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£3.50 Jan/Feb 2017

The essential magazine for salon owners

Strike A POSE Our stunning Photographic Stylist of the Year winners

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Minimum and living wage rates to go up… again

16

How rising self-employment is changing the industry

26

England’s new apprenticeships explained


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Contents

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P6 NEWS Employment tribunal fees have slashed the number of unfair dismissal cases being taken to court, the TUC has said

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P10 UP, UP, AND UP AGAIN National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage rates are going up… again P12 GOING STRONG AT 75 New NHF Business Awards to be centrepiece of 75th anniversary celebrations P14 TUNE IN, TURN ON The NHF is once again working with PRS for Music to offer members the chance to win a “music makeover” worth £5,000 P16 A CHANGING INDUSTRY How rising levels of self-employment are changing the face of hairdressing, barbering and beauty P20 MONEY MATTERS Wages study suggests hairdressing may finally be shaking off its reputation as a low pay/low wage industry P22 GREAT COVERAGE The pros and cons of adding hair loss services to your salon P24 MALE BOOMING How to turn male grooming into a valuable additional revenue stream P26 LESSON PLANS Unpicking how England’s new apprenticeship funding and training model will work

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P30 THE BEST OF BRITAIN! All the excitement, passion and creativity from November’s Britain’s Best P32 STRIKE A POSE Stunning winning images from the NHF’s Photographic Stylist of the Year P34 LOCAL DIFFICULTY NHF members in the Midlands are up in arms over a council’s “heavy-handed” approach to a local licensing law P36 LEARN TO EARN In 2017, the NHF is launching an exciting new programme of business events and workshops, while some popular favourites will return P38 EVENTS Where and when this year’s events will be coming to your area

CONNECT WITH US AND HAVE YOUR COMMENTS AND TWEETS IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF SALONFOCUS Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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Welcome

PRESIDENT’S

L E T T E R H

SALONFOCUS IS PUBLISHED BY: National Hairdressers’ Federation, One Abbey Court, Fraser Road, Priory Business Park, Bedford MK44 3WH t: +44 (0) 1234 831965 f: +44 (0) 1234 838875 e: sfenquiries@salonfocus.co.uk w: www.nhf.info PUBLISHER Hilary Hall e: hilary.hall@nhf.info EDITOR Nic Paton e: nic@cormorantmedia.co.uk EVENTS AND SOCIAL MEDIA Victoria Priestley t: +44 (0) 1234 834386 e: Victoria.Priestley@nhf.info ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Andy Etherton T: + 44 (0) 1536 527297 e: andy.etherton@nhf.info DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Rick Fraterrigo Matrix Print Consultants Ltd t: +44 (0) 1536 527297 e: rick@matrixprint.com While every care is taken in compiling this issue of salonfocus including manuscripts and photographs submitted, we accept no responsibility for any losses or damage, whatever the cause. All information and prices contained in advertisements are accepted by the publishers in good faith as being correct at the time of going to press. Neither the advertisers nor the publishers accept any responsibility for any variations affecting price variations or availability after the publication has gone to press. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the permission of the publisher, to whom application must first be made. The views expressed by contributors to salonfocus are not necessarily those of the NHF, the publisher or its editor. © 2017 The National Hairdressers’ Federation. Material for consideration in this section of the magazine should be submitted via email or digital file transfer to the editor, salonfocus. Submissions should be made on the understanding that the National Hairdressers’ Federation has the right to use the material in any part of the magazine and any of its other publications, promotions or website, free from any copyright restrictions, or appearance fees other than the issue of artistic and photographic credits where applicable. Please include salon name, photographer and stylist. COVER IMAGE BY DAVID BAKER, OF THE VAULT HAIR AND SPA, ESHER, ONE OF THE WINNING IMAGES FROM 2016’S PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLIST OF THE YEAR COMPETITION

airdressing, barbering and beauty has never been an industry to sit still. To survive in a fast-changing environment, salons and barber shops have always needed to be flexible, innovative and creative. Therefore, our latest statistics, which show our industry to be expanding but also shrinking – in terms of the number of people it directly employs – are perhaps not that surprising. Flexible, app-based hair and beauty businesses that bring networks of self-employed contractors ABOUT AGNES Agnes Leonard is president of the rather than “employees” direct to the client are NHF and a registered hairdresser. very much part of an increasingly mobile, She has worked in the industry for 36 years and owns Croppers smartphone-based retail world. And they are Hair Studio in Dundee, a busy, family-run salon successfully exciting and innovative. adapting to the fast-changing But such models do create challenges for our retail environment – just, in fact, like many NHF members up industry. How can traditional businesses with and down the country. employees and “bricks and mortar” premises compete? How will people coming into our industry have access to proper salon-based training and sustainable careers? What are the dangers if it means our industry becomes associated in the public mind with companies such as Uber or Deliveroo, whose business models are being investigated as examples of “bogus” self-employment that potentially exploit workers? Self-employment is a valuable business model for many salons, and an attractive and flexible way of working for many. But, as an industry, we need to recognise that self-employment-based business models have downsides as well as upsides. AGNES LEONARD NHF president

COMING UP IN MARCH/APRIL How to maximise technology, both in-chair and across your salon

Slam! Managing conflict and staff walkouts Recyclables, bit of a fad or a potential salon game-changer?

Do you have a salon story to tell? Would you like to be featured in salonfocus? Get in touch with the team, on 01234 834385, or send an email to nic@cormorantmedia.co.uk

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017


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News

S H A R P FA L L I N TRIBUNAL CASES n investigation by the TUC has suggested the number of people taking their employers to an employment tribunal has fallen by 9,000 a month since charges were introduced in 2013.

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It can now cost as much as £1,200 for an employee to bring a claim against an employer. The fees were originally introduced by the government to discourage frivolous claims, which can be stressful for employers to deal with, especially small business owners who

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

may not have access to specialist HR or legal support. An analysis of Ministry of Justice figures by the TUC compared the number of cases being brought before and after the introduction of fees. In 2012-13 around 16,000 people per month on average took a claim against their employer to tribunal. But in 2015-16 this had dropped to 7,000 a month. Claims for unfair dismissal were down 73%, and the analysis also suggested there had been sharp drops in sex, race and disability discrimination cases. TUC general secretary Frances

O’Grady said the figures showed “discrimination at work can flourish unchecked and people can be sacked without good reason”.

COST OF CLAIMS However, the Ministry of Justice made the counter-argument that it was only “right that those who use our tribunals should contribute to the £71m cost of running the service”. The figures echo the findings of the House of Commons Justice Committee, which in June said there had been a “precipitate drop” of almost 70% in the number of cases being brought.


News

INSURANCE FEARS

More than a third (34%) of small and medium-sized businesses could have insufficient insurance to cover the biggest risks they face this winter, including flooding and digital disruption, a survey has suggested. Of these, a further third (34%) feared cyber attacks the most, with public liability costs considered the next biggest threat (28%), followed by crime and break-ins (19%), according to the poll by insurer SME Insurance. When it came to cyber crime, 30% felt vulnerable to computer viruses, while 22% claimed data theft was their sole digital threat. Some 15% felt a lack of security

awareness among their employees could be leaving their business vulnerable online. Following widespread flooding across the UK last winter, 44% believed the government and the Environment Agency could do more to protect small businesses from flooding, with 22% stating that national flood defences could be improved. The research is a wake-up call for small business owners to doublecheck their insurance policy, and whether they’re properly covered for the risks they feel might most be an issue for them – especially things like flooding over the winter months.

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TRUST ISSUES Salons that are seen to be using modern technology are more likely to be trusted by clients, research from payments processing company Worldpay has suggested. The study in collaboration with “digital anthropologist” Nik Pollinger has argued that, for younger clients especially, handwritten receipts, cash-only payments and the lack of a website are “triggers” that can make clients think twice about whether or not they're prepared to spend money with that salon. Three quarters (75%) of those polled said alarm bells would start to ring for them if a salon seemed to be behind the times from a technology point of view. More than four out of ten (41%) said retailers who made it easy to pay by card as well as cash were most trusted. Small businesses that refused to take card payments provoked a particularly strong reaction among customers, with one in five under35s saying they would be concerned about the quality of product or service they received from that business as a result.

NEW PROVIDER FOR ‘LEGAL LIFELINE’ he NHF moved its legal helpline and legal expenses insurance from Croners to Ellis Whittam at the end of 2016. The change follows the acquisition of Croners by Peninsula, but the NHF has emphasised its members

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will still have 24/7, 365-day access to legal and employment law advice. On top of this, members will also gain access to an extensive suite of online guidance and advice, which will be available via the NHF website. Members with a business, legal

or employment question can still call the lifeline on 01234 831965 or email enquiries@nhf.info Employment-related support is available 24/7 all year round and commercial issues 9am-5pm Monday-Friday.

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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News

WORTHY WINNERS tylists from Gloucester and Brighouse in West Yorkshire were 2016’s Britain’s Best champions, while the winners of the NHF’s Photographic Stylist of the Year competition were also announced in November.

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Bridie Thorne, from Pride Hairdressing & Barber Shop in Gloucester, was crowned Ladies Champion and Kieren Goldspint, from Taylors & Co in Brighouse, was announced as Men’s Champion at the competition, held at the British Motor Museum in Gaydon, Warwickshire on Sunday 13 November. Meanwhile, there were six winners in the Photographic Stylist of the Year

competition, across the four categories of Ladies, Men’s and Afro-Caribbean, announced on the same day. The six were: • Amy Johnson, of Headromance, Portsmouth – Ladies Fashion Look (students and trainees) • Ross Charles, of Ross Charles Salon, York – Ladies Fashion Look • Naomi Brooks, of The Hair Sanctuary, Manchester – Female Afro-Caribbean Fashion Look • Nathan Pinder, of Ross Charles Salon, York – Male Afro-Caribbean Fashion Look • Craig Simpson, of Copperfields Hair & Beauty, Perth – Men’s Fashion Look • David Baker, of The Vault Hair and Spa, Esher – Ladies Fashion Collection NHF president Agnes Leonard

APPRENTICE RISK Apprentices are at much greater risk of suffering accidents and injuries at work than their more experienced colleagues, a survey has warned. The study by insurer Direct Line for Business found trainees were less likely to take sick leave than full-time employees, but 73% more likely to be involved in an accident.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

The NHF’s health and safety toolkit includes a valuable risk assessment form specifically for apprentices, trainees and younger workers. Priced at £65 for members and £99 for non-members (plus £4.50 P&P), the box is available through the NHF’s online shop or by ringing 01234 831965.

praised the high standard of entries to both competitions. “The talent, passion and creativity on display was inspiring – Britain’s Best truly showcases talent from across the country in hairdressing, barbering and beauty. “The Photographic Stylist of the Year competition also showcases some of the most vibrant, exciting talent within our industry, and this year has been no exception,” she said. A full list of the 11 Britain’s Best category winners can be found at britainsbest.me Turn to page 30 for more images from the day, and page 32 for our gallery of the winning Photographic Stylist of the Year images.


News

TWITTER FOLLOWERS 10,400

WELL DONE WALES The organisers of the NHF’s Welsh Awards in November are buzzing after receiving high praise from Andrew Davies, leader of the Welsh Conservatives in the Welsh Assembly. Mr Davies, who presented the Welsh Young Stylist/Beauty Therapist award (won by Shannon Jenkins of Syran John), said it had been an “honour” and “a privilege” to be involved. “It is vital that we celebrate successful hairdressers and stylists, and recognise them for their achievements. The NHF Welsh Awards are a great way of doing this, and it was fantastic to be part of the event,” he added.

HERBERT HOWE Celebrity hairdresser Herbert Howe sadly passed away from cancer in October. Herbert, 72, was synonymous with the city of Liverpool, where he was known as “Herbert of Liverpool” and even once stood as candidate for mayor. He raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for charity and in April last year received a prestigious Humanitarian Award from the Fellowship for British Hairdressing.

NHF SUBS New NHF subscription fees have been agreed for 2017. From January, the fee for a salon member will be £264 a year. For a solo member, it will be £144 a year. The annual fee for affiliate members will be £143. Members are reminded your subscription will not increase until your next renewal date. The NHF will write to you when your subscription is next due.

FACEBOOK LIKES 11,753

GET READY FOR TWELVE-SIDED £1

Salons are being reminded the new 12-sided £1 coin will come into circulation from March. The Royal Mint has created a website, thenewpoundcoin.com, to outline to businesses what the new coin will look like and how they might be affected when it is introduced. The coin is unlikely directly to affect salons and barber shops in terms of till technology, but it will be a good idea to ensure staff are familiar with it and its design before it comes into circulation. Perhaps more importantly, the Royal Mint is highlighting that businesses will need to be prepared for when the old circular £1 coin goes out of circulation from the autumn. All businesses will be told not to accept the old coin or distribute it from this time. Between now and the autumn businesses can accept both coins, the Royal Mint has emphasised. The coin is being introduced because of the number of fake £1 coins currently in circulation. It is estimated as many as one in 30 £1 coins are fakes, and the new distinctive design will be much harder to counterfeit. The introduction of the new coin follows polymer £5 notes coming into circulation last September.

ACADEMY

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INSTAGRAM LIKES 1,185

WHAT’S TRENDING TWEETS AND POSTS FROM BRITAIN’S BEST AND PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLIST OF THE YEAR Hair by Jones We had an amazing time at the National Hairdressers Federation Britain’s Best Competition 2016.

Spirit Hair Company Hayley on her way to Britain’s Best National Hairdressers Federation competition. Shine like a star Hayley, love your Spirit team.

The Vault Hair and Spa Congratulations Dave who is officially the National Hairdressers Federation photographic stylist of the year 2016!!!

EXPANSION NHF member the London Hairdressing Apprenticeship Academy has opened a new academy in Chiswick, west London, with the assistance of a £200,000 funding package from banking giant HSBC. The academy will allow the business to offer more than 150 new apprenticeships to budding hairdressers, and provide 77 new jobs for the local community.

JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION @nhfederation

@NHFederation facebook.com/national hairdressersfederation

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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National Minimum Wage

UP, UP, AND UP

AGAIN

THE NATIONAL LIVING WAGE AND NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE ARE GOING UP… AGAIN. SALONFOCUS LOOKS AT WHAT TO EXPECT.

race yourselves. It may only feel like yesterday since you last put up National Minimum Wage rates, but there are more rises on the way.

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Chancellor Philip Hammond revealed in his Autumn Statement in November that both National Minimum Wage rates and the National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and over will be going up from April. It will mean that in just 12 months – from April 2016 to April 2017 – hair and beauty salons and barber shops will have had to cope with the arrival of the National Living Wage, two sharp rises in National Minimum

Wage rates and a further rise in the National Living Wage. As well as a 4.2% lift to £7.50 for the National Living Wage, the hourly rate for those aged 21-24 will increase by 10p to £7.05 and the rate for those aged 18-29 will go up by 5p to £5.60. The hourly rate for those aged 16-17 will also rise by 5p, to £4.05, and the apprentice rate will go up by 10p to £3.50 (see panel for full details). NHF chief executive Hilary Hall expressed the industry’s dismay at the move. “We all understand the pressures that have been created in our economy and society by pay disparities, but for a labour-intensive sector such as hair and beauty, the rate and frequency of increases is unsustainable,” she said.

WE ALL UNDERSTAND THE PRESSURES THAT HAVE BEEN CREATED IN OUR ECONOMY AND SOCIETY BY PAY DISPARITIES, BUT FOR A LABOUR-INTENSIVE SECTOR SUCH AS HAIR AND BEAUTY, THE RATE AND FREQUENCY OF INCREASES IS UNSUSTAINABLE

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

AND MORE TO COME… The Low Pay Commission, which recommends future minimum and living wage rates, has outlined what salons might now expect in terms of future National Living Wage rates. With the economic outlook more uncertain, the government’s ambition for the wage to be £9 an hour by 2020 will probably have to be scaled back. However, it still wants the wage to be equivalent to 60% of average earnings by 2020. Expect it therefore to be between £7.80 and £7.91 an hour from April 2018. By 2020 it could be between £8.50 to £8.73 an hour, most likely around £8.61.


MORE

CASH

FOR

ENFORCEMENT

THE TREASURY SAID: AS PART OF ITS PAY ANNOUNCEMENTS, THE TREASURY OUTLINED MORE CASH FOR NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE ENFORCEMENT. THE PLAN IS TO INVEST AN ADDITIONAL £4.3M A YEAR TO STRENGTHEN AND BOOST ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES IN THIS AREA

THIS WILL FUND NEW HM REVENUE AND CUSTOMS TEAMS TO PROACTIVELY REVIEW THOSE EMPLOYERS CONSIDERED MOST AT RISK OF NON-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NMW. THE GOVERNMENT WILL ALSO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL SUPPORT TARGETED AT SMALL BUSINESSES TO HELP THEM TO COMPLY; AND A CAMPAIGN AIMED AT RAISING AWARENESS AMONGST WORKERS AND EMPLOYERS OF THEIR RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

NATIONAL MINIMUM AND LIVING WAGE HOURLY RATES FROM APRIL 2017 RATE

CURRENT

FROM APRIL 2017

NATIONAL LIVING WAGE (OVER 25S)

£7.20

£7.50

AGE 21-24

£6.95

£7.05

AGE 18-20

£5.55

£5.60

AGE 16-17

£4.00

£4.05

APPRENTICE*

£3.40

£3.50

*The apprentice rate applies to those aged 16-18 training on an apprenticeship and to those aged 19 or over who are in the first year of an apprenticeship, after which they revert to their appropriate age-related rate

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE When you choose Salonsure you get excellent Salon Insurance, but did you know that Coversure also offers a wide range of other insurance policies? For example: • Personal accident • Home, motor and travel • RAC breakdown cover

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coversure.co.uk/nhf Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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The NHF’s 75th anniversary

A SHORT

AS STRONG AS EVER NHF PRESIDENT AGNES LEONARD REFLECTS ON HOW THE NHF HAS CHANGED SINCE BEING FORMED 75 YEARS AGO.

Agnes Leonard

here’s no question 1942 was a difficult year for Britain. World War Two was at its height and was not going well for this country. Although the tide of war did begin to turn in Britain’s favour by the end of the year, for many people it was a worrying, stressful time.

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Yet, while the history books focus on the global struggle going on at that time, 1942 was also a landmark year for our industry. It was the year the National Federation of Hairdressers Limited and the Northern Counties Hairdressers Federation, at the time the country’s two largest hairdressing organisations, came together to form the National Hairdressers Federation. A lot has changed since 1942. Styles and looks, of course. Technology. The business landscape. But one thing has stayed constant – the support and guidance we’ve offered to members, and also the commitment of you, our members, to the Federation. As we show opposite, hairdressers have long recognised the benefit of collaborating and working together. And the NHF has always been about supporting our members. I genuinely see the NHF as a “family”. We’re led by you, your concerns and your successes.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

That’s why one of the centrepieces of our anniversary celebrations has been to launch a new NHF Business Awards; to celebrate hair, beauty and barber shops that are performing exceptionally day in and day out.

GROW AND IMPROVE I look forward to celebrating our anniversary during 2017 with you, reflecting on our successes and achievements but also looking forward to how we can carry on our momentum, how we can grow and improve. The NHF has come a long way in 75 years, long may this continue.

HISTORY he NHF may have been formed 75 years ago, but we can trace our history back more than 125 years to the foundation of the Oldham Hairdressers’ Association.

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• However, it is likely informal hairdresser associations existed long before even that. In fact, as early as in 1831 there was a benevolent organisation for hairdressers, which suggests hairdressers had even then banded together to form some sort of collaborative body. • The NHF as we know it today came about in 1942 when the National Federation of Hairdressers Limited and the Northern Counties Hairdressers Federation – the two largest hairdressing organisations – amalgamated to form the National Hairdressers Federation. • Within a short time, other hairdressing organisations pooled their resources with the Federation. • These were the Scottish Master Hairdressers’ Association, the North East Hairdressers Amalgamated, the Welsh Hairdressers’ Federation, and numerous other smaller societies. Some of the smaller societies were quite influential, such as the Nottingham Hairdressers’ Association and the Leicester Hairdressers’ Association. • The last influential and longstanding organisation to amalgamate was the London and Provincial Hairdressers’ Association, which had its office in London and joined in January 1958. • With its merger, the National Hairdressers Federation became the biggest salon trade association in the industry, a role that has been unchanged to the present day, and we exist to represent hairdressing, barbering and beauty salons owners across the UK.


The NHF’s 75th anniversary

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A LOT HAS CHANGED SINCE 1942. STYLES AND LOOKS, OF COURSE. TECHNOLOGY. THE BUSINESS LANDSCAPE. BUT ONE THING HAS STAYED CONSTANT – THE SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE WE’VE OFFERED TO MEMBERS, AND ALSO THE COMMITMENT OF YOU, OUR MEMBERS, TO THE FEDERATION.

BRITAIN IN 1942: NATION WAS AT WAR, BUT AS THE YEAR THE NHF WAS FORMED, IT WAS ALSO A LANDMARK FOR OUR INDUSTRY.

CELEBRATE YOUR

BUSINESS he NHF has been there for the hair, beauty and barbering industry through thick and thin, supporting salons and barbershops to make their businesses the best they can be for 75 years. Now we want to celebrate you.

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As part of our anniversary celebrations, we are launching a new NHF Business Awards designed to showcase the success of both NHF member and non-member hair, beauty and barber shops up and down the country. We will be celebrating salons and barber shops in nine categories: • Best independent hair or beauty salon • Best independent barber shop or male grooming business • Best group of businesses • Best new business • Best client experience • Best community support • Best apprentice • Best front of house

• Best environmentally-friendly business The closing date for competition entries will be in July 2017, with finalists revealed in September and then the winners announced at a glittering event at the VOX at Resort World at the NEC in Birmingham on Sunday 19 November. The winners of the NHF Photographic Stylist of the Year competition will also be announced at the same event. The awards will open for entries in March – so look out in the next edition of salonfocus for full details of how to enter.

WE WANT YOUR STORIES! As part of our anniversary celebrations, we’re looking for stories and photographs from members about their time with the NHF. How has the NHF, and hairdressing, barbering and beauty, changed since you’ve been in the industry? What styles or looks – good or bad – really stick in your mind? How has the NHF helped you and your business? We’d love to hear your thoughts and stories and see your pictures on social media, at facebook.com/ nationalhairdressersfederation and twitter.com/NHfederation

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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Member competition

TUNE IN,TURN ON THE NHF IS ONCE AGAIN WORKING WITH MUSIC RIGHTS ORGANISATION PRS FOR MUSIC TO OFFER MEMBERS THE CHANCE TO WIN A “MUSIC MAKEOVER” WORTH £5,000. you’re relieved or sad that Slade’s Merry Christmas Everybody has now been W hether packed away for another year, the music in and around your salon can make a huge difference to the atmosphere and buzz of your business.

The NHF is once again working with music rights organisation PRS for Music to offer members the chance to win a “music makeover” worth £5,000. NHF chief executive Hilary Hall will be among the judges for this year’s competition, which is designed to help hair and beauty salons and barber shops showcase and improve the music “experience” for their clients.

“Music is such a vital part of the experience we want to create for our customers. It helps them to feel welcome and relaxed, it’s also an important part of our brand,” said partner/manager Sophie Webster (pictured above left, with Simon). There will also be a runners-up prize worth £2,500.

MUSIC CONSULTATION

To enter, you need to have a valid PRS for Music licence and simply go to prsformusic.com/musicmakeover and complete the online entry form. The deadline for entries is Friday 24 February, with a final cut-off of 5pm. So, don’t delay!

The competition, now in its third year, has been won by NHF members in both the previous two years, with Brighton salon Simon Webster Hair beating off more than 300 entries to pick up the prize last year. As a result, the salon received a bespoke music consultation from leading record producer Steve Levine plus had a £5,000 interactive sound system installed over its three floors.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

HOW TO ENTER

MUSIC IS SUCH A VITAL PART OF THE EXPERIENCE WE WANT TO CREATE FOR OUR CUSTOMERS. IT HELPS THEM TO FEEL WELCOME AND RELAXED, IT’S ALSO AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR BRAND,


PRS for Music is offering a ÂŁ5,000 Music Makeover for one lucky salon in the UK. Music brings business to life.

Enter now prsformusic.com/musicmakeover Deadline is Friday 24 February 2017 at 5pm (T&Cs apply)


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Hairdressing, barbering and beauty in 2017

A CHANGING

INDUSTRY

SALONS HAVE LONG USED CHAIR OR TREATMENT ROOM RENTING AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO EMPLOYING STAFF. BUT LATEST NHF INDUSTRY STATISTICS SUGGEST THIS TREND IS ACCELERATING, AND COULD BRING RISKS FOR SALONS. irst, the good news. Britain’s hairdressing, barbering and beauty industry remains vibrant, with the number of salons and barber shops on our high streets continuing to grow, latest statistics from the NHF have confirmed.

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However, alongside this, the number of selfemployed people working in our industry is also slowly rising. Salons have, of course, long used chair or treatment room renting as a business model, and its growing popularity appears to be one factor behind this trend. But we’re also seeing new salon business models coming through that are solely based on mobile, self-employed workers, much like Uber for taxi drivers or Deliveroo and Hermes for fast food and parcel deliveries respectively. This trend potentially creates three worries for the industry. First, if it continues, what will this trend mean for established salons with premises to maintain, staff to pay and holiday and sick pay and other employment benefits to cover?

MOBILE WORKING Second, if we see app-based, mobile business models based on self-employment continuing to grow in popularity, what will that mean in terms of the training and development of future generations of hairdressers, barbers and beauty therapists? Where will they learn their trade? And, third, given the fact MPs, the courts and the government are increasingly sitting up and starting to take an interest in the ethics and practices of new self-employment-based models – the so-called “gig economy” – is there a danger here for salons in terms of public reputation and image? Over the next eight pages salonfocus is looking at the figures and what they tell us. Overleaf, we look at how self-employment is potentially changing the industry. Then on pages 1921 we’ll examine an NHF survey of members looking at pay and benefits. salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

THERE ARE JUST OVER 40,000 hairdressing, barbering and beauty businesses in the UK 93% OF ALL hairdressing, barbering and beauty businesses employ fewer than 10 people

TWO THIRDS of hairdressing, barbering and beauty businesses have an annual turnover of less than £99K

THE HAIRDRESSING, BARBERING AND BEAUTY INDUSTRY contributes almost £7bn to the UK economy each year

HAIRDRESSING / BARBERING BUSINESSES are the 5th most popular independent start-ups and beauty salons are the 8th most popular

2% INCREASE in the number of hairdressing, barbering and beauty businesses in the 12 months from August 2016

2% INCREASE in the number of salons with less than four employees. Such micro businesses now account for more than 80% of all hair and beauty businesses


Hairdressing, barbering and beauty in 2017

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2017 INDUSTRY STATISTICS FOR HAIRDRESSING BARBERING & BEAUTY

UP TO 270,000 PEOPLE work in the hairdressing, barbering and beauty industry

48% OF PEOPLE working in the hair and barbering and 57% of people working in the beauty industry are self-employed

OVER HALF THE PEOPLE working in hair and beauty are aged 16 to 34, with females aged 25 to 34 making up the largest group

79% of salon owners are female

OVER 22,000 PEOPLE started hairdressing, barbering or beauty apprenticeships in 2014/15 across the UK. Hairdressing is the 10th most popular apprenticeship in England

3% INCREASE in the number of businesses with turnover of less than ÂŁ49,000. This suggest these smallest businesses are run primarily by self-employed people

5% DECREASE in the number of people working in the industry. This suggests that salon owners have cut back on staff numbers, but could also be an indication selfemployment is growing, not just chair renting or treatments rooms, but also mobile freelancers

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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Hairdressing, barbering and beauty in 2017

WHY UBER CASE COULD BE A HEADACHE FOR SALONS Back in October a UK employment tribunal ruled that taxi firm Uber must stop treating its drivers as selfemployed. The ruling has meant Uber has lost the right to classify its UK drivers as self-employed, and so will need to begin paying them the National Living Wage (or National Minimum Wage if aged under 25) as well as offer paid holiday leave and paid rest breaks. The legal precedent this sets could therefore have implications for the many thousands of hair and beauty salons and barber shops that also use self-employed people, the NHF has warned. However… and it is a big however… the case is by no means cut and dried. Uber is expected to appeal against the ruling, which had yet to happen as salonfocus went to press in December. This means the precise legal implications for salons remain unclear. Equally positively, employment lawyers have pointed out that in legal terms the ruling will not in itself set a precedent that other courts or tribunals have to follow.

PROPER AGREEMENTS Nevertheless, the case has highlighted the need for salons using self-employed workers to have proper, legally watertight agreements or contracts in place. “Salons must make absolutely sure they have watertight chair renting agreements or treatment room/space agreements in place which they operate strictly in accordance with what’s written in the agreement,” explains NHF chief executive Hilary Hall. “One important feature that came out of the Uber case is that it isn’t enough just to have paperwork saying someone is self-employed. What matters – and what will protect a salon – is that you can show you are operating within the strict HM Revenue & Customs definitions of what counts as self-employment. “The NHF chair renting and treatment room agreements are specifically designed to ensure salon owners meet those criteria,” Hilary adds.

NEW MODELS Just like Uber for taxis and Deliveroo or Hermes for deliveries, a range of hair, barbering and beauty business models based around mobile, selfemployed workers are beginning to emerge. All work through an app booking system, after which clients are visited direct at their home or work. Here are some examples…

BLOW Blow (blowltd.com) provides mobile hair beauty services, and says it now has 3,000 self-employed beauty professionals on its books, of which around 200 work for it regularly, visiting clients directly at home. It charges £40 for a blow dry, around £75 for blow dry, make-up and lashes, and £30 for a manicure.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

GET SMOOTH

Similar to Blow, Get Smooth (getsmooth.co) uses self-employed barbers who come out straight to the client. It charges £25 for a haircut, £30 for a haircut and beard trim and £35 for a haircut and wet shave.

URBAN MASSAGE Again on a similar model, Urban Massage (urbanmassage.com) offers one-or two-therapist treatments, ranging from £65 for 60 minutes up to £95 for two hours. It claims to have delivered more than 40,000 treatments via more than 500 therapists. Among its services, it offers chair massages in the office, sports treatments and deep tissue massages.

The NHF offers members access to six legally watertight independent contractor agreements, which can be downloaded by logging into the member site at nhf.info

UBER: COURT CASE COULD HAVE IMPLICATIONS FOR SELFEMPLOYMENT ELSEWHERE, INCLUDING IN HAIR AND BEAUTY.

TO WATCH OUT FOR AND ONE THAT’S A LITTLE DIFFERENT… SPRUCE MOOSE A budget gym chain is launching a new beauty salon arm that uses an innovative gym-style monthly membership business model. Spruce Moose was due to be launched by Pure Gym during November, and will initially be focused in cities in the north of England, including Harrogate, Leeds, Manchester and York as likely destinations. Its overall aim is to roll out nationally. Members will pay a monthly fee and receive discounts on treatments of up to 40%, it has said.


Hairdressing, barbering and beauty in 2017

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MONEY

MATTERS THE HIGHEST PAYING SALONS TEND TO BE LARGER, AND MOSTLY BASED IN THE LONDON AREA.

HAIRDRESSING, BARBERING AND BEAUTY MAY BE SHAKING OFF ITS REPUTATION AS A LOW WAGE EMPLOYER, NHF FIGURES HAVE ARGUED. BUT THERE IS STILL A LONG WAY TO GO. airdressing, barbering and beauty has long been recognised as a creative, exciting career. But, whether as an apprentice or from college, most people coming into the industry don’t expect to make a fortune, at least not straight away.

H

What the industry offers is opportunity: to progress, to build a column and reputation, to open your own business and, hopefully from there, begin to make some serious money. But at trainee and junior level and even in first qualified roles, the industry’s reputation has often been one of low wages and low pay – the bare legal minimum and little more beyond occasional tips, commission and bonuses. A recent NHF poll of members, however, has painted a rather different picture, one that suggests the industry’s reputation for poor or low wages may be unjustified. The poll of some 230 members aimed to find out what salons paid their staff as well as bonuses, benefits and commissions.

Of course, there’s an important “but” here. It stands to reason salons that are proud about what they pay their staff will be more likely to be open about their pay and conditions. Therefore, the survey sample may naturally lean towards salons that tend to be more generous with their pay or benefits. Perhaps unsurprisingly too, the highest paying salons tend to be the larger salons (in the £251,000-£500,000 turnover bracket), and mostly based in the London area.

WAGE VARIATION Our graphics show some of the findings around hourly pay rates. But when it comes to average weekly pay, the lowest rate reported in the survey was £283 (or the equivalent of £14,716 per year). By comparison, the highest weekly rate was £388, or approximately £20,000 a year. The highest weekly wage paid to stylists with two or more years’ experience was £800 per week. For salon managers, the lowest average weekly wage was £401 (or £20,852 per year) and the highest was £463, or about £24,000 per year. Similar to stylists, rates varied, and the top reported rate was also £800 a week.

FIND OUT MORE TURN OVER TO SEE WHAT OUR SURVEY SAID ABOUT SALON PAY Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


20

Statistics, Wages and Self-Employment

HOURLY RATES IN THE HAIRDRESSING, BARBERING AND BEAUTY INDUSTRY

Average hourly rate for… HAIR STYLISTS with less than two years’ experience £6.72

£6.86

HAIR STYLISTS with more than two years’ experience £8.02

£3.00

£4.00

£5.00

£6.00

£7.00

£9.17

£8.00

£9.00

FOR BARBERS with less than one years’ experience £7.50

£7.60

FOR BARBERS with less more than one years’ experience £8.07

£3.00

£4.00

£5.00

£6.00

£7.00

£8.90

£8.00

£9.00

FOR BEAUTY THERAPISTS £7.38

£8.04

FOR AN APPRENTICE £4.11

£3.00

£4.00

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

£4.36

£5.00

£6.00

£7.00

£8.00

£9.00


Statistics, Wages and Self-Employment

21

BONUSES AND COMMISSIONS

56.2%

74.8%

PERCENTAGE WHO GAVE BONUSES

PERCENTAGE WHO PAY COMMISSION

WHAT BENEFITS DO YOU OFFER YOUR STAFF?

50% FREE CAR PARKING

90.2% FREE DRINKS

16.3% HOLIDAYS ABOVE THE STATUTORY

93.5% STAFF DISCOUNT

10.9% PERKBOX*

HOW DO SALONS COMPARE? While this survey does suggest salon pay is improving, how does the industry as a whole compare with the average pay of other trades or professions? Separate research carried out for the NHF by rewards firm Croner has suggested hairdressing is similar to cleaners, at £7.80 an hour, at least for some roles.

43.5% PAID TIME OFF FOR MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS

When compared with retail staff, the average hourly wage for full-time sales staff is £7.76, rising to £11.29 for a shop manager, so in a similar sort of range. A labourer, by comparison, according to Croner, on average takes home £10.80 an hour and a semiskilled craftsperson £11.32 an hour, it also concluded.

14.1% OTHER

*Perkbox is a company that offers employees non-cash benefits, such as movie tickets, restaurant meals, phone insurance and more. The NHF is in discussions with Perkbox to make these benefits available to member salons and their staff. Watch this space!

FIND OUT MORE The full survey is available to members to download from the NHF shop, at nhf.info, or call us on 01234 831965 for a copy.

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


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New Year, new salon – making additional services work: hair loss

GREAT

COVERAGE

MOST SALONS ALREADY HAVE EXPERIENCE OF SUPPORTING CLIENTS WITH HAIR LOSS. SO, COULD ADDING A SPECIALIST HAIRLOSS SERVICE BE A USEFUL ADDITION TO YOUR SALON? air loss is estimated to affect as many as half of women at some point in their lives, while 40% of men have noticeable hair loss by the age of 35, rising to two thirds by 60. Alopecia areata (or patches of baldness) affects one person in 100. And this is before we even get to hair loss associated with treatments for cancer.

H

One way or another therefore, hair salons and barber shops will almost certainly be dealing with hair loss, and issues, fears or worries associated with hair loss, every day. So, given the evident scale of the problem, and therefore the potential market, can adding hair loss services be a money-spinner for a salon? And, if so, how easy is it to do? The first thing to recognise is “hair loss services” can mean a range of different things and different types or levels of service – everything from simple advice and guidance to clients, through to hair extensions, to hair systems, to wigs and full-blown specialist trichology services.

COMPLEX AREA For a salon owner thinking hair loss support might be a valuable addition to their menu of salon services, it is important to think long and hard about how deep you want to dive into what can be a complex area, as hair loss specialist Simone Thomas explains. “It takes years to understand hair loss properly, just as it takes years to become a good hairdresser. It is not an easy option to add to your salon; it is a real skill. “It is a good idea is for salons to understand and know more about common scalp disorders and when to refer clients to a trichologist. But to take on hair loss as a service can be very challenging within a salon environment. It is not like learning to wash and blow dry. Every client is going to be different, and will have different medication and health issues,” Simone adds.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

NHF WORKSHOPS But that’s not to say at least dipping your toes into this area is not doable, argues Eva Proudman, specialist hair consultant and trichologist at wig maker and hair extension supplier Banbury Postiche. “There are three key questions you need to ask. What is it you want to offer? How are you going to offer it? "For example, if you’re going to offer a wig service you need to have a quiet, secluded space, at the very least a screened off area, or to offer it as a service outside normal salon hours. And who are you going to be offering it to?” she advises. “Is it going to be a service that support clients who have hair loss for a medical reason, perhaps chemotherapy? Is it going to be female- or malebased, or both? Or could it be a service for children? Or people who identify as transgender? “What is it that you want to offer? Is it going to be solely about products, perhaps just hair fibres that help to mask thinning hair, hair extensions or integrated clip-ons or ready-to-wear, off-the-peg wigs? Or is it going to be more than that? "Who, or how much of the business, is going to be involved? Is it just going to be you, the owner, or others and what sort of training will be required?” adds Eva. “For me it comes down to the three ‘Is’: investigate, invest, and implement. Investigate all of the questions above. "Consider how much you are willing to invest in this – time and money – and keep a review of it; are you getting a return on your investment? And think about a phased implementation, so doing it in a measured way. “Bear in mind, too, it could be as minimal as simply running a hair health clinic. We normally can’t see the tops or backs of our heads so it is quite possible clients haven’t realised anything might be wrong. "Another option is to work with a trichologist to run a clinic which, in turn, could link to retail sales or, in time, extra services,” Eva adds. Both Eva and Simone are set to be running courses for the NHF in the coming months, on hair loss and hair extensions respectively.


Adding Services – Hair Loss

THERE ARE THREE KEY QUESTIONS YOU NEED TO ASK. WHAT IS IT YOU WANT TO OFFER? HOW ARE YOU GOING TO OFFER IT? AND WHO ARE YOU GOING TO BE OFFERING IT TO?

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FIND OUT MORE

Eva Proudman’s first “Hair Loss Solutions In-Salon” workshop is being run in Chester on 10 April, with others to follow later in the year. Simone Thomas’ “Hair extensions – an introduction” course will be run in Reading on 27 March. For more details see Events in this edition on pages 36 and 38 or go to nhf.info/events

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


24

New Year, new salon – making additional services work: male grooming

MALE

BOOMING EVEN IF YOUR SALON PREDOMINANTLY CATERS FOR FEMALE CLIENTS, MALE GROOMING COULD BE A SIGNIFICANT UNTAPPED MARKET, ARGUES JESSICA ZEINSTRA, EDUCATION MANAGER AT ANDIS. Jessica Zeinstra

I

f you’re running a barber shop, male grooming is probably already a significant part of your business. But for salons with a mix of male and female clients, and even for salons that predominantly offer services for women, there are still ways you can tap into this fast-growing market. Here are my eight top tips.

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

1

Get the knowledge. You’re only going to attract – and keep – clients if they feel confident in your knowledge and expertise. So, don’t assume that, just because you already offer female beauty services, male grooming will be a walk in the park. Go on courses, get the relevant training or qualifications you or your team need. It is important to keep updating and refreshing your knowledge. The NHF runs courses in this area, so check out our 2017 programme on page 36.


New Year, new salon – making additional services work: male grooming

Make sure you have the right tools. This is an obvious one but it is worth reiterating. You’ll need to know how to use clippers and shears but also to understand the different tools you’re going to need for the services you’re going to offer.

2 3

6

Be focused. Too often, especially in “female” salons (even if they’re nominally unisex) men end up being slotted into a spare half hour here and there in the column. If you’re serious about offering, and making money from, male grooming, you have to bring your men more centre stage. However, bear in mind you may also need to….

7

4

Consider separate zones. This will, in part, depend on your space, clientele mix and general salon ambience. But for some men the idea of being groomed and pampered while surrounded by women, and in a clearly “female” environment, will be offputting. So, consider creating a separate men’s grooming zone or area. If you have a separate floor, even better.

5

Use your existing female clients. I recall in one salon I worked in we did an email blast and a poster campaign essentially saying to our female clients “bring us your men!”, and it really worked. Men will listen to their partners and this can be a good way to bring guys through the door and help them to recognise your salon can be for them too.

25

Offer discounts. This can be a tricky area as the last thing you want to do when offering a new service is to erode your price point before you’ve even started. But a promotional deal can be helpful. One we had in my salon when we launched male grooming was “first 100 guys go free”. But the key was we also got 75% signed up for a rebooking there and then. Think beyond beards. Yes, beard maintenance and shaving can be big business. But men, increasingly, are also open to pampering and even beauty treatments. Manicures, facials, pedicures, eyebrows and nose trimming, colour – all these are growth areas for men right now. Even something as simple as offering a male client a five-minute hot towel facial after a wash and cut can over time add significantly to your bottom line, at very little extra expense.

8

Don’t forget retail. Retail is potentially a huge revenue stream when it comes to male grooming. But you really need to walk your male clients through the process; it mustn’t be a hard sell. Men, in my experience, are prepared to spend money if they can see the point of something, see the value within it, the value of making that investment. It may be, for example, they’ve up to now been using their wife’s product and you can offer something that’s much more bespoke for them – and their wife is probably going to be pretty pleased too!

FACTS & FIGURES

300%

18%

£449.5M

GROWTH IN MEN’S BEAUTY AND GROOMING PRODUCTS IN 2015

PERCENTAGE OF MEN WHO USE A BEARD PRODUCT.

VALUE OF MEN’S GROOMING MARKET, 2015

SOURCES: MRPORTER.COM, NPD GROUP, MINTEL

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


Apprenticeships and training

27

LESSON PLANS SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE DELIVERY, ASSESSMENT AND FUNDING OF APPRENTICESHIPS IN ENGLAND ARE BEING INTRODUCED FROM MAY, AND THERE WILL BE EXTRA COSTS FOR SOME SALONS. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW. he NHF’s latest industry statistics (and see page 16 of this edition) have suggested more than 22,000 people started hairdressing, barbering or beauty apprenticeships across the UK in 2014/15, and that hairdressing is the 10th most popular apprenticeship in England.

T

This shows just how much time and energy hair and beauty salons and barber shops invest into apprenticeships and the training of future generations. However, from May it’s not going to be just time and energy salons will have to invest, it’ll be money too. What we’re going to see in just five months’ time is perhaps the most significant shake-up of apprenticeship training, assessment and funding in England for a generation. So, what’s happening? Although even at this late stage some elements are still to be finalised, here and overleaf we’ll be explaining what you need to know.

NEW APPRENTICESHIP ‘LEVY’ The changes cover the delivery and assessment of training and how it is funded, with one of the biggest changes being the introduction of a new apprenticeship “levy”. This will be paid by all bigger employers, and how it will work is explained in more detail overleaf. To emphasise, these changes will just be for apprenticeships in England. In Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, the various devolved governments are in the process of deciding what is changing and how the income they receive from the new levy will be used, although larger employers across the UK, both in England and the devolved nations, will be expected to pay it.

FIND OUT MORE TURN OVERLEAF TO FIND OUT HOW THE NEW FUNDING, TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ARRANGEMENTS WILL WORK.

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


28

Apprenticeships and training

FUNDING SMALL SALONS with fewer than 50 employees

LARGE SALONS

The good news is the government has confirmed small salons taking on an apprentice aged 16-18 will not have to contribute anything towards the cost of training or assessment – training will be 100% subsidised. This will also be the case where a salon is taking on an older apprentice, aged 19-24, who has been in care or who has a healthcare plan. As a further incentive, employers will receive a grant of £1,000 to take on both these types of apprentice. However – and this is an important change, which the NHF has expressed its dismay about – if a small salon wants to take on an apprentice who is older than this, aged over 19 or over, or who has not been in care or had a healthcare plan, it will be expected to pay 10% of that trainee’s training costs. So, how much will this be? Unfortunately, that as yet is still not 100% clear. Funding is going to be based around 15 “bands”, which in turn will be based on industry-specific assessment plans. The assessment plan for hairdressing and barbering were approved by government just as salonfocus went to press in November (and there will be more on this in future editions). But the precise funding band for the industry is still to be decided.

Any salon with a pay bill of more than £3m will be expected to contribute towards the government’s new apprenticeship “levy”. This is being introduced from April, and is being set at 0.5% of each employer’s annual pay bill. However, to cushion the blow the government is also bringing in a £15,000 “levy allowance” that employers paying the levy will be able to use to offset the amount they pay in. The levy will be collected by HM Revenue & Customs through the PAYE on a monthly basis. Unfortunately, it won’t be allowable for corporation tax purposes. Levy money will be able to be accessed and used by employers through new digital accounts. These will be accessed through an online portal, which is available through the government’s gov.uk website. Employers will be able to use their account to choose the most appropriate apprenticeship and training provider for them, and then also pay for that training. Payments will be via a “digital voucher”, which will work much like an online discount voucher. In other words, you register your details, get sent your code, enter it and then redeem your payment to the training provider.

Any salon with a pay bill of more than £3m

FUNDING HOW THE NEW APPRENTICESHIPS PROCESS WILL WORK

SMALL EMPLOYER WITH FEWER THAN 50 EMPLOYEES

WANTS TO HIRE… • An apprentice aged 16-18 (or 19-24 in care or with a healthcare plan) • Cost to employer: free • Plus £1,000 grant

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

WANTS TO HIRE… • An apprentice aged 19 or over • Cost to employer: 10% of costs

LARGE EMPLOYER WITH PAY BILL OF MORE THAN £3M

WANTS TO HIRE… 1. Pays apprentice levy, of 0.5% of its pay bill 2. But also receives a £15,000 levy allowance 3. Creates a digital account 4. Chooses most appropriate apprenticeship standard and provider 5. Redeems digital voucher to pay for training


Apprenticeships and training

29

ASSESSMENT TRAINING DELIVERY Under the new standards, hair professional apprentices will be expected successfully to complete: • An end-point assessment carried out by an independent apprenticeship examiner at the end of their apprenticeship. This will be similar to a conventional trade test. • A new qualification, which will be called the Diploma for Hair Professionals (Hairdressing/ Barbering). • Maths and English functional skills at Level 1. But learners will also be expected to take the Level 2 functional skills tests, even if they don’t pass them. Learners who have achieved maths and English GCSE at grade A*-C will be exempted from these functional skills tests. • Apprenticeships will be graded as either “pass” or “distinction” depending on the learner's performance in the end-point assessment.

HAIRDRESSING AND BARBERING As a salon owner, you will probably have heard over the past couple of years the term “trailblazer” being used in relation to new apprenticeships. This has been the process by which employers, supported by the NHF and skills body Habia, have been leading the development of training and assessment standards for apprenticeships in England, in special “trailblazer” groups. These groups have been looking at what an apprentice should know and be able to do before they are ready to work in the industry. The old apprenticeship frameworks that training providers used to base their training around are being phased out. Within hairdressing and barbering, this will mean new “hair professional” trailblazer standards being introduced from May. Apprenticeship standards for Level 2 have been agreed and approved by the government. Trailblazer standards for Level 3 apprenticeships are still under development, and are expected to be available for delivery from 2018. The standards can be viewed at nhf.info/ apprenticeships

The old standards will apply between now and May and, for Level 3, until 2018. A hair professional apprenticeship will still be expected to take two years to complete.

FIND OUT MORE To help members navigate these complex changes in England, the NHF has produced a new Guide to Apprenticeship Changes in England from May 2017. This will be available to members as a download from the NHF shop, available at nhf.info, or by calling us for a copy, on 01234 831965. There will also be a briefing for employers on our website and NHF chief executive Hilary Hall will be running a series of face-to-face briefings between January and April. See Events on pages 36-38 for more details on go online, at nhf.info/events

SOME OTHER QUESTIONS WILL I STILL NEED TO PAY THE NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE? Yes. Employer contributions towards the cost of apprenticeship training and assessment are on top of the wages and any other employment-related costs you already pay.

HOW MUCH WILL BE OFF-THE-JOB TRAINING? Employers will be expected to allow all apprentices to spend a minimum of 20% of their working week (in other words six hours of a 30-hour working week) doing off-the-job training, either in the salon or with a recognised training provider.

WILL APPRENTICESHIP AGREEMENTS CHANGE? Yes. Anyone starting on the new trailblazer apprenticeships will need a new-style apprenticeship agreement. This will include a commitment statement to be signed by employers, apprentices and parents/carers. These new agreements will be available free of charge to members from the NHF. WILL THE APPRENTICESHIP GRANT FOR EMPLOYERS CONTINUE IN ENGLAND? No, from May 2017 it will be replaced by the new funding arrangements described above, especially the £1,000 grant for small employers to take on younger trainees.

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


30

Britain’s Best 2016

THE BEST

OF BRITAIN!

NOVEMBER’S BRITAIN’S BEST SAW SALONS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY BATTLING IT OUT TO BE CROWNED THE COUNTRY’S TOP STYLISTS. SALONFOCUS PRESENTS A SELECTION OF IMAGES FROM A DAY OF INSPIRATION, TALENT AND CREATIVITY.

Britain’s Best wouldn’t happen without the proud backing, and commitment, of its sponsors. So a very big thank you to our 2016 Britain’s Best sponsors.


Britain’s Best 2016

31

OUR 2016 WINNERS LADIES CHAMPION BRIDIE THORNE, PRIDE HAIRDRESSING & BARBER SHOP, GLOUCESTER MEN’S CHAMPION KIEREN GOLDSPINT, TAYLORS & CO, BRIGHOUSE BLOW DRY CONSUMER FASHION STYLE, MALE OR FEMALE, (STUDENTS AND TRAINEES) LEAH SYMONDS, REDS HAIR COMPANY, ROSS ON WYE BLOW DRY CONSUMER FASHION STYLE, MALE OR FEMALE, (OPEN TO ALL) BRIDIE THORNE, PRIDE HAIRDRESSING & BARBER SHOP, GLOUCESTER MALE FASHION LOOK – ON TREND (STUDENTS AND TRAINEES) LIXON CHOUDHARY, STUDIO 2, MANCHESTER MALE FASHION LOOK ON TREND (OPEN TO ALL) ATTIQ AZAM, PARK LANE HAIR STUDIO, BURNLEY

HAIR UP – GLAMOROUS NIGHT ON THE TOWN (STUDENTS AND TRAINEES) EMMA VENABLES, SANDWELL COLLEGE, WEST BROMWICH HAIR UP – GLAMOROUS NIGHT ON THE TOWN (OPEN TO ALL) DANIELLE MCSTRAVICK, MASQUERADE HAIR & BEAUTY, BOLTON FANTASY TOTAL LOOK (OPEN TO ALL) JADE DAVIES, CREATIONS, COLEFORD FEMALE FASHION LOOK – ON TREND (OPEN TO ALL) AIMEE JONES, HAIR BY JONES, MONMOUTH THE BRIDE – BRIDAL MAKE-UP (OPEN TO ALL) SALLY BRACEY, SALLY’S MAKEUP, PORTISHEAD THE BRIDE (OPEN TO ALL) DANIELLE MCSTRAVICK, MASQUERADE HAIR & BEAUTY, BOLTON COLOUR OF THE DAY LEAH SYMONDS, REDS HAIR COMPANY, ROSS ON WYE

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


STRIKE A

POSE

THE WINNERS OF THE NHF’S PRESTIGIOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLIST OF THE YEAR COMPETITION WERE ALSO REVEALED AT BRITAIN’S BEST. HERE ARE THEIR WINNING IMAGES. FEMALE AFRO-CARIBBEAN FASHION LOOK NAOMI BROOKS, OF THE HAIR SANCTUARY, MANCHESTER MALE AFRO-CARIBBEAN FASHION LOOK NATHAN PINDER, OF ROSS CHARLES SALON, YORK

LADIES FASHION LOOK (STUDENTS AND TRAINEES AMY JOHNSON, OF HEADROMANCE, PORTSMOUTH

LADIES FASHION LOOK ROSS CHARLES, OF ROSS CHARLES SALON, YORK


Photographic Stylist of the Year

33

WINNING A COMPETITION LIKE PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLIST OF THE YEAR CAN BE A REAL BOOST TO A STYLIST’S REPUTATION AND CAREER, WHILE PROVIDING GREAT PUBLICITY FOR THEIR SALON. WELL DONE TO ALL OUR WINNERS AND ALL OUR FINALISTS – YOU CAN BE INTENSELY PROUD OF WHAT YOU HAVE ACHIEVED. AGNES LEONARD, NHF PRESIDENT

MEN’S FASHION LOOK CRAIG SIMPSON, OF COPPERFIELDS HAIR & BEAUTY, PERTH

LADIES FASHION COLLECTION DAVID BAKER, OF THE VAULT HAIR AND SPA, ESHER


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Registration

LOCAL

DIFFICULTY

A COUNCIL’S ‘HEAVY-HANDED’ APPROACH TO A LOCAL LICENSING LAW IS LEAVING SALONS IN THE MIDLANDS AT RISK OF HEFTY FINES, AND NHF MEMBERS ARE NOT HAPPY. SALONFOCUS REPORTS.

HE NHF HAS WRITTEN TO A MIDLANDS MP URGING HIM TO PUT PRESSURE ON A DISTRICT COUNCIL, AFTER NHF MEMBERS HAVE COMPLAINED ITS “HEAVYHANDED” ENFORCEMENT OF A LOCAL LICENSING RULE IS PUTTING THEM AT A COMPETITIVE DISADVANTAGE AND AT RISK OF BEING TAKEN TO COURT AND FINED £1,000.

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The NHF wrote to Alberto Costa, MP for South Leicestershire, after members got in touch to complain about Blaby District Council’s approach to enforcing the local Leicestershire Act in the county. The Act includes a requirement that hairdressers and barbers register not just their businesses with their council, but also the individual stylists and barbers they employ. Salons are asked to pay a one-off fee of £110 for premises registration while individual registration costs £65. Businesses or individuals found not to have the correct registration can be taken to court and fined up to £1,000. The requirement covers businesses operating across most of Leicestershire and Rutland. But it appears the only council actively enforcing it locally is Blaby, just outside Leicester.

ENFORCEMENT MEASURES A number of members have got in touch with the NHF to highlight their concerns. Michael Harris, co-owner of Tanya Harris Hairdressing in Blaby, told salonfocus he had received a letter “advising me that enforcement officers will be in our area over the next few weeks to check that personal registrations are in place.”

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

He added: “This seems a little heavyhanded, especially as they are aware that I’m disputing their interpretation of the Act.” Michael continued: “When we opened in 2007 we went to the council and made sure we had got all the relevant licences and registrations. We were told, as long as we had the correct premises licence, then that would be that. “What they’re now saying is every hairdresser or barber has to have a personal registration to practice as well as our business registration. If you were a self-employed stylist I could quite understand the need to be able to show you had a separate licence to practice because you are running your own business. “But if I’m employing a stylist, they’re covered by my health and safety and insurance policies. So why should they need a licence? They’ve also asked me for the names and addresses of my staff, which I don’t feel at all comfortable giving. It is all very peculiar. “I’m all in favour of registration in principle – and I back the idea of mandatory state registration – but to me this just feels like a bit of a moneymaking scam by the council,” Michael added.

MICHAEL HARRIS: CONCERNED ABOUT EXTRA CHARGE

IF I’M EMPLOYING A STYLIST, THEY’RE COVERED BY MY HEALTH AND SAFETY AND INSURANCE POLICIES. SO WHY SHOULD THEY NEED A LICENCE? THEY’VE ALSO ASKED ME FOR THE NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF MY STAFF, WHICH I DON’T FEEL AT ALL COMFORTABLE GIVING.


Registration

‘HEALTH AND SAFETY RULES’ In her letter, NHF chief executive Hilary Hall urged Mr Costa to “make representations” to Blaby District Council to drop the registration charges. Salonfocus approached Blaby District Council for a response, and a spokesperson said: “The requirement for hairdressers and barbers to register themselves and their premises falls under Section 23 of the Leicestershire Act 1985. This applies to any hairdresser or barber who works within the district of Blaby. This law was adopted by Blaby District Council in April 1986.” The spokesperson emphasised the fee is a one-off, and therefore does not need to be renewed. “Whilst hairdressers may feel this strongly disadvantages them it is important to note that the licensing team are merely carrying out the requirements of the law,” the spokesperson added.

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“Any enforcement of this will help to reassure residents of the district and customers that a hairdresser or barber is following health and safety rules. A copy of the registration certificate needs to be displayed where it can be seen by customers.” As to why Blaby appeared to be one of the few places actively enforcing the regulation, the spokesperson simply said: “Blaby District Council has no say in the way any other council enforces its laws. Any queries as to why the law is not being enforced in neighbouring districts is a question for the individual authority.”

TELL US MORE Have you been affected by this local law, or one similar? Tell us on social media or contact the editor Nic Paton on nic@cormorantmedia.co.uk

ES

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


36

The NHF’s 2017 events programme

LEARN

TO EARN

BOOKINGS Anyone interested in attending events should Go to nhf.info/events, email events@nhf.info or call the membership team on 01234 831965.

WHETHER YOU’RE A NEW SALON OWNER OR ARE LOOKING TO REFRESH AND IMPROVE AN ESTABLISHED BUSINESS, THE NHF HAS AN EVENT THIS YEAR FOR YOU.

eing successful means being busy day-to-day on the salon floor. But it also means carving out the space to learn, reflect, network and constantly think how you can improve. This is where the NHF’s business events can help. This year we’ve got an array of business, technical and creative events and workshops, all designed to help take your business to new heights. Here’s what to look out for during the first half of this year – more will be announced in the summer for the second half of 2017.

B

NEW! MANAGING DIFFICULT PEOPLE Run by The Conflict Training Company Salons can be pressure-cooker environments. This one-day session will look at what causes conflict within your team, how different behaviours can make things worse and how communication styles can help to defuse tensions. It will give you the skills to stay calm and the confidence to take control of any conflict situation. NEW! LET YOUR RECEPTION TEAM BOOST YOUR BUSINESS! Run NHF business coaches Susan Routledge (Glasgow and Sheffield) and Richard Wallace and Chris Amos (Coventry) Receptionists can make a massive difference to your business and play a really important part in the client’s journey through your salon. This one-day session will show you how to use your receptionists to convert enquiries into appointments, drive client retention to consistently fill the salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

appointment book months in advance and boost retail sales.

NEW! THE NHF BUSINESS ADVICE “SURGERY” Run by the NHF’s team of business coaches The top four things small business owners tell us they worry about are: wages, prices and profits; getting new clients and keeping regulars coming back; managing and motivating your team; what you can and can’t do when dealing with employees. The NHF’s business “surgery” sessions will give you the opportunity to find the answers.

CREATIVE EVENING WORKSHOPS Presenters will be announced on the NHF’s website, nhf.info If you’ve enjoyed the business surgery, make a full day of it by attending one of our evening workshops, which will follow straight on from the surgery sessions. These will offer a choice of two demonstrations, one on barbering and one on ladies hairdressing. EMERGENCY FIRST AID AT WORK Run by vocational training provider TutorCare What happens if a client or a member of your team becomes ill or has an accident in your salon? This certified one-day course is recommended to comply with NHF salon health and safety guidelines.

NEW! CLIPPER AND BEARD CONFIDENCE Run by The Great British Barbering Academy As a barber, confidence is crucial. This course will give you the necessary skills to perform effective clipper-over-comb


The NHF’s 2017 events programme

cuts, apply textures to hair with your clippers, line up, trim and layer stunning beards and leave your clients feeling calm throughout their experience.

NEW! COLOUR WORKSHOP – BALAYAGE/OMBRE FUSION

NEW! HAIR EXTENSIONS – AN INTRODUCTION Run by Simone Thomas and Georgia MacDonald. This three-hour workshop covers different types of extensions, their correct application using key techniques and includes a half head live demonstration. NEW! HAIR LOSS SOLUTIONS IN-SALON Run by hair loss consultant Eva Proudman Discover, develop and deliver practical in-salon solutions for the growing number of clients who suffer from fine, thinning hair or hair loss. From simple retail solutions to hair extensions, hair integrations, wigs and even clinical partnerships, this workshop will give you an overview of the options, with handson time with each product.

Run by Goldwell, Matrix and Mood This three-hour session will cover the challenges and options available when creating balayage/ombre effects. It will cover techniques including: using foil, using cling-film, root stretch and the fourpoint star technique.

NEW! MAKE-UP WORKSHOPS BRIDAL; “RED CARPET” LOOK; CONTOURING AND STROBING Presenters will be announced on the NHF’s website, nhf.info These three make-up workshops can link together or be experienced as stand-alone training sessions. The bridal event will cover brush/applicator choice, flawless coverage, shading and contouring, “natural beauty” eyes and lips. The “red carpet” event will cover tips on creating the perfect look for red carpet events, traditionally smoky eyes, full lashes and dramatic lips. And the contouring and strobing event will give you fantastic tips on correcting facial features and face shapes.

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR PENSIONS AUTO-ENROLMENT? Run by Bryan Stott, Wren Sterling, provider of the NHF pension scheme By 2018 all UK companies with one or more employees must have a pension scheme. If you haven’t already gone live, 2017 is the year most small businesses will need to sign up for auto-enrolment, so don’t risk big fines by putting it off. Come along to this session to find out when your staging date is, how to prepare, what it will cost and what your responsibilities are.

NEW! SALARIES, INCENTIVES, RECOGNITION AND REWARDS Run by Ian Egerton, owner of Loop HR software Everything you need to know about salaries and incentivising your staff. In this session, you will learn about Ian’s 360-degree approach to managing staff, how to connect salaries and commission structures with constructive feedback, financial success and how bonuses can drive higher levels of performance.

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NEW! AN EVENING WITH THE NHF – FOCUS ON APPRENTICESHIPS Run by NHF chief executive Hilary Hall Come and find out from the NHF how changes to apprenticeships in England will affect you from May onwards. This session will look at the new hairdressing and barbering standards, how they’ll be assessed, new funding arrangements, what it will cost employers, new-style apprenticeship contracts and the National Minimum Wage. BARBERING WORKSHOPS Presenters will be announced on the NHF’s website, nhf.info An evening with a fantastic barber who will demonstrate a range of different barbering skills and techniques. BRIDAL/HAIR UP WORKSHOP Presenters will be announced on the NHF’s website, nhf.info This workshop will show you how to create beautiful on trend hair up styles suitable for wedding or proms. Find out how to fix a veil or a tiara in place and create a look which will look fantastic all day.

FIND OUT MORE Turn to page 38 for listings of dates, times and venues happening in your area between now and March. Events taking place later in the year will be listed in future editions of salonfocus or you can check online at nhf.info/events

Jan/Feb 2017 | salonfocus


38

BOOKINGS Anyone interested in attending events should Go to nhf.info/events, email events@nhf.info or call the membership team on 01234 831965.

Events

MAKE 2017

INCREDIBLE HAVE YOU GOT AN UP-AND-COMING TEAM MEMBER WHO YOU THINK HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BE SERIOUSLY “INCREDIBLE”? f so, you need to know about this year’s NHF “Incredibles” competition, which is kicking off for 2017 this month.

I

The competition is an exciting opportunity for salons, barber shops and their younger team members to develop their creative skills and talent to help them reach the top of their profession. So, what does it involve? There’s three categories: Newcomer (for year one apprentices), Future Generation (for second and third year apprentices) and The Incredibles Art Team (for qualified stylists). Finalists in the Newcomer and Future

ONE-DAY EVENTS THE NHF BUSINESS ADVICE “SURGERIES” 06 March – Cardiff 15 May – Southampton (including an update on apprenticeships)

O N E - D AY WO R K S H O PS EMERGENCY FIRST AID AT WORK 06 February –Liverpool MAKE-UP WORKSHOP BRIDAL 20 March – Manchester 27 March – Glasgow MAKE-UP WORKSHOP “RED CARPET” LOOK 27 March – Glasgow

salonfocus | Jan/Feb 2017

Generation categories will have the opportunity to spend an inspiring day working with a high-end creative hair team, and last year’s winners worked with the HOB Creative Team. Equally inspiring, the art team photoshoot winners will be invited to take part in a day-long photoshoot with a leading mentor and industry expert and photographer. Their winning images will be a sensational addition to any portfolio, as well as being published in salonfocus. Entries open from 09 January, and will close on 31 May. To enter and find out more, go to nhf. info/events and then click on “Competitions”. Don’t delay!

MAKE-UP WORKSHOP CONTOURING AND STROBING 20 March – Bedford

SALARIES, INCENTIVES, RECOGNITION & REWARDS 20 March – London

HAIR EXTENSIONS 27 March – Reading

FOCUS ON APPRENTICESHIPS 30 January – London 06 February – Newcastle 13 February – Manchester 27 February – Milton Keynes 27 March – Birmingham

EVENING BUSINESS EVENTS ARE YOU PREPARED FOR PENSIONS AUTO-ENROLMENT? 06 February – Telford 13 February – London 27 February – Cambridge 13 March – Bristol 20 March – Lincoln 27 March – Durham

CREATIVE EVENING WORKSHOPS 06 March – Cardiff 15 May – Southampton BARBERING WORKSHOP 13 March – Bangor, Northern Ireland

NATIONAL COMPETITIONS 09 January NHF Incredibles (opening date for entries) 01 February Photographic Stylist of the Year (opening date for entries) 03 February Step Up & SHINE (closing date for entries)

REGIONAL COMPETITIONS 12-13 March Blackpool

AWARDS 19 November NHF Business Awards, the VOX at Resort World, NEC, Birmingham


ALEX...

HELPING HAIRDRESSERS IN NEED DONATE, FUNDRAISE & SUPPORT YOUR INDUSTRY CHARITY Born from

#HairdressersHelpingHairdressers www.thehairdresserscharity.org TheHairdressersCharity

TheHairCharity

TheHairdressersCharity

Company No: 11085412 | Registered Charity in England & Wales No: 1166298

...was disowned by his parents when he told them he was gay. Now in a homeless shelter, Alex is trying to rebuild his life. We were approached to provide support to Alex. We were able to provide him with a new hairdressing kit so he could continue doing what he loves.


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salonfocus January/February 2017  

Salonfocus is the NHF’s award winning magazine. Created for salon owners, the pages are full of business news, industry hot topics and tips...

salonfocus January/February 2017  

Salonfocus is the NHF’s award winning magazine. Created for salon owners, the pages are full of business news, industry hot topics and tips...

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