Page 1

MUSHROOM

Change out

MYSTERIES Unlocking the secret powers of fungi

OCTOBER 2015

SC TR AV E L S

Gourmet for a day HUMOR ME

New kid on the block


We are passionate. This is where we are supposed to be. Surrounded by open space and perpetual silence. We are pursuing more than wild game in the field. We are following our passion to find the best version of ourselves.

kubota.com

Š Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2015


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 69 • No. 10 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 550,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

October 2015 • Volume 69, Number 10

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Pam Martin

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins

FEATURE

16 Mad about mushrooms

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Van O’Cain

Visionary mycologist Tradd Cotter is out to change the world—one fungus at a time.

COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars Becky Billingsley, Mike Couick, Jim Dulley, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner, Tom Tate, Erin Weeks, Libby Swope Wiersema, Pam Windsor

Mic Smith

Contributors

Publisher

Lou Green Advertising

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 5. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought

to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

Cooperative news

6 ON THE AGENDA

Vintage cars and airplanes take center stage at Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival. Plus: Clever new gadgets to save energy and secure your home.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Investing in a brighter future

Stronger communities and a reliable power supply are two of the unique dividends members enjoy as owners of their local electric cooperatives. ENERGY Q&A

12 Tips to balance temps

in your home

Learn how to make every room in your home comfortable and energy efficient. Smart Choice

14 Handy hobby helpers

Get more enjoyment from your favorite pastime with these handy gadgets.

Printed on recycled paper

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

28

SC LIFE STORIES

21 The dogs of war

Vietnam veteran Johnny Mayo will soon complete his longtime mission—building a memorial to military scout dogs. TR AVELS

22 Gourmet for a day

With aprons and tongs at the ready, seven culinary novices enroll in cooking class at Abingdon Manor.

22

RECIPE

28 Oven-fresh quick breads

Whip up these easy recipes for fresh-baked bread, and the whole family will thank you. CHEF’S CHOICE

30 Soup’s on at

Hopsewee Plantation

No tour of historic Hopsewee Plantation is complete without a stop for lunch at Raejean Beattie’s elegant tea room.

Jeff Smith

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

Michael Phillips

National Representation

HUMOR ME

38 New kid on the block

MUSHROOM

MYSTERIES

Jan Igoe shares a few important safety tips for trying to fit in with a herd of wild goats.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS

Unlocking the secret powers of fungi

SC TR AV E LS OCTOBER 2015

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

Gourmet for a day HUMOR ME

New kid on the block

In his private lab near Easley, mycologist Tradd Cotter explores the untapped potential of mushrooms to cure disease, eradicate pests and clean the environment. Photo by Mic Smith.


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

Highlights

OCTOBER 17–18

Colonial Times: A Day to Remember

OCTOBER 23–25

Wings of Freedom Tour

Climb aboard authentic and restored WWII aircraft at Greenville Downtown Airport. Tour the B-24 Liberator and B-17 Flying Fortress, called “the backbone of the daylight strategic bombing campaign of WWII,” and a P-51C Mustang dual-control fighter aircraft. The tour is sponsored by the Collings Foundation, which encourages visitors to explore the planes and talk to visiting veterans about wartime experiences. For a fee, you can reserve a flight aboard one of these historic aircraft. For details, visit greenvilledowntownairport.com/ WhatsNew.html or call (864) 242-4777. To reserve a flight experience, call (800) 568-8924.

OCTOBER 16–18

The town that gave us the great Dizzy Gillespie has lined up a jazz weekend with a focus on the trumpeter’s S.C. roots. More than 30 concerts are planned at Cheraw venues, including a Friday-night tribute by the Ignacio Berroa Quartet, featuring Gillespie’s former percussionist along with S.C. saxophonist Skipp Pearson and trumpeter Mark Rapp. Weekend festivities include a bebop parade, street chalk competition, jazz brunch and Sunday jazz mass.

OCTOBER 30–NOVEMBER 1

Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival and Concours d’Elegance

An array of events catering to collectible-car enthusiasts has an aviation twist this year with Saturday’s Aero Expo. Vintage and new airplanes will be displayed alongside aircraft-inspired autos, cars from compatible eras, and innovative models and prototypes, all celebrating the history and future of aviation. Also new is the Auctions America auction featuring 100 investment-grade vehicles. Palmetto Electric Cooperative is a sponsor. Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival

South Carolina Jazz Festival

For details, visit colonialtimes.us or call (803) 279-7560.

Larry Gleason

Modern-day chores may seem simple by comparison to what daily life was like for Colonial settlers. The 7.5-acre Living History Park in North Augusta showcases bygone skills and crafts like hornsmithing, pottery making, butter churning, weaving, meat smoking and candle making. Special events include appearances by Ben Franklin and George and Martha Washington, Colonial dancing and music, a field surgeon’s tent, tomahawk throw and musket-firing demonstrations.

For details, visit scjazzfestival.com or call (843) 537-8420, ext. 12.

For details, visit hhiconcours.com or call (843) 785-7469.

NOVEMBER 7

Pecan Festival

For details, visit scpecanfestival.com or call (843) 678-5912.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

Phillip Guyton

Party like a nut at this downtown Florence festival, where longtime rock band Three Dog Night is head­ lining on the music stage. New this year is Arts on Evans, featuring live displays of international dance, stone carving, painting and other art forms, and Flavors of Florence, with local restaurants showing off signature dishes.


Email COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND Story suggestions TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

Game on!

Ph o to s by: (f r o m Le ft ) M il to n M orr

Crisp fall days apparently bring out our competitive streak. Consider these noteworthy contests taking place across the Palmetto State this month.

is ; Je ff Sm it h

Loris Bog-Off Festival

Si lf er

Local cooks compete to see who makes the best-tasting chicken bog at the 36th annual Loris Bog-Off Festival. The fun starts at 9 a.m. with two stages of entertainment, a car show and a kids’ area. While festival-goers play, competitors stir up massive quantities of the spicy rice dish and hand out samples, hoping to win both the $1,000 first-place prize and the People’s Choice award. Read this month’s bonus feature, “Winner, winner, chicken dinner,” on SCLiving.coop for a look inside the spirited competition. For full details on the 2015 festival, visit lorischambersc.com.

; M at t

Oct. 1 7 • Downtown Loris

United States Disc Golf Championship

U.S. ProMiniGolf Association Master’s Tournament

Oct. 7–10 • Winthrop University in Rock Hill

Oct. 15–1 7 • Hawaiian Rumble and Hawaiian Village in North Myrtle Beach

Is there a home-field advantage in the world of professional disc golf? We’ll find out when Rock Hill’s Winthrop University hosts the United States Disc Golf Championship. Local professional disc golfer Ricky Wysocki (pictured above, center) will be among the sport’s top competitors chasing the $8,000 grand prize. For event details, visit usdgc.com or facebook.com/USDGC.

Yes, miniature golf is a serious sport, and if you don’t believe us, come to North Myrtle Beach for the U.S. ProMiniGolf Association’s annual Master’s Tournament. Players from around the world—including 2014 champion Danny McCaslin (pictured above, right)—will compete for a $12,000 prize purse and the coveted green jacket. For event details, visit prominigolf.com/​tournaments/ masters/masters-schedule.

Nifty gadgets for the home Thanks to the ever-evolving world of technology, gadget lovers can enjoy fun, new ways to monitor and manage their home’s security, energy use and comfort. Wireless locks. Door locks that you control with a smartphone are the latest tech gadget in home security. August, Lockitron, Goji and Kevo Lock from Kwikset all offer nifty features such as remote monitoring of lock status, temporary guest/ contractor access and different access codes for multiple users. Mood lighting. A popular website, smarthome.com, offers a variety of gadgets, including the WeMo line by Belkin, that allows you to control individual lights and appliances by beaming instructions over a Wi-Fi network to special outlet adaptors. Philips makes

an individually controllable LED bulb called Hue. Using their app, you can control the volume and color of the light emitted. Yes—you can achieve energy savings and create a party mood all at once. Digital plumber. Protect your home from water damage with Smarthome’s Elertus ELRT-107 Wi-Fi Smart Sensor. The device monitors temperature and humidity and alerts you to potential flooding from leaks or broken pipes. Some versions also offer a water-shutoff option. DIY projects. Tinkerers can design and custom build their own wireless control systems with a littleBits Smart Home Kit. Snap together electronic modules to make anything from a remote garage-door sensor to an AC control module. —Tom Tate

 energy

efficiencytip  

Don’t let vampires suck the life out of your energy efficiency efforts. Unplugging unused electronics—other­ wise known as “energy vampires”​— can save you as much as 10 percent on your electric bill.  Source: energy.gov

scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


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Deadly D’s of ­dogwoods. Drought and disease can ruin your favorite flowering tree. Here’s how to fight back.

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (4) (e.g., First-Class Mail®) d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal c.  Rate Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)] Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and or d. Free (1) Free on PS Form 3541 Free or or Nominal Nominal Rate Rate Outside-County Copies Mailed atCopies Other included Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) Nominal (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail) Rate

558,229 586,729 ø 558,229 ø ø ø ø 558,229 ø 15,803

487,514 558,229 ø ø 8,577 15,803 ø ø ø ø ø ø ø ø 8,577 15,803 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) ø ø f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) 496,091 574,032 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) 8,577 15,803 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3)) 13,173 12,697 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) 496,091 574,032 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) 509,264 586,729 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3)) 13,173 12,697 i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100) 100% and Circulation 100% Statement of Ownership, Management, h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) * If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to 509,264 line 17 on page 3. 586,729 (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) Percent Paid 16. i.Electronic Copy Circulation (15c divided by 15f times 100)

100% Each100% Issue During and Issue Published Statement of Ownership, Management, Circulation Nearest to Filing Date (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) Average No. Copies

No. Copies of Single

12page Months * If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skipPreceding to line 17 on 3.

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586,729

487,514 509,264 ø 487,514 ø ø ø ø 487,514 ø 8,577

Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means) (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g.,Rate First-Class Mail)(Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)) e. the Total Free or Nominal Distribution Mail)

Milton Morris

Winner, winner, chicken dinner. Go behind the scenes of the Chicken Bog Cooking Contest at the annual Loris Bog-Off Festival. u

509,264

Like us on Facebook

ø 487,514 ø 496,091 487,514 98.27% 496,091

16. Electronic Copy Circulation a. Paid Electronic Copies

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) a. Paid Electronic Copies c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100) c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

✓I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price.

98.27%

d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100) 17. Publication Statement of Ownership PS Form 3526,ofJuly 2014 (Page 2 of 4)

✓ that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. ✓IfI certify the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

ø 558,229 ø 574,032 558,229 97.25% 574,032

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

97.25%

Publication not required.

October in 3526, the ________________________ issue of this publication. 17. Publication ofJuly Statement of2015 Ownership PS Form 2014 (Page 2 of 4) 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner ✓If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

October 2015 in the ________________________ issue of this publication.

Date Publication not required.

9/9/15

Publisher

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). Publisher

9/9/15

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Letters to the editor We love hearing from our readers. Tell us what you

think about this issue, send us story suggestions or just let us know what’s on your mind by clicking on the Contact Us link at SCLiving.coop. You can also email us at letters@scliving.coop, or mail to Letters, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033. All letters received are subject to editing before publication.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

October

S.C.RAMBLE! By Charles Joyner, See Answer ON Page 35

_ _ _ _ _ _’  _ _ _ _ ,

s e d d o v l e s v a dish of rice and black-eyed peas traditionally eaten on New Year’s Day, has been described as “the toast of the Carolina coast.” Use the capital letters in the code key below to fill in the blanks above.

H I J N O P means sol v ed

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

Minor

17 10:22 2:52 3:07 18 11:37 3:37 4:07 19 — 4:37 9:37 20 — 6:07 12:07 21 — 7:37 9:07 22 2:07 8:52 9:52 23 3:37 9:52 10:37 24 4:37 10:37 4:52 25 11:22 5:37 5:22 26 — 6:22 12:07 27 — 7:07 12:52 28 8:07 1:07 1:22 29 8:52 1:52 2:07 30 9:52 2:37 2:52 31 10:52 3:22 3:37

PM Major PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

8:07 8:37 1:07 2:22 3:07 3:52 4:22 11:07 11:52 12:37 6:22 6:52 7:22 7:52 8:22

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

Minor

AM Major

November

1 11:31 2 — 3 — 4 12:16 5 2:16 6 3:16 7 4:01 8 10:16 9 10:46 10 11:16 11 11:46 12 7:16 13 7:46 14 8:31 15 9:16 16 10:16

3:16 4:16 5:31 6:46 8:01 8:46 9:31 4:46 5:31 6:01 6:31 12:01 12:31 1:01 1:46 2:31

Minor

PM Major

4:31 8:01 — 12:46 8:46 1:46 9:01 2:16 9:31 2:46 3:01 10:01 3:31 10:16 3:46 10:46 4:16 11:01 4:31 11:31 — 5:01 12:16 5:31 1:01 6:01 1:31 6:31 2:16 7:01 3:31 7:46

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Dialogue

Investing in a brighter future and there wasn’t enough profit potential to entice investor-owned utilities to serve sparsely seven days a week, 24 hours a day in most populated areas. Wall Street took a pass on cases. Investments purchased can quickly be building in rural America. converted to investments sold. Only by squeezing out the middle man—the In addition to capital gains, which may be realized with the sale of equity investments, need for profit—was there potential to deliver investors might also look forward to quarterly or affordable electricity to rural areas. Thus, those annual dividends from owning a portion of wellwho needed power the most were the only ones managed companies. willing to invest in rural Co-ops are different, electrification via cooperaThe Seven and that difference can tives. Part of their investCo o p e r at iv e pri n cipl e s be summed up by the ment was a concession third cooperative princithat dollars put into the 1. Voluntary and open membership co-op were not dollars ple—members’ economic 2. Democratic member control that could come immediparticipation. 3. Members’ economic participation When the first elecately out. 4. Autonomy and independence This distinction tric co-ops formed in 5. Education, training and information between stock investSouth Carolina 75 years 6. Cooperation among cooperatives ago, investments were ment and co-op memberin the form of a $5 purship continues even today. 7. Concern for community Within the last several chase of a membership years, South Carolina eleccard. Founding members trudged many a dirt road asking their neightric cooperatives have led the nation in modernbors to put up the $5 (equivalent to $83.86 izing their policies for paying out capital credits today) to become a future member of their to members. Capital credits are created when local electric cooperative. the co-op generates surplus funds. These funds Not until there were enough members are allocated to members in the form of capital and enough $5 membership cards purchased credits, reinvested in new wires, poles and other could the first pole be erected, the first span system improvements, and then eventually of wire strung. Even then, that investment was retired and paid back to the members. not liquid. Why so much attention to detail as it relates Members knew that their initial $5 was tied to capital credits? Dollars paid in never cease to up in wires and poles, which later became subbe members’ dollars. Our accounting systems meticulously track all funds invested in the stations, offices, investments in renewable elecco-op, which remain payable to members in the tricity and multimillion-dollar information form of capital credits. However, members also technology systems—the very things necessary recognize that, as long as they remain part of for the operation of a reliable electricity grid. the co-op, they have a continuing obligation to There is no around-the-clock trading in keep those funds at work, building and mainco-op “stock.” In addition, dividends are more likely to take the form of a growing commutaining the power grid that is the backbone of the local community. nity, well supplied with affordable and reliable electric power. Why would co-op members accept this fundamental difference in investment opportunity and return? Initially, it was the only way to get electricity. Traditional investors expect a significant and predictable return on their investment, Today’s international equity markets run

Mike Couick

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


ON THE ROAD TO SUCCESS

Santee Cooper welcomes Volvo Cars to the Palmetto State! And why wouldn’t they come here? We lead the nation in automobile exports and Southern hospitality. Santee Cooper, together with our partners at the South Carolina Power Team, Edisto and Berkeley cooperatives, will be along for the ride to help Volvo drive toward “Brighter Tomorrows, Today.”

www.scpowerteam.com • www.santeecooper.com/SL


EnergyQ&A

By Jim Dulley

Tips to balance temps in your home

Field Controls

The problem you are experiencing is common, particularly in a two-story home—even with the newest heat-pump systems. Unless you install an expensive zone-control system with multiple thermostats, your heat pump can only respond to the temperature of the room where the wall thermostat is located. Many factors affect how much heating or cooling is used in a room, impacting the temperature. These can include the number and orientation of the windows, whether the room is on the first or second floor, the activity level in the room, and the length of the duct leading to it. Differences in the energy efficiency of various rooms can also cause a temperature imbalance. Leaky windows are a particular problem. One simple way to better distribute cool air throughout rooms is by placing air deflectors over the registers. You should also check your home’s attic insulation, especially if it is the blown-in type. Insulation can shift over time, leaving some rooms with 2 feet of insulation, while others have only 2 inches. This can have a big effect on room temperature. Even out

Suncourt

Q A

Our new heat pump isn’t keeping all the rooms in our home comfortable. Someone is always too hot or too cool. How can we even out the temperatures throughout our house?

the insulation as much as possible. Standard, builder-installed, sheetmetal ductwork often has many leaky spots, so some of the heated or cooled air leaving the heat pump never makes it into your home. The joints between the duct segments are the most common areas that leak. Wrapping all joints in high-quality duct tape may solve most of the problem. Each room should have a returnair register, particularly bedrooms where doors may be closed at night. Return ducts usually run between the wall studs inside interior walls. Adding them in problem rooms is not difficult for a contractor to do. Check the ducts near your heat pump. If you see short handles on each one, they are for control dampers inside the ducts. When the handle is parallel to the duct, the damper is fully open. Partially close the GetMore dampers in the duct leading to Companies that offer booster fans include: rooms that get too much heating Aero-Flo Industries, (219) 393-3555, aero-flo.com or cooling; that forces more air to Field Controls, (252) 522-3031, fieldcontrols.com the problem rooms. Suncourt Manufacturing, (800) 999-3267, suncourt.com Don’t close the dampers in the room’s floor or wall registers. Companies that offer register deflectors include: Typically, they are leaky, so the Ameriflow, (800) 252-8467, ameriflowregisters.com air flow won’t be reduced much. Deflecto Corporation, (800) 428-4328, deflecto.com And, because the ducts inside the 12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

p This register booster fan fits over a register on the floor or wall and plugs into a standard electrical outlet. t This duct booster fan replaces a short section of the existing duct. Notice the small, plastic fan blade for quiet operation.

walls are probably leaky and you have no access to seal them, conditioned air will be lost inside the exterior walls. If these methods don’t help, consider installing duct booster fans. These small fans mount inside the ducts to problem rooms and force more conditioned air to them. The fans are sized to fit standard round and rectangular residential ducts. The simplest models sense when the main blower turns on and automatically run at the same time. Others have built-in thermostats to determine when they run. Let an experienced contractor handle the installation for you. He can wire the fan into your blower switch to turn on with the heat pump. An easy, do-it-yourself option is to install a register booster fan. This small, rectangular fan mounts over the register cover in the room and plugs into a standard electrical outlet. It uses only about 30 watts of electricity. Some models are adjustable and turn on only when more cooling or heating is needed in that particular room. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


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scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


SmartChoice

By Becky Billingsley

Handy hobby helpers No matter the project or pasti me, whether woodworki ng , jewelry making or 3-D print ing, having the right tool in hand helps you craft a product to be prou d of.

THIRD DIMENSION

INNOVATION STATION Scan objects in 3-D on a Sprout by HP desktop computer, then digitally redesign the scan as you wish. When it’s perfect, bring your 3-D creation to life by printing on a Dremel 3D Idea Builder. $2,700 for 3D Makers’ Bundle including Sprout, 3-D scanner and 3-D printer. (800) 565-9917; sprout.hp.com.

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SHINE ON Bring a sheen to dull jewelry and other small items with the Benchtop Polisher from EURO TOOL. The compact machine needs little workbench space; it’s smaller than a computer mouse pad. $67; includes two each of spindles, abrasive wheels and motor brushes. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com. MICRO MANAGEMENT With eight different sanding tips, Micro-Mark’s reciprocating Micro Power Sander fits where your fingers won’t, making it ideal for tiny projects like building models or crafting dollhouse furniture. $93; comes with 60 sanding pads. (888) 263-7076; micromark.com.

3-D DREAMS Whatever you can imagine, be it toys, customized dog tags or replacement parts for machines, create it with a ROBO 3D R1 Plus printer. It features automatic leveling, the ability to print with various materials, and a short video to get you printing within minutes of opening the box. $800. (844) 476-2633; robo3d.com.

KIT AND CABOODLE

SEARING STYLE Walnut Hollow’s Creative Versa-Tool is perfect for burning wood or leather, but its 11 tips and variable temperature control also make it handy for calligraphy, soldering, embossing, pattern transferring or stencil cutting. $30. (800) 642-4235; michaels.com.

CLEAN CUT Right angles, loops, curves and even bevels are easily managed with a Craftsman 16-inch Variable Speed Scroll Saw (21602). Create soft-metal holiday ornaments or wooden children’s puzzles, while a dust blower keeps the cutting area free of debris. You can even connect the dust-extraction port to a shop vac. $113. (800) 697-3277; sears.com. LIGHTWEIGHT POWER A tiny diamond bit in the Proxxon GG12 glass engraver offers accuracy and speed for detailed work on glass, metal, wood or plastic. The head spins at 20,000 rpm, and at just four ounces, the compact tool prevents hand fatigue. $25. (877) 776-9966; shop.prox-tech.com.

HANDY VERSATILITY Dremel upgraded its most popular rotary tool to make the 3000 Series Variable Speed Rotary Tool Kit more ergonomically friendly. With easier tip changes, it cuts, grinds, sands, carves and polishes small projects with precision. $69; kit includes two storage cases and 25 accessories. (800) 466-3337; homedepot.com.

TIGHT BONDS Jewelry makers have just what they need at their fingertips to secure beads, jump rings and other findings with a Bead Landing Soldering Tool Kit. Included are a 60-watt soldering tool, metal stand, 80-gauge solder, clamps and more. $42. (800) 642-4235; michaels.com. 14

PRECISION WORK

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


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16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


BY ERIN WEEKS | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

T

radd Cotter’s Hyundai was in second gear on a dusty Visionary Lowcountry road when the car blew a tire. Or at least that’s mycologist what it sounded like. As he continued to drive away after a visit to a Johns Island mushroom farm, he looked through Tradd Cotter is the rearview mirror and realized someone was chasing his car, out to change banging on the trunk to get his attention. the world—one “The owner of the farm comes up to the window and says, fungus at a time ‘Do you want a job?’ ” Cotter recounts. It was a chance occurrence that would drastically change the course of his life. Back then, Cotter was a 20-year-old college student living at home and struggling to find his life’s direction. Twenty-two years later, he’s a nationally recognized expert on mushrooms, a self-taught scientist who collaborates with Ph.D.s on cutting-edge biological research and gives guest lectures across the nation. But most of all, he’s a man on a mission to show the world that fungi have enormous potential to improve our lives. “My main goal is to find things that humanity can use,” he says of the bioprospecting research on more than 200 varieties of fungi at Mushroom Mountain, his family’s private research lab and farm near Easley. “We’re trying to expand the level of knowledge around fungi and all the different things they can do.” Cotter has no shortage of grand ideas about the power of mushrooms to cure disease, eradicate agricultural pests and even clean up toxic pollution. At first listen, many seem like claims that couldn’t possibly be true. But the science seems to be proving him right.

Foraging for fun and profit

Growing up near Charleston, Cotter had a healthy interest in the natural world but no special designs on mycology, the study of mushrooms, until that fateful visit to the Johns Island mushroom farm. “I guess the fascination occurred when I first started identifying mushrooms,” he says. The farm grew just two varieties: shiitake and oyster mushrooms, which were somewhat exotic table fare for the time. Cotter’s boss told him that Charleston chefs were willing to pay a premium for another variety that could only be found in the wild, the chanterelle.

scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


Mad About mushrooms

supplies started coming in for your Funnel-shaped, golden-hued beau21-year-old son?” Cotter says, laughing. ties that smell faintly of apricots, chan“My mom was like, ‘Are you growing terelles are one of the most prized mushrooms upstairs?’ And I just edible mushroom species. Hoping to remember looking at her and saying, make some extra cash, Cotter studied ‘Yes.’ I wasn’t going to lie.” up on mushroom ID and began foragTo Cotter, the entire fungal kingdom ing in the woods before work and on is pretty magical, but he wasn’t growing weekends. that kind of mush­room. “I started picking and identifying Today’s amateur mycologists have a chanterelles, and then I just started wealth of resources at their fingertips, adding one new mushroom at a time,” but in those pre-Internet days, Cotter Cotter says. Prize find The chanterelle, which smells faintly of apricots, can’t be cultivated, because it will only could only find a single book on the The more he foraged, the more he practice of cultivating mushrooms, learned. And the more he learned, the grow on the root systems of trees. leaving him to figure the process out more he wondered why so few edible largely through trial and error. He kept at it and soon sucmushroom varieties were farm-raised. Some of them, it turned out, are virtually impossible to cultivate. ceeded in cloning his first wild fungus, moving it from “Chanterelles grow on the root systems of trees; they petri dish to fruiting mushroom. At that point, he says, have a symbiotic relationship that can take 20 to 30 years “I thought, ‘Maybe I have a skill I want to explore.’ ” to develop,” he says. “But there are others that grow on The Johns Island mushroom farm where Cotter worked dead material. There are thousands of mushroom species eventually shut down, but the seeds—or rather, spores—of in this region, and hundreds of those are edible.” interest had already found fertile ground. Cotter started experimenting. He purchased used labora‘It’s like being in a candy store’ tory equipment, cultured wild mushrooms and attempted to grow them in a makeshift lab in his bathroom. These Cotter continued to pursue mycology, supporting his weren’t normal things for a 20-something to spend his time hobby by picking up jobs at a greenhouse and in land­ and money on, and his parents took notice. scaping, which familiarized him with the symbiotic rela“What would you think if all of a sudden mushroom tionships between mushrooms, plants and insects.

Family business

Tradd and Olga Cotter enjoy a relaxed moment with their daughter, Heidi. Olga manages all business operations of the farm, which recently tripled its commercial output. “We have the best customer service of any company in our niche, and that is the direct result of Olga’s leadership,” says Tradd.

18


In 2006, while working in Florida, he met and married Olga Katic, a woman with mushroom hunting in her blood. Born in Croatia, Katic grew up collecting and identifying mushrooms and shared Cotter’s passion for mycology. “It was instant mushroom synergy,” Cotter says. “Everything clicked when I met Olga. Before then it was just a hobby. We both worked hard together to make this business our livelihood.” The couple set up their first lab in a small apartment in Boynton Beach, Fla., but quickly realized they needed a better environment for collecting and cultivating mushrooms, so they saved up and moved to the Upstate. Mushroom Mountain now occupies Picking favorites The first time Tradd Cotter 26 acres of rolling countryside near succeeded in culturing a wild fungus, taking it from petri dish to a fruiting mushroom, he found his Easley, where it is served by Blue calling in life. Today, he routinely clones and raises Ridge Electric Cooperative. mushrooms for sale (above) and research purposes Part commercial growing operaby removing small amounts of fungus, applying them to petri plates and keeping the samples tion, part education facility, part under proper growing conditions. research lab, the property is the place the Cotters dreamed of building—a for what I call my addiction—the mushroom kingdom where chicken of the woods, a fleshy, lobed species in research,” he says. “I don’t know what shades of gold and orange, might be other people spend their money on, elevated to a potent tool against staph but for me it’s new lab gear, more infections; where gourmet edibles like petri plates and more testing kits.” almond portabellas and blue oysters There’s a sense of controlled chaos are bred for the region’s top restauin the lab, where chunks of mushrants; where the cultivation of brainrooms and experiments-in-progress invading fungi could tilt the scales cover most surfaces. It’s a long way in the battle we wage on insects and from the bathroom of his parents’ ‘I don’t know what ­agricultural pests. house, although he still largely works other people spend The couple carefully chose the site. solo in the lab. He’s pursuing a They’re near I-85, a major transportanumber of research avenues, many their money on, but for focused on mycoremediation, the use tion artery, and within easy delivery of fungi to clean up environmental distance of several metropolitan areas. me it’s new lab gear, contaminants. More important, they’re just down the Fungi “eat” by exuding digestive road from a mushroom hotspot, the more petri plates and enzymes into their surroundings, like Appalachians. a stomach turned inside out. The “It’s the most fungal diverse area more testing kits.’ range of materials on which fungi will in North America,” Cotter says. “It’s grow is remarkable: coffee grounds, like being in a candy store. If you want animal waste, sawdust, even blue jeans. Fungi can also to study mushrooms and fungi, this is the place to be.” break down and absorb compounds that are toxic to nearly In the lab all other forms of life, including pesticides, industrial dyes, heavy metals and liquid petroleum. Growing and selling mushrooms is the core of Mushroom The Cotters champion mycoremediation on a domestic Mountain’s business, and there’s always a fresh crop of scale. Cotter’s recent book, Organic Mushroom Farming and springy shiitake and pendulous oyster mushrooms under Mycoremediation, has tutorials for composting pet waste and cultivation. To meet the demands of area restaurants and reducing yard erosion using fungi. There’s even a fungal speother bulk purchasers, the farm has tripled its output, shipping 600 to 900 pounds a week, but the heart and cies with an appetite for common household plastics. Cotter soul of the operation is Cotter’s research lab, where he recently got his hands on a sample from a culture bank. puts decades of experience to work by culturing fungi and “What we’re doing now is saving all our plastic at the meticulously observing their behavior, always looking for farm,” he says. “We’re going to take this [fungus] and use unique properties than can serve mankind. it to try to eat all of our waste and compost our plastic.” “We are a production facility, and that pays the bills Cotter’s forays into the medical and agricultural uses

scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


Mad about mushrooms

Bioprospecting Cotter’s research includes studying a group of fungi with the ability to mummify insects, including this cockroach. He envisions a day when toxic chemicals won’t be needed to rid a home of pests.

here that nobody has explored, and Tradd has this incredible collection of mushrooms to test. The potential is really enormous.” Although Cotter has studied biology and microbiology at the undergraduof fungi are perhaps the most excitate level, his greatest strengths as a ‘There are 1.5 million co-researcher are his decades of field ing of his many research projects. Just as some fungi can break down toxic fungi on the planet, and experience and a naturally scientific mind, McNealy says. chemicals or plastics, other species only 10 percent of those “He has real-world, ‘I know what show a particular talent for destroythese are’ and ‘I know how these ing bacteria. Cotter runs petri dish have been identified.’ work’ experiences, and he’s got the trials to determine which fungal most incredible sense of curiosity that strains are best at attacking the bacdrives him to ask the important questions,” McNealy says. teria that cause staph infections, salmonella poisoning and “When that comes so naturally to somebody, it’s an incredstrep throat. “We’re plating these things out and seeing them chase ible resource.” each other around the plate like a gladiator match,” he Cotter is also working on Cordyceps, a fascinating group says. “So I set these matches up between specific fungi and of fungi that reproduce by invading the brains of ants, bacteria, and I notice that some are good at this, and some turning them into “zombies.” The infected ants latch onto are good at that. I grade them on what they can do.” leaf veins, where they die and provide conditions that are ripe for more Cordyceps fungus to grow. Cotter has amassed Digging deeper a variety of mummified insects including cockroaches, The lab also contains a few dozen prototypes of something spiders and wasps cloaked in white, fungal tendrils, leading him to envision where this might one day lead—a natural Cotter is working on with Clemson University microbiologist Tamara McNealy. On a metal shelving unit, the small, way to rid a home of cockroaches without toxic chemicals. “We observe and note what the fungi are doing, then we sealed bags don’t look like much, but Cotter considers each basically sit down and think, ‘How can we put that to use? one a “pharmaceutical company in a bag.” What does the world need that this fungus can do?’ ” Cotter Each bag contains a small amount of water and a comsays of his bioprospecting work. “It’s just like panning for pact brick of growing medium (usually sawdust) that’s gold. There are 1.5 million fungi on the planet, and only 10 been inoculated with one of those gladiator fungus strains. Through a secure port in the top, McNealy’s researchers can percent of those have been identified, so we really are just seeing the surface. We’re going to keep digging deeper.” inject nasty, drug-resistant bacterial cultures like MRSA and With a growing list of research projects, speaking E. coli 0157. Within a couple days, the fungus will sweat out engagements across the country, foraging classes to teach at liquid metabolites containing bacteria-gobbling enzymes— the farm, a young family and the daily demands of expandin other words, a potential natural antibiotic. “What Tradd and I are doing is examining the potening mushroom production, Cotter admits to sometimes feeling overwhelmed. But he also feels lucky to pursue the tial of mushrooms to produce novel antibiotics,” McNealy calling he found on Johns Island two decades ago. says. “There is such a wide variety of mushrooms out “Had I not worked at that farm, I don’t know what I would be doing,” Cotter says. “I am already genuinely fulGet More To learn more about Mushroom Mountain or filled at 42. If something happened tomorrow, I would say schedule a group tour of the farm, call (864) 855-2469 or visit I lived the life I dreamed of.” mushroommountain.com. 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


SC Life

Stories

Johnny Mayo AGE:

65

Columbia CAREER: Served with 39th Scout Dog Platoon, 173rd Airborne Brigade, U.S. Army, Vietnam, 1969–71; retired from U.S. Postal Service MISSION: Securing recognition for the contributions of military working dogs MEDIA: Authored Buck’s Heroes (wardogwall.com), in which fallen war dogs tell their stories; appeared in Saving Private K-9 and Oliver North’s War Stories TV shows and in nationalgeographic. com video “Remembering the Vietnam War’s Combat Dogs” HOMETOWN:

Milton Morris

Get More The dedica-

tion ceremony for the S.C. War Dogs Monument will be Veterans Day, Nov. 11, at 3 p.m. at Memorial Park, 700 Hampton St., Columbia. To learn more, visit facebook.com/ scwardogmemorial. To make a tax-deductible donation, visit wardogmemorialfund.com.

The dogs of war

Second day, second mission. That’s when a 20-year-old Johnny Mayo lost his best friend in Vietnam. It is still, 45 years later, an emotional memory. “A dog handler and his dog—those are two living beings in as close a relationship as there is, dropped in the enemy’s backyard,” Mayo says of “walking point” ahead of his infantry platoon with Tiger-9A34, his German shepherd scout dog. In October 1970, Tiger triggered an enemy trip wire in Bong Son and died from shrapnel injuries. Mayo and his fellow soldiers survived the blast. Soon after, Mayo was assigned another canine partner, Kelly-819A, who would save him during an enemy mortar attack. Many soldiers returned from Vietnam wanting only to forget. But dog handlers fondly remembered their buddies who served as scouts, trackers and sentries, alerting troops to hidden dangers. So it came as a terrible shock to Mayo and other “dog men” when a 1999 TV documentary revealed that thousands of scout dogs never came home when the U.S. left Vietnam in 1973. Designated “surplus equipment,” they were given to the South Vietnamese or, worse, euthanized. More than 4,000 military working dogs served in Vietnam; only 204 survived and returned home. Mayo launched a crusade to ensure that war dogs were not forgotten. He traveled the country, displaying his “tribute wall” covered in names of canine warriors. His work on a committee to erect a national war dog memorial led to an invitation to place a monument in downtown Columbia’s Memorial Park. On Veterans Day 2015, that statue—a handler in full gear, kneeling beside his German shepherd on full alert—will be dedicated to war dogs and their partners. “That memory of that dog is as close as any family member,” Mayo says. “There’s not many family members you go to war with.” —DIANE VETO PARHAM

scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


SCTravels

BY LIBBY SWOPE WIERSEMA | Photography by Jeff Smith

Gourmet for a day With a rolling up of the

Aprons and tongs at the

sleeves, seven apron-clad ready, seven culinary guests of Abingdon Manor begin their day. The novices enroll in cooking kitchen is warm with the class at Abingdon Manor smell of brewed coffee, the camaraderie of friends and the promise of an elegant meal at day’s end—prepared by this mix of home cooks and somewhat nervous newbies. Chef Patty Griffey sizes up her students with a smile that lets us know the only island in the room is the sizable one on which we’ll chop, whisk and stir. Cooking class is a team affair at Abingdon, and while the reputation of its AAA four-diamond dining room seems to be in the hands of novices today, it’s all good. The chef is an experienced pro, an expert at dishing out instruction with a heavy dollop of patience and praise and a pinch (or two or three) of laughter for good measure. “There’s nothing you can do that can’t be fixed,” she reassures the not-so-sure. “It’s just food. You can’t break it.” It was a message I needed to hear. Having twice dined at the gracious country inn, located 25 miles down the road from Florence in the quaint town of Latta, I was well aware of the high expectations of guests and equally aware of how impeccably Abingdon delivers on those expectations. A place at the table here feels like a splurge, the stuff Sarah Staats and fiancé John Kimbrell stand aside while Chef Patty Griffey checks on their pear-poaching technique. Filled with mascarpone cheese and served with raspberry sauce, the pears are an elegant finish to the cooking-class meal.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


John Kimbrell, Paul Chamberlain and Matt Suggs take their turns charring the peppers. Everyone joins in when it is time to peel off the blackened skin.

of dreamy dining experiences and ultimate foodie fulfillment. But relax those pinkies—this is fine dining without the high-brow stuffiness, thanks to the warm demeanor of Griffey, her husband, Mike, and a friendly, attentive staff. “While the focus is on fine dining, we hope to make it feel like entertaining at home,” says Griffey, who opened the dining room in 2000. “Abingdon Manor is a chance to slow down a little and enjoy life the way it used to be in a genteel, civilized fashion.” And that relaxed air permeates the atmosphere of our cooking class. That is, until Griffey reminds us that what happens in the Abingdon kitchen won’t stay in the Abingdon kitchen. What we’re preparing today will grace our plates as well as the plates of other guests for that night’s dinner. No pressure, right? “You’ve got this,” Griffey insists, and we nod in unison, a septet of bobbleheads who’ve hit a street bump.

Gourmet boot camp

I am the “seventh” wheel today, tagging along with a class of three couples: John Kimbrell and Sarah Staats, a newly engaged pair from Atlanta; and Brig. Gen. Paul Chamberlain, his wife, Lara, Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew Suggs, and his wife, Lee Anna, all of Fort Jackson in Columbia. John arranged an overnight stay and cooking class at Abingdon to celebrate Sarah’s birthday, and the military folk are here as part of a birthday surprise for Lara. Paul and Matthew, who oversee the Soldier Support Institute, are about to get their hands dirty in a way they didn’t train for in boot camp. “I definitely have some trepidation,” Matthew says with a grin. “I am here to build some confidence in the kitchen.” The women see their turn at the Abingdon cooking school, well, a bit differently. “To do this as a couple is just fun,” says Lee Anna, to which Lara adds, “It’s a good way to refresh your marriage.” The cooking school at Abingdon Manor caters to couples

and groups of individuals who long for a little hands-on kitchen action to complement an otherwise laid-back getaway. A variety of class options are offered, with or without overnight stays, and include personalized aprons, wine sipping and a recipe booklet so you can recreate your masterpieces at home. Today’s class begins with a two-hour morning session during which we’ll prepare roasted red pepper soup, shredded collard salad with walnuts and pickled apples, Hpnotiq sorbet, and Campari-poached pears with raspberry sauce. While the women lean in comfortably, the men hover behind, their nervous smiles played up by the jocular bantering they dish out to one another. We flip to the first page of our recipe booklets. For starters, there’s roasted red pepper soup, and we are faced with our first challenge: how to roast the peppers and prepare them for the soup pot. Griffey fires up all six eyes of a serious-looking, cast-iron stovetop, and someone jokingly calls for the marshmallows. Using tongs, she grasps a freshly washed-and-dried red pepper, about the size of a cat’s head, and lays it directly on one eye. We watch, entranced, as the flames lick the slick red skin, our olfactory alarms set off by the “something’s burning” aroma blooming in the air. “You want it to get nice and blackened all over—this is one time where I want you to burn the food,” Griffey says, laughing. And just like that, the culinary question is no longer whether we can cook an edible dish, but whether we are adept enough to incinerate a vegetable. We watch, our eyes like saucers, as she plucks the pepper from the flame and displays the charred skin. Taking turns in groups of three, we attempt the same, hovering over the blistering veggies like they are eggs about to hatch. And then, something magical happens—we are wielding our tongs with more authority, turning the peppers on each side, comparing results and, finally, settling them down into scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


Travels

GetCooking Abingdon Manor: A Country Inn & Restaurant 307 Church St., Latta (843) 752-5090 or (888) 752-5090 abingdonmanor.com Cooking classes are usually slated once a month for a maximum of

six people. Special requests for dates are sometimes accommodated for groups of four to six. The tastes, dietary limitations and interests of participants are taken into consideration for menu planning. Packages include a two-night weekend stay, with breakfast each morning, dinner each night and Saturday cooking classes, for $440 per person; Saturday-night accommodations with dinner and cooking classes for $275 per person; and a classes-and-dinner-only day package for $175 per person. All packages include cooking classes, wine sipping, recipe booklet, aprons, tax and gratuity. Gift certificates are available.

The Abingdon Manor dining room is open to the public for

dinner Monday through Saturday, by reservation only. The six-course, prix fixe dinner is $55 per person, plus tax and gratuity. If you’d like to include a wine pairing, the cost is $77.50. Cocktails and wine are served in the parlors at 7 p.m.; dinner begins at 7:30 p.m.—one seating only. For overnight guests, dinner is served seven days a week. Monthly menus are posted on the website.

a brown grocery bag, which Griffey quickly closes so the veggies can steam. She says this helps the skin come off more easily, and we experience the truth of that a few minutes later as we wipe away the charred surface with paper towels. Within minutes, we have sliced the roasted peppers, mixed them with some chicken stock and other ingredients, then pureed it all with a hand blender, a handy gadget that we take turns immersing in the mixture and pulsing until we have a velvety soup. A sampling is distributed in tiny cups for tasting. Did we just make that? Judging by the looks of wonder on our faces, a kitchen miracle has just occurred. “My hope is that everyone will learn something, be it a new technique, a new tool or that food doesn’t have to be complicated to be good,” says Griffey, whose most memorable teaching moment was showing a hand surgeon how to cut and french a rack of veal. Indeed, any intimidation we began the day with has gradually evaporated, a fact we don’t pick up on until a little after noon. That’s when we realize another miracle has occurred: We’ve scratched off every dish on our morning list of recipes. We are giddy as Griffey recommends some Latta eateries and duly releases us to find

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop


lunch. At 1:30 p.m., we will begin preparing the second series of courses for tonight’s dinner.

History of dining at Abingdon

Adding a dining component at Abingdon Manor was not originally part of the Griffeys’ vision for the country inn, which they acquired in 1995. Trading the high energy of Miami for a gentler way of life, the Griffeys chose the Latta landmark partly for its proximity to I-95 and partly for its bucolic setting. But living here had a major drawback: Guests had to leave the property in search of dining options, few of which complemented the Abingdon experience. “We knew we would lose the repeat overnight ­business if they [the guests] didn’t have an excellent place to dine,” Griffey says. “Once we embarked on the journey, we decided to do it in a manner similar to what we experienced traveling in England and Scotland, staying at manorhouse hotels with fine dining.” Having honed her skills through years of gourmet cooking classes and hosting countless formal dinner parties, Griffey—South Carolina’s own version of Martha Stewart— was confident in her ability to establish a dining room worthy of Abingdon Manor. “I enjoy the process of planning, shopping and executing

Patty Griffey, along with her husband, Mike, purchased Abingdon Manor in 1995. Original plans didn’t include serving dinner, but there were no fine dining options nearby.

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Travels

meals that are tasty but made more special by being served on china with silver and crystal,” she says.

Making the grade

The first cooking class was offered in 2002. Today, I am a part of class number 104, though Griffey treats us as if we are the most important group to ever wear Abingdon aprons. That fuels our determination to get things right and make our teacher proud. The afternoon session is led by Griffey’s right hand, Jeff Grubb, who’s been assisting as sous chef since the dining room opened. He leads us through the steps of making ­focaccia, rolling out an impressive litany of bread-making do’s and don’ts along the way. Wine is passed as we finish the remainder of the menu: ravioli with spinach, prosciutto and goat cheese with portwine reduction, and lobster thermidor. We crank sheets of dough through a pasta machine, fill and seal them, then slit lobster tails, carefully prying out the prized, sweet meat. I sit back on a stool to observe and jot down a few notes. As I look around, I no longer see the awkward foodies that began this culinary journey. We are a team of budding gourmets, and we’ve prepared a sumptuous meal worthy of the tables at Abingdon Manor.

Sous chef Jeff Grubb instructs Lee Anna Suggs about quantity and placement of filling for each ravioli pocket.

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Recipe

BY Belinda Smith-Sullivan

Quick breads are just that—quick and easy great for to whip up with few ingredients, bread can nut i weekday meals. Banana-zucchin st or topped toa ch Fren as be served plain, skillet fried overs are a pop tery But . sert with ice cream for des a twist with t. And family-pleasing dinnertime trea got ’ve you , uits on traditional buttermilk bisc rry wbe stra for a sweet foundation shortcake.

Oven-fresh quick breads BANANA-ZUCCHINI NUT BREAD SERVES 8–10

1 N cups all-purpose flour ¾ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon baking powder ¾ tablespoon cinnamon 5N tablespoons butter O cup sugar 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 ripe banana, mashed ½ cup grated zucchini ½ cup chopped walnuts

William P. Edwards

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease an 8-by-5-by3‑inch loaf pan. Whisk together flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder and cinnamon. Using a mixer on high speed, blend butter and sugar together. Switch to lowest speed, and add flour mixture until all is blended and has the consistency of brown sugar. Gradually beat in eggs and vanilla. Fold in banana, zucchini and walnuts. Bake for 60–65 minutes or until done. Cool on a rack.

CITRUS-GLAZED SWEET POTATO MUFFINS MAKES 16

1 G cups granulated sugar 1 G cups cooked, mashed sweet potatoes 1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature 2 large eggs, room temperature 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder

1 G teaspoons cinnamon G teaspoon salt 1 cup milk H cup raisins H cup chopped pecans G cup fresh citrus juice (orange, lemon, lime or grapefruit) 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

Iuliia Nedrygailova

Preheat oven to 400 F. Grease muffin cups or use paper liners. Using a mixer, blend granulated sugar, sweet potatoes and butter until smooth. Add eggs, and blend well. In a separate bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt. On lowest mixer speed, add flour mixture alternately with milk to sweet potato mixture, stirring just to blend. Do not overmix. Fold in raisins and nuts. Spoon into muffin cups (fill cups only 2/3 full). Bake 25–30 minutes or until muffins test as done. For glaze, mix citrus juice and confectioners’ sugar together in a bowl, stirring until sugar dissolves. Drizzle on warm muffins.


Gina Moore 

BUTTERMILK DESSERT BISCUITS 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar G teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces and chilled 1 cup fat-free buttermilk G cup milk Sugar Sweetened, sliced strawberries (optional) Whipped cream (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large bowl, sift together flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Work quickly through the next steps, so the butter does not warm up and soften too much. With a pastry cutter or two knives, cut the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles small crumbs (the size of a pea). Make a hole in the middle of the flour, and add buttermilk. Gently stir until the dough is mixed together but still tacky. If it is too dry, add more buttermilk, 1 tablespoon at a time. Pour out the mixed dough onto a floured surface and, with floured hands, gently pat into a rectangle, 1 inch thick. With a 2½-inch biscuit cutter, push down to cut the dough, and pull up without twisting the cutter and the dough. Leftover scraps can be combined and cut again—but only once. Arrange the biscuits on a parchment-lined cookie sheet, not touching each other. Brush the tops with milk, and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 20 minutes or until they are golden brown. Top with strawberries and whipped cream for strawberry shortcake. Biscuits can also be cut up to use in a fruit trifle or bread pudding.

Michael Phillips

MAKES 12–14

BUTTERY POPOVERS MAKES 9–10

1 cup all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup milk 2 eggs (large) 1 tablespoon butter, melted Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 375 F. In a medium bowl, combine flour and salt. In another medium bowl, combine milk and large eggs, stirring with a whisk until blended. Let wet and dry ingredients stand 30 minutes. Gradually blend flour mixture and egg mixture together, stirring well. Stir in melted butter. Lightly coat 9-10 popover cups with cooking spray, and heat them in oven for 5 minutes before filling cups. (If you don’t have popover cups, you can use a muffin tin, but reduce baking time by 4-5 minutes. Popovers baked in muffins tins may not rise as high.) Divide the batter evenly among prepared popover cups, filling cups about halfway (muffin tins can be filled higher). Bake for 40 minutes or until golden brown (35-36 minutes if using a muffin tin). Never open the oven while popovers are cooking, or they will not rise properly. Remove from pan immediately. Serve warm with plain or flavored butter.

W h at Õ s C oo k i n g at

SCLiving.coop

Spiced honey butter makes a sweet spread on warm popovers. Get Chef Belinda’s recipe and watch her technique for mixing dough in a stand mixer at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda scliving.coop   | October 2015   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

29


SCChefÕsChoice

BY Pam windsor

Soup’s on at Hopsewee Plantation When Raejean Beattie and her

Photos by Milton Morris

husband, Frank, bought Hopsewee Plantation near Georgetown, they never thought about serving food. Their goal was to live in the preRevolutionary War house and allow tours during the day. After all, the

Raejean Beattie raided the family cookbook for recipes when she began serving lunch at her elegant tea room on the grounds of Hopsewee Plantation. The former rice plantation includes the manor home that was the birthplace of Thomas Lynch Jr., a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Hopsewee Plantation Tea Room 494 Hopsewee Road, Georgetown. (843) 546-7891; hopsewee.com. Hours: The Tea Room is open for lunch Tuesday– Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Reservations are recommended. Tours of the home are held on the hour Tuesday– Friday beginning at 10 a.m., with the last tour starting at 3 p.m. On Saturdays, tours begin at 11 a.m. During December and January, tours are offered by appointment only.

30

former rice plantation was the birthplace of Thomas Lynch Jr., a signer of the Declaration of Independence. But when the tourist traffic got to be a bit much, they built a small tea room to allow themselves a place to get away during the day. It turned into something more when the ladies of the Red Hat Society asked if the couple would host a special tea at Hopsewee. It was such a success that the Beatties began serving tea, scones and small sandwiches on a regular basis. A few years later, they expanded the tea room, added a full kitchen, and introduced a lunch menu featuring family recipes for shrimp and grits, Cajun gumbo, and the house specialty—Gin-Gin’s chicken and wild rice soup. “Gin-Gin Soup is my mother’s recipe,” Raejean Beattie says. “My children call their grandmother Gin-Gin and would always say, ‘Let’s have Gin-Gin soup.’ ” A former assistant professor of engineering at USC-Aiken, Beattie has no professional culinary training but has spent years experimenting with recipes and creating new dishes of her own. “I’ve always enjoyed entertaining and fixing good food, looking up recipes and combining recipes,” she says. “If I try something somewhere that I like, I don’t ask for the recipe. I might say this looks like it has this or that in it. And I think of other flavors to add.” As the menu has grown, so has the Tea Room’s reputation. Years ago, visitors used to come to Hopsewee simply to tour the home. Now some come just to eat. Reservations are recommended, as the Tea Room seats 56 people, and on some days it fills up quickly with busloads of tourists from Myrtle Beach. While casual dress is welcome and

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

Gin-Gin’s Chicken and Wild Rice Soup Serves 8

2 tablespoons oil 1 box wild rice mix 1 small onion, diced                             2 small ribs celery, diced                     2 small carrots, diced 1 teaspoon pepper 4 medium chicken breasts, diced 32 ounces chicken stock 2 cans cream of mushroom soup 1 cup milk

In a large pot, sweat vegetables in oil. Add chicken and sear on the outside. Season with pepper. Add chicken stock and bring to a boil, then add rice and seasoning. Let simmer 15–20 minutes, until rice is cooked. Add cream of mushroom soup and milk. Reheat without boiling. “This is the way my mother fixed it,” says Raejean Beattie. “At Hopsewee, we cook button mushrooms with the vegetables and make a roux with butter, flour and heavy cream instead of cream of mushroom soup and milk.” even expected, guests will dine in elegance with classic lace linens, fine china and polished silverware. Woodframed, full-length windows on three sides of the tea room allow an open view of the Hopsewee grounds, as well as the nearby plantation home. On a typical day, guests will find Beattie overseeing the lunch rush, always making time to visit with customers. “They’re here because they love history, they love the idea of what we’re doing, and they’re pleased with the whole experience, from the tour, to the beauty of the place, to the food,” she says. “I’m very pleased with all of that.”


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35


Calendar  of Events UPSTATE

NOVEMBER

6–7 • Mistletoe Market, OCTOBER Anderson County Museum, 12–18 • Piedmont Interstate Anderson. (864) 260-4737. Fair, 575 Fairgrounds Road, 6–8 • “The Fantasticks” by the Spartanburg. (864) 582-7042. Spartanburg Repertory Company, 13–17 • Union County Agricultural St. John’s Lutheran Church, Fair, Union County Fairgrounds, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Union. (864) 427-6259, ext. 112. 6–8 • Richland Creek Antique 15 • Oktoberfest, 200 Oregon Fall Festival, Richland Creek Ave., Greenwood. (864) 942-8448. Farms, Saluda. (864) 445-2781. 16 • Contra Dance, First 6–15 • “Of Mice & Men,” Presbyterian Church, Spartanburg Little Theatre Spartanburg. (864) 308-1337. at Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 16–17 • Hogs and Hens BBQ Cook-off, Trinity Street, 7 • Fall Festival and Holiday Abbeville. (864) 366-5007. Market, Greenville Classical Academy, Simpsonville. 16–18 • Antiques, Fine Art & (864) 329-9884. Design Weekend, Greenville County Museum of Art, 7 • Foothills Skills and Crafts Greenville. (864) 271-7570. Show, Piedmont Technical College, Greenwood. (864) 941-8400. 16–18 • “Cinderella” by Ballet Spartanburg, Chapman Cultural 7 • Howser House Tours, Kings Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Mountain National Military Park, Blacksburg. (864) 936-7921. 16–18 • Oktoberfest, Main Street and Sertoma Field, 7 • Wild Fermented Foods, Hagood Walhalla. (864) 638-2727. Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. 16–18 and 23–25 • Boo in the Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 7–8 • Open Studios, multiple studios, Greenville 17 • Fall Vintage Market, Greer area. (864) 467-3132. City Park, Greer. (864) 621-2020. 7–8 • Veterans Day Encampment, 17 • S.C. Upstate Pagan Pride Kings Mountain National Military Day, Greenville Unitarian Park, Blacksburg. (864) 936-7921. Universalist Fellowship, Greenville. (864) 356-0139. ONGOING 17 • Storytelling Festival, Hagood Daily through October • Pumpkin Mill Historic Site & Folklife Patch, Disciples United Methodist Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Church, Greenville. (864) 297-0382. 18–22 • Starburst Storytelling Tuesdays through Saturdays, Festival, Anderson Public Library through Nov. 5 • “Kay Larch: and other locations, Anderson. Galeria Mexicana,” Pickens (864) 260-4500, ext. 107. County Museum of Art & History, Pickens. (864) 898-5963. 22–24 • Enchanted Forest, Pavilion Recreation Complex, Tuesdays through Saturdays, Taylors. (864) 288-6470. through Nov. 12 • “Shifting Plates II: Works by 16 South 23–24 • SpartOberfest, Jesus, Carolina Printmakers,” Pickens Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, County Museum of Art & History, Spartanburg. (864) 576-1164. Pickens. (864) 898-5963. 23–24 • Sugarfoot Weekends through October • Festival, downtown, Honea Corn Maze, Stewart Farms, Path. (864) 369-1605. Enoree. (864) 969-7270. 23–25 • Wings of Freedom Tour WWII Aircraft Display, Greenville Downtown Airport, MIDLANDS Greenville. (864) 270-6660. OCTOBER 24 • Clusters for Kids 11–18 • Rock Hill Rocks Oyster Roast, Arran Farm, Open, Rock Hill Tennis Center, Easley. (864) 506-0737. Rock Hill. (803) 326-3842. 24 • Fall Bazaar, Disciples 13–17 • Eastern Carolina United Methodist Church, Agricultural Fair, Eastern Greenville. (864) 297-0382. Carolina Agricultural Fairgrounds, 24 • Fall Harvest Festival, Village Florence. (843) 665-5173. Green, Pendleton. (864) 646-9409. 14–25 • South Carolina 29–31 • Anderson County State Fair, State Fairgrounds, Halloween Boograss Bash, Columbia. (803) 799-3387. Civic Center of Anderson, 15–18 and 22–25 • “Agnes Anderson. (864) 934-6451. of God,” Sumter Little Theatre, 31 • Children’s Fall Festival, Sumter. (803) 775-2150. Old Market Square, Easley. 16 • Yamasee Foodways, USC(864) 423-4344. Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313-7063.

36

16–17 • Conway BBQ Fest, Riverfront Park, Conway. (843) 385-1724. 16–18 • Mini Marathon, Marina Inn at Grande Dunes and other locations, 29 • Taste of Wine and Art, 16–30 • Boo at the Zoo, Myrtle Beach. (800) 733-7089. Aiken Center for the Arts, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Aiken. (803) 641-9094. Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 16–18 • South Carolina Jazz 17 • Clover Fall Festival, Longshot 31 • Fall Steeplechase, Ford Conger Festival, multiple locations, Cheraw. (843) 537-8420, ext. 12. Field, Aiken. (803) 648-9641. Farms, Clover. (866) 531-4222. 17 • Artisan & Crafters Show, 17 • An Evening in the 1800s with 31 • Howl at the Moon 5K Run, Omar Shrine Convention Center, Kim Poovey, Aiken County Historical Orangeburg County Broadband, Mount Pleasant. (843) 771-7703. Branchville. (843) 560-2427. Museum, Aiken. (803) 641-0650. 17 • Bog-Off Festival, downtown, 31 • Trunk or Treat, Joe Miller 17 • Knights of Columbus Fall Loris. (843) 756-6030. Park, Elloree. (803) 897-2821. Car Show, St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Aiken. (803) 663-1777. 17 • Fall Festival, Jungle Road, NOVEMBER Edisto Island. (888) 333-2781. 17 • Oktoberfest, Old Town, 4 • Under the Stars Jumper Rock Hill. (803) 329-8756. 17 • Harvest Festival & Block Night, Stable View Farm, Party, Olde Village, North 17 • Spirits & Stories: Brattonsville Aiken. (484) 356-3173. Charleston. (843) 740-5854. by Twilight, Historic Brattonsville, 4–7 • Underexposed Film McConnells. (803) 684-2327. Festival, Community Performance 17–18 • Camping Ex‑PIER‑ience, Myrtle Beach State Park, 17–18 • Colonial Times: A Day to Center, Rock Hill. (803) 328-2787. Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-0874. Remember, Living History Park, 5–8 • Katydid Combined North Augusta. (803) 979-9776. 17–18 • Palmetto Campout, Driving Event, Katydid Farm, Huntington Beach State Park, 18 • S.C. Philharmonic: The Great Windsor. (803) 295-6785. Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-8755. American Songbook, Harbison 6–8 • Craftsmen’s Christmas Theatre at Midlands Technical 17–18 • Wooden Boat Classic Art & Craft Festival, College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. Show, downtown waterfront, S.C. State Fairgrounds, Georgetown. (843) 520-0111. 22–31 • Western Carolina State Columbia. (336) 282-5550. Fair, Aiken County Fairgrounds, 18 • Bark in the Park Oktoberfest, 6–8 • Southern City Film Aiken. (803) 648-8955. Wannamaker County Park, North Festival, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 23 • Committed, gospel/ downtown Aiken. (803) 215-5936. pop a capella group, Harbison 18 • Children’s Day Festival, 7 • Apple Fest, St. John’s Theatre at Midlands Technical Park West Recreation Complex, United Methodist Church, College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. Mount Pleasant. (843) 884-8517. Aiken. (803) 648-6891. 23 • Spirits of Hallowed Eve 19 • Tee Off Fore the Arts, 7 • Papermaking with Botanicals, Dinner, Living History Park, Wexford Golf Club, Hilton Head Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, North Augusta. (803) 279-7560. Island. (843) 686-3945, ext. 304. Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 23–24 • Francis Marion/Swamp 23 • Cane Pole Fishing, Hobcaw 7–8 • Repticon, Jamil Temple, Fox Symposium, F.E. DuBose Barony, Georgetown. (843) 546-4623. Campus of Central Carolina Technical Columbia. (803) 772-0732. 23–24 • Halloween in the 7–8 • Revolutionary War College, Manning. (803) 478-2645. Swamp, Cypress Gardens, Days, Historic Camden 24 • All Hallowed Eve Ghost Walk Field Moncks Corner. (843) 553-0515. War Site, & Illusion Show, Living History Park, Revolutionary Camden. (803) 432-9841. 23–25 • Fall Festival of North Augusta. (803) 441-8956. Historic Houses & Gardens, 10 • Fabien Cousteau: One 24 • Bark in the Park, multiple locations, Beaufort Ocean, One People, Harbison Edisto Memorial Gardens, area. (843) 379-3331. Theatre at Midlands Technical Orangeburg. (800) 545-6153. College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. 23–25 • Savannah Speed Classic, 24 • History Walk to Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort 13 • “Things Your Man Won’t Defeat Senior Hunger, & Spa, Savannah. (843) 785-7469. Do, ” Township Auditorium, Lancaster First Baptist Church, Columbia. (803) 576-2350. 24 • Lowcountry Arts & Literary Lancaster. (803) 285-6956. Festival, Frampton Plantation, ONGOING 24 • Sumter Sunrise Rotary 5K, Yemassee. (843) 597-0912. downtown, Sumter. (803) 436-2500. Mondays through Saturdays, 29–Nov. 8 • Coastal Carolina Fair, 24 • Zombie Crawl 5K & Fun Run, through Nov. 1 • Corn Maze, Bush- Exchange Park, Ladson. (843) 572-3161. N-Vine Farm, York. (803) 684-2732. Old Town, Rock Hill. (803) 524-5671. 30 • Trick or Treat at the 24–25 • Civil War Reenactment, Weekends through Nov. 11 • Creek, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Corn Maze, Pim Farms, Historic Brattonsville, Island. (843) 869-2505. Darlington. (803) 983-9073. McConnells. (803) 684-2327. Weekends Nov. 7–Dec. 21 • “The 31 • Senior Dances with 25 • BOO-seum, Main Real Christmas Story,” NarroWay Rosalie Halloween Party, Base Street Children’s Museum, Recreation Center Ballroom, Theatre, Fort Mill. (803) 802-2300. Rock Hill. (803) 327-6400. Myrtle Beach. (570) 881-0244. 25 • Taste of Orangeburg, 31–Nov. 1 • Motoring Festival LOWCOUNTRY Russell Street Square, & Concours d’Elegance, Port Orangeburg. (803) 531-6186. OCTOBER Royal Golf Club, Hilton Head Island. (843) 785-7469. 25 • Ukulele Jam, Andrew Jackson 1–25 • Fall Tours of Homes State Park, Lancaster. (843) 761-4859. and Gardens, historic district, NOVEMBER Charleston. (800) 514-3849. 27 • Moonlight Kayak Trip, 3–5 • Small Plate Crawl, Big Allison Creek Landing, Lake 11–18 • Arts & Seafood multiple locations, Charleston Wylie, York. (803) 329-5527. Festival, historic district, area. (864) 320-3002. Bluffton. (843) 757-2583.

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

4–8 • American Heart Association Beach Ride, Lakewood Camping Resort, Myrtle Beach. (843) 282-2911. 4–8 • Charleston International Film Festival, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 817-1617. 5–6 • Rice & Ducks lectures, Hobcaw Barony, Georgetown. (843) 546-4623. 7 • Harvest Festival, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center at Johns Island County Park, Johns Island. (843) 795-4386. 7 • Pecan Festival, downtown, Florence. (843) 665-2047. 7–8 • Art in the Park, Chapin Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446-3830. 7–8 • Mythical & Medieval Fest, Myrtle Beach Speedway, Myrtle Beach. (843) 602-1049. 8 • Charleston Cup, Plantation at Stono Ferry, Hollywood. (843) 766-6202. 12–14 • Heritage Days Celebration, Penn Center, St. Helena Island. (843) 838-2432. 12–15 • Dickens Christmas Show & Festival, Myrtle Beach Area Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 448-9483. 13–14 • Smoke on the Harbor BBQ Throwdown, Lookout Pavilion at Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina, Mount Pleasant. (843) 284-7022. 13–15 • Holiday Market, North Charleston Area Convention Center, North Charleston. (336) 282-5550. 13–15 • Merry Marketplace, Florence-Darlington Technical College, Florence. (843) 667-0376. 13–15 • Oyster Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. 14 • Lowcountry Reads for the Holidays—A Book Fair, Christ Lutheran Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 686-6560. 14–15 • Art in the Park, Valor Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446-3830. 15 • Open Land Trust Oyster Roast and Annual Meeting, Sand Creek Farm, Edisto Island. (843) 869-9004. ONGOING

Daily through October • Pumpkin Patch, Centenary United Methodist Church, Conway. (843) 347-3781. Daily through Nov. 1 • National Sculpture Society Awards Exhibition, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-6000. Daily through Dec. 31 • Public Art Exhibition on Hilton Head Island, Coastal Discovery Museum, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-9100. Weekends in October • Myrtle Maze and Pumpkin Patch, Legare Farms, Johns Island. (843) 559-0788.


SCHumorMe

By Jan A. Igoe

New kid on the block When it comes right down to it,

being human isn’t all that much fun. We sweat and get toenail fungus. We have to floss. Our computers crash. We have to deal with spiders and Miley Cyrus. It’s no wonder that, given his options, Thomas Thwaites—a 34-yearold trans­humanist from England— decided to try being a goat instead. Not a loyal, lovable dog. Not some diva’s pampered cat. Not a powerful, majestic lion. Of all the four-footed creatures in the world, he picked a goat. Morphing into a hoofed creature is not as simple as it sounds. You can’t just grab a set of horns and a mohair coat and go marching into Starbucks on all fours expecting the java junkies to acknowledge your goatliness. If it were that easy, everyone would do it. No, no. Thwaites spent a year designing prosthetics to help him realize the full goat experience, which one can only have in the Swiss Alps. He spent several days in his prosthetic hoofs climbing the hills, trying to blend in with his highly skeptical goat family. If you are a native-born Swiss goat, you don’t often see something like Thwaites stumbling up your mountain­side. So the first question you ask yourself is: “Why is that poor, homely creature wearing a helmet?” Well, there’s a very good reason

38

for that. Compared to a goat, human knees are on backwards. So the prosthetics were designed not only to compensate for the bipedal tendency to balance on two limbs, but to cover up his hands and feet—always a dead giveaway—and to make the knee thing more convincing. In other words,

much like women over 50 wearing spike heels, Thwaites fell on his head a lot. He also got a crash course (no pun intended) in herd manners. When you are the new “kid” on the block, you never hobble up the hill ahead of the alpha. That’s bad form. According to dailymail.co.uk, Thwaites unwittingly found himself in that socially awkward position. “I looked up and all the other goats were looking at me. Everyone else had stopped chewing and it was in that

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   October 2015  |  scliving.coop

moment, when I thought, ‘those horns look quite sharp,’ ” the Daily Mail reported. You’d think he’d understand that psychology, since Thwaites invented a set of executive chairs designed to puff up aspiring alphas who need help intimidating their troops. Based on the same principle as a puffer fish, the boss’ chair inflates itself to affirm who is in charge. At the same time, an unwitting underling’s tush is parked in a chair that’s shrinking down and becoming more uncomfortable by the second. The subordinate will assume the alpha has absolute authority, if not magical powers. Or he’ll think something’s wrong with the chair. You’re probably wondering what’s next for the infamous goat man. As we speak, Thwaites is penning a book about his six days as a hoofed beast and the break he took from being human. For future goats, it’s a self-help book. For women in high heels, it’s a safety manual. Just skip right to the helmet chapter. Jan A. Igoe likes goats, particularly in pajamas, but would rather personally morph into a colorful tropical creature that shuns frigid mountains and dines on something besides grass. Cookies, if possible. Share your animal wisdom at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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South Carolina Living October 2015  

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