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£3.50 The essential magazine for salon owners

Mar/Apr 2018

MORNING GLORY “4am”, the latest collection from Clayde Baumann of D&J Ambrose Hair Salon

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GDPR – how will new EU data law affect you?

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Coping off site, and keeping calm, when doing bridal hair

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How to be a great barbershop business leader Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


Contents

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C O N T E N T S

12 20 26

P6 NEWS Worries over falling apprenticeship numbers P10-19 – SPECIAL FOCUS ON ‘GDPR’ DATA LAW With just two months to go until the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes in, salons and barbershops say they have no idea what to do. Plus, we outline eight things you need to be doing between now and May 25, and how salon technology companies can help P20 WEDDING SERVICE Bridal hair can be lucrative, but coping with an unfamiliar venue and a stressed-out bride can be tough. We ask members how they manage P26 NORTHERN PASSION She’s just 25, yet has won four major awards, including the NHF’s best new business. What’s Melissa Timperley’s secret? P28 CUT IT… AS A BARBERSHOP LEADER The NHF is sponsoring the ‘Best Business Leader’ category at this year’s Modern Barber awards. What do NHF barbers say is the secret to being a great leader? P30 TEAM BUILDING Whoever you’re looking for, finding someone who will add value and fit in is always hard. But the NHF can help P34 CRISIS MANAGEMENT How well do you understand business insurance? P38 EVENTS Where and when events will be coming to your area, plus our new law changes planner

£3.50 The essential magazine for salon owners

Mar/Apr 2018

MORNING GLORY “4am”, the latest collection from Clayde Baumann of D&J Ambrose Hair Salon

34

10

GDPR – how will new EU data law affect you?

22

Coping off site, and keeping calm, when doing bridal hair

30

How to be a great barbershop business leader Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus

COVER IMAGE An image from “4am”, the new collection from Clayde Baumann of D&J Ambrose Hair Salon, Pinner. The collection, he argues, “is an ambitious collection inspired by the millennial generation. It’s an artistic statement, a visual commentary on today’s aspirational socialites who have been elevated to a new celebrity status through social media culture.”

CREDITS Colour: Clayde Baumann Hair styling: Darren Ambrose Make-up: Katie Moore

Clothing: Jackie Ambrose Photography: Chris Bulezuik

CONNECT WITH US AND HAVE YOUR COMMENTS AND TWEETS IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF SALONFOCUS Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


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Welcome

PR ESIDEN T’S

L E T T E R SALONFOCUS IS PUBLISHED BY: National Hairdressers’ Federation, One Abbey Court, Fraser Road, Priory Business Park, Bedford MK44 3WH t: +44 (0) 1234 831965 f: +44 (0) 1234 838875 e: sfenquiries@salonfocus.co.uk w: www.nhf.info PUBLISHER Hilary Hall e: hilary.hall@nhf.info EDITOR Nic Paton e: nic@cormorantmedia.co.uk PR, EVENTS AND SOCIAL MEDIA Kelly Sylvester t. +44 (0) 1234 831965 e. kelly.sylvester@nhf.info ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Andy Etherton T: + 44 (0) 1536 527297 e: andy.etherton@nhf.info ART DIRECTOR Adriano Cattini Matrix Print Consultants Ltd t: +44 (0) 1536 527297 e: adriano@matrixprint.com While every care is taken in compiling this issue of salonfocus including manuscripts and photographs submitted, we accept no responsibility for any losses or damage, whatever the cause. All information and prices contained in advertisements are accepted by the publishers in good faith as being correct at the time of going to press. Neither the advertisers nor the publishers accept any responsibility for any variations affecting price variations or availability after the publication has gone to press. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the permission of the publisher, to whom application must first be made. The views expressed by contributors to salonfocus are not necessarily those of the NHF, the publisher or its editor. © 2018 The National Hairdressers’ Federation. Material for consideration in this section of the magazine should be submitted via email or digital file transfer to the editor, salonfocus. Submissions should be made on the understanding that the National Hairdressers’ Federation has the right to use the material in any part of the magazine and any of its other publications, promotions or website, free from any copyright restrictions, or appearance fees other than the issue of artistic and photographic credits where applicable. Please include salon name, photographer and stylist.

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ne of the hardest lessons to learn when you start out as a salon owner is that, suddenly, you are a business owner first and a stylist, barber or beauty therapist second.

This is very much the case with something like GDPR (the General Data Protection Regulation), the new European data law coming in from May. When you’re busy on the salon floor, it is all too easy to overlook or dismiss these sorts of changes as not being relevant or not needing to be prioritised. But, ABOUT AGNES as a business owner, GDPR is something you Agnes Leonard is president of the NHF and a registered cannot afford to ignore. hairdresser. She has worked in Yet, as our survey shows in this edition, the industry for 37 years and owns Croppers Hair Studio most – if not all – salon or barbershop in Dundee, a busy, family-run salon successfully adapting to the business owners have yet to get their heads fast-changing retail environment around what it is, how it may affect them – just, in fact, like many NHF members up and down and what they should be doing. the country. GDPR will affect a lot of things, not least the fact that, if you’re not compliant, you will no longer be able to send clients marketing or promotional information – offers, new services, salon news and so on – unless you have obtained specific agreement from them allowing you to do so. If you send it without this, you risk incurring massive fines. The key, as we show, is not to hide your head in the sand; the sooner you start the less painful it will be. GDPR is going to feel like a time-consuming bore for the next few weeks, but in the end, it will be worth it.

AGNES LEONARD NHF president

COMING UP IN MAY/JUNE 2018 Everything you need to know about opening a new barbershop, and making a success of it Eek, is that a mouse?! Don’t panic – we show you how to protect your business from a vermin infestation

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

Do you have a salon story to tell? Would you like to be featured in salonfocus? Get in touch with the team, on 01234 831965, or send an email to nic@cormorantmedia.co.uk


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News

QUESTION-MARK OVER ‘T LEVELS’

FALL IN

APPRENTICESHIPS atest figures from the government have shown a further steep decline in the number of people starting apprenticeships, with a 27% drop from August to October last year compared with the same period in 2016.

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The figures from the Department for Education follow a 59% year-on-year drop recorded during the previous three months (May-July). This fall coincided with the introduction of the apprenticeship levy for big employers and the requirement for the first time that even small employers make a financial contribution to the cost of training. The numbers starting apprenticeships in hairdressing, barbering and beauty have also declined in the past year, though nowhere near as much as the overall drop, falling around 8%, 11% and 9% respectively compared to the previous year. The NHF has long expressed

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

concerns that requiring small businesses to contribute to the cost of training could put employers off from taking on older apprentices. Even though an incentive of £1,000 is available for recruiting 16-18-yearolds, many salons and barbershops report they are struggling to find suitable school-leavers to take on as apprentices. ATTRACTING YOUNG TALENT

On the latest figures, NHF chief executive Hilary Hall said: “Employers have responded positively to the new ‘trailblazer’ apprenticeships, especially its standards and independent assessment. “As an industry, we need to do more to attract talented young people into apprenticeships. This may include paying more than the National Minimum Wage or taking on older apprentices who tend to learn much more quickly and therefore become income earners more quickly, even though they cost employers more,” she added.

The NHF has questioned whether the government’s plan to develop new collegebased technical qualifications, so-called “T Levels”, will work within hair and beauty. T Levels were announced by the government in March last year and aim to develop a range of work-based college courses that will leave 16-19-year-olds “work fit” when they finish education. The first three T Levels – digital, construction, and education and childcare – were unveiled in October but the plan is there will eventually be T Levels in hair and beauty. However, NHF chief executive Hilary Hall has pointed out that T Levels will include mandatory work placements to give learners more work experience – but nowhere near as much as an apprentice gets. To convince employers that an apprenticeship and a T-level give learners the same “salon-ready” skills, employers would therefore want all learners on T-levels to take the same independent end-point assessment that apprentices have to pass. “We therefore question why public funds are being used to develop and support these new college-based options,” she said.


News

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PLASTIC BAG LEVY TO BE EXTENDED TO ALL SHOPS

REED ALL ABOUT IT Well done to the team at Essex salon and NHF member Reed Hair (pictured), which recently won the title of Best Salon in Essex at the Essex Salon Awards. The three-floor hair and beauty salon, based in Maldon, Essex, has been trading for 11 years and employs 25 staff. The salon, which also won in the British

Hairdressing Business Awards in 2017 and 2016, won this latest award in November, which was judged by Errol Douglas and Karine Jackson, president of the Fellowship for British Hairdressing. “It was lovely because all of the team were there – so it did get quite rowdy!” co-owner Vicki Meredith told salonfocus.

“Sometimes, with industry awards, while it can be great to win them if you’re lucky enough, clients don’t really understand what it’s all about. But to win Best Salon in Essex, we’ve done it really for our clients. We are all excited – it is brilliant for the town and great for Essex,” she added.

WELSH BAN ON INTIMATE PIERCINGS FOR UNDER-18S Wales in February became the first UK country to ban intimate piercings or “making arrangements” to perform intimate piercings for under-18s. The ban is meant to protect children and young people from potential harm to their health from such piercings, or from being put in a vulnerable position when having a procedure. A study in England has found complications reported with a third of all body piercings for 16-24-year-olds.

DIVIDEND REFORM Salon or barbershop owners who pay themselves an income from dividends rather than a salary are being reminded that how these are taxed is changing from April. The tax-free dividend allowance will be falling from £5,000 to £2,000, meaning that any income from dividends above this will now be subject to tax at 7.5% for basic-rate taxpayers, 32.5% for higher-rate payers

Charging for plastic bags is to be extended to all retailers, the government has said. All businesses in England employing more than 250 staff have had to charge 5p for single-use plastic bags since 2015, with firms in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales doing so since 2014, 2013 and 2011 respectively. The move has led to a near-90% drop in the use of plastic bags in England, the government has said, and similar sharp drops in the other countries of the UK, with the money normally being donated to good causes. The success of the scheme led prime minister Theresa May in January to announce that it will now be extended to all retailers, however big or small, although no timeframe was put on when this will happen. “This success should inspire us. It shows the difference we can make, and it demonstrates that the public is willing to play its part to protect our environment,” she said. Mrs May also said the government would launch a call for evidence on the pros and cons of taxing or charging for single-use plastics, such as plastic bottles.

and 38.1% for top-rate payers. “Put simply, you might earn £30,000 per annum, 50% as a dividend. Of that £15,000 you would have only paid £750 to HMRC. From April, that will rise to £975,” explained Amanda Swales, director of SimpleTax. Jo Nockels senior training and communications manager at TaxAssist Accountants, added the change made it important that small businesses review what is the most tax-efficient way to pay themselves in future.

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


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News

FORMAL NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

INDUSTRY MOURNS TONI&GUY’S TONI MASCOLO he hairdressing world mourned the loss of Toni Mascolo in December, one half with his brother Guy of the Toni&Guy brand.

T

The son of an immigrant hairdresser, for over 50 years Toni and Guy between them turned Toni&Guy into an internationally franchised brand, and a familiar name on many British high streets. Toni was born Guiseppe Toni Mascolo and with Guy (originally Gaetano) opened their first salon in Clapham, south London, advertising it as offering “Italian style”. As well as salons up and down the country, Toni&Guy was renowned for its commitment to training, opening its first academy in London’s West End in 1984. NHF member Richard Ward, of Richard Ward Hair

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

& Metrospa, said: “The main thing is that Toni pioneered the concept of the chain. There had been chains before but not on this scale. Even Vidal Sassoon didn’t have them at this level. “Back in the day you would have people coming up to London to get their hair done, but by franchising and taking a very high standard out into the counties and the country, it meant that they could find what they wanted on their own high street. And it changed the life of all hairdressers. It raised the bar for all of us.” Comments on social media included “a wonderful leader and friend”, “they brought something new and exciting to hairdressing”, and “he expressed his creativity not in extreme cut or colouring but in a novel business structure through his family firm”. Toni (Giuseppe) Mascolo, born 6 May, 1942; died 10 December, 2017.

Formal notice is hereby given that the 76th Annual General Meeting of the members of the National Hairdressers’ Federation will be held at the Holiday Inn Regents Park, Carburton Street, London W1W 5EE on Sunday 13 May 2018 at 13.00 hours. It will be for the purpose of: installing the president and other officers; the appointment of auditors; receiving the accounts for the Federation for the year ended 31 December 2017; receiving a report from the chief executive on NHF activities for 2017; any other decision requiring members’ approval and any other item of business notified to the chief executive by a member of which due notice has been given. If you have any items of business, please submit them to tina.beaumont@nhf.info by no later than 5pm on Tuesday 3 April 2018. H Hall Chief Executive National Hairdressers’ Federation One Abbey Court, Fraser Road, Priory Business Park Bedford, MK44 3WH Members must present their membership card to gain entry. Please send any questions arising from the minutes of last year’s meeting or the accounts to tina.beaumon@nhf.info at least one week in advance.


News

TWITTER FOLLOWERS 11.6K SCOTTISH TAX CHANGE

FACEBOOK LIKES 12,997

INSTAGRAM LIKES 2,247

WHAT’S TRENDING

Salons and barbershops in Scotland should be alert to the fact that income tax rates north of the border are set to change from next month. Under proposals outlined by Scottish Government finance secretary Derek Mackay (pictured) in December, the basic rate of income tax will be frozen at 20p, while a new intermediate rate of 21p will kick in on earnings above £24,000. The rate for higher-rate taxpayers will also increase, by 1p to 41p. Finally, a new “starter” rate is being introduced from April, set at 19p, and will apply to the first £2,000 of taxable income between £11,850 and £13,850. Business owners are being advised to check with their payroll providers that these changes have adjusted in their system so that employees are paying the correct income tax rate from April.

TWEETS AND POSTS FROM AROUND THE NHF

Modern Barber Magazine The MOBAA's are open for entry. There are nine categories to choose from and the winner takes away a handsome trophy and a sponsor prize plus the glory at our handsome finals event on May 13th in Soho. It's an easy online entry process, just go to mobaawards. co.uk. Thanks to our sponsors Takara Belmont UK Denman Brush American Crew UK Wahl Professional UK Salon Service National Hairdressers Federation Aston and Fincher Shortcuts Smarter Business Technology UK

ehsalon ehsalon Love opening professional magazines and seeing our faces! Thank you @nhfederation for featuring us #professional #awardwinning #hairstyle #bexhill

CLARIFICATION

In the January/February edition of salonfocus, we highlighted how income tax thresholds were changing from this April, as announced in the Budget (page 10-11). We pointed out that Chancellor Philip Hammond had argued this would make most basic rate employees £1,075 a year better off. However, it should have been made clear this was compared to 2010, when the Conservatives came to power, rather than a year-on-year improvement. Year-on-year, basic rate taxpayers will actually be around £70 a year better off under the change.

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material_hair material_hair Very proud to see @bethsomerset_ hairstylist and @ analeez_ac names inside @nhfederation salon focus magazine

JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION @nhfederation

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Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


10

Understanding GDPR

WITH JUST TWO MONTHS TO GO UNTIL A TOUGH NEW EUROPEAN DATA PROTECTION LAW COMES IN FORCE, MORE THAN HALF OF NHF SALONS AND BARBERSHOPS SAY THEY HAVE NO IDEA WHAT TO DO OR HOW TO GET THEMSELVES READY. re you ready for the new General Data Protection Regulation yet? Not even remotely, if a survey of NHF members is anything to go by.

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The worry is, with just two months until the introduction of the tough new data protection law, more commonly just known as GDPR, on 25 May, the industry could be hugely unprepared. GDPR will affect how salons keep, maintain and manage client and team records, client contact details, children’s names, allergy test results and any medical information. It will also mean that if businesses want to carry on sending out marketing or promotional information, appointment reminders or offers to clients they will need to be able to show clients have given their specific consent to receive this. On page 12 we answer some of the key questions you may have about GDPR, and outline what actions you will need to be taking between now and the end of May.

4%

of turnover (up to £18m) Maximum amount you can be fined for non-compliance

But to find out just how prepared, or not, the industry is for the arrival of this new regulation, the NHF carried out a poll of nearly 200 members during January. Given that NHF members generally are the most regulation-aware hair and beauty salons and barbershops within the industry, the lack of knowledge and preparedness for GDPR was therefore deeply worrying. So, what did our survey find? Nearly two-thirds of those polled

(65%) admitted either to not knowing anything or not knowing “much” about GDPR and its implications. Just 2% (or four respondents in total) said were confident they “knew everything there is to know” about GDPR and its potential impact. Despite this, while around 40% were conscious that something was happening that would mean them needing to make changes, only 1% described themselves as “extremely” worried. Around a sixth (16%) said they were “not worried at all” while 43% felt it was “yet another thing small business owners have to worry about”. HEFTY PENALTIES

Part of the reason for this lack of concern could perhaps be down to the fact that the vast majority (86%) had no idea what the penalties will be for non-compliance with GDPR. Yet, as we explain from page 14, in reality these could be extremely severe, anything from 2% to 4% of your annual turnover. When asked whether they were beginning to change how they

Do you know what GDPR is? ANSWER CHOICES I know everything there is to know about GDPR and I know everything there is to know about GDPR and how it will impact my business how it will impact my business

RESPONSES

2%

I know some information about GDPR

33%

I don't know much about GDPR

33%

I don't know anything about GDPR

32%

Total

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

100%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


Understanding GDPR

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How do you feel about GDPR being enforced? RESPONSES

ANSWER CHOICES I'm extremely worried?

1%

I'm conscious I need to make changes

40%

I'm not worried at all

16%

It's yet another thing small business owners have to It's yet another thing small business owners have to worry about worry about

43%

Total

100%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Do you know what the penalties are for non-compliance? ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Yes

14%

No

86%

Total

100%

0%

10%

20%

Have you started to change the way you handle data within your business to ensure you are ready for the GDPR deadline? ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Yes- we have started to make changes

10%

GDPR is on our radar but we haven't taken steps to change things yet

33%

No - we have no idea what we need to do

57%

Total

handled data to make themselves GDPR-compliant, the answer was a resounding “no”. More than half (57%) of respondents admitted they had “no idea what we need to do”. Nearly a third (33%) conceded it was “on their radar” but had not taken steps to do anything about it. Just a tenth, 10%, had begun to react to this looming change. NHF chief executive Hilary Hall said: “When you’re busy, things like data management can seem

100%

0%

10%

20%

The NHF is running two GDPR webinars on March 6 and April 17, at nhf.info

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

irrelevant or easily slip down the todo list. But GDPR is something salon and barbershop owners need to be engaging with, and right now. “The changes you need to make are not complex, but may take a while to get right and put into place. And the fines if you are caught out are extremely high. So our message to all salons and barbershops is to give yourself peace of mind by starting the process of becoming GDPR-ready right now.”

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


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Understanding GDPR

EIGHT WAYS TO BECOME GDPR-READY GDPR WILL AFFECT ALL BUSINESSES, INCLUDING SALONS AND BARBERSHOPS. THE PENALTIES COULD BE STEEP IF YOU GET THINGS WRONG, SO THE NHF IS WARNING BUSINESS OWNERS TO START PREPARING NOW FOR THIS CHANGE. HERE IS WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

WHAT’S HAPPENING?

A new law, the General Data Protection Regulation (or GDPR for short), is due to come into force on 25 May. It will replace the current Data Protection Act 1998. It is a European Union law but even though the UK is due to be leaving the EU at some point after May 2019, UK businesses will still need to comply with it. BUT I RUN A SALON, NOT A DATA COMPANY?

All businesses nowadays run on data, to a greater or lesser extent. As a salon or barbershop owner, you’re going to be managing client and staff data, there’s also going to be things like payroll and stock data, email and postal addresses, landline, text and mobile phone numbers, data you’re collecting via social media and so on. You’ll undoubtedly also be running marketing or promotional campaigns that make use of this

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

data. You’re probably storing all this data electronically somewhere, too. If so, you need to sit up and take notice. WHY SHOULD I BE WORRIED?

GDPR will introduce eye-watering fines for non-compliance, depending on the type of breach. You can be fined anything from 2% of your annual turnover (up to a maximum of €10m or £9m) up to 4% (or up to €20m or £18m). OK, SO WHAT WILL GDPR COVER?

GDPR will apply to all the personal data your hair or beauty salon or barbershop holds about people, both electronically on computers and on paper, including things like client contact details on record cards. It is very focused on ensuring people have given visible consent to information or data on them being used or kept. In other words, you need to show they

have agreed to being contacted by you. You will also need to be able extract and show them what data you have on them, and have proper processes in place to delete their data if they ask. Finally, there are new rules around keeping and using data from children.

EIGHT THINGS YOU NEED TO DO

1

DON’T BURY YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND

Data protection can seem just like more “red tape” when you’re already really busy. when you’re already really busy. But GDPR is approaching fast, and all businesses need to be making sure they’re not caught out. Recognise, too, it’s not just about the fines. As well as the steep penalties, any business found to be breaking the law under GDPR will


Understanding GDPR

2 risk suffering a load of bad media and reputational damage. After all, if you can’t prove the data you’re keeping on clients and employees is secure and GDPR-compliant, it’s going to raise serious questions.

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REVIEW YOUR SALON SOFTWARE

If you use salon software, you will need to audit and review what personal data you have and record from clients and how you use it. This will need to include any automated communications (for example appointment reminders) or birthday gift cards. But also look at things like marketing information, allergy test results, colour notes and missed

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


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Understanding GDPR

appointment records. The good news is your salon software provider should already be well up to speed with the fact that GDPR is coming down the line. So, speak to them about what help they can offer and what updates or advice they can provide. KEY ACTIONS TO TAKE: ß Check what are your main

sources of incoming data. These will probably be your client list, your social media, your website. But it may also be things like test results, mailing lists, colour records, appointments data, and employee data (CV, salary, contact details, doctor, next of kin etc). Questions to ask should include: • How easily accessible is it, in other words how easy is it to understand and pull things out? • If someone asked, would I be able to provide or delete it? • Is it still relevant (for example, if it’s the details of someone who has now left the business)? • How secure and protected is it? • How will I be able to show all this if my data management comes under scrutiny? ß Check what are your main

sources of outgoing data. This is likely to be mailshots, push notifications, promotional and marketing activity, appointment reminders, newsletters and so on. Ask the same questions about it as above. But add: • Who gave me the information? • Where did it came from? • Do I have clear permission to use it (and if not, how can I get this)? There is more on this in point seven. • Do I have clear permission to share it?

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

3

BE READY AND ABLE TO PROVIDE INFORMATION/DATA, IF ASKED FOR IT

4

HAVE SYSTEMS IN PLACE TO DELETE INFORMATION, IF ASKED TO DO SO

One of the key elements of GDPR is that, if requested, you must be able to provide people with the information you hold about them free of charge. Information must be provided within one month of receiving the request.

Another key element of GDPR will be a new “right to be deleted”. People will have the right to ask you to delete any data you as a hair or beauty salon or barbershop holds about them, unless there is a good reason not to.

KEY ACTIONS ß Assess whether you or your

KEY ACTIONS TO TAKE ß Much as with point two, you

system would be able to do this accurately, quickly and in a straightforward way. ß Speak to your salon software provider and whoever runs or manages your apps, website and social media.

will need to ensure you have the systems and processes to be able to do this, and prove you have done it. Again, speaking to your software provider may be a good starting point.


Understanding GDPR

5

TIGHTEN UP SECURITY

This is sensible at any time but, given the focus on compliance under GDPR, now will be a good moment to review and double-check that you have the right procedures in place to detect, report, manage and investigate a data breach.

6

RECOGNISE SOMEONE WILL NEED TO TAKE CHARGE

Under GDPR you’ll need to be able to show that someone has overall charge for data protection, security and compliance. This will probably be you, the business owner. One of your responsibilities will be to draw up a privacy policy or notice. Every business will need one of these to include all details on GDPR and how data is handled. You can find examples on the website of the Information Commissioner’s Office, ico.org.uk

7

RETHINK HOW YOU USE DATA FOR MARKETING

This is perhaps the biggest change coming in under GDPR. You probably send clients appointment reminders, e-newsletters, special offers, newsletters, birthday vouchers and seasonal greetings. Most will probably be fine with this. But under GDPR you can no longer assume this to be the case; you can no longer assume clients

are happy to be contacted just because you have their details and have done so in the past. Therefore, you need to be able to show clearly when and how people have agreed to receive each type of communication. You must also keep clear records that demonstrate they have given their consent. KEY ACTIONS TO TAKE ß Go through your client lists.

Check they’re up to date and remove any old or irrelevant data. ß Do the same with your employee lists. For example, are you still holding on to data of people who have left the business? ß Put in place a plan or a process to contact anyone who you hold data on or who receives data from you so you can update their consent. This will primarily mean clients and your employees, but could also mean agencies, freelance stylists, colleges, suppliers and so on. How you do this in practice is up to you. You may decide physically to ring round or contact people by email or text or other means. However, this is likely to be time-consuming. You will, for example, need to keep a record of what answers people give you. It also runs the risk of messages being ignored. Bear in mind, if this happens, the individual has not consented and their data must be removed from any future activity. Probably the best solution, therefore, is to do the above but also to create a simple digital or paper tick-box consent form that you can explain in person and

15

then get individuals to tick when they next come in. This guarantees they have actually consented. To create this, check first whether your salon software can do this for you. Software firm Phorest, for example, argues it can generate a standard digital consent form via its system. It can also add various tools and filter to emails, social media or SMS marketing campaigns to ensure they are GDPR-compliant. So, again, it is worth asking about this sort of relatively easy solution. To create a consent form yourself, check out our advice on page 16 for how you might word this. If you gather in consents from clients gradually over the next few months that will be much less painful – and safer – than doing it all in a panic at the last minute. This is one of the reasons why it is so important not to leave GDPR to the last minute.

8

RECOGNISE CHILDREN’S DATA IS AN IMPORTANT, AND SEPARATE, ISSUE

Under GDPR, children under 16 are considered a special case. You may need consent from a parent or guardian to keep and use any personal data about children. KEY ACTIONS

Make a separate list of all your clients who are children. You should then analyse it in the same way as above.

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


16

Understanding GDPR

FIND OUT MORE If you’re getting stuck, speak to your software provider or contact the NHF’s business helpline on 01234 831965. The Information Commissioner’s Office, which will be overseeing GDPR in the UK, has an easy-to-use 12-step guide to GDPR, which can be found at ico.org.uk and then search for “GDPR”. The NHF has also published an online blog setting out GDPR advice which can be accessed through the “advice” section at nhf.info And don’t forget to check out our GDPR webinars, at nhf.info, on 6 March and 17 April.

WHAT TO PUT IN A GDPR CONSENT FORM If you want to create a consent form for clients and others to tick or sign, under GDPR it has to cover at least these five things. It must be clear and unambiguous. In other words, clients must easily be able to understand what they’re signing up for. For example: “I would like to receive emails from [salon name]” “Sign me up for email communications” Clients must actively opt-in. On a paper form this will be straightforward, they’ll tick the box. If it’s a digital form, boxes must

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not be pre-ticked and all options must have the same prominence. Clients will also need to be asked for consent on the phone. Clients should be able to choose which content they are happy to receive. This should include the channel they receive it via (for example email or text). An offer or promotion, for example, will be different to a mailshot about a new service or product.

Don’t tie consent to other incentives. This should be fairly obvious but if people are being offered a gift or a voucher, for example, for ticking the box that will raise questions as to whether they have genuinely given their consent.

they can do this. If there is an “unsubscribe” link in any text or email you send out, for example, highlight that fact to them. You will need to check regularly that their consent still stands.

Make it clear they can withdraw consent. Tell clients they have the right to withdraw their consent at any time, and clearly outline how

The Information Commissioner’s Office has more detailed guidance on all of this, and can be found at ico.org.uk


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Understanding GDPR

SAFE IN THE KNOWLEDGE YOUR SOFTWARE OR TECHNOLOGY PROVIDER WILL BE AT THE HEART OF HELPING TO MAKE SURE YOUR BUSINESS IS GDPR-READY. SO, WHAT ARE TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES ADVISING? WE ASKED FOUR.

DPR is coming and, as we’ve seen on the previous pages, hair and beauty salons and barbershops need to be reviewing and updating how they collect, process, store and manage data.

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Software and technology providers are going to be at the heart of this process between now and the end of May. We spoke to four firms to see what they suggest needs to be at the top of your to-do list. “GDPR is about the safekeeping of personal information,” explains Garrett Ahern, data protection officer at Phorest Salon Software. “As a business owner or manager, you are responsible for protecting the information you store about your clients, but also your own staff.” “First, you should keep staff records securely stored, whether that’s paperbased (a locked filing cabinet that only you have access to) or electronic. If electronic, you should keep your files on a password-protected PC that staff do not have access to; ideally your hard-drive should be encrypted too. “Second, for client information

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stored in a salon management system it’s important to enable mandatory password/PIN checking. Without this, staff can look through the records unhindered, without any record that they have done so. “Third, when it comes to passwords, it is important to regularly change your password or PIN regularly, and to make sure it is not too easy to guess,” Garrett adds. RIGHT TO BE ‘FORGOTTEN’

“Under GDPR, people must allow you to have their data and can ask you to remove their information from your system/salon (cards and computer),” emphasises Trevor Jennings, managing director of Shortcuts Salon Software. “They have to ask to be marketed to, not just automatically receive any details. They must know what you’re sending (such as emails or texts) and what the reason is, for example, reminders or newsletters,” he adds. “The key is that salons must have a viable reason for the data being held. For example, recording and storing someone’s shoe size is not important to a business such as yours, and therefore it won’t be allowed to be kept. “You must clean up your

information, as it if it is old and unused it is also irrelevant. Finally, you must keep control of who can see it, and ensure that only people who need it can access it,” Trevor says. “For businesses in the beauty industry, the best way to comply is to ensure they’re using a scheduling system that can enable the tracking and managing of client interactions securely,” recommends William Zeqiri, chief executive of Shedul.


Understanding GDPR

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HOW THE NHF CAN HELP Alongside the webinars on March 6 and April 17, telephone advice and blog activity, the NHF will continue to update members on GDPR between now and May. The NHF will also be producing a comprehensive guide to GDPR. So keep an eye on nhf.info for the latest information and updates.

GOOD FOR PROFITABILITY

Adding this functionality will not just be good because of GDPR, it can also help a business to save time and money and improve productivity, which in turn of course improves profitability, he adds. “Websites sometimes require information or permission to use private data from users,” points out Ross Kernick, director at Bright Salon. “If your website allows users to submit

data, whether this is buying a product, booking an appointment, signing up to a newsletter or filling out a contact form, then it will need to be GDPRcompliant by 25 May,” he adds.

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Managing bridal hair out of the salon

WEDDING SERVICE BRIDAL HAIR CAN BE A LUCRATIVE BUSINESS FOR MANY SALONS. BUT GETTING THE BIG DAY RIGHT, WHEN YOU’RE COPING WITH AN UNFAMILIAR VENUE AND A STRESSED-OUT BRIDE CAN BE CHALLENGING. WE ASKED FOUR MEMBERS HOW THEY MANAGE.

‘SUDDENLY, AS WELL AS THE BRIDE, THERE WERE THREE BRIDESMAIDS AND HER MUM – AND I HAD A FULL COLUMN TO GET BACK TO AT THE SALON’ Francesca Harmon is senior stylist at Abacus Hair in Bewdley, Worcestershire, and was winner of the Hair Up (open to all) category at November’s NHF Britain’s Best competition You have to be prepared for anything, especially the unexpected. I had one experience where I turned up thinking it was only going to be the bride. I had spoken to her and quoted a price, we’d done a trial. But then I got there and suddenly

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there were three bridesmaids and her mum who also needed doing – and I had a full column of clients to get back to at the salon! So, you need to make sure all the Is are dotted and the Ts crossed. It comes back to lots and lots of organisation and communication. You have to have a lot of contact with the bride – she needs to feel really important. You need to show that you understand it is her day. For wedding hair, you’re generally looking at probably one hour per person. But don’t forget you have to take travelling time into consideration, whether that’s going to be half an hour there and back or 45 minutes. So, we simply charge per hour for wedding hair, so travelling time can be factored in easily. You must never get stressed, or at least must never show it.


Managing bridal hair out of the salon

You have got to be that one person who remains calm, chilled and professional, whatever else is happening. Make sure you turn up with literally every bit of kit you think you’re going to possibly need – hair grips, extension leads (really important), mirrors. A lot of the time the room may not be that big and there may be lots of people coming in and out. If it’s a hotel however, often they will be pretty well prepped with mirrors, sockets and good lights.

The trial in the salon is really important, vital in fact. Even if you’re going off site, the bride needs to come into the salon for her trial. Make sure you discuss everything – timings, where they need to be when, whether there are any hair pieces or a veil, whether the bridesmaids or mother will need styling, all that sort of thing. Currently the trend is not to have the hair too scraped back or too neat. It needs to look messier, looser and more romantic; it is very much about the under-done look rather

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than anything too curly. On the day, however, make sure she knows to wear a baggy top or dressing gown to ensure she is not going to destroy her hair when getting dressed afterwards. Definitely I think the hairdresser is the most important part of the bride’s day, at least beforehand! You often develop a really good connection – you need her to feel confident and relaxed enough with you to be able to say if something does not feel right. That is really important, too.

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Managing bridal hair out of the salon

‘WE DO AS MANY WEDDINGS OUT OF THE SALON AS IN IT THESE DAYS’ Lindsey Scott is salon manager at Hooker & Young in Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne. Brand owners Gary Hooker and Michael Young are working as joint industry ambassadors for the NHF We do as many weddings out of the salon as we do in the salon these days. Some wedding venues now seem to be further afield and out of the way for the bride to come to us, so we find out the distance and how big a

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party we will be looking after, and then budget our price accordingly, including travel time for each team member so it doesn’t affect the takings of the salon. We would usually take some team members with us to make the bride feel as special and stress-free as possible. The bride will usually come into the salon for a trial beforehand, where she meets everyone and we will take pictures to help her to reflect on her look. We also pass on the salon’s email, so she can keep in constant contact. This is useful if anything changes or if, for instance, she lives abroad and there are time differences to take into account.


Managing bridal hair out of the salon

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than weekends – Thursdays and Fridays are now more popular than Saturdays. But it can be any day of the week, and more often than not at a venue rather than the bride’s house. The salon consultation is absolutely vital. We’ll do a trial run in the salon, where everything gets written down and everything is agreed. You want to avoid that when you turn up they suddenly turn around and say “oh can you also do Aunt Deirdre’s hair”; everything needs to be tied down and agreed. We also take a deposit of 50% well in advance. Ultimately, it is the bride’s day and they can be stressed if they want! But the key from our point of view is to try to make the whole environment as relaxed, professional and as special for her and her party as possible.

‘YOU HAVE TO FACTOR IN THAT THERE WILL BE INTERRUPTIONS AND UNEXPECTED THINGS WILL HAPPEN’ Steven Smart is owner of SMART:EST 73 in Weston-superMare, Somerset. He was Wales and South West Hairdresser of the Year in last year’s British Hairdressing Awards and has won European and world hairdressing championships

‘SOME OF OUR TEAM SPECIALISE IN WORKING WITH THE BRIDE, OTHERS WITH THE FAMILY AND BRIDESMAIDS’ Vicki Meredith is co-owner of Reed Hair in Maldon, Essex, which was in November named Best Salon at the Essex Salon Awards. The salon is also a two-time winner at the British Hairdressing Business Awards We have a four-strong bridal team, with normally two stylists working

on any particular bridal job. Two of the team tend to specialise in working with the bride, and two who are more likely to do guests or family or bridesmaids. When we go out on location, it is simply priced by time. We do also charge mileage – if you’re going out of the salon, however much time it takes to get there and back, you need to be charging for that. Traditionally, of course, the busiest day for bridal hair used to be Saturdays, the same as the busiest day in the salon. But I have found in the last year or two often it is much more likely to be weekdays

I have run the salon since 1999, and we have always done bridal hair, both on an individual basis and as packages. All of our stylists can do bridal hair if need be, which is important if it’s the bride, her mum, some guests and ten bridesmaids! You just have to be able to cater for whatever’s required. For a party of that size, especially if we were required to go off location, it would effectively mean the salon would have to close for the occasion, and so that would be reflected in the price of the package. You have to be realistic about calculating the time it is going to take, including travel time (for which our minimum is one hour), so that it is worthwhile financially. We very much base it on hourly cost. If you under-charge for bridal parties, you’re simply selling yourself

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Managing bridal hair out of the salon

Often brides will say “thank god you were there because you were so calm and relaxed”. We always try to ensure that we have thought of everything so the bride does not have to worry about things.

FIND OUT MORE Steven and Debra Smart will be running an NHF bridal hair and make-up evening masterclass on 19 March in Cardiff, from 7-9.30pm. Visit nhf.info/events to book

IF NOTHING ELSE READ THIS Budget for your travel as well as your working time

short. If you’re a specialist bridal salon then clients will, naturally, come to you for their wedding. But you may also never see them again, so there is no point undercutting yourself in the hope it’ll encourage them to come back another time. That is something I have definitely learned over the years. When it comes to the logistics, if it’s in a hotel it will often be the bridal suite. This is normally a bigger room, which helps, but at the same time you have to expect there will be a lot of other people around, so it can get cramped. We bring all the equipment we’re going to need with us, even mirrors and chairs. Extension leads are an absolute must – the number of times I have had to try to stretch a lead over to some tongs or dryer because the mirror or chair is in an awkward position, or I’ve had to be not too close to where the dress is hanging. It is important to iron out in advance precisely what is going to be

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needed, as that will take the pressure off the bride; she’ll have quite enough on her mind. We never do bridal hair without a trial. It normally takes a good two hours for a bridal runthrough. The consultation is very important; you can work through all the questions and tweak and change things as you go. On the day itself, you have to factor in that there will be interruptions and that unexpected things will happen – a bridesmaid’s dad has forgotten his buttonhole, make-up is running late, people are coming in and out asking her questions. Also, quite often you will have to stay until she gets into her dress so as to make sure her hair is perfect before she goes down the aisle. This can add an extra half hour to an hour, and so that needs to be factored into your timings and costs. You can’t be looking at your watch because you need to get back to the salon and your next client. So it is very important to build in some leeway.

Don’t undersell your service – it has to be worthwhile financially Bring absolutely everything you’ll need, including mirrors, chairs and lots of extension leads The consultation is critical – get everything agreed and written down Use the salon trial to make sure the bride, and her party, fully understand what to expect Be prepared to be flexible about timings, for example staying on until she’s fully dressed and ready (but also budget it in) Expect the unexpected, and stay calm and professional at all times


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Member profile

quite high end – we want to make clients feel as if they’re coming to a luxurious spa. FOCUS AND TRAINING

NORTHERN PASSION SHE’S JUST 25, YET IN LITTLE MORE THAN A YEAR HER SALON HAS WON FOUR MAJOR INDUSTRY AWARDS, INCLUDING BEST NEW BUSINESS IN NOVEMBER’S NHF BUSINESS AWARDS. SO, WHAT’S MELISSA TIMPERLEY’S SECRET? SALONFOCUS ASKED HER TO REVEAL ALL. didn’t come into the industry the conventional way. I was head girl at my school and did very well academically at GCSE, achieving A* and A grades. However, rather than go on to college or sixth form, I was always passionate about going straight into hairdressing.

I

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My parents (somewhat reluctantly, it has to be said) eventually agreed and now, in fact, are both directors in the business. We’re located in the Northern Quarter of Manchester, which is quite a trendy area, there are a lot of coffee shops and boutique outlets – it has quite a villagey feel. But there are also at least ten other hairdressers, so it is a competitive area. We’re a specialist precision cuts and colour salon, and the salon is

The fact that we specialise, that we do just a few services really, really well is, I feel, one of our strongest selling points. I worked at Sassoon for eight years and so I’m also very big on training. In fact, one thing I’m proud of is that, when the NHF’s mystery shopper for the Business Awards came to the salon, she was seen by our newest member of staff, who had only been with us for a fortnight. She scored us 100%! I look for people, obviously, with excellent skills. But I also want people who are going to fit into the team, who have the right attitude. We have five employees, and we provide a very bespoke client experience – the same stylist will be with the client for the whole of their appointment; there won’t be any breaking off to wash someone else’s hair or “here’s my colleague for this next bit”. That does mean we’re quite exclusive – we have a six-week waiting list for certain days, and have been fully booked since the day we first opened. We’ve smashed our first-year targets and, in fact, had to become VATregistered after just 10 months. BUZZER ENTRY

Before opening the salon, I got a marketing firm to carry out a survey of 300 people to find out what they liked or didn’t like about their hair salon experience. One thing which came out clearly was that many found the reception desk at salons intimidating, especially if they weren’t greeted in a friendly way or by name. I took that pointer on board and clients have to be buzzed in to enter the salon. At first glance this might sound odd – you want clients to come to the salon, after all. But it is about creating a sense of exclusivity – that the client feels special and important immediately. I also researched my pricing very carefully. At top Manchester salons a


Member profile

ladies’ cut is around £75. We charge £60 which, obviously, is lower but is still at the top end for our area. We price per service but also look at the time each service takes. Every client gets at least a one-hour appointment. Allergy alert testing is also very important to us. We always test 48-hours before any colour is applied, even if the client has had lots of colour in the past. NHF SUPPORT

Entering awards has been something I’ve been very keen on from day one. At Sassoon, and as a member of the 2016 Fellowship for British Hairdressing F.A.M.E team, I got a lot of experience of going to awards, shows and photoshoots. Even though sometimes the time and effort it takes to enter feels like it nearly kills you, they do help to set you apart. We’re now seen – both by clients and within the industry – as one of the top salons in Manchester. I joined the NHF from the moment I started out in business. It has been

absolutely fantastic in the support it has provided, especially around all the different rules and regulations you need to follow. I’d never employed anybody before I opened the salon, and so I needed help with even simple questions, such as how much holiday someone should get if they were only working two days a week. It has been a steep

FACTFILE Born in Rochdale, head girl at her school Trained and worked at Sassoon in Manchester Member of the 2016 Fellowship for British Hairdressing F.A.M.E team

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learning curve, but the NHF business helpline has been invaluable. In many respects, our “secret” is pretty straightforward. We simply want all clients to go away feeling and looking beautiful, with beautiful hair. But for me it’s also about being really focused, being really, really good at just a few things, and sticking with it.

Opened Melissa Timperley hair salon in Manchester’s Northern Quarter in December 2016 Awards include Best New Business in the NHF Business Awards, Best Male Photographic Image in the NHF Photographic Stylist of the Year awards,

Best Independent Salon in the Fellowship for British Hairdressing Awards and Best Newcomer Business in the Talk of Manchester Awards. Finalist in ten other industry awards. Attracts international clients, including from the Middle East and Canada

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Barbers and business

CUT IT… AS A BARBERSHOP LEADER YOU CAN BE THE BEST BARBER, BUT THAT’S NOT GOING TO MAKE YOU THE BEST BARBERSHOP OWNER. THE NHF IS SPONSORING THE ‘BEST BUSINESS LEADER’ CATEGORY AT THIS YEAR’S MODERN BARBER AWARDS. SO, WHAT DO NHF BARBERS FEEL IS THE SECRET TO BEING A GREAT BUSINESS LEADER?

‘A POSITIVE ATTITUDE’

A positive attitude is key, says Paul Davenport, of barbershop group MR Barbers: “An upbeat positive attitude with both clients and staff creates a happy environment,” he says, adding that respect and passion are also important qualities for a leader within a barbershop environment to have. ‘A PASSION FOR EVERYTHING’

“You have to have respect for others,” Paul Davenport adds. “Always treat everyone as you would want to be treated yourself. And it’s vital to have a passion for everything barbering; passion is infectious. It inspires and motivates staff and enhances the client experience.” ‘BE FIRM BUT FAIR’

“Be firm but fair with your staff, treat them with respect and be aware of their needs and aspirations,” says Robert Rix, of the Master Barber’s Shop in Southport. Integrity, a clear vision of your corporate goals, and being even-

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handed are all important, he adds. “Encourage and compliment in an open forum and criticise in a constructive manner – but on a oneto-one basis only.” ‘KEEP A CLOSE EYE ON THE BALANCE SHEET’

“Keep abreast of the financial workings of your business,” explains Robert Rix. “A successful business is not about doing a really great fade, it’s about keeping a close eye on the balance sheet. Run a spreadsheet, do a flowchart, be diligent; that is how a business gets to be successful.” ‘STICK TO YOUR BUDGET, AND FORECASTS’

“Keeping to your budgets and forecasts is hard, but having the correct processes in place and having the discipline to stick to them will help to ensure they can be delivered,” agrees Paul Davenport, adding that it is essential to stay disciplined.

‘DON’T PANIC!’

Day-to-day reality can be messy, and certainly messier than neat spreadsheets and financial projections. But, if things aren’t working out as you’d hoped, don’t panic – and try to keep a cool head, Paul adds. “If budgets or forecasts start to slip, ask for advice and don’t deviate from the proven business model. If you report to anyone, always keep them informed about how the business is doing against targets and make them aware of any issues. Never hide anything.” ‘LEAD BY EXAMPLE’

For anyone thinking of taking the plunge into running their own barbershop for the first, there are three words to keep repeating, day in, day out, emphasises Paul. “Lead by example. The people working for you look up to you for guidance, leadership and inspiration. Always remember that you are their role model.”


Barbers and business

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THIS YEAR’S MOBAAS The Modern Barber Awards, or MOBAAs, are the only barbering industry awards dedicated awards to celebrating creative and commercial success. This year there are nine categories: ß Best team ß  Best business leader (being sponsored by the NHF) ß Best training ß Best shop interior ß Best innovation ß Best apprentice ß  Best photographic entry ß Best “body of work” ß  Best customer experience Although the deadline for entries, has now passed, tickets can still be purchased to attend the event itself, which is taking place on Sunday 13 May from 1pm-6pm at 100 Wardour Street, Soho, London. Tickets cost £45 plus a £2.97 booking fee and are available from Modern Barber at mobaawards.co.uk

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Finding the right people

TEAM BUILDING WHETHER YOU’RE LOOKING FOR AN APPRENTICE, NEED TO REPLACE A SENIOR TEAM MEMBER, OR WANT TO TAKE ON SOMEONE WITH NEW SKILLS, FINDING SOMEONE WHO WILL ADD VALUE AND FIT IN IS ALWAYS HARD. BUT THE NHF CAN HELP.

air, beauty and barbering are people businesses. Yet, often, it is people – your staff – that are also one of your biggest headaches as a business owner: finding them, hiring them, keeping them.

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Competition for talent within hair, beauty and barbering is fierce, and staff turnover is often high. Getting recruitment right is therefore vital to your future success. If you need a new member of staff, don’t rush into recruiting someone. Take the time to think through the type of employee you actually need, and who will fit in well with the rest of the team. When a key member of staff resigns, always do an exit interview to find out why they are leaving and if you could have done anything differently to avoid losing them. This is valuable information and will help with future staff retention. You may even be able to persuade them to stay when they realise how much you value them. Make the most of the NHF’s expert recruitment resources – free of course to NHF members – including guides, contracts, sample job descriptions and application forms, all to be found at nhf.info or able to be downloaded.

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You can also call the membership team on 01234 831965 with any questions or queries about recruiting staff, and have access to our free 24/7 legal helpline. TAILOR YOUR VACANCY

Your first step will be to decide what type of employee your salon or barbershop needs to help it grow and prosper. If someone is leaving, you won’t necessarily need to replace “like for like”, even if it is someone senior within the business. You may be able to promote an existing member of staff instead and perhaps take on someone at a more junior level or an apprentice. Or it may be an opportunity to go for someone who can work different hours or offer new services. You also, of course, need to choose between taking on a new employee or finding a self-employed chair renter to work at your salon or barbershop. You can get more guidance on this from the NHF’s Guide to Chair Renting and Employing Staff, which is free for NHF members (nhf.info/ chair-renting). Plus visit the NHF shop at nhf.info/shop to download free chair renting agreements as well as employee contracts. CREATE A JOB DESCRIPTION

Write the job description early in the


Finding the right people

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Finding the right people

recruitment process. You will then be able to provide detailed information to applicants who respond to your job ad. It will also help you clarify exactly what you are looking for in terms of qualifications, skills, experience and level of seniority. The job description should include the main duties of the post plus details such as pay, holiday allowance, working hours including any weekend work, and any training or progression opportunities. You can find a sample job description at the end of the NHF’s Guide to Recruitment (again free to NHF members at nhf.info/ recruitment or call 01234 831965). The job description can be adapted to suit. THE APPLICATION FORM

It’s a good idea to ask applicants to fill in an application form rather than send in CVs. Application forms make it easier to compare applicants’ experience, skills and qualifications. An application form template is also included in our recruitment guide or can be downloaded at nhf.info/shop. THE INTERVIEW

When it comes to the interview, the key is to have a clear plan, including: ß Sift the applicants and decide how

many you will interview. ß Tell them to bring proof of qualifications, proof of the right to work in the UK, and their ID documentation. ß Will you interview alone or with a colleague? ß Will the interview be formal or informal? You may also need to decide: ß How trade tests will be organised. ß How you will communicate with

your applicants – by phone, email or letter? In terms of practicalities, here are five things to bear in mind.

1

Prepare a list of questions to ask each applicant. Use the same questions for each interview as this will make the interview

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process fair for each applicant and it’s less likely you will be accused of favouring one person over another. A list of suggested interview questions is included at the back of the Guide to Recruitment.

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Open questions are better than closed questions. A closed question can be answered with a yes or no, which means you won’t learn much about the applicant. An example of a closed question is: “Do you keep up to date with the latest trends in our industry?” Much better is an open question that will encourage a two-way conversation, for example: “How do you keep up to date with the latest trends?”

3

Avoid discrimination. Ensure you don’t ask any questions that would break discrimination laws. This means you cannot ask questions about someone’s place of birth, ethnicity, religion, marital status, children, sexual orientation, age, medical conditions, or lifestyle choices. Be aware, too, of what is called “unconscious bias”. This is when, without realising it, we favour a person because they are “like us”, so perhaps people who are the same race, gender, age group or have a similar personality.

4

Be clear what is expected on trade tests. Make sure your candidates know exactly what to expect when they are invited for a trade test. Will they need to bring anything or are you supplying everything? What will they need to wear? Tell them in advance exactly what they will be asked to do and how long it should take. Think carefully about the feedback you will provide to each applicant. Highlight strengths as well as weaknesses and where possible offer practical suggestions to help them improve.

5

Keep accurate interview records. Always make notes during the interview and trade test, otherwise, it will be very hard to remember who said what and how everyone performed. The Guide to

Recruitment includes a summary sheet which you can use to record scores of one to five (poor to excellent) plus any additional notes you wish to make. Having an accurate record will help you make a final decision on your preferred applicant. It will also help with requests for feedback from unsuccessful interviewees. THE JOB OFFER

It stands to reason that it is a good idea to make sure your first choice is still interested in taking the job before you inform other applicants they have been unsuccessful. This is just in case you may want to offer the post to your secondchoice applicant if your first choice withdraws. Once your selected applicant has accepted and you have received satisfactory references, you will need to send out: ß A job offer letter ß A contract ready to be signed by both parties ß A staff handbook. NHF members can download free ready-to-use contracts and staff handbooks from nhf.info/shop. TAKING ON AN APPRENTICE

If you’re thinking of taking on an apprentice, download the NHF’s free expert Apprenticeships Guide at nhf. info/apprenticeship. As an NHF member you can also benefit from free apprentice agreements, help and advice from the membership team on 01234 831965 and access to the free 24/7 legal helpline. WAGES: DON’T BE CAUGHT OUT

The simple message here is: be clear about how much you will have to pay your employees. This is especially true given that from this April the National Living Wage for over-25s will rise to £7.83 an hour. There are also new National Minimum Wage rates coming in: £7.38 for 21 to 24-year-olds; £5.90 for 18 to 20-year-olds; and £4.20 for 16 to 17-year-olds. The apprentice rate will increase to £3.70. But don’t be caught out: an


Finding the right people

apprentice aged 19 or over must get the National Minimum Wage appropriate for their age in the second year of their apprenticeship. EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY INSURANCE

The law says you must have Employers’ Liability insurance if you employ at least one person. You can be fined £2,500 for each day you do not have this insurance, and £1,000 if you don’t display your Employers’ Liability insurance certificate. Turn over to find out more about business insurance. As an NHF member, you can get 20% off your insurance with Coversure, the NHF’s recommended broker, at coversure.co.uk/nhf

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PROBATIONARY PERIOD

During your new employee’s probationary period make time for regular performance reviews, offer constructive feedback and keep records of what’s been said and agreed. Regular communication will make it far easier to discuss weaknesses as well as positives and will help to avoid the need for awkward conversations out of the blue. Proactive performance management early on will help to mould the kind of team player you want your new member of staff to become in the long-term. Visit nhf.info/shop to download a free performance appraisal form to manage your new recruits better.

FIND OUT MORE Always seek expert legal advice when dealing with tricky employment issues. As an NHF member you have 24/7 access to the free legal helpline.

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


34

Understanding business insurance

ou sometimes hear people complain that insurance can feel like money for old rope. You pay all these premiums, and what do you get back?

Y

HOW WELL DO YOU UNDERSTAND BUSINESS INSURANCE AND WHAT YOU’RE GETTING FOR YOUR MONEY?

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

Well, for starters, how about the ability to trade legally? Or, protection in the event of a disaster? Or, peace of mind that will enable you to sleep at night? There are loads of good reasons to make sure your business is properly insured, not least the fact that, as an NHF member, you get 20% off your salon insurance when you go with the NHF’s preferred and recommended insurance broker Coversure Insurance Services. Despite this, research by consultancy firm PwC last year


Understanding business insurance

found many small businesses try to cut corners when it comes to insurance, with the vast majority being under-insured. This was especially the case when it came to protecting against new threats such as cyber attacks or growing problems such as flooding. So, how well do you understand different sorts of business insurance? We look at three key types. EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY INSURANCE

This is one of the insurance policies you must have by law as a business if you employ people. Your insurance must: ß cover you for at least £5m ß be with an authorised insurer (and you can check this at https:// register.fca.org.uk/) or use a trusted

and reliable insurance broker such as Coversure Insurance Services. Remember, if you don’t have employers’ liability insurance you are breaking the law and can be fined £2,500 for each day you do not have it. You can also be fined £1,000 if you do not display your employer’s liability insurance certificate in a place where your employees can easily read it. This can include making it accessible electronically, so your staff can easily find and read it. Employers’ liability insurance will cover your legal and compensation bills if an employee is injured or becomes ill as a result of the work they do for you. However, it won’t cover: ß Deliberate acts or omissions that lead to an employee’s injury or illness.

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ß Fines or penalties received under

corporate manslaughter or health and safety at work laws.

FIND OUT MORE The NHF’s newly updated health and safety “toolkit in a box” contains everything you need to ensure you are covered under health and safety law. Developed specifically for hair salons and barbershops, it is available from the NHF shop (nhf.info) at £65 for members and £99 for nonmembers, plus £4.50 p&p.

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


36

Understanding business insurance

PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE

Public liability insurance may not be a legal requirement in the same way as employers’ liability is, but it is vital peace-of-mind cover for any business dealing with the general public. Having this insurance means you will be covered if a member of the public is injured or has something they own damaged because of your business activities. Public liability claims can easily run into many thousands of pounds so, even if not a legal necessity, in reality this insurance is a crucial piece of cover. “Injury” can include physical injury (such as trips, spills and other accidents) but also emotional stress or trauma. Public liability insurance will pay compensation and claimants’ costs and expenses in respect of accidental injury to any person and loss of or damage to property. Don’t forget, self-employed stylists, beauty therapists and barbers who rent a chair or room will also need their own public liability insurance. Coversure offers a specific chair renters policy, if they need cover. There are things that public liability insurance does not cover, including: ß Accidents that affect you and/or damage your own property. ß Accidents that affect your employees. These should be covered by your general business insurance or, as above, your employers’ liability insurance. But, again, do check. TREATMENT LIABILITY INSURANCE

Treatment liability cover does not come as standard with most public liability insurance policies, but is included in Coversure’s specialist public liability insurance, subject to some exclusions. It is designed to offer protection if a treatment goes wrong, subject to the relevant precautions being carried out. Importantly, it may cover you in the event of a client suffering an allergic reaction. “We cover most treatments, but if you’re not sure about a particular treatment, please call us on 0800 458 8181,” says Coversure’s Mark Lowery-Wiltshire.

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018


Understanding business insurance

COLOUR PROTECTION

As an NHF member you can be sure you’re following industry best practice by using the NHF’s free Colour Record Cards and Guide to Allergy Alert Testing and Colour Products. Coversure approves both as standard within its insurance. You can download the guide through the NHF’s website, nhf.info/allergy-guide and order the cards through nhf.info/ colour-card If you use a different insurer, simply check whether it accepts the cards or not. Not all insurance providers do. Clients sometimes ask if they can sign something to say they won’t make a claim if something goes wrong, but you should never agree to this:

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“Disclaimers are not worth the paper they’re written on,” says Mark Lowery-Wiltshire at Coversure, which offers discounted insurance to NHF members. “We’re often asked if clients can agree to exempt their hairdresser, barber or beautician from liability, but the answer is a definite no. Disclaimers would not stand up in court.”

FIND OUT MORE To find out more about Coversure’s insurance either ring 0800 4588181 or go to coversure.co.uk/nhf For more information generally on NHF insurance, go to nhf.info/insurance

OTHER TYPES OF INSURANCE TO CONSIDER ß Buildings and contents

If you own the freehold of your premises, it goes without saying you will need buildings insurance. Otherwise, contents is also a must. ß Personal, accident and illness

Does what it says on the tin. This provides an extra level of peace of mind on top of employers’ liability insurance.

and your premises was cordoned off, what would that cost you? Business interruption insurance can protect against these sorts of eventualities. Another one to consider here is “key person” insurance, essentially insurance to cover the cost of any interruption from someone key to your business not being able to work. ß Cyber threat insurance

ß Employee fraud or theft

Again, pretty self-explanatory. This will protect you against lightfingered or malicious employees. ß Shopfront glass and

equipment breakdown Check the extent to which this is covered within your buildings and/or contents insurance. But, again, this can provide extra peace of mind and prevent potentially costly disruption. ß Business interruption

If there was a fire down the street

With our growing reliance on computers and digital devices, this is becoming an increasingly popular form of insurance to protect against cyber threats such as viruses, ransomware or hacking of your system. ß Flood insurance

With flooding, especially in the winter, becoming a growing issue for many areas of the country, it can be good to investigate this as additional cover on top of any buildings, contents, or business interruption insurance.

Mar/Apr 2018 | salonfocus


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Events

WATCH OUT FOR THESE

DATES!

BOOKINGS Anyone interested in attending events should go to nhf.info/events Bookings can also be made by emailing events@nhf.info or contacting the NHF team on 01234 831965

BUSINESS EVENING EVENTS (7-9PM) USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO

THE NEW FINANCIAL YEAR FROM APRIL WILL BRING CHANGES YOU NEED TO BE PREPARED FOR. HERE ARE SOME KEY DATES. APRIL • National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage rates will go up From 01 April, the National Living Wage for over-25s and the various National Minimum Wage rates will all be going up.

GROW YOUR BUSINESS 19 March – Middlesbrough 14 May – Loughborough

• Changes to income tax in Scotland From April the Scottish Government is introducing new income tax rates, which will mean rates will be different between Scotland and the rest of the UK. See our news story on pages 8-9 for full details.

MOTIVATING YOUR TEAM

16 April – London (from 7pm –

• Income tax thresholds will go up With the start of a new tax year, the amount that can be earned before paying income tax will rise, both for higher and basic rate taxpayers.

• A reduction in the tax-free dividend allowance The government will be reducing the tax-free dividend allowance from £5,000 to £2,000 from April, meaning business owners who pay themselves via dividends rather than salary want to review whether this is still the most tax-efficient way. See our news story on pages 6-7 for full details.

• Tougher penalties will be introduced for employing illegal workers From April, employers will not be able to claim the Employment Allowance for one year if they are found to have hired an illegal worker or been penalised by the Home Office.

MAY The General Data Protection Regulations. 25 May is “GDPR Day”, or the day tough new European Union data laws will come into force, the General Data Protection Regulations. See our special focus in this edition, from pages ten to 19.

• Auto-enrolment pension contributions will go up The amount employers and employees will be expected to pay into their employee pensions under auto-enrolment will increase from April.

salonfocus | Mar/Apr 2018

12 March – Huddersfield IMPROVING YOUR PROFITS 16 April – Edinburgh 14 May – Cambridge AN EVENING WITH RICHARD & HELLEN WARD 21 May – Bournemouth GET SOCIAL, BE INSPIRED! 7.30pm)

CREATIVE EVENING EVENTS (7PM-9PM) BARBER DEMO WITH VIK RIAT 21 May – London FESTIVAL HAIR MASTERCLASS 5 March – Bristol BRIDAL HAIR AND MAKE-UP MASTERCLASS 19 March – Cardiff

WEBINARS (9.30AM TO 10.15AM), AT NHF.INFO CHANGES TO DATA PROTECTION REGULATIONS (GDPR) 6 March 17 April

Events taking place May-July are now available for booking via nhf.info/events


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salonfocus March/April 2018  

Salonfocus is the NHF’s award winning magazine. Created for salon owners, the pages are full of business news, industry hot topics and tips...

salonfocus March/April 2018  

Salonfocus is the NHF’s award winning magazine. Created for salon owners, the pages are full of business news, industry hot topics and tips...

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