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News for members of Northcentral Electric Power Association

ELVIS PRESLEY

EVELYN GANDY

AARON HENRY IDA B. WELLS

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

JAMES D. HARDY

4 Five inducted into

state’s Hall of Fame

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Little Free Library promotes reading

12 Mom, son make bread together


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February 2017

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February 2017

Slam the door on scammers by being a cautious consumer on’t be tricked into paying a bill you don’t owe. Phony debt collection attempts rank among the most common scams targeting consumers, according to the Better Business Bureau. The “power cut-off” scam goes something like this: A consumer receives a phone call from someone claiming to represent the electric utility in collecting a past-due power bill. The consumer is told that to avoid a service disconnection, he must give the caller a credit card number, prepaid debit card number or other form of payment. Please don’t fall for this con. Your electric power association will never demand immediate payment of a bill over the phone. If you receive such a call, don’t be pressured to act. Hang up, and call your electric power association to get the true status of your account. In another scam, the caller claims to be an IRS agent and threatens to fine or arrest the consumer for failing to pay a non-existent tax debt. This kind of fraud accounts for 25 percent of all scams reported by victims to the BBB. Another common scam has to do with phony sweepstakes or prize winnings. The prize isn’t real but the caller’s attempt to get upfront payment of taxes or other fees from you is very real. In the “government grant” scam, the caller asks the victim for checking account or credit card information, or an upfront payment of fees in order to qualify for the “free” grant money. Regardless of the scenario, the goal of all these scams is to steal your money, or obtain your personal information for the purposes of identity theft. All of them have targeted consumers in Mississippi. (Not everyone took the bait; many Mississippians recognized a scam and reported it to the BBB.) You can learn about and report scams to the BBB through the BBB Scam Tracker, a free interactive online tool at www.bbb.org/scamtracker. By clicking on a map, you can read about scams being reported in specific areas of the country, as well as your own area. You can also subscribe to the BBB’s scam alerts.

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On the cover The newest inductees in the Mississippi Hall of Fame are two civil rights leaders, a rock ‘n’ roll icon, a political pioneer and a ground-breaking surgeon. The Hall of Fame was founded in 1902 to instill pride in the achievements of outstanding Mississippians. Learn more about the new inductees and their contributions on pages 4-5. Photos courtesy Mississippi Department of Archives and History

And remember, an offer that sounds to good to be true usually is. Just hang up the phone or ignore the email solicitation. ••• Mississippi’s new year was ushered in with heavy rains, high winds, a few tornadoes, sleet, ice and temperatures dipping into the teens in some areas. Bad weather is the most common cause of power outages. Tens of thousands of electric power association members in south Mississippi lost their service during tornadoes and high winds that swept the My Opinion state on Jan. 2, and our Michael Callahan crews quickly scrambled to Executive Vice President/CEO rebuild power lines. Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi This is a good time to remind everyone of the dangers of fallen power lines. Contact with a line on the ground can cause a deadly shock—even during a power outage. There is no way to tell if a downed line is energized simply by looking at it, so please, just stay away and report the situation immediately to your electric power association. One more safety-related plea: Our crews often work on lines after dark, in the fog and during downpours. They use various safety devices and procedures to help drivers spot them, but they still need your help to stay safe. Please slow down when you approach a utility work site on a roadside. On multi-lane highways, remember the “Move Over Law”: Move over at least one lane away from any utility or emergency vehicle with lights flashing. If you can’t change lanes due to traffic, slow down and be prepared to stop. Nothing is more important to us than the safety of our members, employees and the public.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 2 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 436,892 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

Portaits of some of Mississippi’s First Ladies are displayed in a small room off the Senate Chamber in the Old Capitol Museum, in Jackson.

Mississippi is home to many different churches and some are even one of a kind. They are large, medium and small, or whatever comes to mind. Some in the larger towns are majestic and very tall, While some in the smaller towns and countrysides are very minute and small. Some have pointed steeples reaching high in the sky, But some have no steeples at all and no one asks why. The stained glass windows in some look like gems And are so pretty to look at while singing the hymns. Whether large choirs with robes or choirs that have not, They are kept both warm and cool by 4-County Electric, and we thank them a lot. – Mary Carolyn Mitchell, Starkville The little big town of McComb called my magnoliaborn husband and me to put down our roots in 1979. Job transfers gave us a broader look around Mississippi, but back home we came to Pike County in 1982. Now we click our heels any time we are away and say, there is no place like home. Sweltering, too-hot summers remind us of just-right winters (for the most part), with frontporch-sitting autumns and springs wedged in between. Beautiful blooms and hummingbird feeders to coax those amazing little creatures to a near ‘bout arm’s reach. Delta blues and Elvis roots, beaches and space travelers, and more paths, rivers and lakes than you can imagine. Arts and entertainment nearly every weekend of the year because of the wonderful weather. Although we may have to brace ourselves for a hurricane now and again, my Mississippi knows how to band together to repair and restore. The South is in my genes and Mississippi is forever in my heart. – Ronda Temple, Pike and Amite counties

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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artists • authors • military commanders • justices • civil rights pioneers • tribal chiefs • religious leaders • educators

Mississippi Hall of Fame honors Mississippians who made a difference

By Debbie Stringer Some of the world’s best-known artists hailed from Mississippi—Elvis Presley, Muddy Waters, Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner, to name a few. Yet Mississippi has produced innovators and leaders in other fields as well—medicine, law and civil rights, among them. A few examples: • Sen. Hiram Revels in 1870 became the first

African American to serve in the U.S. Congress. • Burnita Matthews served as the first female federal trial judge and a key figure in the National Women’s Party. • Dr. Felix Underwood made the state a model for public health departments nationwide during his tenure as director of the State Board of Health. • Alfred Stone was a leader in developing flood control methods along the Mississippi River.

• Lucy Howorth, a state representative from Hinds County, and her mother, Nellie Somerville, became the first mother-daughter legislators in the country. These and other Mississippians who have made important contributions to the state (and nation) are honored in the Mississippi Hall of Fame, a collection of portraits displayed at the Old Capitol Museum, in Jackson. Dunbar Rowland, the first director of the Mississip-


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legislators • journalists • college presidents • women’s rights advocates • philanthropists • senators • congressmen Far left, many of the portraits making up the Mississippi Hall of Fame hang in the Senate Chamber at the Old Capitol Museum. Most but not all Hall of Fame members are represented by a portrait in the museum. Recent inductees into the Hall of Fame include civil rights leader Aaron Henry, left. Hall of Fame member and Biloxi native George Ohr (18571918), below right, was an innovative artist whose ceramic works received little recognition in his day but are now collected by major museums. Choctaw chief Pushmataha (1764-1824), below left, helped negotiate treaties between the Choctaw Nation and the U.S. government. He fought alongside Andrew Jackson in the War of 1812. Photos this page courtesy Mississippi Department of Archives and History

pi Department of Archives and History, created the Hall of Fame in 1902 to be a “collection of portraits of the great men of Mississippi” for display at the New Capitol, then under construction. The Hall of Fame moved in 1961 to the Old Capitol Museum. The portait painters have included prominent Mississippi artists such as Marshall Bouldin III and Karl and Mildred Wolfe. Funding for the portraits comes from private supporters. Any Mississippian deceased at least five years may be nominated for the Hall of Fame, and anyone may make a nomination. The board of trustees of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History elects up to five new Hall of Fame inductees at a special meeting

held every five years. From a field of 40 individuals nominated by the public, the board in 2016 selected Evelyn Gandy, James Hardy, Aaron Henry, Elvis Presley and Ida B. Wells. Evelyn Gandy (1920-2007), a Hattiesburg native and gradute of the University of Mississippi School of Law, was elected to the state legislature in 1947. She became the first woman to serve as assistant attorney general, commissioner of public welfare, state treasurer, commissioner of insurance and lieutenant governor. She ran unsuccessfully for governor twice. She died in 2007. James D. Hardy (1918-2003), born in Alabama, was the founding chairman of surgery at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, in Jackson. In 1963 he led the team that performed the world’s first lung transplant and, a year later, transplanted the heart of a

chimpanzee into a dying man—three years before the first human-to-human heart transplant. He retired in 1987 from UMMC. Aaron Henry (1922-1997) was born in Dublin, Miss. Henry was a Clarksdale pharmacist who became one of Mississippi’s most distinguished civil rights leaders. He organized the Clarksdale branch of the NAACP and in 1959 was elected the organization’s state president. He started the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the Council of Federated Organizations. Henry served as a state representative from 1982 until 1996. Elvis Aaron Presley (1935-1977), a Tupelo native, was given his first guitar at age 11; within 10 years he had released his first No. 1 single, “Heartbreak Hotel.” Dubbed the “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” Presley sold more records than any other recording artist. His music reflected pop, country, gospel and R&B influences. Presley also starred in more than 30 feature films, won multiple Grammys, received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and was inducted into rock, country and gospel music halls of fame. Ida B. Wells (1862-1931), born into slavery in Holly Springs, was an outspoken civil rights pioneer and one of the most important civil rights advocates of the 19th century. She was a teacher in north Mississippi and in Tennessee, and later a journalist who campaigned against lynching, segregation, inequitable school funding and other racial injustices. She became one of the founders of the NAACP in 1909. In 1990 the U.S Postal Service issued a stamp in her honor. Mississippi Hall of Fame inductees now number 136, with more to be elected in 2021. The Hall of Fame portraits and brief biographies of their diverse subjects, along with guidelines for making nominations for future inductees, can be viewed at the museum’s website, mdah.ms.gov/oldcap.


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February 2017

Take a book, leave a book at a Little Free Library

By Nancy Jo Maples “take a book or leave a Miniature libraries filled with free books are sprouting all over the book.” Most hold world, including places like Pascagoula where 14 have emerged about 20 books that throughout the past year. are protected from the With a total of nearly 40,000 locations, Little Free Library (LFL) elements with a roof exchange boxes can be found in all 50 states in the U.S. and in 70 and a door. countries globally. The design of each The LFL effort in Pascagoula was spearheaded by five women book exchange is who wanted to promote reading in their community. unique. A box at Scran“We have a wonderful library system here, but there are some ton’s restaurant in children who don’t have transportation to get to the library,” Amy Pascagoula is decorated Brandenstein, the local group’s founder, said. as a fire engine because Brandenstein had noticed LFLs in her Ohio hometown while visthe historical cafe once iting last year, and she brought the idea back to her Pascagoula served as the city’s fire staPascagoula’s Little Free Library boxes friends. Today there are LFLs scattered throughout the city in aparttion and municipal complex. One at the were built and decorated by members ment complexes, low-income neighborhoods, restaurants and groPascagoula Recreation Center looks like the Cheshire of the Pascagoula/Gautier School Discery stores. trict’s maintenance crew, students in “All of us are mothers and encourage readthe high school woodworking class and local artisans. ing in our own homes. We felt that this was a way to encourage reading throughout our community,” Heather Wiggins, another of the local LFL organizers, said. LFL is a nonprofit movement that began in Hudson, Wisc., in 2009 when Todd Bol built and decorated a wooden box that mimicked a one-room schoolhouse in memory of his mother, a former school teacher. He mounted the box, about the size of a dollhouse, to a post and placed it on his front lawn. He filled the container with books for neighbors to take and use. Bol’s idea evolved into a worldwide free book exchange where people can take a book Piper Wilson uses a Little Free Library book exchange box in Pascagoula. Her mother, or return a book. On its website, littlefreeliTracy Wilson, helped organize their town’s LFL effort. brary.org, interested readers and donors can access a map to pinpoint the GPS location of a little library in their Cat from “Alice in Wonderland.” neighborhood. LFLs are often erected on private property or at busiPascagoula’s first LFL was installed nesses with the permission from the owners. Some may be found in in November 2015 and the movement public places where the LFL sponsor has gained consent from simply grew and grew. In the spirit of authorities. community involvement, the local organizaOne such public place in Pascagoula that houses a LFL is the tion partnered with the Pascagoula/Gautier School Tracy Wilson police department. Decorated with black and white paint to resemDistrict. The district’s maintenance crew, a woodworking class at the high ble a classic police car, the box is visited mostly by children who find school and local artisans all built and decorated the boxes. themselves bored while awaiting their parents’ city court appearEach LFL has a steward who oversees the site by keeping the box stocked ances. Many court attendees are without childcare assistance. with books and watching for vandalism. A local gift shop, Whimsy Books Placing LFLs near places like city court meets the goals of the and Toys, serves as a collection point for book donations. Used books in global organization whose mission, according to its website, is “to good condition are accepted as well as new books. Books can be from any promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book genre or reading level; most, however, are geared toward children. exchanges worldwide and to build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity and wisdom across generations.” Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Each book exchange is identified as a LFL with an invitation to Lucedale, MS 39452 or via email at nancyjomaples@aol.com. Heather Wiggins


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Roads least traveled are the most fun am anxiously awaiting our readers’ entries for the next “Picture This” feature in this publication. The photo theme as announced last month is Country Roads (details on page 18). And since I have spent the last 30 or so years of my career traveling mostly country roads, I want to see how many of the photos submitted are ones I’ve driven. Or, more importantly, ones I haven’t. Yet. Charles Kuralt is the first television reporter that I am aware of to make a career of traveling the lesser-traveled paths. I am indebted to him for paving the way (inadvertent pun) for feature reporters like myself to follow him. I really believe if his “On The Road” series for CBS News had never happened, people Mississippi who do what I Seen do for a living by Walt Grayson might have had to do something else. But Charles Kuralt proved that television audiences (which means people in general) want to see something other than bad news on their sets. Of course, when Kuralt set the precedent, he also set the bar very high. He is probably remembered as a travel reporter. But very few of his stories were about traveling. They were about the people he met at the end of the journey. And he was a brilliant thinker with keen observations and insights. In comparison, I try to get by. I bring up Charles Kuralt in association with country roads because when I saw the upcoming (April) theme for “Picture This,” the first thing that popped into my mind was something he said about modern America. Here it is: Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything. Of course, no one doubts the need for America’s superhighway system. Yet the other side of the coin shines through without having to flip it over. To me he is also saying something to the effect of: We have progressed as a society and modern-

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Around the bend of a country road can be anything. That's part of the appeal of driving them. Could be another bend. Or a fork in the road! The disappointment with a fork is you can choose to go only one way; you’ll just have to wonder what may have happened had you chosen the other. Photo: Walt Grayson

ized and streamlined, but we’ve left something behind in the process. What is it we’ve left behind? Drive a few miles down any country road and you will find it. My Grandmother’s house was on one of those country roads. The cemetery where she and several prior generations, as well as members of the current generation and my Mom and Dad, are buried is on a country road. Many of the most picturesque churches in the state (in January’s “Picture This,” by the way) are on country roads. Most of the places where history was made are down country roads. When I am trying to get my thoughts together I can either find myself or lose myself (depending on the need) while driving a country road. They not only carry you to your destination but also transport you through a variety of scenery and topography, and can even take you back in time along the way. A part of a country road’s appeal to me is the anticipation of what’s around the next bend. Around that bend may be an

old farmstead or a town you’ve never seen before, or another bend. And sometimes around the next bend there may be a fork in the road, one you weren’t expecting. If your GPS isn’t handy, deciding which way to go is a dead reckoning. Whichever way you choose has another set of adventures. I suppose the destination is the ultimate reason for the journey. But traveling

a country road makes the destination an anticlimax, compared to the drive. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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A ballet in the

PINES

Above, a canine ballet unfolds. David Cotton, left, with Smolly and Travis Lindsey, right, with Candy. Photos: Tony Kinton

logue about shotguns and agree erry and I chat as we watch the frosty countryside slip past to a similar affinity for 28s. With such pronounced propensity for his truck windows. We are headed to a ballet. Not “Swan the 28, I feel awkward explaining I am today shooting my 20, a Lake,” but equally as dramatic. Not “The Nutcracker,” but equally as handsome Browning Citori 725 that is still an infant in the bird ornamental. fields. It is a part of me, an extenThis ballet is in the wild, a gathering sion of my sight and feel and of disciplined dogs and flighty quail. reflex. I tell Travis I will acquire The dogs’ perfected arabesques and the identical model in a 28 soon. He pirouettes will be much like those of smiles in agreement, but then he will not dancers. The quail’s thunderous flush be the one writing a check! will be much like those rumbles from David moves the conversation to the orchestra’s tympani section. other matters. It is time to Jerry pastored the counhunt. But before we board try church my family the ATV, behind which is a attended during my early dog trailer filled with animatcollege days. Only a few ed and energetic canines, years my senior, he quickly David reads a short passage gained my admiration. A from the Bible and offers a solid friendship formed. We prayer of thanksgiving for recall many outings from this glorious day and those days as the morning Creation. We all climb in ages and miles glide by, but and head down a field road, we are suddenly interrupted dogs barking and chattering by a road sign: Dancing as we go. Rabbit Quail Preserve. We by Tony Kinton Around the bend a grand turn off and pull up to a big site awaits. An expansive hay field lies to farm shed. Dancing Rabbit Preserve (www.danc- the right. It is bordered on three sides by ingrabbitquailpreserve.net), located near hardwoods, their bare arms reaching into Macon, is owned and operated by David a gray, early-morning sky. On the left is a sizable plantation of mature pines, the Cotton and Travis Lindsey. These genunderstory managed perfectly for quail. tlemen are enamored of good dogs and There is native grass with an abunquail country, and each entity is more dant supply of beggar’s lice, a traditional than abundant at Dancing Rabbit. quail staple. The incline occupied by this Jerry knows both David and Travis, stand is gentle and favorable for aging but I am the newcomer. A round of introductions and firm handshakes come legs. Two dogs are cast, characters for the ballet’s pas de deux. easily. “That’s Smolly and Candy,” says Travis and I promptly engage in dia-

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Outdoors Today

Travis. Young females, Smolly an English pointer and Candy a German shorthair, the duet is primed for action and wastes no time getting down to business. I admit to a touch of trepidation regarding the obvious youth of these two, but my misgivings are ill placed. Both know the drill. “Smolly?” I ask in disbelief of my hearing. “Strange name.” Travis explains that an elderly friend had two dogs. One was Smokey, the other Molly. In the fashion of many of us with some years to our credit, this friend would do that “roll call” we know well. He would more often than not call out for Molly but inadvertently begin with Smokey. Thus the name Smolly emerged. In the setting of this morning, it is amply apparent that Smolly knows her name, evidenced by the fact that the quietest and most gentle mention of it brings her immediately to heel. And it is Smolly that first comes to point, locked solidly into a classic pose that is the stuff of bird-dog paintings hanging on office walls. Candy is still rushing, but she sees her comrade and locks into a similar posture, dutifully backing if even unsure of what is there. Three quail burst from the grass, none

of them into my cone. Jerry obliges with his 20, and Candy makes the perfect retrieve. Smolly again. She is in a head-long dash when she hits the scent. Her breeding, training and athletic prowess exemplified, from that hasty pace she becomes immediately motionless—head craned sharply to the right, front leg on that side curled tightly, tail rigid and properly placed at 45 degrees. The bird is inches from her nose. Candy joins Smolly. A single flutters briefly to clear the grass and lays a right-hand arc into my shooting cone. The Browning feels fluid and is like a third arm. The quail tumbles; Smolly retrieves. Travis even makes a kind comment at how he enjoys watching a leftie such as I make one of those silky right-hand crossing shots. I smile in deep appreciation but feel his accolade comes too early, for I consider myself a poor shotgunner, unlikely to continue with such stellar performance. And so it went. The hunt ends much too soon. We place Smolly and Candy back into the trailer and make our way to the shed where we started three hours earlier. I repeat my own version of David’s prayer of thanks for the day and the Creation. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Friendships come in many forms riendship is a subject that is very complex. First, it depends on the time frame. We can reference friends we had in our very young years, or high school years, and, if we attended college we made more friends there. In my case, my husband, Mr. Roy, sent me off to college, not my parents, so my friendships were different from those of kids who went straight out of high school. I didn’t begin college until our daughters began school. As a side note: I’ve never been quite sure if I embarrassed Roy one time too many and that was the last straw. So he agreed to send me off to get educated. When we married, his friends were older and we socialized with them while we were in the army. I remember he’d give me that “look” when I made comments he thought were unsuitable. College didn’t alleviate that disapproving look. My little family encouraged and helped me while I went to the University of South Alabama (USA) in Mobile—especially with mathematics! We had a celebration when I graduated. My mother and stepfather came, and I had proven to my mother I was smart

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enough to graduate. She told me in elementary school I wasn’t as smart as my friend Julia. That hurt, and I never forgot it. Why do we remember hurt feelings all our lives? Some friendships develop when we’re young, or develop when we are newly married couples, and these may continue throughout our lives. One thing I have noticed as I get older (that word was hard to write), is that new friendships don’t come as easily. I mean, compared to those we’ve had for many years. There are always exceptions. Take a moment to consider other friendships. Men’s friends live in an incomparable world, when compared to women’s friends. I can’t explain male friends. Both genders, however, usually have at least one close friend. A good friend can break our heart if she turns her back and chooses someone else. I pray all people have a friend they can depend on. A few cross words or telling our secrets can end that relationship—unless we follow God’s rule and forgive. Now, consider couples’ friendships. There are couples that socialize together and become very close over the years. If we aren’t careful, however, misunderstandings or gossip can spoil those. There are other categories of friendships; I’ll name three more that come to mind. Mary was my black caretaker when I was about 5

years old. Being an only child, I was lonely and I had to create my own little world—except when my cousins came to my grandparents’ house. I loved Mary because she treated me like a grown-up. I followed her around the house telling her stories, and she was successful in convincing me she believed every word. She was my good friend. Her son Mike came over to play when she had no one to keep him. We played hide-and-seek and climbed trees. I lived six blocks away from my grandparents’ house. I stayed there many times. My Big Mama wouldn’t let Mike come visit me at her house. That made me very sad. I didn’t understand; I was innocent of race relationships. Today in our society, the media tell us that race relationships have deteriorated. My wish and prayer is that we become as innocent children and never think in terms of color. Grin ‘n’ Next door to my grandparBare It ents was a two-story boarding by Kay Grafe house full of people. My friend Miss Cassie lived there. She was very old and stayed in her room most of the day. I visited her and she seemed so happy to see me. Back when dinner was in the middle of the day, if I was at Big Mama’s house I’d walk across the side yard to visit and carry Miss Cassie’s tray down the hall to her room. She never wanted me to leave. I challenge you to think back to your early years and recent years. Write in your journal or a notebook about each close friendship you can remember. Would you like to change anything? I took the challenge this Christmas when I sent a card to one of my younger cousins and apologized for mistakes I made concerning her when we were young. I was the oldest cousin on my mother’s side of the family and would ostracize her from my chosen group of cousins. Only because I could. This new year, I plan to write and apologize to everyone I hurt by an inappropriate remark or behavior. If you don’t receive my apology, remember I am a little older and my memory may fail. Oh my! But yours may too. So, if we’ve both forgotten ... no need for an apology. Whew. That’s a relief. Stamps are expensive these days. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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everyday life!

Helping you to enjoy

Mississippi’s electric cooperatives have a long-standing tradition of promoting electrical safety and energy efficiency—a natural fit with our initial mission of extending affordable electric service to everyone who wanted it. We are member-owned electric cooperatives whose viability reflects our commitment to providing valuable, money-saving services to our members. Our broad mission of service also encompasses a range of community service activities. Our employees are respected leaders and civic-minded volunteers in our service area. We help grow our communities through economic development, leadership and volunteerism. We are more than an electric utility service. We are part of the family of electric cooperative members, and we work every day to make your life better!

Northcentral Electric Power Association

We’re not afraid of 70,000 volts of electricity... But we are afraid of distracted drivers. Our linemen work along our state’s highways, streets and rural roads to keep the power flowing to our members. When drivers do not pay attention and adhere to the Move Over law, the lives of these linemen are at risk.

Help make the road a safe place for them to work.


We have an app for that!

February 2017 I Today in Mississippi

Apps for iPhone, iPad and Android are available to download and they’re free! Search in Apple App Store or Google Play Store for Northcentral.

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MISSISSIPPI

Cooks

Green Lady Bakery RECIPES FROM:

By Debbie Stringer Bread making is as enjoyable as it is practical for Lynnette Scott. Most important, it’s all about family. This full-time mom has baked bread for her family of four children, taught bread making to hundreds of youth and adults, and now, with son Robbie, sells bread at a farmers market to help fund his upcoming college education. Scott and her husband, Robert Scott, live in Jones County and are members of Dixie Electric Power Association. He is a cabinet maker and tree farmer. She homeschools and cooks a family dinner every night—and bakes bread. The Scott kitchen doubles as the family room. “The thing my family does together is cook. Even the two [children] that don’t like to cook will come in and eat, taste, stand around, dance to the radio. Seriously, we live in our kitchen,” Lynnette Scott said. Her life-long passion for bread baking began when she was 8, while visiting her great-grandmother in California. “I vividly remember standing at the edge of the cabinet with my Nana. I loved to watch her make bread,” Scott said. One day, Nana was preparing dough for a family gathering. “I need you to make this into rolls,” she told young Lynnette, who balked at the idea. How could she possibly make anything as perfectly shaped as Nana’s dinner rolls? But Nana, who was blind, patiently showed Lynnette how she pinched and twisted the dough to form the beautiful rolls she herself could not see. “Mine were ugly, ugly rolls, but no one said a word. And I remember that very vividly, how they tasted so much better because I made them,” Scott said. At age 12, Scott took charge of her

family’s yeast-bread needs, baking for holidays, special dinners and daily meals at their home in Seattle. When she was 17, she began baking breads to serve at huge feasts hosted by the Society of Creative Anachronism, an activity she still enjoys today. SCA is an international organization whose members study and reenact pre-17th century European life, including cooking. One summer, Scott worked at a Girl Scout camp in Louisiana, where she taught girls of all ages to make bread. “Most of them hadn’t even cooked before and didn’t know where bread came from. They were amazed at the process of how flour, water and yeast come together to make bread,” she said. The process also fascinates son Robbie, 18, who learned to make biscuits around age 8. “I’ve always been interested in cooking, and I’ve been doing it since I could stand over the counter and help,” he said. Robbie’s enjoyment of cooking, grilling and baking as a hobby led him to consider a career in chemical engineering. But first, he and his mom are getting ready to begin their second year as the vendors known as Green Lady Bakery at the Mississippi Farmers Market, in Jackson. They sell their freshly baked breads at the market on Saturday mornings from Feb. 4 through late fall. They offer the same specialty breads their family enjoys at home, including an herb bread, Cheddar cheese and jalapeno bread and a whole-wheat “steakhouse” bread. This year they’ll also offer a halfsize king cake in various flavors. Most all their breads begin with the basic recipe Scott developed from memories of her Nana’s homebaked bread. “I still do it exactly the same way she did

Lynnette Scott and son Robert “Robbie” Scott II, of Jones County, share a love of baking breads and experimenting with new recipes. She learned bread making from her great-grandmother, who never measured ingredients. Scott developed her own basic bread recipe based on memories of her Nana’s bread.

it,” she said. The Scotts freely divulge their bread recipes with customers and welcome questions. Sharing recipes, knowledge

and advice with others is part of the fun, they say. Lynnette Scott may be reached by phone at 601-319-6946 or by email at GreenLadyBakery@gmail.com.

Foccacia Bread 2 tsp. rapid-rising dry yeast 1 cup warm water 2 Tbsp. sugar

3 ½ to 4 cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup olive oil 1 Tbsp. salt

In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a dough hook, proof the yeast by combining it with the warm water and sugar. Stir gently to dissolve. Let stand 3 minutes until foam appears. Turn mixer on low and slowly add the flour to the bowl. Pour in olive oil and add salt. When the dough starts to come together, increase the speed to medium. Stop the machine periodically to scrape the dough off the hook. Mix until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes, adding flour as necessary. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and fold over itself a few times. Form the dough into a round and place in an oiled bowl. Turn to coat the entire ball with oil so it doesn’t form a skin. Cover with a towel and let rise a warm place until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Coat a sheet pan with parchment paper. Once the dough is doubled and domed, turn it out onto the counter. Roll and stretch the dough out to an oblong shape about ½ inch thick. Lay the flattened dough on the pan and cover with towel. Let rest for 15 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 F. Uncover the dough and dimple with your fingertips. At this point you should add any toppings you would like. Recipe author Lynnette Scott uses salt, pepper and olive oil infused with rosemary and garlic. Bake on the bottom rack for 15 to 20 minutes.


February 2017

Lynnette Scott’s White Bread Makes 2 loaves or 15 dinner rolls. 1 Tbsp. yeast 3 Tbsp. sugar (or 6 Tbsp. for dinner rolls) 1 cup all-purpose flour

3 Tbsp. oil 1 Tbsp. salt 4 to 5 cups all-purpose flour

Mix yeast, sugar and 1 cup flour with 2 cups warm water.* Let mixture stand for 10 minutes, until foamy. (The foaming indicates the yeast is active and good to use.) Add oil and salt. Slowly mix in 4 to 5 cups of flour, 1 cup at a time, until dough is smooth and slightly tacky to the touch. (Humidity will affect the amount of flour needed.) Turn dough into an oiled bowl, cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. Push down to release air and knead until smooth. Form dough into 2 loaves and place into loaf pans, or make 15 dinner rolls. Bake in a preheated oven at 400 F for 20 minutes. * Water temperature should be less than 110 F to avoid killing yeast. Put a few drops on the inside of your wrist; if it burns, it’s too hot for the yeast. Note: Make your bread extra special with an add-in such as shredded Cheddar cheese, dried herbs, dried fruit, nuts, etc. Stir it in after the oil and salt.

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Bread baking need not be intimidating. After all, you can eat your mistakes or feed them to the chickens, as Lynnette Scott does. Here are some of her tips: • Use an all-wheat flour. Read the label; some flours contain fillers like barley. • Using water warmer than 110 degrees Fahrenheit kills the yeast. Use the baby-bottle test: Put a few drops on the inside of your wrist; if it burns, it’s too hot for the yeast. • Yeast is a living organism affected by heat and humidity, so throw away that old packet in the back of your cabinet and buy a fresh one. • When the humidity is high, add more flour to the dough slowly, a little at a time. You want a dough that feels slightly tacky to the touch. • When a loaf of bread is done, it will be slightly brown on top and will make a hollow sound when thumped on the bottom. • Before adding shredded cheese to dough, mix a little flour with the cheese. This will keep the cheese from clumping and sinking to the bottom of the pan. The most important ingredient in bread baking? “Patience. That’s the biggest thing,” Scott said. “Don’t expect your bread to look beautiful the first time. And give yourself some credit for the fact that you are creating something from scratch. It’s never going to look like a commercial item, and you don’t want it to. My loaves are uneven sometimes, but you know what? That’s what bread is. It’s imperfect.”

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Gardening catalogs ease cabin fever in winter hey seem to show up at my house every day, whether in sunny, rainy, warm or cold weather. They’re relentless. I’m not referring to homesecurity sales folks; I’m talking about gardening catalogs. These catalogs arrive in all shapes and sizes, in full color or black and white, and they all encourage us to make sure we’re ready for spring. This spring marketing blitz is targeted at gardeners suffering from cabin fever. And the catalogs do succeed in us getting ready, maybe a little too ready if we succumb to their temptations. Even I have fallen, and fallen hard, for the siren call of the catalogs. A couple of years ago, I became interested in growing dry soup beans. Never mind that they are inexpensive and readily available at the grocery. I wanted to grow heirloom dry soup beans. So, I ordered various varieties, like the white-and-maroon mottled Jacob’s

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Gardening catalogs that fill our mailboxes in winter offer varieties of plants not found in local stores and garden centers. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

Cattle, the black-and-white Holstein, and the two-toned and mottled cream and deep brown-red Hog Brains cowpea. These were definitely selections not available from the local grocery. In all, I went overboard and bought 25 different varieties. That experience helped me learn that

when confronted with a pile of catalogs, rhythm. Many gardeners ask me about growI sometimes have to pause and come ing heirloom vegetables and flowers. To back to reality. be honest, I try to grow only heirloom Now, I’m not knocking the gardenvarieties. Not that I’m a gardening snob ing catalog—far from it. As you know, or anything, but heirloom vegetables and the selection of plants at a local garden flowers offer a broad range of colors and center can be limited. Sometimes, they are just the same varieties year after year. flavors, many not seen in hybrid varieties. The downside is they The big advantage of ordertend to be less resistant to dising from the catalogs is that eases and pests. However, I you can get exactly the varithink the tradeoff is worth takety you want, and you can ing. try some new varieties that Catalogs are usually the sound interesting, too. only option for finding a wide Ordering seeds is an inexselection of heirloom seeds. pensive way to try new So, you may be wondering plants, but do your research. Southern what catalogs I order from. I Some plants, like tomatoes, Gardening spread my seed purchases need to be started inside for by Dr. Gary Bachman around maybe 12 different six to eight weeks before catalogs, but my main, go-to transplanting. For the novice gardener, this is important infor- catalogs are Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, Johnny’s Selected Seeds and Seeds mation. of Change. Of course, this is not an allI find growing new selections or inclusive recommendation, so be sure to some old favorites an extremely satisfytry your favorite catalogs. ing gardening endeavor. One last bit of advice about catalogs: Whenever I’m sowing seeds, I marvel They tend be full of jargon such as deterat the potential contained in that seed. From a single, tiny seed, I could be har- minate or indeterminate, bush or pole, open pollenated or F1 hybrid, etc. A vesting 10 to 20 pounds of tomatoes in good garden terminology guide I recomthree months. The catalogs also allow home garden- mend is “Garden-Pedia: An A to Z Guide to Gardening Terms.” This book ers to select and grow varieties that can help you sort out what you want and ripen at different rates and times so the make the garden jargon understandable. whole garden doesn’t have to be harvested all at once. I grow my Ocean Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Springs vegetable garden using a succesExtension and research professor of hortision strategy, meaning I always have culture at the Mississippi State University something new ripening all through the Coastal Research and Extension Center in year. Ordering seed through the year Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern can help you establish a gardening Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@ecm.coop. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Gypsy Queen Burial Commemoration, Feb. 4, Meridian. Commemorates 1915 death of Gypsy Queen Kelly Mitchell with storytellers in period costume; 2 p.m. Rose Hill Cemetery. Details: 601-681-8525. Chili Cook-off and Family Fun Day, Feb. 4, Hattiesburg. Chili, burgers, dogs, desserts, inflatables, kids workshop, bake sale, silent auction. Benefits Hope For Hattiesburg home repair ministry. First Presbyterian Church. Details: HopeForHattiesburg.org. Shape Note Singing Workshop, Feb. 8, Florence. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; second Wednesday monthly; 6-8 p.m. Free. Details: 601-953-1094. Prentiss Institute Alumni Valentine Gala, Feb. 11, Prentiss. Admission; 6-9 p.m. Rosenwald Building. Details: 601-847-1984, 601-249-5643. 52nd Annual Dixie National Livestock Show and Rodeo, Feb. 2-19 (livestock shows), 9-15 (rodeo), Jackson. Entertainers, professional rodeo, parade, farm expo, farriers’ competition, more. Mississippi Coliseum. Admission. Details: DixieNational.org. The McKameys in Concert, Feb. 17, Petal. Love offering; 7 p.m. First Baptist Church of Runnelstown. Details: 601-583-3733. Katt Williams: “Great American” Tour, Feb. 17, Southaven. Landers Center; 8 p.m. Details: 662-470-2131; ticketmaster.com. Eric Church: “Holdin’ My Own” Tour, Feb. 18, Southaven. Landers Center; 8 p.m. Details: 662-470-2131; ticketmaster.com. Southern Strings 10th Dulcimer Festival and Deep South Dulcimer Championship, Feb. 17-18, Hattiesburg. Workshops for all skill levels. Hammered and mountain dulcimer, beginner psaltery and beginner fiddle. Admission. William Carey University. Details: 601-583-6424; MississippiDulcimer.com. Arbor Day Native Plant Sale, Feb. 18, Picayune. Native trees and shrubs; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free Admission. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. Big Pop Gun Show, Feb. 18-19, Greenville. Buy, sell, trade, appraisals. Display will revert

to “On” as it reheats; when “Hot” appears again, flip chicken.Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. Roosevelt State Park Music Festival, Feb. 23-25, Morton. Live bluegrass, gospel and country music. Admission. Livingston Performing Arts Center. Details: 601-5373641, 601-672-9046. A Celebration of Aldo Leopold, Feb. 25, Picayune. Readings from “Sand County Almanac” and “Green Fire” film viewing and discussion. Registration fee. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu. 58th Annual Gem, Mineral, Fossil and Jewelry Show, Feb. 25-26, Jackson. More than 25 dealers, lapidary arts demos, exhibits, children’s activities, more. Admission. Mississippi Trade Mart. Details: 601-344-8171; rock2lanes@gmail.com; MissGems.org. 16th Annual Starkville Farm Toy Show, Feb. 24-25, Starkville. Buy, sell, trade or talk toy tractors. Mississippi National Guard Armory. Details: 601-562-8859, 662-7693107; Facebook: Starkville Farm Toy Show. Shape Note Singing Workshop, March 2, Jackson. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Miss. Ag Museum. Details: 601-953-1094. 27th Annual Greenhouse Tomato Short Course, March 7-8, Raymond. Expert speakers present seminars on topics relevant to greenhouse tomato production. Registration fee. Eagle Ridge Conference Center. Details: 601892-3731; Rick.Snyder@msstate.edu. Mississippi Bluegrass Reunion, March 911, Purvis. Featured acts include Ralph II, Kevin Prater Band, Driskill Mountain Boys, more. RV hookups. Admission. Lamar County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-408-5965. City-wide Rummage Sale, March 11, Laurel. More than 100 families; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Good Samaritan receives unsold items. Free admission. Magnolia Center, fairgrounds. Details: 601-319-6086; MyRummageSales.com. Big Pop Gun Show, March 11-12, Jackson. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com.

‘Picture This’ explores country roads Country roads take us home in our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Send us your photos of scenic rural roadways (paved or not) anywhere in Mississippi. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is March 17.

Submission guidelines • Submit as many photos as you like, but select only photos in super-sharp focus. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos eligible for publication may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the date appearing on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by iden-

tifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Be sure to include the name of the town or county where your country road is located. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

How to submit photos Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Or, mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@ecm.coop. Photographers whose photos are selected for publication are eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December.


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Customer Rating

99

$59

$

METRIC ITEM 42305 69044/63171

YOUR CHOICE

SUPER COUPON

$599

7999$129.99 comp at

8

$ 99 comp at

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 4 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase must be purchases after 30 days ansferable. Original coupon Non-tr last. s er supplie per custom per day. Offer good while h 6/5/17. Limit one coupon presented. Valid throug

$14.97

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $70

MECHANIC'S CHOICE SHOP TOWELS - PACK OF 50

ITEM 61258 shown 61840/68146 Customer Rating 61297/63476

SUPER COUPON

$999

comp at

$119.99

ITEM 63365/63360 shown

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

44", 13 DRAWER INDUSTRIAL QUALITYT ROLLER CABINE

SUPER COUPON

99

$134 $

199

99

HarborFreight.com

• Weighs 245 lbs.

ITEM 69387 62744/63271 68784 shown

SAVE $330

SUPER COUPON

$

$349 $ 37999

$17.98

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

3 PIECE DECORATIVE SOLAR LED LIGHTS ITEM 60561 69462 shown

SAVE 35%

7 99

$ 99 $

$679.99 .com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. original 800-423-2567. Cannot original purchase withl coupon must be from days 30 after Origina purchases s last. Non-transferable. per day. er supplie custom while per good Offer h 6/5/17. Limit one coupon presented. Valid throug

• 800-423-2567

1299

99

comp at

comp at

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase Original coupon must ble. purchases after 30 days ansfera Non-tr last. s per customer per day. Offer good while supplie coupon one Limit . 6/5/17 h presented. Valid throug

SAVE 44%

comp at

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 4 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase l coupon must be Origina ble. purchases after 30 days s last. Non-transfera er per day. custom per Offer good while supplie coupon h 6/5/17. Limit one presented. Valid throug

ITEM 69684 shown 61969/61970

$339

17999 1

ITEM 97214

SUPER

comp at

700+ Stores Nationwide

$

3-POINT QUICK HITCH • 2000 lb. capacity • 27-3/16" Clearance

comp at

99 99 $49 $ 8999 19$49

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

$283.50

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

comp at

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$149

comp at

62873/68239 shown

Includes one 18V NiCd battery and charger.

Customer Rating

Blade sold separately.

$169 99 $ 99 57 $19999 $45 $59.99 99

SAVE 65%

99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $296

99

18 VOLT CORDLESS 3/8" DRILL/DRIVER WITH 2500 LB. ELECTRIC KEYLESS CHUCK WINCH WITH WIRELESS ITEM 69651/62868 REMOTE CONTROL

$281.87

. Cannot or by calling 800-423-2567 stores, HarborFreight.com 30 days from original LIMIT 4 - Good at our nt or coupon or prior purchases after ansferable. Original while supplies last. Non-tr be used with other discou per day. good er Offer . custom per receipt purchase with original ted. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon coupon must be presen

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

comp at

$79.99

Customer Rating

$ 99

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

99

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

4

comp at

17999 $269

$8.48

17 FT. TYPE I A MULTI-TASK LADDER

SUPER COUPON

Tools sold separately.

$2

SUPER COUPON

ITEM 63371/69262 63372/63424 61916/2745 shown

19"

Customer Rating

$9999

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 64%

$55.82

LOW-PROFILE CREEPER " 40

2499

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

99

comp at

comp at

$

ITEM 69091/61454 61693/62803 Customer Rating 67847 shown

comp at

SUPER COUPON

69512 shown

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

2.5 HP, 21 GALLON 125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR

$52999 $59 5 999

ITEM 69249/69115/69137 69129/69121/877 shown

$14

ITEM

SUPER COUPON

68530/6308 • 76 dB ITEM 1/63 085 shown Noise 6967 68525/69677 ITEM l Leve 63087/63088 IA ONLY SUPER COUPON CALIFORN

99

HOLDS UP TO 176 LBS.

1 TON CAPACITY P CRANE FOLDABLE SHO6944 5/61858

SUPER COUPON 7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ® TON ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RAPID PUMP 1.5 K UM RACING JAC RESISTANT TARP ALUMIN 68053/62160/69252

SUPER COUPON

EEN HOLDS FLAT SCR HES TVs UP TO 70 INC

ER SUPER SUP PON COUPON COU

SUPER COUPON

61807 shown

comp at

$69.99

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

$999

TILTING FLAT PANEL TV MOUNT SAVE ITEM 62289

4 99 49

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase Original coupon must ble. purchases after 30 days ansfera Non-tr s last. per customer per day. Offer good while supplie coupon one Limit . h 6/5/17 presented. Valid throug

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

$

7

SAVE $469

Wheel kit and battery sold separately.

ITEM 60581/60653 shown

VALUE

comp at

$17.99 LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

$2999

$ 97

SUPER COUPON 8750 PEAK/ 7000 RUNNING WATTS 13 HP (420 CC) GAS GENERATORS6

10 FT. x 20 FT. PORTABLE CAR CANOPY

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $169

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Bauer, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Hercules, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, StormCat, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17.

SAVE 57%

6 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET ITEM 62728/62583 47770/62570 shown

ANY SINGLE ITEM

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 77%

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

Today in Mississippi

11

comp at

$12.42

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store

item or a "comp at" advertised should be associate.

I

19



Today in Mississippi February 2017 Northcentral