hahndorf, Kingscote KI, Mount Barker, Mount Lofty, Penneshaw, Port Elliot, Strathalbyn, Victor Harbor, Willunga, Central Yorke Peninsula, Kadina, Minlaton, Moonta, Wallaroo. Telephone (08) 8202 9200 for contact / information details.

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The National Trust of South Australia acknowledges its partners and supporters. CIVIC PARTNERS

Adelaide City Council CORPORATE PARTNERS

NTSA STATE OFFICE STAFF

NTSA BRANCHES (46)

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Supporters

Wines by Geoff Hardy Beerenberg Farms Bickfords Coopers Laucke Flour Mills Theodore Bruce Thomson Geer GOVERNMENT RELATIONSHIPS

Australian Government –– Department of the Environment and Energy –– National Library of Australia South Australian Government –– Department of the Environment, Water and Natural Resources –– SA Water –– History Trust of South Australia


P laces to S tay

G Collingrove Homestead: leisured luxury

Nestled in the eastern Barossa Valley, Collingrove offers a unique, elegant escape in an authentic colonial homestead. Located 90 kilometres north of Adelaide, Collingrove Homestead was built in 1856 for John Howard Angas, son of George Fife Angas, one of the founding fathers of South Australia.

eorge Fife Angas established the South Australian Company in 1835 that led the formation and development of the colony. He also supported the first German emigrants to the colony lead by Pastor August Kavel, many of whom later settled the villages of Hahndorf and Klemzig. Although he had developed extensive interests in the colony, George Fife Angas did not arrive in South Australia until 1851. In the meantime, he sent his son John Howard Angas to manage his affairs in 1843. John soon established successful cattle and sheep stations in the Barossa Valley. He married Suzanne Collins in 1855 and they established Collingrove Homestead the following year, naming it in honor of her family. Henry Evans, husband of John’s sister Sarah, designed the house, although he was not a trained architect. The house is designed in a practical fashion, with extensive working buildings adjacent to the home. It is made of stone quarried on the property and features a symmetrical façade with matching bow windows. The homestead was occupied by generations of the Angas family until it was generously gifted to the National Trust in 1976 by the late Ronald Angas. The property now sits on over 5 acres, with manicured gardens and surrounding trees and paddocks. Today it provides stylish guest accommodation in the converted servant quarters adjacent to the homestead. Guests can enjoy meals in the house, which includes a range of fascinating family memorabilia and a wide front verandah overlooking the enchanting gardens and lawn. There are individually styled rooms to choose from. All are furnished with French Provincial hand carved beds, fresh white linen and French Style Toile quilts. Three of the rooms include ensuites and another two rooms share an authentic bathroom complete with a claw foot bath. The Guest Lounge in the house is complete with leather lounges and open fire. Dinner packages are available by prior arrangement. The freshest local produce is used to create a memorable dining experience served either in the original cedar clad Dining Room or Drawing Room. Your full Barossa cooked breakfast is served on the front verandah overlooking the front gardens (weather permitting). Collingrove is perfect for those who want to enjoy a little luxury in a peaceful setting on the edge of the world famous Barossa Valley wine region.

Your hosts Marcia or Andrew Frost can answer all enquiries and take bookings on (08) 8564 2061 or by email to: info@collingrovehomestead.com.au

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ay 30 April 11am to 4pm Sund Cost: Adults $5 Children $2 Beaumont House 631 Glynburn Road Beaumont SA 5066

Take the children back to the Victorian era for a day of old fashioned games and play in the beautiful grounds of Beaumont House. Enjoy stories, music and dress-ups, feed baby farm animals and try some parlour and outdoor games from long ago! www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa/events

NATIONAL TRUST

18 April – 31 May FIND ALL THE EVENTS AND BOOK AT:

www.nationaltrust.org.au/ahf/sa/

Australian Heritage Festival is presented by the National Trust of South Australia with support from the Australian Government’s National Trusts Partnership Program.