Page 1

CHANGE OUT

WHAT A

TREAT

SC G A R D E N E R

Healthy soil gets gardens growing SC R E C I PE

MARCH 2016

Satisfying snacks for the club

On the trail of forgotten heirloom crops SPRING LAWN & GARDEN ISSUE


APPROACHING THE ‘BIG R’? IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY TO START PLANNING. Check out our Retirement Planning Resource Center! We know a lot of planning comes with retirement, and it’s never too early to start. We’ve got you covered! Register for our FREE Retirement Planning Resource Center and access the following: Retirement Calculator so you can easily plan and organize your expenses.

Personal Calendar to mark and remind you of all of the milestone dates for your ‘Big R.’

Retirement Checklist to help you plan ahead and compile your “to-dos.”

Retirement planning articles and more!

Start Planning Today! Visit www.MyBigRPlan.com

BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

18198-2-2016


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 3 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 559,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

MARCH 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 3

MIC SMITH

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread

FEATURE

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

15 Saving a

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

sweet slice of culture

DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

MIC SMITH

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars

SPRING LAWN &N GARDE ISSUE

Nearly forgotten, Bradford watermelons— and other heirloom crops—are making a comeback in South Carolina.

CONTRIBUTORS

Becky Billingsley, Mike Couick, Hastings Hensel, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Patrick Keegan, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner

4 CO-OP CONNECTION Cooperative news

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

We’re off to the races with a roundup of South Carolina’s spring equestrian events. Plus: Five tips to keep your pets comfy and your energy bills low.

DIALOGUE

10 Concern for community

South Carolina electric cooperatives do more than deliver safe, affordable electricity. We seek to empower the communities we serve. SMART CHOICE

12 Off-road connections

Portable electronic gear helps you stay connected and equipped for adventure in the great outdoors.

WHAT A

TREAT Healthy soil gets gardens growing SC R E C I PE

On the trail of forgotten heirloom crops SPRING LAWN GARDEN& ISSUE

MARCH 2016

Satisfying snacks for the club

GARDENER

22 Digging up answers

Nat Bradford shares his family’s secret—an heirloom breed of watermelon so sweet and tender that foodies, gardeners and chefs can’t get enough of it. Photo by Mic Smith

Unlock the secrets to a better garden and a healthier landscape with a simple, $6 soil test. TRAVELS

25 Grounded in history

Go Beyond the Fields on a guided tour of historic Middleton Place. RECIPE

28 Club snackers

When it’s your turn to feed the troops at book club, try these delicious finger foods that are easy to prepare and easy to eat.

25

HUMOR ME

38 Let’s blame Wilbur

and Orville

Modern air travel is nothing short of miraculous—right up to the moment the plane is officially declared “broken.”

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS

28

GINA MOORE 

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

Meet the man behind Homegrown Cotton, a new brand of polo shirts grown and sewn in South Carolina.

with soil samples

POWER USER

SC G A R D E N E R

21 Wear it with pride

MIC SMITH

© COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

22

STORIES

6 ON THE AGENDA

PUBLISHER

SC LIFE


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

Highlights

Equestrian outings Once upon a time, moneyed Northerners looking for a winter retreat found South Carolina’s climate and soil were ideal for the equestrian sports they loved. Now, every spring, we get to enjoy their legacy at stylish social outings built around horse competitions.

n Horse-racing fans who like an early glimpse of future

stars head to the Aiken Trials, where young thorough­ breds race on March 19. Hobnob at the infield tent party before the traditional carriage parade and horse races at Aiken Training Track.

For details, visit aikentrials.com or call (803) 648-4631.

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

n For action and variety, visit the Elloree Trials at Elloree

APRIL 8–SEPTEMBER 5

“Nature Connects” LEGOS Exhibit

Can you imagine a hummingbird 6 feet long, hovering midair over a giant trumpet flower? You don’t have to—LEGO artist Sean Kenney has already imagined and created it from thousands of LEGO bricks. See 12 of Kenney’s larger-thanlife LEGO creations at Brookgreen Gardens as the award-winning “Nature Connects” traveling exhibit makes a stop in Murrells Inlet. For details, visit brookgreen.org or call (843) 235-6000.

Training Center on March 19. A dozen or more races feature both thoroughbreds and quarter horses, and entertainment includes lancing and skydiving exhibitions.

For details, visit 54th Elloree Trials at facebook.com or call (803) 897-2616.

n A good tailgating spread is essential at the Aiken Spring

Steeplechase on March 26. Stake out a location as close as possible to Aiken Horse Park in time to enjoy your party before the six races begin.

For details, visit aikensteeplechase.com or call (803) 648-9641. n Revel in tradition and the beauty of Hitchcock Woods at

the 100th Aiken Horse Show April 1–3. This weekend of equestrian competitions for riders of all ages welcomes picnickers.

For details, visit aikenhorseshow.org or call (803) 642-0528. n By April 2, have your wide-brimmed hats and dapper

APRIL 15–24

Greater Clemson Music Festival

It started with the blues, but this annual festival, now in its fifth year, couldn’t resist adding jazz, rock, reggae, gospel and country music, celebrating the variety of music enjoyed in our state. Over 10 days, at multiple locations, music fans can hear beach music’s Men of Distinction, legendary Mac Arnold and Plate Full o’ Blues, R&B/soul singer Wanda Johnson (right), and many more. The festival raises funds for area charities. For details, visit clemsonmusicfest.org.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

bowties ready for the celebrated Carolina Cup at Springdale Race Course in Camden. With 60,000 spectators, parking is at a premium; settle in for a simple tailgate, or rent a tent and nosh in style before the races.

For details, visit carolina-cup.org or call (800) 780-8117. n Pacers and Polos offers a different kind of horsing

competition on April 2. The third leg of the Aiken Triple Crown features mallet-wielding riders on horseback, whacking a small ball into opposing goals at Powderhouse Polo Field.

For details, visit pacersports.com or call (803) 641-3406.

AIKEN STEEPLECHASE

MARCH AND APRIL


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

O N LY O N

SCLiving.coop

BONUS VIDEO Fresh ideas for ginger. Fresh ginger delivers big flavor to savory dishes, and it’s not hard to grate. Learn the best technique from Chef Belinda at SCLiving.coop/ food/chefbelinda.

Keeping pets comfortable PET OWNERS OFTEN ASSUME THEIR ANIMAL COMPANIONS WANT THE

same level of cooling and heating as the rest of the family, but most dogs and cats can be comfortable with a wider range of temperatures. Here are a few tips to keep your furry family members comfortable without raising your utility bills. u A cozy, insulated doghouse might be all your outdoor dog needs in winter, except on the very coldest days. The exception might be an older pet or one with medical issues. Consult your veterinarian. u If you have a very drafty home or an older pet who may appreciate more warmth, a heated pet bed or bed warmer will use far less energy than running your central heating high all day. This solution can also be good for those who keep their pets in the garage and don’t want to heat a large, uninsulated space. u Pet doors are popular, but they can also be a major air leak that drives up your energy use. When purchasing a pet door, make sure it has energy-efficient features like thick construction, weather sealing and the ability to be closed off when not in use. Some newer models have magnet or battery locks—a small magnet or sensor on your pet’s collar opens the door, and the rest of the time, the door is shut tight. u When summer comes, you don’t need to leave the air conditioning on full blast for Spot and Fluffy. Dogs and cats are comfortable with temperatures between 78 F and 82 F. In addition, dogs and cats sweat differently than humans, so running fans will not have the same effect it has on you. u In warmer months, keep shades drawn to block direct sunlight. This will keep indoor pets (and their humans) cooler throughout the day. Provide cool areas to rest, such as a basement or a tile floor with a cooling mat. —PATRICK KEEGAN

S.C.RAMBLE! BY CHARLES JOYNER, SEE ANSWER ON PAGE 35

Divorce occurs when _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ends in _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . a s e l r a b m d s c l r a b m d Use the capital letters in the code key below to fill in the blanks above.

A C I M N O R T Y means s cra m b l ed

BONUS ARTICLES A bumper crop of garden tips. Visit our Home & Garden section this month for advice on growing fresh veggies, keeping a gorgeous landscape year-round and ­avoiding seven common garden blunders.

INTERACTIVE FEATURES Register to win $100. Sign up today for our free email newsletter, and you will automatically be entered in this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn to win a $100 gift card. Register before March 31 at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. Congratulations to Carol Watson of Bluffton, the winner of our January prize drawing.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

MARCH

17 09:31 18 10:01 19 10:31 20 11:01 21 11:31 22 — 23 06:16 24 12:31 25 12:46 26 01:16 27 01:46 28 02:16 29 02:46 30 12:16 31 10:01

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

04:01 04:31 05:01 05:16 05:31 05:46 12:01 06:31 06:46 07:01 07:16 07:46 08:01 08:31 02:01

01:46 03:01 04:01 04:31 05:16 06:01 06:31 07:01 07:46 08:31 09:16 10:31 — — —

09:16 10:01 10:31 11:01 11:31 12:01 12:16 12:46 01:16 01:46 02:16 03:01 03:46 05:01 06:46

Minor

APRIL

1 08:31 2 09:16 3 09:46 4 10:31 5 05:01 6 05:31 7 12:01 8 12:46 9 01:16 10 02:01 11 02:46 12 03:31 13 09:31 14 11:46 15 09:16 16 09:46

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

02:46 03:31 04:01 04:31 11:01 11:31 06:01 06:31 07:01 07:31 08:01 08:31 01:01 02:31 03:16 03:31

12:31 02:16 03:31 04:16 05:16 — 06:46 07:46 08:31 09:46 11:01 — — — 01:46 03:01

08:01 09:01 10:01 10:46 11:16 06:01 12:16 01:01 01:46 02:31 03:31 04:31 06:01 07:16 08:31 09:16

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


THE 2016 SOUTH CAROLINA

presents

4-H ENGINEERING

CHALLENGE

An opportunity for students 9 - 19 years old to learn, have fun, demonstrate their science, technology and math skills, and compete for individual and team honors.

Registration deadline: March 21, 2016. Participants can only register for one competition. T-shirts and lunch provided.

Saturday, April 9 Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College GPS

ROCKETRY

BRIDGE

ROBOTICS

ENERGY

MYSTERY

Learn More and Sign Up at

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Dialogue

Concern for community infrastructure they need to grow and prosper. Second, educational sustainability is criticooperative principle—concern for community—seems simple enough: “While focusing cal to our future success in South Carolina. It is on member needs, cooperatives work for the hard to develop our economy and recruit new sustainable development of their communities industry if we don’t have an educated workforce through policies accepted by their members.” with the skills to do the job. Going further, why In practice, the idea of sustainability has been would a company relocate to South Carolina if reshuffled and retooled by the cooperative comwe can’t offer employees the very best schools for their children? Co-ops munity, especially with across the state do their the advent of the enviTHE SEVEN parts to support educaronmental movement in CO O P E R AT I V E P R I N C I P L E S the 1960s and 1970s. Last tion by offering such proAugust, we talked about grams as Bright Ideas and 1. Voluntary and open membership the significant accomEnlightenSC that lift our 2. Democratic member control young people’s minds to plishment of making it 3. Members’ economic participation the future. to 75 years as an elec4. Autonomy and independence Third, environmental tric cooperative in South 5. Education, training and information sustainability matters. In Carolina. That’s not easy. 6. Cooperation among cooperatives order to last, the health I’d argue that the reason of the co-op is tied to the some cooperative move 7. Concern for community health of the communities ments last and others we serve. We must take don’t really comes down care of our own backyard—our Common Home to this last principle, which is what I call the “lasting” principle. (a term I borrow from Pope Francis in his May Focusing on members’ needs allows you 2015 encyclical, Laudato si’ ). We rise and fall to look at the dashboard of where you are together based upon the choices we make. (the today) but also look down the road (the Finally, infrastructure as a key ingredient of tomorrow), working with your members on a sustainability speaks for itself. Our co-ops need constant basis to keep the community strong and good roads not just for trucks to quickly and effisustainable. ciently repair outages, but also to serve the busiWhen you look at what cooperatives in South nesses and schools essential to our communities. Carolina have done and should do to empower Transportation infrastructure needs are the communities we serve, there are at least four obvious. Less obvious, but just as important, are ways to nurture sustainability. our broadband and digital infrastructure, a vital First, economic sustainability is huge. The requirement for success in an ever-changing South Carolina Power Team, a business-­ economy. development partnership of electric cooperatives What do our co-ops need for tomorrow? and Santee Cooper, leads the state in landing Honestly, hopefully and humbly, I don’t know. new business investment, including the 2015 I only know that, if we listen to our members, decision by Volvo Car Corporation to build we’ll figure it out together as we have for the past its first North American manufacturing 75 years. facility in a co‑op-served territory. That major announcement is merely the latest win from the Power Team. Since 1988, they have brought more than $11 billion in capital investments and 63,000 jobs to our state by helping companies find suitable industrial sites with the utility IN ITS LONG FORM, THE SEVENTH (AND LAST)

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


SWING FOR THE GREEN.

RBC Heritage

Presented by Boeing

April 11 – 17, 2016

South Carolina’s annual PGA TOUR event

Green Power and RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing

Palmetto Electric Cooperative and Santee Cooper know what it’s like to swing for the green. For the last eight years, we’ve joined forces with the RBC Heritage, South Carolina’s annual PGA Tour event, to make each swing and each green a little greener – with Green Power. RBC Heritage has shown its dedication to the environment time and again with its commitment to use 100 percent Green Power for the event, which takes place at the Hilton Head Island’s Harbour Town Golf Links. Green Power is made from clean, renewable energy sources generated right here in South Carolina. It can change the way we all live, work and play, and it has the power to change the world. For more insight, visit www.scgreenpower.com.

santee cooper Green Power

®


SmartChoice

BY BECKY BILLINGSLEY

Off-road connections

Portable elec tronic gear lets you stay connecte d and equipped for adventure while biking, hiki boating or sim ng, camping, ply enjoyi great outdoo ng the rs.

SAFE TRAVELS

TREKKING TOOL Celestron’s Trekguide Digital Compass helps hikers keep track of their positions, on or off the beaten path. It also tracks altitude, barometric pressure, weather forecasts, temperature, time and date. $35. (310) 803-5955; celestron.com. SMOOTH SAILING Command your marine outings with precision as you fish, boat or sail with a Garmin Quatix GPS watch on your wrist. Load tracks, waypoints and routes for easier navigation, and share on compatible devices. Features include a compass, thermometer and tide tables for more than 3,400 locations. $250. (800) 800-1020; garmin.com. STAND OUT Cyclists bike brighter with a Triviz Electroluminescent Light Pack from Proviz. The lightweight triangles, charged by USB, emit a bright, flashing light and attach to a Proviz harness, backpack or jacket. $50 for light and charging cable; $16 for harness. info@provizsports.com; provizsports.com.

TAKE CHARGE

HOT POT A lightweight, 1.2-liter Powerpot 5 does double duty on your off-road adventures. While it cooks your food over a campfire, the pot generates an electrical current that can charge your mobile devices through its USB connection. $100. (801) 335-5064; powerpractical.com. INSTANT GRATIFICATION Pack a compact Jackery Giant+ Portable Battery Charger, and get instant power for smartphones or other USB devices wherever you go. The little power bank holds enough electricity to extend most phone batteries up to 600 percent. $28. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com. HARNESS THE SUN Unfold the notebook-size, 15‑watt RAVPower Solar Charger, let it soak up some sun, and you can charge two USB-powered devices with free energy. A mesh cover allows the portable pack to hang easily on a backpack, tent or trees. $55. (888) 280-4331; amazon.com. CRANKED UP You choose—use batteries to power an L.L. Bean/Eton FRX5 All-Purpose Weather Radio, or charge up with its hand crank, solar panel or USB cable. The little dynamo keeps you abreast of weather alerts and functions as a lamp, flashlight, emergency beacon, alarm clock and USB charger. $100. (800) 441-5713; llbean.com.

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

SIGHT AND SOUND

ZOOM IN Snap images of the wildlife or sporting events you view through a Vivitar CV-1225 Digital Camera Binocular with 12x magnification. Capture motion with its continuous-shot mode, taking three rapid shots with one click. You select the resolution you want and control the options for light exposure and white balance. $45; $7 for 8GB memory card. (800) 831-2434; bhphotovideo.com.

LIFE‑PROOF Portable, wireless, rugged, waterproof and sand-proof, an Altec Mini Life Jacket 2 Bluetooth Waterproof Speaker is a great option for listening to music outdoors, while boating or at the beach. It even floats! The lithium-ion battery is enough for 10 hours of music and hands-free phone calls. $100. (800) 591-3869; target.com. EASY LISTENING Yurbuds Inspire 100 are designed to be comfortable, sweat- and rainproof earbuds that won’t fall out, even during rigorous activity. They let in just enough ambient noise to keep you aware of surroundings, and tangle-free magnets ensure no more snarled wires. $18. (800) 336-4525; jbl.com.


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FIND YOUR BURIED TREASURE

WATERFURNACE UNITS QUALIFY FOR A 30% FEDERAL TAX CREDIT ROCK HILL, S.C.

WHAT KEEPS WAYNE SMILING? THE TREASURE IN HIS YARD How did you learn about WaterFurnace? I was visiting relatives up North about 10 years earlier. They had a geothermal system, and I was amazed. I looked into the functionality here in the South and decided to go GEO when I did an 1,800-square-foot addition to my home.

Why did you choose a geothermal system? It was a no-brainer after all the research concluded that the constant temperature of the earth could be tapped for heating and cooling. Why not use a renewable source of energy that is right in your own backyard?

Has your power bill shown a savings? After the addition in 2011, which almost doubled the square footage of my home, my power bill is approximately half of what it was prior to the addition.

You may not realize it, but your home is sitting on a free and renewable supply of energy. A WaterFurnace geothermal comfort system taps into the stored solar energy in your backyard to provide savings of up to 70% on heating, cooling and hot water. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how to tap into your buried treasure.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Nearly forgotten, South Carolina’s native Bradford watermelon is making a comeback BY SUSAN HILL SMITH | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH & HEATHER GRILLIOT

The first watermelon Nat Bradford grew remains burned in his memory. He was about to turn 5 years old in Sumter during the summer of 1980, and he had his own garden patch, which he would tend with his dad’s help. As the watermelon started to form, young Nat asked endlessly when it would be ready, excited by the

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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HARVEST TIME Careful not to bruise the delicate rinds, Nat Bradford picks the first melons of the 2015 season. Although last summer’s drought led to a diminished harvest, Bradford says careful thinning of the vines and collection of seeds from the best melons will help strengthen the line against future dry spells.

Bradford feels a spiritual call to share the crop with less-developed parts of the world.

behind the Bradford watermelon—a late-season treat so tender and sweet that thieves reportedly risked their lives for it. Yet the heartache he felt as a young boy taught him early that his family’s watermelons should be protected. “These are precious things,” says Bradford, now 40, whose recent efforts to revive the heirloom melon have attracted national attention and led him on a new life path. Thanks to the buzz about its history and unique qualities, the Bradford watermelon has become a celebrity on today’s food scene. When rated for sweetness, it boasts a Brix measurement of 12.5, compared to a 10 for most melons. At the same time, Bradford feels a spiritual call to share the crop with less-developed parts of the world where, he believes, the melons can provide needed sustenance.

A juicy legend HEATHER GRILLIOT

Shop for a watermelon at the supermarket today, and you have limited options, mostly based on size or whether you want to go seedless. But in the early days of America, after watermelons had found their way here in roundabout ways from Africa, a wide variety

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

ABOVE AND OPENING PAGE: MIC SMITH

magic of growing something from a seed, not to mention the anticipation of that first slice. Then, one day, he was devastated to find his watermelon gone from the vine. He never found out who took it or why, though he searched for evidence. “I started looking around, opened the trash-can lid, and it was broken inside. I don’t even know if it was pink. It had a long way to go.” Many years later, he would learn the full story


SWEET SLICE OF CULTURE

of distinct cultivars emerged, and the most popular became known by name. Introduced around 1840, the Bradford watermelon has an intriguing lineage, according to food historian and author David Shields, the University of South Carolina professor who dug up its past. His telling of the legend starts with the Lawson watermelon. Captured during the American Revolution, Patriot John Franklin Lawson was traveling to the West Indies on a prison ship in 1783 when the captain gave him a memorable melon slice. Lawson saved the seeds and, after being freed, brought them back to Georgia, where everyone agreed that his watermelon, while lumpy and difficult to grow, tasted better than any around. He shared his seeds with Nathaniel Napoleon Bradford of Sumter County, who crossed the Lawson with the Mountain Sweet watermelon. “It produces this extraordinary picnic melon that is absolutely dark green, very sweet, white seeded, red fleshed, and it has an inch-thick rind that is spoon tender and is the ideal rind for making watermelon pickles,” says Shields. The Bradford watermelon became so treasured that it had to be protected from poachers. Growers even made it known that they had poisoned one or two in the field, only to fall victim occasionally to their own security system. But as the South rebuilt its agricultural economy following the Civil War, Shields says, farmers turned their attention to melons that could be shipped long distances, and by the start

‘Its rind is so tender that it crushes when you stack them more than two deep in a boxcar.’ — DAVID SHIELDS

of the 1900s, the Bradford watermelon’s widespread popularity faded. “The problem is that its rind is so tender that it crushes when you stack them more than two deep in a boxcar.” Once a Southern darling, it became an increasingly anonymous backyard watermelon, though the Bradford family continued to quietly grow it in Sumter, its birthplace, where its reputation lingered with locals.

Piecing history together

Growing up, Nat Bradford understood watermelons were a family tradition but didn’t know how far back it went. He had not heard of Nathaniel Napoleon Bradford, who preceded him by six generations. He did know that his great-grandfather, Linwood Bonneau Bradford, grew the watermelons as a hobby long before World War II. Clemson Extension agent Jim Eleazer documented that fact when he included his friend “Chief” Bradford in the book 50 Years Along the Roadside. Chief Bradford passed along his wisdom and seeds to son Theron Bradford, Nat’s grandfather, who kept the sideline effort going in Sumter and recruited Nat to help in his fields as early as age 9. As a teenager, Nat sold Bradford water­ melons for extra cash, often to patients at his dad’s dermatology office. More than his siblings, he showed a passion for plants, one he pursued by studying landscape architecture at Clemson University. He finished

HEATHER GRILLIOT

FAMILY BUSINESS On the family farm near Sumter, Nat and Bette Bradford raise their five kids as well as heirloom varieties of watermelon, okra and collards. Their children are (left to right) Theron, Noah, Aiden, Danny and Natalie. The farm is served by Black River Electric Cooperative.

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PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

Restoring superstar crops from the South’s past IT STARTED WITH A DESIRE TO BRING BACK CAROLINA

Gold rice, the crop that helped shape the Lowcountry’s landscape and America’s early history. The once-coveted long-grain rice disappeared after the 1890s, when hurricanes nearly wiped out the seed supply, but was renewed a century later with the dogged efforts of Glenn Roberts, who also resurrected several Southern dent corns that he mills into grits and cornmeal at Anson Mills in Columbia. Roberts created the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation and recruited University of South Carolina professor and author David S. Shields to pinpoint other lost antebellum foods worthy of adding back to the menu. “If something was historically important and good, someone somewhere saved it for some reason, and it’s retrievable in most cases,” says Shields. Shields began by scouring agricultural journals from the 1800s and, after arriving at a checklist of desired ingredients, sought to uncover hidden growers or at least leftover seeds. Those discoveries have been nurtured by a network of people who ensure the proper history, science, growing methods and culinary uses are put into play. One essential collaborator is Brian Ward at the Clemson Coastal Research and Education Center fields in Charleston. He takes seeds recovered by the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation and turns them into viable crops for South Carolina growers. Here’s a taste of their latest efforts:

Carolina African runner peanut

Considered the South’s ancestral peanut, this was a staple that could be boiled, roasted, made into soup, fried into fritters or ground into nut cakes, which street vendors sold into the early 1900s. This small but flavorful peanut got lost in the mix as bigger varieties became more prominent. Shields thought the Carolina peanut was extinct, until he tracked down a few seeds in the freezer of a North Carolina State University professor and handed them over to Ward.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

A GROWING CONCERN Brian Ward, a research specialist at the Clemson Coastal Research and Education Center, specializes in bringing old seed lines back from near extinction. Here, he examines the latest crop of James Island Jimmy red corn. The fields at the education center support a colony of egrets that provides organic insect control.

The Clemson research specialist has built up the crop, and while the historic fall rains hurt the 2015 harvest, he still has 1 million seeds to share with South Carolina growers. “I’ve been contacted by people all around the nation wanting these peanuts,” Ward says. Candy makers like the small size of Carolina African runner, which can be used in a candy bar without being chopped or crushed. Researchers also want to explore whether the line’s resistance to disease could be bred into other peanuts.

Purple straw wheat

Shields suspects the flour from this wheat was a cornerstone of kitchens in the early South but is still trying to pin down the details on the line. “This purple straw wheat could be the wheat that all the famous Southern cakes were made of, as well as the whiskey.”

James Island Jimmy red corn

Native Americans likely grew this colorful dent corn, and a James Island family continued to harvest it in the 1900s, reportedly using it to make grits and moonshine. Local grower Ted Chewning eventually took over as caretaker of the seeds, which he shares with others, including Ward, who has devoted a section of his fields to fine-tuning the line. One or two cobs recently popped up with purple, orange and white stripes. If the variation remains true, Ward may be able to develop it into a new line, though he says it would take several seasons. “I’m calling it Tiger Eye or Clemson Tiger Eye,” he says with a grin. —SUSAN HILL SMITH


in 1997 with an internship in Pennsylvania at Longwood Gardens, which, he says, has one of the “richest and most extensive horticulture libraries in the world.” His exit paper led him to search for the family watermelon in old journals, where he found a cultivar called Bradford on a list of best garden choices from the mid-1800s. Could it be the same one? While he couldn’t confirm the connection, the possibility nagged at him as he returned with his wife to South Carolina and started a landscape architecture business and a family in Seneca. The question bubbled back up in 2012, as Bradford considered a career shift to sustainable agriculture. By that time, Shields had uncovered much of the Bradford watermelon history as part of a quest to restore forgotten favorites to Southern fields and tables, an expansion of his work with heirloom grains through the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation. But he had not been able to track down Bradford watermelon seeds, despite an exhaustive search. Shields posted his frustrations on the American Heritage Vegetables page he maintains through USC. “It was a kind of complaint that this greatest of all watermelons had vanished from the face of the earth, you know. And who should send me an email at 2 a.m. some morning but Nat Bradford.”

PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

SWEET SLICE OF CULTURE

A TOAST TO SUCCESS David Shields, a USC food historian, uncovered the history of the Bradford watermelon and helped popularize it among modern gardeners, chefs and foodies. When Nat Bradford began small-scale commercial production of the sweet melons in 2013, Shields encouraged Scott Blackwell (below left) at Charleston’s High Wire Distilling to make watermelon brandy from the juice.

Watermelon bounty

They both savored the moment. “It was just exciting to know that it all started in Sumter, and it’s been passed down, father to son, all those generations,” says Bradford, who now has five children of his own. Shields, meanwhile, was delighted to learn the family still had seeds. Bradford had collected some over previous years and was able to add a stash from his dad. He also found a bucketful at the house of his grandfather, who had passed away. “It had a handwritten note from my Paa Paa, and it said, ‘Bradford Watermelons 1990–93.’” The Bradfords had never been large-scale commercial growers and had avoided using irrigation and chemicals on their small fields. Instead, they saved seeds from the best melons in each harvest and blended different years to nurture natural resiliency. “It’s like stirring the genetic pool,” Bradford explains. With encouragement from Shields, he ramped up growing efforts in 2013 with two pints of seeds. He divided them between two plots, a

‘The foodies got ahold of it, and it took on a life of its own.’ —SCOTT BLACKWELL

small one in Salem and another in Sumter, and began by planting 12 seeds to a hill, then thinning each hill to the two strongest plants. The 440 plants left produced 465 melons, more than 100 percent yield in spite of heavy rains that devastated many other South Carolina farms. Bradford also saved 13 quarts of seeds for the future. Shields offered guidance on how to market the melons, as did Glenn Roberts, the other driving force behind Carolina Gold Rice Foundation. The duo opened doors for Bradford and fed a frenzy of interest from South Carolina chefs in upscale eateries, pushing prices up to $20 a melon. They encouraged Bradford to use the melons in old-fashioned ways, arranging for watermelon molasses to be made from the juice at McCrady’s restaurant in Charleston, as well as pickles from the rind. High Wire Distilling Co. in Charleston made a splash crafting 130 bottles of Bradford watermelon brandy that sold out at $79 a pop. “The foodies got ahold of it, and it took on a life of its own,” says Scott Blackwell, owner of the artisan distillery. The PBS TV show Mind of a Chef aired a

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


HEATHER GRILLIOT MIC SMITH

FARM TO TABLE Subscribers to the Bradford Watermelon Company’s email newsletter get first notice when fresh melons are available for sale during the late-summer harvest, but much of the crop is spoken for by upscale eateries. Depending on their size and appearance, some melons are held back for processing. The best seeds are saved for future planting, and the thick, white rinds are cured into watermelon pickles. Juice from Bradford watermelons is used to make watermelon brandy and molasses.

clever animated segment of the Bradford watermelon legend with narration by Shields. And when NPR’s The Salt featured the story last May, it led to a run on seed packets sold through the Bradford Watermelon Company’s website. By that time, Bradford had collected nearly 25,000 seeds.

‘We really believe that God is leading us to do this, and He’s opening up the doors.’ —NAT BRADFORD

Guided by faith

The revival came at the right time, considering America’s increasing appetite for heirloom crops. A man of faith, Bradford says, “We really believe that God is leading us to do this, and He’s opening up the doors.” The soft rind still limits shipping, so Bradford’s fresh watermelons will always be sold close to home. He hopes that people in other parts of the country will enjoy them by getting 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

seeds to grow their own, though they may need to be patient as the cultivar adapts to new surroundings. Even Bradford faced a tough growing year in 2015 due to the summer’s unusually dry conditions. Because he felt the crop did not meet Bradford watermelon standards for fresh sales, he used them all for rind pickles, molasses and brandy. This year, he expects to have 1,000 or so fresh watermelons to sell in South Carolina. A percentage of total sales is earmarked for the company’s nonprofit effort, Watermelons for Water, which is helping to fund clean-watercollection systems in rural Tanzania, a need Bradford learned about at church. The Bradfords also sent watermelon seeds to Tanzania so residents can try to establish a drought-resistant line. It seems fitting to Bradford, given the watermelon’s original roots in Africa. If successful, the Bradford watermelon could be very beneficial to impoverished villages, since each one can grow up to 40 pounds and yield up to 4½ gallons of nutrient-dense liquid. “That’s the soul behind what we’re doing,” Bradford says, “the window to be able to share God’s creation and how He’s implanted each seed with such abundance.”

GET MORE For more information on Bradford watermelons, to order seeds or to find out when and where harvested melons are available for sale, visit bradfordwatermelons.com.


Stories

SC Life Wear it with pride

At McIntosh AGE:

35

Kingstree Bachelor’s degree in business management and an MBA, both from Francis Marion University CLAIM TO FAME: Cotton farmer and owner of Homegrown Cotton, a manufacturer of Carolina-made clothing. For details, visit homegrowncotton.com or facebook.com/homegrowncotton SIDE JOB: Works as an on-call commercial pilot and, in his spare time, enjoys flying his own Cessna 172 CO-OP AFFILIATION: Santee Electric Cooperative HOMETOWN:

MILTON MORRIS

EDUCATION:

When you want something done right—and close to home—sometimes you just have to do it yourself. In a nutshell, that’s why Santee Electric Cooperative member At McIntosh took the leap from growing cotton to manufacturing and selling his own line of polo shirts made entirely in the Carolinas. It started when McIntosh, an eighthgeneration cotton farmer with a mind for business, toured the world headquarters of Cotton, Inc. He came away with a renewed sense of pride in his work, but dismayed that his cotton had to travel around the world to be made into finished products. Before long, he was typing up a business plan for Homegrown Cotton, an apparel company dedicated to keeping every aspect of production close to home. “I originally wanted it all made in South Carolina, but that turned out to be hard to do,” he says. Cotton from McIntosh’s 1,000-acre farm is processed by Tri-County Gin in Salters and woven at White Plains Knit Fabrics in Jefferson, and the fabric is stitched into shirts by Craig Industries in Lamar. Spinning and dying take place at plants in North Carolina. From planting the seed to delivering shirts to the store shelf, the process takes about a year. “I’ve heard some people call it dirt to shirt, but I say grown and sewn in South Carolina,” McIntosh says. Marketed through social media and word of mouth, the first run of 1,000 shirts in four colors sold well enough that McIntosh is planning to double his production and color choices this year. He’s also contemplating the addition of high-quality T-shirts and longsleeve button-down shirts to the line. Watching the business take off has been gratifying, he says, but supporting local industry is another reward, one he enjoys every time he dons one of his shirts with the cotton boll logo. “It’s something that I wear with pride.” —KEITH PHILLIPS

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


SCGardener

BY S. CORY TANNER | PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

DIGGING UP ANSWERS WITH

soil samples are often ridiculed for constantly recommending soil testing. “My plant died.”—“Take a soil sample.” “My grass won’t grow.”—“When’s the last time you had your soil tested?” “My dog ran away.” Maybe not, but you get the idea. Gardening starts with the soil. Not knowing what’s in your soil or what needs to be added is like baking a cake without a recipe—guessing at the ingredients won’t give you the results you want. It’s the same with soil nutrients. You could guess how much lime or fertilizer to apply, but you probably won’t get the proportions right. You might over-fertilize, wasting fertilizer (not to mention money) and creating pollution from the excess that ends up in ground or surface waters. If you wouldn’t bake without a recipe, why garden without a soil test? They’re relatively inexpensive ($6 per sample) and easy to do. Testing in the fall allows ample time to amend the soil before spring, but tests and soil improvements can be done any time of year. Gather a few supplies: a sharp spade or garden trowel that’s not dirty or rusty; a clean, plastic bucket; and WE EXTENSION AGENTS

GetMore University of Georgia Fertilizer Calculator aesl.ces.uga.edu/soil/fertcalc Clemson Extension County Office Locater clemson.edu/extension/county Clemson Extension’s Home & Garden Information Center  (888) 656-9988

22

some soil sample bags from your local Clemson Extension office (or resealable plastic bags). To get a complete picture of soil conditions across your landscape, you’ll need to take samples from each different area and order soil reports for each. The report for your lawn,

Not knowing what’s in your soil or what needs to be added is like baking a cake without a recipe. for example, will offer little help for the vegetable garden, shrub borders, flower­beds, shade trees or fruit trees. A good sample for each area should consist of eight to 12 subsamples mixed together. Using your spade or trowel, dig a V-shaped hole 6 inches deep for each subsample. Take a slice from one side of the hole, collecting soil from the surface to the bottom of the hole. Repeat this for all subsamples, then combine them in a bucket. Break up dirt clods, remove rocks and plant debris, and mix well. What you’re doing is creating an average mix of soil for that area of your landscape. Scoop out about two cups to submit as your soil sample from that area, and pour it into your soil sample bag. Repeat this process for each landscape area you want to test. Carefully label each bag to keep track of which area it came from. Take the samples to your county’s Extension office, and pay the $6 analysis fee per sample. Give them an ID name for

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

A tubular soil probe is good for taking lawn samples, because it creates smaller holes. A 2- to 4-inch-deep sample is sufficient for lawns. But specialized equipment isn’t necessary. A garden trowel or sharp spade will also work.

each landscape area you sampled. Tell them what plants or crops you intend to grow there, what type of soil you have (sand, loam or clay), and your contact information. In about two weeks, you should get your soil-test report back from Clemson University. A standard soil report will include your soil’s current pH, its levels of phosphorous, potassium and other essential plant nutrients, as well as recommendations for lime and fertilizer additions specific to the plants you are growing. If this is your first soil test, you may be thoroughly confused by the report you get. Soil reports contain a lot of information that’s interesting to soil nerds like me but won’t mean much to


SAMPLE 2

SAMPLE 4

Vegetable garden

Shrubs and other plants that don’t like acid

SAMPLE 1

Lawn/grass

SAMPLE 3

Azaleas and other acid-loving plants

1

2

HOW TO TAKE A

soil sample STEP 1 Divide your landscape into use areas, such as lawn, vegetable garden, shrubs. STEP 2 In each area, take eight to 12 subsamples of soil from different locations. Dig a V-shaped hole at least 6 inches deep for each subsample. STEP 3 Collect a slice of soil from the surface to the bottom of the hole. Repeat this for each subsample. STEP 4 Combine subsamples in a clean, plastic bucket. Break up large clods and remove rocks and plant debris.

3

4

5

6

STEP 5 Mix well. This will average the soil for that use area, minimizing the effect of local soil abnormalities. STEP 6 From the soil in the bucket, take about two cups to submit as your sample from that use area. Scoop into a zip-style sandwich bag or soil sample bags from Clemson Extension.

Turn the page to learn how to make sense of your soil report.

the average gardener. The sample soil report on page 24 illustrates how to find the info that will be most useful to you. What if you can’t find the exact product recommended in your soil report? Try using the University of Georgia Fertilizer Calculator at

aesl.ces.uga.edu/soil/fertcalc. It tells you how to blend common fertilizers to match the recommendation or at least get close. You can also use this tool to calculate quantities of organic fertilizers to apply, so long as you know the nutrient content (N-P-K) of those sources. Your local Clemson

Extension agent can also help you interpret your soil test results and select soil improvements. Test your soil about once per year until its pH and nutrient levels have stabilized to the desired ranges. Then you can wait two to three years between tests. l l

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


SC GARDENER

MAKE SENSE OF YOUR

soil report NEAR THE TOP OF YOUR SOIL REPORT, look at

“Soil pH” under the “Analysis/Results” section. This is a measure of your soil’s acidity—lower numbers indicate more acidity. For most crops, a slightly acid soil (pH of 5.8 to 6.5) is preferred. If the pH falls below that range, lime will most likely be recommended.

Soils Lab Results

3/1/15, 9:13 AM

Soils Lab Results Comments

118 Two cups (1 pint) fertilizer is equal to approximately 1 pound. Three-quarter pint limestone weighs approximately 1 pound.

173 Before planting, broadcast and work into the soil either 6 lbs 15-0-15 or equivalent fertilizer per 1,000 square feet (or for each 300 feet of row). Three weeks after appearance of first new leaves, apply four inches from base of the plants, 10 lbs 15-0-15 or equivalent fertilizer per 300 feet or row in a continuous band. For organic gardening recommendations, please call the Home and Garden Information Center at 1-888-656-9988 between 9:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. during the workweek. 654 Soil test again next year if either phosphorus (P) or potassium (K) is high or excessive to monitor levels.

The Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to people of all ages, regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, or disability and is an equal opportunity employer. Clemson University cooperating with U.S. Department of Agriculture, South Carolina counties. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914.

Soils Lab Results

3/1/15, 9:13 AM

Agricultural Service Laboratory

171 Old Cherry Road, Clemson, SC 29634 Phone: 864-656-2068 Fax: 864-656-2069

Date: 1/28/2015

15016976 COGRNVL

Lab Number: Account:

Soil Report for: TANNER, CORY 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE GREENVILLE, SC 29601

Analysis

Farm Id:

TANNER, CORY

Sample Id: Soil Code:

Garden 4

Results 6.5

Soil pH Buffer pH

Date: 1/28/2015 7.75

88

lbs/acre

Potassium (K)

136

lbs/acre

Calcium (Ca)

1407

lbs/acre

Magnesium (Mg)

136

lbs/acre

Phosphorus (P)

Soil Report for:

Zinc (Zn)

5.2

Manganese (Mn)

38

Boron (B)

0.5

lbs/acre lbs/acre

TANNER, CORY 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE GREENVILLE, SC 29601

lbs/acre

Copper (Cu)

1

lbs/acre

Sodium (Na)

11

lbs/acre

Sulfur (S)

lbs/acre

Soluble Salts

mmhos/cm

Nitrate Nitrogen

ppm http://cufan.clemson.edu/soils/aspx/standardreport.aspx?key=guD1346JM0933djktu88fKJL&pval=XJZRE343RU7456s3z&id=15016976

Organic Matter

% (LOI)

Calculations Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC)

Acidity

6.3 meq/100g

2 meq/100g

Base Saturation

Ca

Mg

56%

9%

Recommendations

K

Na

3%

0%

Home Garden (Inorganic)

68%

No Lime Required

See Comments: 118,173,654

http://cufan.clemson.edu/soils/aspx/standardreport.aspx?key=guD1346JM0933djktu88fKJL&pval=XJZRE343RU7456s3z&id=15016976

Analysis

see a list of your soil’s nutrient levels. These numbers indicate the actual quantity of plantavailable nutrients in the soil—in other words, the nutrients the plants can use. The two most important values are on top: phosphorous and potassium. Nitrogen, being the nutrient that plants need the most of and the one that most quickly leaves the soil, is always assumed to be deficient on soil tests, so every soil report will recommend nitrogen fertilization.

Page 2 of 3

Total

Lime

Crop

ALSO IN THE “ANALYSIS/ RESULTS” section, you’ll

FINALLY, IN THE “COMMENTS” SECTION, each comment is numbered to match the crop(s) you indicated on your test sample. Since your soil analysis might test for up to four crops per sample, it’s important to match the appropriate comments to the corresponding crop. Some comments are3/1/15, simply general 9:13 AM information. Others contain specific fertilizer recommendations, typically given in pounds per 1,000 square feet. Fertilizer recommendations are based on how much nitrogen (N), Agricultural Service Laboratory phosphorous and potassium (K) should be added to the soil for 171 Old(P) Cherry Road, Clemson, SC 29634 optimal Phone: plant growth. TheseFax: are864-656-2069 the same nutrients, commonly 864-656-2068 expressed as N-P-K, you see on fertilizer bags (e.g., 10-10-10, 16-4-8, 0-0-60) and tell us how much of each major plant nutrient is in each bag of fertilizer as a percentage by weight. A 50-pound bag Lab Number: 15016976 of 10-10-10 contains 10 percent, or five pounds, of each nutrient. Account: COGRNVL Farm Id: rarely needTANNER, Plants equalCORY amounts of these minerals, so test reports Sample Id: Garden usually recommend imbalanced fertilizers, such as calcium nitrate Soil Code: 4 (15.5-0-0) and muriate of potash (0-0-60). By reading the numbers, you can figure out the best mix of fertilizers to apply.

Page 1 of 3

Results

Soil pH

6.5

Buffer pH

7.75

Phosphorus (P)

88

lbs/acre

Potassium (K)

136

lbs/acre

Calcium (Ca)

1407

lbs/acre

Magnesium (Mg)

136

lbs/acre

Zinc (Zn)

5.2

lbs/acre

Manganese (Mn)

38

lbs/acre

Boron (B)

0.5

lbs/acre

Copper (Cu)

1

lbs/acre

Sodium (Na)

11

lbs/acre

Sulfur (S)

lbs/acre

Soluble Salts

mmhos/cm

Nitrate Nitrogen

ppm

Organic Matter

% (LOI)

Calculations Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC)

Acidity

6.3 meq/100g

2 meq/100g

Recommendations Crop

Base Saturation

Ca

Mg

K

Na

Total

56%

9%

3%

0%

68%

Lime

Home Garden (Inorganic)

No Lime Required

See Comments: 118,173,654

http://cufan.clemson.edu/soils/aspx/standardreport.aspx?key=guD1346JM0933djktu88fKJL&pval=XJZRE343RU7456s3z&id=15016976

DON’T WORRY MUCH ABOUT THE BAR GRAPHS. If there’s

anything you need to be concerned about, recommendations will show up in the “Comments” section at the end of the report. And don’t be alarmed if you see one or more nutrients reported as “excessive.” Excessive simply means there is more of that nutrient than the plants can use, not necessarily enough to cause harm. The only practical way to deal with an excessive nutrient is not to apply any more of it. Your report will likely recommend a fertilizer that doesn’t contain that ingredient. S. CORY TANNER

24

Page 1 of 3

NOW LOOK AT THE “RECOMMENDATIONS” SECTION. On the right

side of the page, under “Lime,” you’ll see the recommended number of pounds of lime to spread per 1,000 square feet (or per acre). If lime is not needed, the report will say “No Lime Required.” If your soil pH is too high for certain acid-loving crops, such as blueberries, azaleas and camellias, the report will state “No Lime Required,” but there may be additional advice under the “Comments” section that recommends lowering soil pH by applying sulfur. If so, contact your county’s Extension office for information about the amount of sulfur to apply.

is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Greenville County. Contact him at shannt@clemson.edu.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


SCTravels

BY HASTINGS HENSEL

MIDDLETON PLACE

Grounded in history Going Beyond the Fields oldest landscaped gardens in the U.S. There are, of course, modern amenia volunteer guide at Middleton Place, at Middleton Place begins his moving Beyond the Fields ties at Middleton Place—two gift shops, tour near the stables, where he takes as well as the fine Middleton Place resIt is a sobering dramatization, the his bald-eagle walking cane and first of many on this tour, in which taurant—but much of the plantation draws lines in the dirt, delineating the retired chorus teacher asks his is preserved as it was. Sheep graze on the routes of the Middle Passage. guests to imagine the lives of the the lawn, and in the stable yard, artiThe history of slavery as it existed slaves who built Middleton Place and sans in period clothing demonstrate in South Carolina and here on the grew the rice that made its fortune. textile weaving, blacksmith forging, potplantation of the Middleton family, Beyond the Fields is one of three tery wheeling and barrel coopering. he explains, begins with the forced complimentary tours available with Other tours explore the livestock raised journey across the Atlantic—captured general admission to Middleton Place, on the plantation and the symmetrical a National Historic Landmark better garden designs following the principles Africans packed into the cargo holds known as the birthplace of Arthur of landscape architect André le Nôtre, of slave ships. On the cane’s shaft, Middleton, a signer of the Declaration designer of the gardens at Versailles. Manigault has notched the size of the of Independence, and as home to the All three tours offer views of the cramped space each slave occupied, stately “flanker” house, which, and he holds it up for everyfor an additional fee, one one to see. can tour in order to observe “Now, all of a sudden, you Middleton family heirlooms run into a storm,” he says, and trace the family’s history inviting the tour group to in South Carolina from the imagine themselves on the 1670s to the Civil War. The journey. “And the ship is stately brick structure, which rocking and rolling, and you once served as guest accomget seasick. They close the hatch to keep the water out, modations, is the oldest buildso now the airflow below deck ing from the plantation days. is quite foul. Some of you get The main house—burned by sick. They throw you overUnion troops near the end of Tour guide Leslie Manigault shares the history of the slaves who lived and worked at Middleton Place. the Civil War, and then doubly board. The sharks are waiting.” MIC SMITH

EIGHTY-FOUR-YEAR-OLD LESLIE MANIGAULT,

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

25


SC TRAVELS

MIC SMITH

destroyed by an earthquake almost 20 years later—is now just a pile of rubble, a place where Manigault stops to fill in more blanks of the slave experience. From there, he leads the tour to

GetThere Middleton Place is located at 4300 Ashley River Road in Charleston. HOURS: Open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Christmas Day. Middleton Place Restaurant is open for lunch from noon to 3 p.m. ADMISSION: A $28 admission fee allows you access to the formally landscaped gardens, stable yards, exhibits and complimentary tours, including the Beyond the Fields slavery tour, the Meet the Breeds livestock tour and the Garden Overview tour. There are additional costs for carriage tours ($18) and house museum tours ($15). DETAILS: Visit middletonplace.org or call (843) 266-7477.

The stately brick flanker house served as guest accommodations on the old plantation. The main house was burned by Union troops near the end of the Civil War.

Eliza’s House, a weatherboard duplex named after Eliza Leach, an AfricanAmerican who lived there and worked for more than 40 years at Middleton Place. Inside, one poignant display includes a list that gives every slave’s name and job description. “It’s just about a one-of-a-kind document and an excellent educational tool to remind people what slavery was all about,” says Stephen Reed, the director

2016 SC LIVING BFBB_BFBB sc living 11/18/15 8:51

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of communication at Middleton Place. By the final stop of Manigault’s tour—the plantation chapel on the banks of the river—the tour group is fully absorbed in his dramatizations, hanging onto every word. “The church is a very important aspect of the slave world,” he explains. “What would you do to earn your freedom before the Underground Railroad or emancipation?” Here, Leslie Manigault doesn’t expect anyone to answer. After a moment’s pause, he says, “You reach down into that personal reservoir of personal, spiritual and religious strength, and you come up with the spiritual ‘Nobody knows the trouble I seen, nobody knows but Jesus.’ ” And reaching back into his own reservoir, he sings in his gorgeous voice the spiritual “Steal Away,” as the group listens on in a solemn, beautiful quiet.


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SC EVENT OF THE YEAR

Register online at is an area horticulture agent and Master Gardener coordinator for SCLiving.coop/reader-reply Clemson Extension based in S. CORY TANNER

Grant assistance from the Rock Hill Accomodations Tax/Tourism.

Greenville County. Contact him Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes at shannt@clemson.edu. and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from entries received by March 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the form below. BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS:

jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga jj Bluffton Chamber of Commerce, Taste of Bluffton, S.C. jj Come See Me Festival, Rock Hill, S.C. jj Flopeye Fish Festival, Great Falls, S.C.

jj Historic Pendleton District jj Santee Cooper Country jj South Carolina Farmers Markets jj South Carolina Living magazine

T R AV E L R E A D E R R E P L Y Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address   City State/ZIP  Email*  Phone

SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, TRR, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or

travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by March 31, 2016, to be eligible. *Winners will be notified by email and listed online at SCLiving.coop.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

When it’s your turn to feed the troops at book club, bunco ial games, garden club or other soc t tha ds foo er fing for aim gs, gatherin s Thi . eat to y are easy to prepare and eas wdcro a rs offe ies assortment of munch even pleasing variety. The quiches can d ppe be made ahead, individually wra ed eat and frozen, then reh when guests arrive.

Club snackers PORK-AND-SHRIMP WONTONS MAKES 24

½ pound ground pork ¼ pound peeled, deveined shrimp, chopped 3 green onions, finely chopped 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger 1 tablespoon rice wine* 1 tablespoon soy sauce 24 wonton wrappers 1 medium egg, beaten Cooking oil

DIPPING SAUCE

1 cup soy sauce ½ cup water ¼ cup rice vinegar 4 teaspoons sugar ¼ cup sliced green onions

GINA MOORE 

28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

In a medium bowl, mix pork, shrimp, onion, ginger, rice wine and soy sauce. On a flat surface covered with parchment paper, lay out wonton wrappers, a few at a time. Put 1 teaspoon of pork-shrimp mixture in the middle of each wrapper. Using a pastry brush, brush edges of wrappers with beaten egg or plain water. Fold wrapper over, forming a triangle, and press edges to seal. Set aside prepared wontons; cover with plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out while you prepare remaining wrappers. Allow wrappers to sit about 10 minutes, so edges will seal thoroughly. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat about a half-inch of oil. Fry wontons 1–2 minutes on each side, until brown. Drain on paper towel. To make dipping sauce: Stir together soy sauce, water, vinegar and sugar until sugar is dissolved. Add green onions just before serving. * In place of the rice wine, you may substitute gin, dry white wine, apple juice or white grape juice, but the resulting flavor will be different.


CRAB DIP SERVES 10–12

3 tablespoons butter 3 shallots, peeled and sliced ½ cup heavy cream 3 tablespoons mascarpone cheese 12 ounces cream cheese, softened

½ cup chopped green onions 1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce ¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 pound crab meat 2 ounces grated Swiss cheese

IULIIA NEDRYGAILOVA

In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter, and saute shallots until tender. Add cream; simmer mixture until it reduces by two-thirds. Reduce heat to low, and add mascarpone cheese and 3 ounces of cream cheese. Gradually stir in remaining cream cheese, stirring constantly, until thickened. Add green onions, pepper sauce and Worcestershire, and remove from heat. Turn on oven broiler, and position a rack to within 6 inches of heat source. Gently fold crab meat into mixture; pour into a 1½-quart baking dish, and sprinkle with Swiss cheese. Broil until cheese is melted and golden. Serve with crostini, crackers or raw vegetables.

MINI HAM QUICHES MAKES 1 DOZEN

4 ounces cured ham, diced small 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 4 ounces mushrooms, sliced ¼ cup sliced green onions

¼ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese 2 extra-large eggs ½ cup heavy cream Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

Preheat oven to 325 F. Coat a nonstick, 12-cup mini-muffin pan generously with cooking spray. In a large, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, cook ham until browned, 3–4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Add oil to pan, and cook mushrooms, stirring often, until golden brown, 3–5 minutes. Add mushrooms to bowl with the ham; mix together, and let cool 5 minutes. Stir in green onions. Divide mixture among 12 muffin cups. Divide cheese among cups. In a medium measuring cup with a spout, whisk eggs, cream and black pepper. Pour egg mixture evenly among muffin cups. Bake until tops are just beginning to brown and centers are firm, about 12 minutes. Remove from oven, and let cool on a wire rack 5 minutes. Remove from pan. Serve warm or at room temperature.

NUTTY BAKED BRIE SERVES 8

1 9-inch store-bought piecrust 1 8-ounce brie wheel ¼ cup preserves (fig, or your favorite flavor)

¼ cup chopped pecans, walnuts or almonds 1 medium egg, beaten Additional chopped nuts (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 F. Unroll pie crust onto a flat surface, and place brie wheel in center. Cover top of brie with preserves and nuts. Wrap piecrust around brie, smoothing up the sides and folding crust over the top. Be careful not to tear crust as you work. End with a decorative twist on top. Transfer to an ovenproof baking/serving dish. Using a pastry brush, lightly baste with beaten egg, but do not allow egg to run under the wrapped cheese. Sprinkle with additional chopped nuts, if desired. Bake 18–20 minutes, until golden brown. Allow to cool about 5 minutes before serving. Serve with crostini or crackers. W H AT Õ S C O O K I N G AT

GINA MOORE 

SCLiving.coop

Fresh ginger delivers a huge boost of flavor, and it’s not hard to grate. All you need is a spoon, a microplane and some instruction from Chef Belinda at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


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SCLIVING.COOP   | MARCH 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

35


Calendar  of Events UPSTATE MARCH

17 • Oconee Bell Nature Walk, Devils Fork State Park, Salem. (864) 944-2639. 17 • “Two on Tap,” Josephine B. Abney Cultural Center Auditorium, Lander University, Greenwood. (864) 227-8744. 18–20 • “The Dixie Swim Club,” Spartanburg Little Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 18–20 • “The Secret Garden,” Foothills Playhouse, Easley. (864) 855-1817. 19 • Family Fun Day, Spartanburg Regional History Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 596-3501. 19 • Harlem Globetrotters, Bon Secours Wellness Arena, Greenville. (864) 241-3800. 19 • Kids Fest, Hagood Mill State Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. 19 • Peacock Strides for Babies 5K Run/Walk, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (888) 825-7437. 19 • Spring Festival, Main Street, Reidville. (864) 486-9614. 19 • Spring Market, Union County Fairgrounds, Union. (864) 426-6539. 23 • Arbor Wind Trio, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948-9020. 25 • Lunch & Learn: The Second Coming of the Invisible Empire, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. APRIL

1 • Get Out and Play Day, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 2 • Enrichment Day, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 2 • Fantastic Shakers, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638-5277.

36

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events. 18–19 • Columbia City Ballet’s “Peter Pan,” Koger Center for the Arts, Columbia. (803) 777-7500. 18–20 • Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 734-4008. 19 • Aiken Trials, Aiken Training Track, Aiken. (803) 648-4631. 19 • Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors, McCelvey Center, York. (803) 909-7313. 19 • Elloree Trials, Elloree Training Center, Elloree. (803) 897-2616. 19 • “Holocaust Remembered” exhibit opening, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 19 • Laps for Lancers, USC‑Lancaster Carole Ray Dowling Building, Lancaster. (803) 313-7000. 19 • St. Patrick’s Day Festival, downtown, Clover. (803) 222-9493. 19 • St. Pat’s in Five Points, Five Points district, Columbia. (803) 748-7373. 22 • The Young Irelanders, Clover School District Auditorium, Clover. (803) 810-8000. 22–23 • Recognized Horse Trials, Stable View Farm, ONGOING Aiken. (484) 356-3173. Wednesdays, Fridays and 24 • A Taste of Lake Murray, Saturdays • Hagood Creek Doubletree by Hilton, Petroglyph Site of S.C. open to public, Hagood Mill State Historic Columbia. (803) 781-5940. Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. 26 • Aiken Spring Steeplechase, Aiken Training Track, Aiken. Thursdays, April–July • Music (888) 648-9641. on Main, Morgan Square, Spartanburg. (864) 596-2026. 26 • “A Collection of Collections” exhibit opening, S.C. State Third Thursdays • Art Walk, Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 26 • Slope Valley and High Ridge Bluegrass Band, Third Fridays • Contra Dance, Haynes Auditorium, BatesburgFirst Presbyterian Church, Leesville. (803) 582-8479. Spartanburg. (864) 308-1337. Second Saturdays • Heartstrings, 28–April 1 • Spring Break Camps, S.C. State Museum, Hagood Mill State Historic Site, Columbia. (803) 898-4999. Pickens. (864) 898-2936. 28–April 1 • Spring Break Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Zoo Camp: Wild Neighbors, Chapman Cultural Center, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 31 • Savannah River Site MIDLANDS Public Tour, Aiken County MARCH Applied Research Center, 15 • Negin Farsad: Fighting New Ellenton. (803) 952-8994. Islamophobia, Bigotry, and What 31–April 3 • Tartan Day South, Have You with Comedy, Harbison West Columbia Riverwalk Theatre at Midlands Technical Amphitheater and Historic Columbia College, Irmo. (803) 407-5011. Speedway, Cayce. (336) 499-9733. 17 • Career Festival and Open APRIL House, Lexington Technology 1–3 • Aiken Horse Show, Hitchcock Center, Lexington. (803) 821-3000. Woods at Aiken Horse Show 17 • St. Patrick’s Day on Main, Grounds, Aiken. (803) 642-0528. East Main Street, Old Town 2 • Carolina Cup, Springdale Race Rock Hill. (803) 329-8756. Course, Camden. (800) 780-8117.

2 • Where We All Belong: Marshall Tucker Band Tribute Show, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 2 • Zoom through the Zoo 5K, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 2–3 • Historic Pendleton Spring Jubilee, Village Green, Pendleton. (864) 646-3782. 2–3 • S.C. Comicon, TD Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 235-3488. 6 • Portland Guitar Duo, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948-9020. 7–9 • Spring Skunk Music Fest, 4063 Jordan Road, Greer. (864) 233-8430. 8–17 • “Rumors,” Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882-1910. 9 • Colors 4 Hope, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 467-3344. 15–16 • Azalea Festival, downtown, Pickens. (864) 507-0180. 15–16 • Hub City Hog Fest, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 494-9133.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

2–3 • “Aladdin,” USC‑Aiken Etherredge Center, Aiken. (803) 641-3305. 2–3 • Columbia Open Studios, multiple locations, greater Columbia area. (803) 779-4571. 3 • “Confronting the Holocaust and the Aftermath” Panel Discussion, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 6 • Under the Stars Jumper Nights, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 8 • Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science, Koger Center for the Arts, Columbia. (803) 777-7500. 9 • Adult Garden Workshops: Vermicomposting, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 9 • Fire Truck Pull, Columbia Fire Department & Museum, Columbia. (803) 238-1920. 12 • Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Clover School District Auditorium, Clover. (803) 810-8000. 13 • Dressage under the Stars, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 14–15 • Jim Witter, AECOM Center for the Performing Arts, Aiken. (803) 643-4774. 14–17 • Midlands Spring Plant & Flower Festival, S.C. State Farmers Market, West Columbia. (803) 734-2210. ONGOING

Daily when weather permits • Solar Observing, S.C. State Museum observatory, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Daily through April • “Julius Caesar: Roman Military Might and Machines,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 12th day of month • 12-Cent Kids’ Day, EdVenture Children’s Museum, Columbia. (803) 779-3100. Weekdays through March 25 • Palmetto Portraits Project and South Carolina Palmetto Hands Fine Craft Exhibition, Gallery at City Hall, Columbia. (803) 898-4948. Tuesdays • Second Shift Twosdays, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Saturdays in March • Engineering the International Space Station, DuPont Planetarium, Aiken. (803) 641-3654. Saturdays, weather permitting • Aiken Trolley Tours, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 644-1907. Fourth Saturdays • Mountain Dulcimers of Aiken, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 293-7846.

LOWCOUNTRY MARCH

15–19 • Charleston Fashion Week, Marion Square, Charleston. (843) 577-7652. 16–17 • CanAm Days, Conway Visitors Center, Conway. (843) 248-6260. 16–April 24 • Festival of Houses and Gardens, historic district, Charleston. (843) 722-3405. 18–19 • Highland Games and Heritage Festival, Grand Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 283-7883. 18–19 • Plantation Tours, multiple locations, Georgetown area. (843) 545-8291. 18–19 • Wingfest, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. 18–20 • Charleston Antiques Show, Memminger Auditorium, Charleston. (843) 722-3405. 19 • Edisto Eats Festival and Ultimate Chef Competition, McConkey’s Jungle Shack, Edisto Island. (843) 868-1095. 19 • Lowcountry’s Running Festival: Beaufort Twilight Run, Habersham Village, Beaufort. (843) 321-8309. 19–20 • Pet Fest, Palmetto Islands County Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795-4386. 22–April 2 • Lowcountry Quilt Show, Georgetown County Museum, Georgetown. (843) 545-7020. 25–27 • RenoFest, Center Theater, Hartsville. (843) 639-2988. 26 • The Hat Ladies Promenade, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 762-6679. 26 • Hunting Island Adventure Biathlon, Hunting Island State Park, St. Helena Island. (843) 379-4327. 26 • Race for the Inlet Walk & Run, Murrells Inlet 2020 office, 4124 U.S. 17 Business, Murrells Inlet. (843) 357-2007. 31–April 2 • Lamar Egg Scramble Jamboree, downtown, Lamar. (843) 269-5692. APRIL

1–3 • Catfish Festival, downtown, St. Stephen. (843) 567-3597. 1–3 • Cheraw Spring Festival, Community Center, Cheraw. (843) 537-8421. 1–3 • Flowertown Festival, Azalea Park and downtown, Summerville. (843) 871-9622. 2 • Cooper River Bridge Run, Cooper River Bridge, Mount Pleasant and Charleston. (843) 856-1949. 2 • Park Palooza! Myrtle Beach State Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-0874.

2 • Spring Planting Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365-3596. 2–10 • Volvo Car Open, Family Circle Tennis Center, Daniel Island. (800) 677-2293. 3 • Honey & Bee Expo, Cinebarre, Mount Pleasant. (843) 817-0411. 3 • Lowcountry Blues Bash, Bowens Island Restaurant, Charleston. (844) 297-1962. 3 • Lowcountry Cajun Festival, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 6 • Wine Down Wednesday, Old Towne Creek County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 7 • Founders Award with Martha Ingram, Charleston Library Society, Charleston. (843) 723-9912. 8 • Kiawah Island Art and House Tour, multiple locations, Kiawah Island. (301) 404-6605. 8–10 • World Grits Festival, downtown, Saint George. (843) 563-9946. 9 • Arts International, FMU Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661-1225. 9–10 • Art in the Park, Chapin Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446-3830. 9–10 • Winyah Bay Heritage Festival, Carroll Ashmore Campbell Marine Complex, Georgetown. (843) 833-2674. 9–16 • Volunteer Archaeological Excavation, Hampton Plantation, McClellanville. (843) 546-9361. 12 • Brewsday, Old Towne Creek County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 14 • Opening the Closed Society by Dr. Susan Glisson, Avery Research Center, Charleston. (843) 953-7609. 14–16 • Puddin’ Swamp Festival, downtown, Turbeville. (843) 659-3030. 14–17 • Charleston Race Week, Patriot’s Point, Mount Pleasant. (843) 628-5900. ONGOING

Daily, April 8–Sept. 5 • “Nature Connects” LEGOS Bricks Sculpture Exhibit, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-6000. Daily • QR Code Tour, downtown, Conway. (843) 248-6260. Tuesdays through Sundays, through April 7 • “Frank Lloyd Wright: Architecture of the Interior,” Franklin G. BurroughsSimeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-2510. Wednesdays through May 25 • Weekly Wine Strolls, Middleton Place, Charleston. (800) 782-3608. Fridays • Horseshoe Crabs, Coastal Discovery Museum, Hilton Head Island. (843) 689-6767, ext. 223.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Let’s blame Wilbur and Orville waiting for a replacement plane, because the one that was supposed to take off seven hours ago is officially—drum roll, please—broken. First, it was just a couple of “minor repairs.” An hour later, it was “an over-fueling problem.” Three updates after that, the spokesperson gingerly announced, “The smell of burning oil has permeated the cabin, so we’re fumigating.” Even if that stench wouldn’t have everybody reaching for the airsickness bag, it was bound to make us SO, HERE I AM, SITTING IN AN AIRPORT,

awfully nervous. So they wisely started hunting for another plane. You’d think there would be some spare 707s just waiting to take off from an international airport, right? Afraid not. The closest one was “just a few hours away.” That’s when the frequent flyers lost their manners. Everywhere around me, stranded masses of weary, post-blizzard passengers began buzzing like angry hornets. I’d buzz, too, if I thought it would help. But my primary goal in flying is never to find out if the inflatable life vests actually work. (I’ve yet to see one inflated.) As 38

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   MARCH 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

long as I’m still wondering, I’ll gladly wait for a healthy plane. The airlines have a lot of experience explaining broken planes to irritated travelers, so they’ve had plenty of time to study passenger mindset. Apparently, it’s never good to come right out and say, “Look, kids, you’re going to be stuck in this terminal longer than Tom Hanks. Your connecting flights have already left, so suck it up. Go have a few $8 beers, and drop what’s left of your money in some of our wickedly overpriced shops. Stop back in a few days for an update.” No, they won’t do that. They soften the blow by predicting 30-minute delays 23 consecutive times. Using this psychology, the airlines figure fewer people are likely to become homicidal. But after the fifth delay, when they start breaking out free refreshments, you know it’s bad. Airlines would sooner let you bring a buffalo on board than give out free stuff. If Wilbur and Orville are watching this show from the great flying machine in the sky, they must be flabbergasted. Those crazy Wright brothers had the foolish notion they could fly when bicycles were the newfangled rage in transportation. Some folks warned that the evil, pedaled contraptions would lead to social decay and promiscuity. (Something did.) Anyhow, that generation wasn’t ready for mopeds, much less modern aviation. In the early 1900s, when the featherless duo was first spotted flapping around the Outer Banks, trying to imitate shorebirds, the general consensus was that Wil and Orv weren’t the sharpest tools in the shed. In the scheme of things, that wasn’t all that long ago. So, before I grab a Starbucks, tap into the airport’s free Wi-Fi and jump on Facebook to kvetch to “friends” on three continents about this appalling inconvenience, it’s only fair to marvel at the genius that made the delay possible. When I’m done marveling, I’ll kvetch. JAN A. IGOE is still amazed every time a 200-ton plane takes off. Even if she’s delayed, it’s usually faster than walking. Write Jan at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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On its 10 year anniversary and with over five million satisfied customers, MyPillow® has been selected the Official Pillow of the National Sleep Foundation! How Well Did You Sleep Last Night? Did you toss and turn all night? Did you wake up with a sore neck, head ache, or was your arm asleep? Do you feel like you need a nap even though you slept for eight hours? Just like you, I would wake up in the morning with all of those problems and I couldn’t figure out why. Like many people who have trouble getting a good night’s sleep, my lack of sleep was affecting the quality of my life. I wanted to do something about my sleep problems, but nothing that I tried worked.

Mike Lindell Inventor of MyPillow®

The Pillow Was the Problem I bought every pillow on the market that promised to give me a better night’s sleep. No matter how many pillows I used, I couldn’t find one that worked and finally I decided to invent one myself. I began asking everyone I knew what qualities they’d like to see in their “perfect pillow”, and got many responses: “I’d like a pillow that never goes flat”, “I’d like my pillow to stay cool” and “I’d like a pillow that adjusts to me regardless of my sleep position.” After hearing everyone had the same problems that I did, I spent the next two years of my life inventing MyPillow.

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South Carolina Living March 2016  

South Carolina Living March 2016

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