Page 1

SPIN CONTROL

CHANGE OUT

Explore the competitive world of professional disc golf SC R E C I PE

Bacon-mania SC TR AV E L S

JANUARY 2016

A trip down memory lane


NEED AN AFFORDABLE HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN? LOOK NO FURTHER!

Losi ng Y Cov our erag e?

With a BlueEssentialsSM plan from BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina, you will LOVE all the value-adds and benefits, like:

Dental coverage

24/7/365 access to a board-certified physician through video consults

Vision coverage

Wellness Plus+ – $500 for services not covered under your standard preventive doctor visits

Pharmacy benefits

No-cost credit monitoring

ARE YOU… A first time buyer? Switching from another plan?

VISIT WWW.MYSCPLAN.COM TO: ■ See If You Qualify for a Subsidy ■ Learn More About BlueEssentials Plans ■ Watch Online Videos

A parent of an adult child?

■ Request a Kit

Replacing your coverage?

■ Compare and shop for a BlueEssentials Plan

We’ve helped thousands and we can help you too!

CALL 855-816-7633 TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE

OPEN ENROLLMENT ENDS JANUARY 31! GET COVERED TODAY AND AVOID THE PENALTY.

BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 1 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 559,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

JANUARY 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 1

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins

FEATURE

PRODUCTION

12 Playing to win

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Van O’Cain

Fort Mill’s Ricky Wysocki chases victory on the professional disc golf tour.

COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

Becky Billingsley, Mike Couick, Hastings Hensel, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Anne Prince, Belinda Smith‑Sullivan, Libby Swope Wiersema PUBLISHER

Lou Green

MIC SMITH

4 CO-OP CONNECTION Cooperative news

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

Celebrate the Lowcountry’s rich cultural history at the Hilton Head Island Gullah Celebration. Plus: Learn how to seal up savings around the house with a little caulk and some elbow grease.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Education remains a top priority Electric co-ops are committed to keeping members, managers, trustees and public officials up to speed on utility issues.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

18

TRAVELS

18 Cruising down memory lane Load up the car and head to Nostalgic Station to relive the drive-in culture of the ’50s and ’60s. RECIPE

22 Bacon-mania

Bacon makes everything better, but these four recipes take your favorite foods to a whole new level.

22

CHEF’S CHOICE

SPIN

CONTROL SC TR AV E LS

JANUARY 2016

A trip down memory lane

Professional disc golfer Ricky Wysocki takes his shot at winning the 2015 U.S. Disc Golf Championship. Photo by Mic Smith.

You don’t need a special occasion to enjoy Chef Cooper Thomas’ creative menu at Victors in Florence. HUMOR ME

30 Digital disasters are man-made Computers are wonderful things—right up to the moment they gobble up your files and send them to Mars.

26 MARKETPLACE 28 SC EVENTS

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

SC R E C I PE

Bacon-mania

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

Florence sculptor Alex Palkovich pursued a business career before becoming a worldrenowned artist. Now he’s making up for lost time.

24 Southern with a twist

Explore the competitive world of professional disc golf

Printed on recycled paper

STORIES

17 Life in art

CAR ROL L FOS TER

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

6 ON THE AGENDA

SC LIFE


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 8 page 2

Highlights TOP PICK FOR KIDS

FEBRUARY 4

‘Peter Rabbit Tales’

The timeless adventures of mischievous Peter Rabbit and his pals still delight children, even as the 150th birthday of author Beatrix Potter comes around in 2016. Celebrate the anniversary at Clemson’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts when Enchantment Theatre Company stages a 7 p.m. performance full of whimsy, imagination and music. Come an hour before show time for family games and art projects in the lobby. For details, call (864) 656-7787 or visit clemson.edu/centers-institutes/brooks.

JANUARY 15–17

South Carolina International Auto Show

Ready for some new wheels? Get a look at the latest cars, trucks, crossovers, vans, SUVs and alternative-fuel vehicles at this Motor Trends Auto Show at TD Convention Center in Greenville. Look under the hood, climb behind the wheel and test drive models on site in a no-pressure, non-sales setting. Special displays of Corvettes and customized modern muscle cars will also be featured. For details, visit southcarolinaautoshow.com or call (864) 233-2562.

JANUARY 14–16

MLK Jr. Blues Festival

Honoring Martin Luther King Jr.’s ideals of nonviolence, brotherhood, peace and justice, this weekend of concerts and tributes takes place at Carolina Hall in Chester. Organizer Dave Claytor of 2nd Thursday Blues, a nonprofit dedicated to revitalizing Chester “one song at a time,” says audience members will be invited to share how King’s words influenced their lives. Performers include Johnny Rawls (left), Drink Small, Little G Weevil, Slam Allen and Doris “Lady D” Fields. For details, visit facebook.com/SecondThursdayBlues/ or call (803) 379-1683.

FEBRUARY 1–28

Hilton Head Island Gullah Celebration FEBRUARY 12–14

Southeastern Wildlife Exhibition

Rich in Gullah culture, Hilton Head Island is the place to learn about and enjoy the art, food, music and history of the Gullah people at the 20th annual edition of this month-long celebration. Sample conch stew, hear Gullah spirituals, witness traditional crafts, dance, and storytelling, meet African-American authors, and browse artworks focused on Gullah life. For details, visit gullahcelebration.com or call (843) 255-7304.

This Charleston event is an annual pilgrimage for fans of wildlife and nature, celebrated through fine art and sporting demonstrations. TV personality Jack Hanna (left) is back this year as a featured entertainer, along with live animal shows from Busch Wildlife Sanctuary and the Center for Birds of Prey. DockDogs shows, outdoor sports and cooking demos, and original art created in front of live audiences are among the highlights. For details, visit sewe.com or call (843) 723-1748.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

SEAL AND SAVE

heating and cooling accounts for roughly half of your home’s energy use? Caulking cracks and gaps around windows, doors, and the spaces around wires (­telephone and cable), gas lines, water spigots and dryer vents can pay off with big energy savings. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a small investment in caulk and caulking supplies could cut your monthly energy bill by 5 to 10 percent. Best of all, caulking is an easy do-it-yourself job that can be accomplished in an afternoon. You’ll need caulk, a caulk gun, a utility knife, rags and water. Weatherproof silicone caulk, available at hardware stores and home improvement centers, is usually the best choice for sealing gaps around windows and doors and for filling in gaps that are less than onequarter-inch wide.

Start saving with a DIY home energy audit

DID YOU KNOW

PREP Clean the area where you will be applying the caulk. Remove any dirt, loose paint or old, cracked caulk. Be sure the area is dry before applying new caulk appropriate for your application.

As temperatures drop this winter, consider conducting a do-it-yourself energy audit to boost your home’s efficiency and comfort.

BOOST YOUR INSULATION.

According to the Department of Energy, the fastest and most cost-­ effective way of improving your home’s efficiency is to seal air leaks and bring insulation up to the R-38 insulation standard recommended for South Carolina homes.

MANAGE ELECTRONIC DEVICES.

Inventory all of the electronic devices you have and how often you use them. Computers, printers, DVD players, phones and gaming consoles are notorious “vampire power” users—they drain energy even when not in use. If items can be powered down without disrupting your lifestyle, consider plugging them into a power strip that can be turned on and off or put on a timer.

APPLY To figure out the right amount of caulk needed, experiment with an out-of-the-way section. You may find that you need less caulk than you thought. Hold the gun at a slight angle. Apply steady pressure on the trigger to create a solid stream from the tip, which should be placed a half‑inch or less from the intended destination of the material. Use just enough caulk to do the job. Use your finger to gently press the caulk into the corner, crack or space.

LOAD Puncture the seal on your new tube of caulk. Slice off the plastic tip at an angle, starting with a small opening. You can always make the hole larger if necessary, but never RELEASE Once the trigger is fully smaller. depressed, allow it to spring back, You will need to pull the plunger and depress it again. Keep the gun all the way back to load the tube of moving while caulk is still coming caulk into the barrel of the caulking out of the tip. gun. Next, squeeze the trigger a few times until the plunger CLEAN Use a damp cloth makes contact with the or rag to clean off most For more information on making your home tube. Squeeze once or of the excess caulk. Use energy efficient, visit twice more to fill the tip a dry cloth to clean off SCLiving.coop/energy. with caulk. the rest.

UPGRADE YOUR LIGHTING. Do you still have incandescent lights? Consider replacing them with CFL or LED upgrades. Are there places where you can install motion-sensor lights in low-use areas, such as a closet, porch or garage? CONTROL THE THERMOSTAT.

Do you have a programmable thermostat? When was the last time it was programmed? Make sure the time and date are correct, and review the settings to make sure you’re maximizing savings to the season.

UPGRADE APPLIANCES. Large appli-

ances like refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, washing machines and dryers use a lot of energy. If yours are more than 10 years old, it’s time to consider replacing them. Newer models are far more efficient and will save you money in the long run. —ANNE PRINCE

energyEFFICIENCYtip  

Save energy and money by lowering your water heater thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This will also slow mineral buildup and corrosion in your water heater and pipes. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda O N LY O N

LOCAL

HEROES

When the ala sounds, S.C. rm firefighters volunteer ready to respare ond

SCLiving.coop NOV/D EC

2015

BONUS VIDEO

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after.

SC R E C I PE

Pies for the holi days SC GA R D ENER An amaryllis enco re

Minor

LETTERS Thank you so much for the nice article about our volunteer firemen and firewomen (“In the line of fire,” SCL, November/ December 2015). My husband was a volunteer firefighter for 50 years in Pennsylvania. No one has any idea the sacrifices they and their families make unless they’ve “been there and done that.” These men and women risk their lives and miss many celebrations, like kids’ birthdays and Christmas dinners. When that radio goes off, they go, no matter what else is going on at that moment in their lives.

BONUS ARTICLES S.C. GARDENER: Hiring a landscape pro.

ENERGY Q&A:

SENSORIA SMART SOCKS

Exploring inner space. Follow these commonsense tips for using space heaters, and you’ll stay warm this winter without driving up your power bill.

JOAN KILGUS, CONWAY HOLMES

Ready to turn lawn maintenance over to someone else? Here are the questions to ask when hiring a lawn service.

SMART CHOICE: Health break. Resolved to live a healthier lifestyle in 2016? These gadgets can help you meet your activity and wellness goals.

INTERACTIVE FEATURES Get our free email newsletter. Get everything you love about South Carolina Living delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for our free email newsletter at SCLiving.coop/newsletter.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Minor

PM Major

12:16 1:16 2:16 3:01 3:46 4:31 12:01 12:31 1:16 1:46 2:31 8:31 9:31 11:31 —

7:46 9:01 9:46 10:31 11:16 11:46 5:16 5:46 6:31 7:01 7:46 3:16 4:01 5:16 6:31

JANUARY

THE CALL OF DUTY

Flipping over omelets. Whether you prefer to flip or fold your omelets, perfect your technique by watching Chef Belinda whip up an omelet both ways. See the video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

AM Major

WRITE US We love hearing from our readers. Tell us what you think about this issue, send us story suggestions or just let us know what’s on your mind by clicking on the Contact Us link at SCLiving.coop. You can also email us at letters@ scliving.coop, or mail to Letters, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033. All letters received are subject to editing before publication.

17 5:46 1:16 18 7:31 3:16 19 9:01 4:31 20 10:01 5:16 21 10:46 5:46 22 11:31 6:31 23 — 7:01 24 7:16 12:16 25 7:46 12:46 26 8:16 1:16 27 8:31 1:46 28 9:01 2:16 29 9:31 2:31 30 3:01 9:46 31 3:31 10:31

FEBRUARY 1 3:01 11:16 2 7:01 4:01 3 9:01 4:31 4 9:46 5:01 5 10:31 5:31 6 11:16 6:01 7 11:46 6:16 8 6:46 12:01 9 7:16 12:31 10 7:46 1:16 11 8:31 2:01 12 9:01 2:31 13 3:16 9:31 14 4:01 10:16 15 1:31 11:16 16 7:31 3:46

— 7:46 12:16 8:46 1:31 9:31 2:31 10:01 3:31 10:46 4:16 11:16 — 5:01 12:16 5:46 1:01 6:46 1:46 7:31 8:16 2:31 9:31 3:31 11:01 4:31 — 6:01 — 7:16 12:31 8:31

S.C.RAMBLE! BY CHARLES JOYNER, SEE ANSWER ON PAGE 27

Encompassing more than 52,000 acres outside of Columbia, the U.S. Army’s _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

s m b e c u n r l m a is the largest entry-training base in the country. Use the capital letters in the code key below to fill in the blanks above.

A C F  J K N O R S T means u nsc r a mb l e


ADVERTISEMENT

“To you, it’s the perfect lift chair. To me, it’s the best sleep chair I’ve ever had.” — J. Fitzgerald, VA

Easy-to-use remotes for massage/heat and recline/lift

Complete with battery backup in case of power outage

Our Perfect Sleep Chair® is just the chair to do it all. It’s a chair, true – the finest of lift chairs – but this chair is so much more! It’s designed to provide total comfort and relaxation not found in other chairs. It can’t be beat for comfortable, long-term sitting, TV viewing, relaxed reclining and – yes! – peaceful sleep. Our chair’s recline technology allows you to pause the chair in an infinite number of positions, including the Trendelenburg position and the zero gravity position where your body experiences a minimum of internal and external stresses. You’ll love the other benefits, too: It helps with correct spinal alignment, promotes back pressure relief, and This lift chair encourages better posture to puts you safely prevent back and muscle pain. on your feet!

And there’s more! The overstuffed, oversized biscuit style back and unique seat design will cradle you in comfort. Generously filled, wide armrests provide enhanced arm support when sitting or reclining. The high and low heat settings along with the dozens of massage settings, can provide a soothing relaxation you might get at a spa – just imagine getting all that in a lift chair! Shipping charge includes white glove delivery. Professionals will deliver the chair to the exact spot in your home where you want it, unpack it, inspect it, test it, position it, and even carry the packaging away! Includes one year service warranty and your choice of fabrics and colors. If you’re not 100% satisfied simply return the chair within 30 days for a refund of the product purchase price. – Call now!

The Perfect Sleep Chair

®

Call now toll free for our lowest price. Please mention code 101775 when ordering.

1-888-849-0773 Long Lasting DuraLux Leather

DuraLux II Microfiber

Tan

Burgundy Cashmere

Fern

Chocolate Burgundy

Chocolate Indigo

© 2015 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.

46383

We’ve all had nights when we just can’t lie down in bed and sleep, whether it’s from heartburn, cardiac problems, hip or back aches – it could be a variety of reasons. Those are the nights we’d give anything for a comfortable chair to sleep in, one that reclines to exactly the right degree, raises feet and legs to precisely the desired level, supports the head and shoulders properly, operates easily even in the dead of night, and sends a hopeful sleeper right off to dreamland.

Sit up, lie down — and anywhere in between!


Dialogue

Education remains a top priority FOR 75 YEARS IN SOUTH CAROLINA,

electric cooperatives have been in the business of education. It started with neighbors teaching neighbors how a cooperative works and how it could improve their lives by bringing electricity to their farms, homes and rural communities. It continues today with cutting-edge programs that educate future leaders about sustainable energy development. It’s pretty intuitive that co-ops would educate employees about safety. We deal with some of the

Cecilia and Ron Calcaterra at the unveiling.

Former Central CEO honored Central Electric Power Cooperative, the whole­ sale power supplier to your local electric cooperative, recently honored former CEO Ron ­Calcaterra with a portrait unveiling. ­Calcaterra, who retired after 34 years of ­service, was joined at the ceremony by his wife, Cecilia. “I want to thank the [Central] board for doing this, but also for the opportunity to serve the people of South Carolina,” he said. “You couldn’t ask for a better organization. My heart was here, and it still is.”

10

THE SEVEN CO O P E R AT I V E P R I N C I P L E S 1. Voluntary and open membership 2. Democratic member control 3. Members’ economic participation 4. Autonomy and independence 5. Education,

training and information

6. Cooperation among cooperatives 7. Concern for community

most dangerous workplace environments imaginable when power lines fall during violent weather. We train for that, but we also train in areas that may not be as intuitive, including the challenge of serving a population that’s quickly becoming polylingual. We also educate our board members, our trustees. Most of them have other jobs that do not involve the generation and transmission of electricity. So, for us, it’s a matter of your cooperative equipping them to serve on a board where they can become member advocates in a way that’s meaningful to you. In fact, South Carolina cooperatives recently led the nation in training our trustees on how to guide members through the complex issues of solar generation. As financial stewards of their members’ investments, trustees also are trained to work with professional managers in order to carefully evaluate all business operations. Employees are a cooperative’s most valuable asset. Our co-op managers ask for and receive training that empowers them to develop and enhance the value of that asset. Managers also are charged with making sure their systems are reliable. For that reason we make sure they are current on issues like cybersecurity,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

cyberterrorism and the impact of distributed energy resources. We also educate elected officials. Co-ops have a long history of enlightening our representatives on matters that impact your ability to receive affordable and reliable electricity that is generated in an environmentally responsible manner. The second cooperative principle of democratic member control would have very little meaning if cooperative members had to operate in an information vacuum. Cooperatives routinely publish in this magazine their financial reports, updates to operations and plans for the future. At each cooperative’s annual meeting, trustees and chief executive officers give reports on major challenges and accomplishments encountered by the cooperative within the last 12 months and frequently preview what’s lying ahead. Cooperatives are different. Our shareholders and ratepayers are one and the same, and that difference is one that requires frequent educational reinforcement to the general public. We should always be willing to explain and defend our unique system of direct accountability to the members we serve. Our return on investment is not measured by the stock market but by the economic health of the ­communities we serve, and telling that story through education never gets old.

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina MIKE COUICK


ON THE ROAD TO SUCCESS

Santee Cooper welcomes Volvo Cars to the Palmetto State! And why wouldn’t they come here? We lead the nation in automobile exports and Southern hospitality. Santee Cooper, together with our partners at the South Carolina Power Team, Edisto and Berkeley cooperatives, will be along for the ride to help Volvo drive toward “Brighter Tomorrows, Today.”

www.scpowerteam.com • www.santeecooper.com/SL


Fort Mill’s Ricky Wysocki chases victory on the professional disc golf tour BY HASTINGS HENSEL | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

HOLE 15 AT WINTHROP GOLD, THE ROCK HILL COURSE WHERE THE

Professional Disc Golf Association holds its national championship, is a tough par four with a dogleg-left fairway and a hole that sits in a thicket of dense trees. It requires players to throw their tee shots low and straight through two “mandos” (what disc golfers call mandatory obstacles), while threading the needle of a yellow-roped hazard on the right and a red-roped O.B. (out-of-bounds marker) on the left. During the second round of the 2015 U.S. Disc Golf Championship, local favorite Ricky Wysocki, one of the world’s best players, went left on 15, his thin driver disc barely staying inbounds as it bounced into the underbrush beneath a magnolia tree. For his second shot, he bent down on one knee and tried a roller, a difficult toss that would turn the disc on its side and force it to arc on the ground toward the target. At first, the shot looked perfect. But then,

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


TEEING OFF Ricky Wysocki winds up for a tee shot on Hole 5 at Winthrop Gold.


DISC GOLF: PLAYING TO WIN

GET THERE Amateur disc golfers can make a reservation to play on two non-tournament courses at Winthrop University by calling (803) 323-2354. For information on the 2016 U.S. Championship, scheduled to be played in Rock Hill this October, visit usdgc.com. To find disc golf courses in your area, see pdga.com/ course-directory/advanced.

everyone in the gallery started to wince as the disc careened into a basketball-sized rock. Wysocki shook his head and almost slammed his hand down on the turf before regaining his composure. Things, after all, were tense. He was playing in a group that consisted of the numberone player in the world, Paul “McBeast” McBeth, and 12-time world champion Ken “The Champ” Climo. The pressure was on the 22-year-old Wysocki to win his first national championship on his home turf. But to stay competitive during the four-day tournament, he couldn’t afford many botched throws. “Just like any sport, if you’re winning the tournament or doing really well, people are out to get you,” Wysocki says after the round. “Me and Paul McBeth, we’ve battled a lot recently in the majors. I’ve gotten second multiple times in a row the past few years, so that has to be a rivalry. We’re always competing.”

WAITING THEIR TURN Ricky Wysocki greets fans and signs discs after Sunday’s championship round.

PLAY IT WHERE IT LANDS Paul McBeth negotiates a difficult lie in lowhanging limbs during the Saturday round.

14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

‘Golf is golf’

If all this seems a little overdramatic for a sport that consists of young guys throwing Frisbees at trees, think again. For starters, the objects these well-paid professionals are hurling are properly called discs. They are lighter and smaller than Frisbees, and it takes a perfect throw to land one in the chain-link baskets that serve as targets. Second, when you think about it, isn’t traditional golf just people trying to hit a small, white ball into a cup? Why shouldn’t professional disc golfers take their version of the sport seriously? “We love golf,” says Jonathan Poole, the team manager for Innova Discs, the tournament’s sponsor. “It’s just a different set of tools, but it feels very similar. We don’t want people to look down at us like skiers look down at snow­boarders. We’re still bringing people to the mountain. And, what’s more, we’ve had 15 percent growth every year since 1983, which speaks to disc golf being more than a fad.” Like their PGA counterparts, PDGA professionals use much of the same vocabulary, though they’re more likely to say “he flicks a birdie,” rather than “he shoots a birdie.” They have drivers, the skinniest discs in their bags; mid-range discs, which are like irons; and putters, which are the heaviest and have the fattest rim and the easiest grip. And while professional disc golfers are more likely to sport tattoos than PGA golfers, they also have sponsors, the names of which are printed on their shirts and bags. Disc golfers arrive at tournaments a week early to practice, and some even have caddies to carry backpacks full of discs. They travel all over the world, and they have legions of loyal fans who cheer on every shot and beg for autographs. “And the mental game is almost the exact same,” Wysocki says. “Golf is golf.”

No home-field advantage

Quiet, respectful, humble, focused—it’s a style Wysocki perfected while playing as a high school kid in Medina, Ohio, where he grew up across the street from the popular Roscoe Ewing disc golf course. He practiced every day, for two hours a day, and soon joined the professional tour, winning Rookie of the Year in 2011 and then Player of the Year the following season. When Wysocki was 18, his family moved to Fort Mill, a turn of events that allowed him to play year-round on the Winthrop University course, where a large lake


‘We’ve had 15 percent growth every year since 1983, which speaks to disc golf being more than a fad.’ —JONATHAN POOLE, INNOVA DISCS

and rolling hills make for challenging disc golf even when it’s not set up with the tournament’s restrictive out-of-bounds ropes. Now with 73 professional wins, including two majors and more than $165,000 in tournament earnings to his name, “Socki-Bomb,” as he’s affectionately known on tour, has seen more of the world than most people see in a lifetime. Disc golf has taken him all across the U.S. and to Australia, Canada, Finland and Sweden, where the sport is extremely popular. Last year, he signed a sponsorship deal with a Swedish company, Latitude 64. “I love traveling,” he says. “I’ve adapted my lifestyle to it. I like to play new courses, but I also like to check out parts of the country with local food or local hot spots.” Heading into the 2015 national championship, Wysocki was one of the favorites to win, but nobody could call his familiarity with the course a home-field advantage. Disc golf is just too unpredictable, and Winthrop Gold is always a challenge. “I’m not too often at home, but when I am, I like to come out here and play,” Wysocki says. “It’s a great place to practice. This course, especially, it brings out all the shots. You have to use every shot in your bag playing this course, because you’re going to get in so many different lies.”

‘A very nerve-racking hole’

On the final day of the 2015 tournament, the weather turned cold and rainy, but hundreds of diehard fans still lined the fairways, watching as rivals Wysocki and McBeth battled it out, the lead seesawing between them over six holes—​ a birdie here, answered by a bogey there. On the 16th hole, Wysocki sidearmed a beautiful drive that left him with an easy birdie putt, which he made, but McBeth saved par with a 45-footer that left them tied going into the infamous Hole 17. Hole 17 at Winthrop Gold is an island-like par 3 upon which you either land your drive with precision or go out of bounds. If you go O.B., you must tee off again with a one-stroke penalty.

“My least favorite hole has got to be 17, coming down the stretch,” Wysocki says. “You’ve got to make sure you get that tee shot in, and that’s a big game changer if you don’t. It’s a very nerve-racking hole.” Wysocki teed off first in front of the home crowd. Here was his chance, finally, to capture the major he’d always wanted. The disc cut through the wind and rain. For a moment, it looked like his disc would land close enough for a makeable birdie, and Wysocki

SWEET 16TH Ricky Wysocki’s mood matches Saturday’s sunshine as he flicks his disc toward the target, a metal basket mounted on a pole.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


DISC GOLF: PLAYING TO WIN

WATER HAZARD After a disastrous 17th hole, a rainy Sunday turns downright gloomy for Ricky Wysocki (front), as he heads for the 18th hole with Paul McBeth (behind Wysocki, with pink umbrella).

would climb the hill on 18 and wave his hand to the crowd like he does whenever he makes a great shot. For a moment, it looked as if he might raise the trophy above his head, hug his family and pick up the $8,000 winner’s check.

Scattered among the throngs of spectators, media and professional players at the 2015 U.S. Disc Golf Championship were four jersey-wearing groups from Colorado State University, Winthrop University, Augusta University and the University of South Carolina—all competing in a collegiate invitational called the Dean’s Cup. The annual competition is hosted by College Disc Golf, the organizing body for the sport’s intercollegiate competition, which is headquartered in North Augusta. One might not think a mid-sized town in South Carolina would be home to such an organization, but North Augusta has one of the sport’s best disc golf complexes in the Hippodrome, which has been hosting the National Collegiate Disc Golf Championship since 2007. And it doesn’t hurt that the college disc golfers can ride the coattails of the nation’s top PGA golf tournament, says Alan Kane, College Disc Golf’s general manager. “It’s always the week after the Masters,” says Kane, a former collegiate player who started the disc golf team at the University of South Carolina. “We sort of feed off of Augusta’s golf attitude.” Students at any college who are willing to start a team can register for a mere $40 and begin playing in qualifying tournaments in their region. The state of South Carolina currently boasts five teams: USC-Aiken, Clemson, Winthrop, Anderson and USC. For more information on collegiate disc golf, visit collegediscgolf. org. For details on the 2016 National Collegiate Disc Golf Championship, go to ncdgc.com.

Disc Golf U.

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

But then he heard the crowd gasp. The disc had bounced on the green and skidded into Winthrop Lake. The weather suddenly seemed a bit colder, a bit windier. His second tee shot also looked good until it wedged itself into the stack of hay bales that guard the island—another out of bounds. The collapse—not quite the equivalent of Jean Van de Velde’s triple-bogey demise at the 1999 British Open, but still heart-wrenching— ensured that Wysocki would finish second to Paul McBeth, who went on to win his fifth and final major of the year—the first accomplishment of its kind in the sport. For many in the crowd, the moment was bittersweet. No one wants to see someone win at another’s breakdown, especially for the hometown kid, but history was being made in Rock Hill. “You really have to look at it from the historical significance of having Paul McBeth win the Grand Slam,” Poole says. “That has never happened in more than three decades of tournament disc golf. Who knows how long before it happens again? So, for the U.S. championship, for Winthrop University, for Rock Hill, for South Carolina—that’s something that we have. That’ll always be part of our history.” Although frustrated and searching for answers, Wysocki took the long view as well. “I had the lead for most of the round, and I’m going to take that into next year,” he says. “I’ve been right there for every major, and that’s all I can do—just put myself in contention.”


SC Life

Stories

Life in art

JEFF SMITH

“Sculptor” seems too subtle a word to describe Alex Palkovich, a Florence artist whose creative intensity could be measured on the Richter scale. His passion is riveting and infectious. When asked about his sculpting process, he spins like a dervish from sculpture to sculpture, firing off details of taking his conceptions from clay to cast to bronze. And then there are the works. Whether you are standing beneath a looming likeness of General Francis Marion or contemplating a diminutive Pavarotti, his sculptures call up an immediate sense of the tangible and the abstract, the personal and the universal, stillness and action. “Movement is the language of my sculpture,” says Palkovich, who was born to Holocaust survivors in a Soviet-ruled region of the Ukraine. “Walk around my sculptures and they will speak to you differently from each new angle.” His studio is likewise teeming with movement, thanks to several sculptures, big and small, in various stages of development. Since retiring from a career as an engineer and global executive, Palkovich says he is now playing “catch-up.” “I have been sculpting since I was 6 years old, and that is always, always what I wanted for my life,” he says. “But being a CEO paid for living, something sculpting could not do. So, I had that career and was a sculptor only in free time. I was a man living two lives—life in a factory and life in art.” The payoff for promoting his inner artist to full-time status has been more than sweet. Palkovich enjoys widespread acclaim, with his works prized by art connoisseurs and collectors across the globe. And there are no regrets about his career path. “I would not do one thing differently,” Palkovich says. “Not one thing.”

—LIBBY SWOPE WIERSEMA

Alex Palkovich AGE:

68

Ukraine Florence, S.C., with studios in Colorado, Israel and the UK FAMILY TIES: Wife, Aggie; son, Edy; daughter, Natalie CAREER PATH: Engineer, CEO, sculptor CREATIVE ASIDES: Furniture design BIRTHPLACE: HOME BASE:

GET MORE For a gallery depicting Alex Palkovich’s public works in South Carolina, including “Home Safe” (pictured) in Florence Veterans Park, visit alexpalkovich.com.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


SCTravels

BY KEITH PHILLIPS | PHOTOS BY CARROLL FOSTER

Richard and Cindy Kuhnel (far left) share their love of 1950s car culture at Nostalgic Station. “We try to make it oldfashioned fun,” Cindy says of cruise‑ins held at the restored filling station. For owners of classic cars, like Larry Penland (below), it’s a chance to show off their beloved rides and relive old memories. “It’s a fun place to come and just hang around with your friends.”

Cruising down memory lane EVERY CAR AT A NOSTALGIC STATION

cruise-in has a story to tell, and in the case of Larry Penland’s Roman red, 1961 Chevrolet Impala, it’s the tale of a proud 22-year-old buying the car of his dreams. Along with a photo album showing the classic bubble-top sedan before and after some recent restoration work, he’s happy to show off the original owner’s manual and a neatly folded bill of sale. But the real story is told by the gleam in his eye as Penland, now 73, recalls the days spent tooling around Laurens in a car that was “the talk of the town.” “It was my get-up-and-go car,” the Laurens Electric Cooperative member says with a laugh. Reliving memories, peering under hoods, swapping car stories and shooting the bull—this is exactly the sort of behavior Richard and Cindy Kuhnel had in mind when they renovated a vintage gas station on the outskirts of Laurens, stocked it full of memorabilia and invited classic-car owners across South Carolina to stop by on the first Friday of every month. The goal: Provide a place where young and old could experience the uniquely American car culture that flourished in the ’50s and ’60s, right down to the antique jukebox inside the station cranking out hits of the era. 18

“In the day, there was always a place for the kids to hang out. There was a gas station, there was a burger place, there was a hot dog stand,” Richard Kuhnel says. “We want this to be a community place.” It all began when the couple moved to Laurens in 2002 and started house hunting. Car buffs to the core, they collected and sold memorabilia at races and auto shows, and they needed a fixed location for their side business. A real estate agent was about to show them a house at 1110 West Main St., when Richard’s eyes went straight to the neglected 1930s-era filling station on the edge of the lot.

GetThere Nostalgic Station is located at 1110 West Main St. in Laurens. HOURS: Cruise-ins are hosted on the first Friday of every month from 6 to 10 p.m., rain or shine. Photographers can book the station by appointment. ADMISSION: Cruise-ins are free and open to all car owners, car buffs and curious spectators. DETAILS: Call (864) 984-0527 or visit nostalgicstation.com. The Kuhnels also announce events, share stories and post photos on facebook.com/NostalgicStation.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

For a man with motor oil in his veins (as a teen he ran a junkyard and went on to race dragsters professionally), it was love at first sight. “‘We want it! It’s sold,’ ” Cindy recalls her husband telling the real estate agent. “And I said, ‘Richard, I haven’t even looked at the house yet!’ ” It took nearly five years to remodel the filling station, and today the eye-catching establishment and the Kuhnels’ 1949 Ford Coupe are popular backdrops for photographers. But the Friday night cruise-ins are still the heart and soul of Nostalgic Station. For regulars like Barrett Stewart, a local repair shop owner who enjoys showing his cars on site, it’s the authentic setting and the variety of car buffs who show up each month that keep him coming back. “You’ll have some new guys come in every month, and everybody flocks to that car,” he says. “It’s just a neat experience.”


P en dl eton distr ic t south carolina

Where Water Falls

Something for everyone at the Top! Discover North Georgia’s mountain jewel, just two hours from Atlanta, Chattanooga and Greenville.

and

h i s to ry c alls

• Minutes from Greenville

• SC Botanical Gardens • State & National Parks • Big-Water Lakes • Museums • Festivals • Hiking • Antiques • Concerts • Guided Tours • Whitewater Rafting • Living History Events • Fishing & Boating • Two hours from Atlanta or Charlotte ASHEVILLE, NC

N

CHARLOTTE, NC

W

85

11

85

385

E

29

26

S

77

29

26

20

501

95

ATLANTA, GA

20

301

17

26

95

AUGUSTA, GA

17

ATLANTIC OCEAN

SAVANNAH, GA

P e n d l e t o n d i s t r i c t. o r g Brasstown Valley Resort, Hiawassee & Young Harris

Vi s i tP ic k e n s c ou n t y.c om

8 0 0 - 8 6 2 -17 9 5

MountainTopGA.com 800.984.1543

$

206,990

The Worthington

2923 sq ft

New Homes Built On Your Land Visit or Contact us:

Charleston (843) 879-8661 Greenville (864) 881-1568 Augusta (706) 680-6568

www.Lockridgehomes.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


WIN A $100 GIFT CARD!

This winter, explore S.C. without the crowds

and with a little extra spending money. Register online at is an area horticulture agent and Master SCLiving.coop/reader-reply Gardener coordinator for S. CORY TANNER

Clemson Extension based in Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes Greenville County. Contact him and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky at shannt@clemson.edu. winner will be drawn at random from entries received by January 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the form below.

2016 Show & Sale

February 5-6, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. February 7, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $15 Ticket Good for Show Duration Underwriter:

Benefactors:

Aiken Center for the Arts 122 Laurens St., SW, Aiken www.aikencenterforthearts.org (803) 641-9094

Ace it in Aiken County!

BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS:

jj Aiken Center for the Arts jj Aiken County Tourism jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Lowcountry Tourism

jj Pendleton District Historical, Recreational, and Tourism Commission jj Santee Cooper Country jj S.C. National Heritage Corridor jj Towns County Chamber of Commerce, Ga. jj South Carolina Living magazine

T R AV E L R E A D E R R E P L Y Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address   City State/ZIP 

HOLE 10 567 FEET PAR 4

Just opened at Langley Pond Park —Aiken County’s only championship level disc golf course.

Langley Pond Disc Golf Park

Email* 

7,262' • PAR 61

Phone

www.DiscoverAikenCounty.com 803-642-7557

SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, TRR, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or

travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by January 31, 2016 to be eligible. *Winners will be notified by email and announced in the March issue.

20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


2016 SC LIVING BFBB_BFBB sc living 11/18/15 8:51

2016

MARCH 28

UR FO 00 $ 5 kly e We i z e s r P TO

$39,200

SANTEE COOPER C O U N T R Y $100 $500 $5,000 4 Weekly

(our)

HISTORY.

APRIL 24

IN PRIZES GUARANTEED

4 Daily

Live

4

Overall

P R I Z E C ATA G O R I E S

BASS, CRAPPIE, CATFISH & STRIPER Tickets: $10 Adults $5 Children

Quite simply,

we are a reflection of our rich past. Cheraw’s well-preserved history blends the influence of kings from yesteryear with the soulful jazz of our most famous native son. Explore our history and discover firsthand the heart, soul and spirit of the “Prettiest Town in Dixie.” For a free Visitor’s Guide, call 888.537.0014

www.bigfishbigbucks.com (803) 854-2131

SANTEE COOPER COUNTRY Big Fish Big Bucks Fishing Derby PO Drawer 40, Santee, SC 29142

Visit us on Cheraw.com

BEING AN OUTSIDER HAS NEVER BEEN SO EPIC JUST NORTH OF TRADITIONAL AND SOUTH OF ORDINARY, YOU’LL FIND US. TAKE ON THE WHITEWATER RAPIDS. FEEL SMALL AT THE FEET OF A WATERFALL. SET UP CAMP AT THE BASE OF THE BLUE RIDGE. KAYAK SOME OF THE MOST SCENIC RIVERS IN NORTH AMERICA. HIKE OUR TRAILS AND DISCOVER HIDDEN COASTAL COVES. HOWEVER YOU CHOOSE TO BE AN OUTSIDER, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Small wonder eats age person st that the aver n makes almo on a year—baco ac n b o , le ac b b f ta o st s e breakfa 18 pound th f o ar t with St ea r! gr stes e bette rotein that ta thicker slices p anything tast to t fa f o balance choose has a perfect foods. For crispy bacon, eded. t e, longer if ne ee ic sw sl d er p e ut in savory an n m o e about one ment paper and microwav atches, lay strips on parch 425 F about For bigger b t and bake at a baking shee  minutes. 20

BACON LOVERS’ MAC & CHEESE SERVES 6

H pound small pasta (such as elbow, penne, ditalini) 3  H tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 2 cups milk 2 garlic cloves, peeled H teaspoon dried thyme 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper Pinch nutmeg J teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional 1 cup grated Gruyere cheese 1 cup grated sharp white cheddar cheese H cup grated provolone cheese H cup grated Parmesan cheese, divided 6 slices crispy cooked bacon, crumbled 2 tablespoons breadcrumbs

GINA MOORE

22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large pot of salted, boiling water, cook pasta until al dente, about 6 minutes. Drain pasta in a colander and return to pot. Toss with 1 tablespoon butter. Set aside. In a medium saucepan, combine milk, garlic and thyme. Warm over medium-low heat until milk starts to steam, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and let the flavors infuse 2–3 minutes. In a large pot over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter, and add the flour. Cook, stirring constantly, 1–2 minutes. Do not let brown. Strain the milk, and whisk it into the flour mixture to avoid lumps. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 3–4 minutes. Remove from heat; season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and cayenne pepper. Add the Gruyere, cheddar and provolone cheeses (substitute your favorite cheeses, if you prefer). Add half of the Parmesan, and stir until cheeses are melted. Adjust seasoning to taste. Add cooked pasta to the cheese mixture, and mix until pasta is well coated. Coat an 8-inch-by-8-inch baking dish with the remaining ½ tablespoon of butter. Put half of the pasta and cheese mixture into the baking dish, and cover with half of the crumbled bacon. Repeat with remaining pasta and bacon. In a small bowl, mix remaining Parmesan and breadcrumbs, and sprinkle over the top. Bake until golden brown, about 45 minutes.


MICHAEL PHILLIPS

BACON-WRAPPED MEATLOAF SERVES 4–6

Freshly ground black pepper G teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes H cup chopped parsley or basil (or combination) G cup milk 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce G cup grated Parmesan cheese H cup tomato paste or ketchup 1 teaspoon brown sugar 1–2 tablespoons water Bacon slices

GINA MOO RE

1 pound ground beef (80/20 lean/ fat ratio) H pound bacon, ground or finely chopped H cup chopped green onion, including stems H cup chopped celery G cup chopped red bell pepper, optional 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 large eggs H cup rolled oats Kosher salt

CHOCOLATE-COVERED BACON SERVES 12

6 slices thick-cut bacon, halved 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate G cup white chocolate, optional

Preheat oven to 350 F. In large bowl, mix ground meats with all ingredients except tomato paste, brown sugar, water and bacon slices. Do not overmix, or meatloaf will be tough. Shape and put in a loaf pan or on a shallow baking sheet. Mix tomato paste with brown sugar, and add enough water to make mixture spreadable. Spread over meatloaf. Lay bacon slices horizontally across meatloaf, completely covering on all sides. Cook about 1 hour or until instant-read thermometer reads 165 F. Increase oven temperature to broil, and cook just until bacon is crisp. W H AT Õ S C O O K I N G AT

Cook bacon slices until crispy. Drain and cool thoroughly on a paper towel. Melt semi-sweet chocolate. Holding a slice of bacon over the melted chocolate, use a spoon to coat the top side of the bacon strip. Lay the strips on a piece of parchment or waxed paper while the chocolate hardens. (This can be done in the refrigerator for quicker hardening.) When chocolate is set, flip the strips over, coat the other side and let harden again. To decorate the bacon strips, melt the white chocolate. Using a small piping bag with a very small piping tip, or using the tips of a fork dipped in the melted chocolate, drizzle white chocolate over one side of the bacon.

SCLiving.coop

Folded or flipped, a fluffy, well-made omelet is a treat at any meal. Perfect your omelet technique by watching how Chef Belinda does it at

BACON-STUFFED OMELET SERVES 1

2 large eggs 1 tablespoon milk or water Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper, to taste Hot sauce, a dash or to taste G teaspoon dried tarragon (or herb of choice) Unsalted butter 1 tablespoon chopped green onion Grated cheese (Swiss, cheddar), to taste 2 slices crispy cooked bacon

In a small bowl, whisk eggs, milk, salt, pepper, hot sauce and herbs. In a small, nonstick pan over medium-low heat, add just enough butter to coat the bottom of the pan, approximately ½ teaspoon. When butter is heated, add onion, and saute until onion is soft, about 1–2 minutes. Add egg mixture to the pan, and let cook about 15 seconds, allowing it to set. Using a spatula and tilting the pan slightly, carefully lift the edges of the omelet all around the side of the pan, letting the eggs that are still liquid roll over the cooked edges and onto the bottom of the pan. Continue this until the omelet is cooked but still soft and fluffy in the middle. Top one side of omelet with cheese and bacon slices. Using a spatula, fold the plain side over the bacon and cheese. Slide the omelet onto a plate and serve.

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


SCChefÕsChoice

BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

Southern with a twist Cooper Thomas has likely been there, done that. Cooked at a four-star, Lowcountry restaurant? Check. Manned the grill at a Charleston deli? Yep. Supervised 45,000 meals a week as head of a university’s dining service? Did that, too. “I have told myself I would always try new things if the opportunity was there,” says the 43-year-old Thomas, whose mix of cooking adventures has led him to Victors, a longtime Florence eatery (formerly Victor’s Bistro), which became a full-day restaurant and bar when it relocated to the lobby of the Hotel Florence downtown. “He brought to the table everything you’d want in terms of experience, creativity, great people skills and great knowledge,” Victors owner Tim Norwood says of his general manager and executive chef, singling out Thomas’ boiled peanut hummus as a sample of his creative cookery with Southern flair.

Thomas has come a long way since that first deli job. “At that point, I was just like a sponge, trying to soak up as much as I could,” he says. “I didn’t really think I was going to be a chef. I was just cooking.” And reveling in it. He loved learning about food—“the processes, the science behind it, the joy of people eating something I made.” He enrolled at Charleston’s Johnson & Wales University to study culinary arts and, simultaneously, stumbled into a job at the elegant Charleston Grill at Charleston Place. “My first real dinner kitchen job was at this four-star, four-diamond restaurant I probably didn’t have enough experience to be working at,” he says. But it laid a foundation in Frenchinfluenced Southern cooking with high-quality, fresh ingredients. Every job thereafter fed a hunger to learn more—resort and country club

PECAN-ENCRUSTED SHRIMP SERVES 4 AS ENTREE OR 8 AS APPETIZER

2 cups canola oil 24 shrimp, peeled, tail on 1 cup flour

1 cup buttermilk 1 cup pecan breading (recipe below)

Heat oil in a heavy-bottomed skillet until it just starts to smoke. Dredge the shrimp, one at a time, in flour, then dip in buttermilk, then dredge in pecan breading. Once all shrimp are breaded, carefully add half of them to hot oil. Fry shrimp on both sides until breading is a deep golden brown. Remove shrimp to a towel-lined plate, then cook the second half. Serve with Cajun-seasoned honey mustard. PECAN BREADING

MILTON MORRIS

24

2 cups toasted pecans 1 teaspoon paprika 2 cups panko breadcrumbs 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon cayenne

Place all ingredients in a food processor and blend well. If mixture is too moist, add more panko, a little at a time. Store in airtight container until ready to use.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

MILTON MORRIS

PICK A CULINARY CHALLENGE, AND

As executive chef of Victors, Cooper Thomas caters to downtown hotel guests, as well as locals stopping by for weekday lunch, elegant dinners or Sunday brunch.

Victors

126 W. Evans St. Florence (843) 665-0846 victorsflorence.com HOURS: Monday– Thursday, 6:30 a.m.–3 p.m. and 5–10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 6:30 a.m.–3 p.m. and 5–11 p.m.; Sunday, 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m. and 5–10 p.m.

dining, banquets, catering, institutional food service, an upscale steakhouse. His experiences show up on Victors’ menu in dishes with a familiar Southern appeal and a nod to sophisticated tastes. “We try to make it unique, but not so over the top that it’s going to scare people. We’re still in the South,” says the Columbia native, who, for the past year, has promoted S.C. agriculture as one of the state’s Chef Ambassadors. High-end steaks are standards, and flavorful prime rib stuffs the restaurant’s top-selling French dip sandwich. Thomas’ Cajun macaroni and cheese topped with lobster is a signature dish. The seared tuna with wasabi vinaigrette is so popular, it’s offered as both an appetizer and a dinner entree. When it comes to desserts, Thomas shares the limelight with Peggy Paul Yarborough, Victors’ resident piano player and cheesecake maker, whose banana praline cheesecake attracts customers all on its own. Thomas’ innovations alongside traditional favorites like “Miss Peggy’s” cheesecakes has proven to be the right mix for Victors in its new home. “We are a special-occasion place,” Norwood says. “But we want to be an occasion place you want to come to several times a week.”


Palmetto  State  Marketplace

er row

G

ct

Dire

Grow Half-Dollar sized

Muscadines

and Blackberries. We also offer over 200 varieties of fruit and nut trees plus vine and berry plants.

MOBILE HOME ROOFING SOLUTIONS

• LIFETIME WARRANTY • PROFESSIONALLY INSTALLED • #1 STEEL PRODUCTS • 3” INSULATION REDUCES UTILITY COST • 12” OVERHANG

Since 1992 CALL TOLL FREE FOR A FREE QUOTE

in our FREE

877-839-6449

e-newsletter

Sign up today at SCLiving.coop

MOBILEHOMEROOFINGSOLUTIONS.COM

: d e v l o s e R Build s busines in 20N1H6E!LP! WE CA

Ce

lebrating

44

2 197 - 2 016 Years

www.hooverbuildings.com S.C. locations - Lexington & Greer

26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

a Living is the South Carolin culation ir state’s largest-c tion. ca li lifestyle pub Watts at Contact Mary • (803) 739-5074 p o o ads@scliving.c the at Or learn more on k “advertise” lin SCLiving.coop


To advertise, please go to SCLiving.coop or e-mail ads@scliving.coop

Arco Steel Buildings 1-800-241-8339

CUSTOM STEEL BUILDINGS AT ANY SIZE

30 x 40 x 10 40 x 75 x 12 50 x 100 x 12 60 x 125 x 12 Mini Storage

AGRICULTURE

>>

COMMERCIAL

>>

INDUSTRIAL

>>

MINI STORAGE

$7,499.00 $12,999.00 $18,799.00 $25,999.00 $7,299.00

ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

>>

20’ x 100’ x 8’-6”

40 x 60 x 10 ...................................... $11,200 50 x 75 x 12 ...................................... $15,800 60 x 100 x 12 .................................... $22,800 100 x 75 x 12 w/column .................. $29,500 20 x 100 x 8’6” Mini Warehouse ...... $8,400

All sizes available!

35

Prices subject to change due to loads and codes.

1.800.882.5150

PREMIERBUILDINGS.COM

Years

(Buildings not as shown above) (FOB plant-local codes may affect prices)

ROOF

MOBILE HOME

PROBLEMS? INSURANCE NO MORE EXPERT ROOF RUMBLE INSTALLATION CREDIT

STOP REDUCED LEAKS

INCREASED HOME VALUE

LIFETIME

ELECTRIC BILL WARRANTY

Since 1983

FORT JACKSON

S.C.RAMBLE! ANSWER

®

roofover.com

800.633.8969

Start off the year right by giving a friend a subscription of YES! Send 1 year (11 issues) for just $8

YES! Send 2 years (22 issues) for just $15

GIFT TO______________________________________________________________________________

FROM _______________________________________________________________________________

PHONE ______________________________________________________________________________

PHONE_______________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS_____________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS _____________________________________________________________________________

CITY________________________________________________________________________________

CITY________________________________________________________________________________

STATE/ZIP_____________________________________________________________________________

STATE/ZIP_____________________________________________________________________________

NOTE: Co-op members should already receive this magazine as a membership benefit. Please make check payable to South Carolina Living and mail to P.O. Box 100270, Columbia, SC 29202-3270.

(Please allow 4 – 8 weeks.) Call 1-803-926-3175 for more information. Sorry, credit card orders not accepted.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


Calendar  of Events UPSTATE JANUARY

15–17 • South Carolina International Auto Show, TD Convention Center, Greenville. (323) 216-7557. 15–17 and 22–24 • “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 16 • Contextile, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582-7616. 16 • Greenville News Run Downtown, Greenville News building, Greenville. (888) 759-3666. 16–17 • Cowpens Battle Anniversary, Cowpens National Battlefield, Gaffney. (864) 461-2828. 21 • Art Walk Reception for Dian Hammett and Lalage Warrington, Artists’ Guild Gallery, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 22–24 • “The Merry Widow,” Twichell Auditorium, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 583-2776, ext. 518. 22–24 • Remodeling Expo, TD Convention Center, Greenville. (800) 374-6463. 23 • Wedding Festival, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (800) 745-3000. 23 • Winter Bluegrass Jubilee, Pickens High School, Pickens. (864) 878-4257. 28 • Opening Reception for “Cognitive Dissonance,” Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 5827616, ext. 254. 29 • Polish Baltic Philharmonic Orchestra, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656-7787. 30 • Wedding Festivals Bridal Show, TD Convention Center, Greenville. (800) 997-2499.

6–7 • Meriwether Lewis: Journey into the Unknown, Wade Hampton High School, Greenville. (864) 244-1499. 12–13 • “Junie B. Jones: The Musical,” Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 12–13 • Studio Series: Love Inspired, Ballet Spartanburg Studios, Spartanburg. (864) 583-0339. 12–14 and 19–21 • “Love Letters,” Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882-1910. 13 • Symphony Sweethearts ’n’ Jazz, Twichell Auditorium, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596-9000. ONGOING

Daily through Jan. 27 • “Awakening Your Psyche” exhibit, Spartanburg Public Library headquarters location, Spartanburg. (864) 596-3500. Tuesdays–Saturdays, through Feb. 11 • “Jo Ann Taylor: Art of Aquarius” and “Brian MacCormack’s Participaintings,” Pickens County Museum of Art & History, Pickens. (864) 898-5963. Third Fridays • Contra Dance, First Presbyterian Church, Spartanburg. (864) 308-1337. Second Saturdays • Heartstrings, Hagood Mill State Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

MIDLANDS JANUARY

15 • Family on Safari— Overnight: Winter Wonderland, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 15–17 • “Hairspray: The Musical,” BlueBird Theatre, Orangeburg. (803) 536-5454. 15–17 • Home Building & FEBRUARY Expo, Columbia 2 • A Tribute to Benny Goodman: Remodeling Metropolitan Convention Center, The Julian Bliss Septet, Brooks Columbia. (800) 374-6463. Center for the Performing Arts, 15–17 and 21–23 • “A Clemson. (864) 656-7787. Midsummer Night’s Dream,” 4 • “Peter Rabbit Tales,” Brooks Barr Street Auditorium, Center for the Performing Arts, Lancaster. (803) 285-7451. Clemson. (864) 656-7787. 15–31 • “Nice Work If You 4 • Voices in American Art, Can Get It: A New Musical Chapman Cultural Center, Comedy,” Town Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Columbia. (803) 799-2510. 5 • An Evening with Meriwether 16 • Come Draw with Me Lewis, Fine Arts Center, Day, Museum of York County, Greenville. (864) 244-1499. Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. 6 • Chamber Concert by the 16 • Horseback Riding Foothills Philharmonic, Cannon on Walt Schrader Trails, Centre, Greer. (864) 268-8743. Historic Brattonsville, 6 • S.C. Horse Expo, T. Ed Garrison McConnells. (803) 684-2327. Arena, Pendleton. (803) 230-8810. 16 • Reverend Dr. Martin Luther 6 • Sweetheart Charity Ball, Hyatt King Jr. Celebration, multiple Regency, Greenville. (864) 233-6565. locations, Lancaster. (803) 286-1145.

28

STARE DOWN

“Concentrate” by Cary Hunkel is part of the “Only Owls” exhibit at the Museum of York County, which runs through Feb. 28.

30 • Hilton Head Snow Day, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. 30–31 • Battle of Charleston Reenactment, Legare Farms, Johns Island. (843) 559-0788. 31 • Lowcountry Oyster Festival, Boone Hall Plantation, Mount Pleasant. (843) 577-4030. FEBRUARY

1–28 • Hilton Head Island Gullah Celebration, multiple locations, Hilton Head Island area. (843) 255-7304. 5 • “Puttin’ on the Ritz,” Charleston Area Convention Center Ballroom, North Charleston. (843) 740-5847. 5–7 • Winter Coin Show, Exchange Park, Ladson. (843) 572-3161. 6–7 • Myrtle Beach Stamp & Postcard Show, Clarion Hotel 5–7 and 12–14 • “Almost, 16-17 • Aiken Camellia Show, & Conference Center, Myrtle LOWCOUNTRY Maine,” Rock Hill Community Aiken Mall, Aiken. (803) 643-9542. Beach. (843) 347-0087. JANUARY Theatre, Rock Hill. (803) 326-7428. 17 • “Treasure Island,” Harbison 7 • Hilton Head Bridal Show, 6 • Beginning Birder’s Workshop, 15–17 • Build, Remodel & Theatre at Midlands Technical Westin Resort & Spa, Hilton Landscape Expo, Exchange Park Museum of York County, College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. Head Island. (843) 384-5378. Fairgrounds, Ladson. (800) 374-6463. 21 • “The Princess & the Pea” by Rock Hill. (803) 981-9182. 10–14 • Beaufort International 16 • Charleston Marathon, 6 • MGC Long Run, downtown, Children’s Theatre of Charlotte, Film Festival, USCB Center for the downtown, Charleston. Columbia. (803) 227-2286. Clover School District Auditorium, Arts, Beaufort. (800) 889-6734. (843) 300-7500. Clover. (803) 810-8000. 6 • S.C. Philharmonic: All That 12–14 • “My Funny Valentine” 16 • Sweetgrass Basket Weaving Jazz, Koger Center for the Arts, 21–24 • Ringling Bros. and by the Carolina Master Chorale, Workshop, Charleston Museum, Columbia. (803) 777-5112. Barnum & Bailey Circus Trinity Presbyterian Church, Charleston. (843) 722-2996. XTreme, Colonial Life Arena, 6–7 • Black History Parade & Surfside Beach. (843) 444-5774. 17–18 • Berlioz Symphonie Columbia. (803) 576-9200. Gospel Festival, Martin Luther King 12–14 • Southeastern Fantastique by the Hilton Jr. Park, Columbia. (803) 361-5470. 22 • Junior Brown, Wildlife Exposition, multiple Head Symphony Orchestra, Newberry Opera House, 11–14 and 18–21 • “The locations, downtown First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Newberry. (803) 276-6264. Mountaintop,” Sumter Little Charleston. (843) 723-1748. Head Island. (843) 842-2055. Theatre, Sumter. (803) 775-2150. 22 • Strings and Salsa, Harbison 13 • Animal Swoon under the 22–23 • South Carolina Theatre at Midlands Technical 13 • By Way of the Back Moon, Myrtle Beach State Park, Square & Round Dancers College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. Door, Historic Brattonsville, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-0874. Convention, Springmaid Beach McConnells. (803) 628-6553. 23 • Red Shoe Run, Hand Resort & Conference Center, 13 • Blacksmith Demonstration, Middle School, Columbia. Myrtle Beach. (803) 788-0118. 13–14 • Happy Hearts Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, (803) 254-0118, ext. 11. Main Street Children’s Museum, Conway. (843) 365-3596. 22–24 • Charleston Jazz Rock Hill. (803) 327-6400. 26 • “Madame Butterfly: An Festival, multiple locations, 13 • Grand Strand USA Dance, Opera by Puccini,” Newberry Opera Charleston. (843) 641-0011. Base Recreation Center, Myrtle ONGOING House, Newberry. (803) 276-6264. Beach. (843) 918-2380. Daily through January • Solar 23 • Smokehouse Day, L.W. 29–30 • “Aladdin,” Columbia City Observing, S.C. State Museum, Paul Living History Farm, 13 • Hilton Head Island Ballet, Columbia. (803) 799-7605. Conway. (843) 365-3596. Marathon, Jarvis Creek Park, Hilton Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 30 • FROST Winter Gala, 23–24 • Kids Jamboree, Florence Head Island. (843) 757-8520. Daily through January • EdVenture Children’s Museum, Civic Center, Florence. (843) 679-9417. 13 • A Taste of Gullah, Arts “Threads: The Story in Our Columbia. (803) 400-1152. Center of Coastal Carolina, Hilton Clothes,” S.C. State Museum, 27 • Biogeography of the 31 • Super Game Day, Main Head Island. (888) 860-2787. Columbia. (803) 898-4921.  Carolinas, Coastal Discovery Street Children’s Museum, Museum, Hilton Head Island. 12th day of month • 12-Cent ONGOING Rock Hill. (803) 327-6400. (843) 689-6767, ext. 223. Kids’ Day, EdVenture Children’s Daily • Day in the Life Museum, Columbia. (803) 779-3100. 29 • A Night in the Valley, FEBRUARY of a Sailor, Charles Towne Trident Technical College, Tuesdays–Sundays, through Landing State Historic Site, 4 • “A Closer Walk with Patsy Charleston. (843) 574-6580. Feb. 14 • “Wintertime” by Charleston. (843) 852-4200. Cline,” Clover School District Auditorium, Clover. (803) 810-8000. Vernon Grant, Museum of York 29–30 • National Shag Dance Tuesdays–Saturdays, County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. Championship Preliminaries, through January • “Creating 4–7 • Antiques in the Heart Spanish Galleon and OD Beach Tuesdays–Sundays, through the Carolinas,” Horry County of Aiken, Aiken Center for the & Golf Resort, North Myrtle Feb. 28 • “Only Owls” and Museum, Conway. (843) 915-5320. Arts, Aiken. (803) 641-9094. Beach. (843) 222-6706. “Carolina Landscapes” exhibits, Fridays–Tuesdays • Guided 5 • Family on Safari— Museum of York County, 29–31 • Charleston Boat Show, House Tours, Hampton Overnight: Valentines Event, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. Charleston Area Convention Center, Plantation State Historic Site, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, North Charleston. (864) 250-9713. Saturdays, weather McClellanville. (843) 546-9361. Columbia. (803) 779-8717. permitting • Aiken Trolley Tours, 30 • Chocolate Walk, historic Saturdays • Honey Horn 5–6 • Monster Jam, Colonial Life Aiken Visitors Center and Train downtown, Conway. (843) 248-6260. Nature Walk, Coastal Discovery Arena, Columbia. (803) 576-9200. Museum, Aiken. (803) 644-1907. Museum, Hilton Head Island. (843) 689-6767, ext. 223.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Digital disasters are man-made TECHNOLOGY IS A WONDERFUL THING,

as long as you never forget that computers hate us. They may play along, acting like allies, but they’re just waiting for the right moment to gobble up the 15 projects your boss wanted yesterday and send them to Mars. My computer is like my car, which I know how to drive. But that’s all. Sure, I’ve memorized the important stuff, like which side the gas tank is on and how many tires work best (usually an even number). Also important: Neglecting to close the moonroof causes hurricanes. Computer-wise, it’s the same deal. I can use lots of programs, but I have no idea how the mysterious box they live in works. Most of my fellow females were also born without the brain lobe that reminds them to clear caches and defrag whatchamacallits. Take Alexis, for example. She has a doctorate in some 15-syllable thing, which means her family forked over a lot of money for a framed certi­ ficate that proves she’s not dumb. She’s a highly capable, self-­sufficient ­something-or-other, not prone to ­hysterical fits unless she’s getting ready for a national conference when her computer stops in its tracks. (I’m telling you, they know when to pull this stuff.) Yep. Out of nowhere, Alexis’ computer demanded to know who she was and what right she had to put her grimy fingers on its keyboard. She realized it was after some obscure password she hadn’t used since the 30

last time she walked her dinosaur. The top-secret phrase resided somewhere in her computer’s evil brain, which refused to access itself. For years, Alexis endured a rocky relationship with the ungrateful box. While she worked to buy faster modems and all the bandwidth it

could chug, that computer rested comfortably on its digital duff, sprawled out on her king-size desk. Never once—not one single time—did it say “thank you.” She’d done everything in her power to keep it happy. Alexis supplied all the latest software, while it sat around getting loaded. She nursed it back to health after every malicious virus. (Computers never admit exactly what they’ve been up to when they cruise the Internet, but they’re always catching some communicable disease.) Anyway, a lesser woman would have kicked the binary bum out years ago. Desperate, Alexis called our weird, somewhat scary coffee-shop acquaintance, the Inter-nerd. She hated to

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   JANUARY 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

admit defeat, but this situation clearly called for a male in black-rimmed quadri-focals who still Brylcreems his head and speaks fluent Geek. The Inter-nerd considered her plight for roughly two seconds and responded, “Zabag>809qobzlock??wonZebboofenDing. Then hit ‘enter.’ ” And just like that, the blue screen of death vanished, and she was saved. The whole thing was highly suspicious. As you know, most women were not designed to read instruction manuals, even the ones that might spare them from digital disaster. (Please note the term: MAN-ual.) When you’re battling insomnia, computer manuals have their place. And cantankerous computers may behave better knowing they are about to be smacked upside the monitor by a deranged female who happens to be brandishing one. Beyond that, women and manuals don’t socialize. There’s one small consolation: Computers are a lot like buses. Five minutes from now, the one infuriating you will be obsolete, and you can get another one to take you where you’re going. Then you can tell your ungrateful ex-computer where to store that password. Alexis found it very gratifying. JAN A. IGOE ’s computer recently was hospitalized for several weeks, causing her to pick up a rock and scrawl this month’s column on a cave wall. Write her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

SUPER COUPON

20% FREE

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 600 Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP O C

26", 4 DRAWER TOOL CART LOT 95659 shown 61634/61952

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE

R PE ON SU UP O C

RIP

LOT 69006 60715/60714

LOT 47873 shown 69005/61262

Customer Rating

99 159 $349.99 YOUR CHOICE

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Includes one 18V NiCd battery and charger.

SAVE 65%

ADJUSTABLE SHADE AUTO-DARKENING WELDING HELMET LOT 61611 46092 shown

SAVE 49%

$40 Customer Rating

SAVE 55%

$

$

99 49 $79.99

comp at

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $264

$

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL Customer Rating SHAFT GAS ENGINES

SAVE $230

13499

LOT 60363/69730/68120 LOT 68121/69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

$9797 $11999 comp at

$328

$399

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER Customer Rating 69594 SAVE LOT 69955 82% 42292 shown

LOT 60637 61615 95275 shown

3999

5

$ 99

comp at

$89

10 PIECE DRAGONFLY SOLAR LED STRING LIGHTS

7

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON LOW PROFILE HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

• Weighs 73 lbs. LOT 61282 shown 68049/62326 62670/61253

$

20"

SAVE $85

8499

comp at

$169.99

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP CO

12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE

SAVE $453

comp at $ 99 $34.49

comp at

$34.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 60758 62689 shown

SAVE 76%

SUPER COUPON

$17.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

– The Family Handyman

WOW

2

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OILLESS PANCAKE AIR COMPRESSOR

$49.21

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

R PE ON SU UP O C

LOT 69684 shown 61776/61969/61970

Best Value Award

comp at

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

1699

comp at

VALUE

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

$ 99

comp at

Customer Rating

$

4

$ 98

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW WITH LASER GUIDE

SAVE 83%

comp at

LOT 69651 62868/62873 68239 shown

R PE ON SU UP O C

WINNER

CLAW

$99

18 VOLT CORDLESS 3/8" DRILL/DRIVER WITH KEYLESS CHUCK

LOT 65020/69052 shown 69111/62522/62573

ANY SINGLE ITEM

99

R PE ON SU UP CO

ANY PURCHASE

3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT NINE LED ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills,  storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking.  Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16.

Customer Rating

$

WITH

OFF

SAVE $250

• 580 lb. Capacity

SUPER COUPON

LOT 60497/61899 62399/93888 shown

• 1000 lb. Capacity

LOT 61256 60813/61889 68142 shown

$29999

$

MOVER'S DOLLY

39999 $752.99

comp at

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$876

$

99 11 $19.97

comp at

SAVE 56%

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/12/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • No Hassle Return Policy • 600 Stores Nationwide • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools • HarborFreight.com 800-423-2567


THE 2016 SOUTH CAROLINA

presents

4-H ENGINEERING

CHALLENGE

An opportunity for students 9 - 19 years old to learn, have fun, demonstrate their science, technology and math skills, and compete for individual and team honors.

Registration deadline: March 21, 2016. Participants can only register for one competition. T-shirts and lunch provided.

Saturday, April 9 Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College GPS

ROCKETRY

BRIDGE

ROBOTICS

ENERGY

MYSTERY

Learn More and Sign Up at

scionthemove.org/engineeringchallenge with support from

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

@scionthemove

South Carolina Living January 2016  

South Carolina Living January 2016

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you