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East Mississippi Electric Power Association

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Nuts and bolts: Chic King’s decorative welded bowls

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Visit to Holy Land sites an emotional experience

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

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Mississippi a fertile market for fruit, vegetable producers

Chic King


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June 2012 I Today in Mississippi

The real value of electricity owadays, cell phones and personal digital devices are a part of our culture. Everyone, it seems, is connected on the go— whether they’re just making phone calls, text messaging, or checking email. Such communication freedom is a luxury we pay for, generally without grumbling. So why is it that when it comes to electricity—a necessity in our modern world—many of us grumble and complain when the electric bill comes every month? We expect electricity to be there at the flip of the switch, and when it’s not, we get angry or frustrated. Hey, I’m no different—I expect the lights to come on every time, too. And as the CEO of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, I have a special responsibility to make sure your electric service is safe, reliable and affordable. But I also believe that when compared to other commodities, electricity remains a great value. For example, over the past 10 years, gasoline has shot up 10.9 percent on average every single year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. A loaf of white bread has increased 4.2 percent annually, and a dozen eggs 6.5 percent per year. In comparison, electricity has increased just 3.7 percent a year nationally for the past decade. When you consider how reliable electricity is, the value goes up even more. Electric power association members experience a low power outage rate each year—something we’re proud of, considering electricity is a 24-hour-a-day commodity. Of course, we’re working hard to reduce even brief interruptions, increase our service reliability and control costs through innovative technology. Those cell phones I mentioned earlier? Nearly a third of all U.S. households have four electronic devices, such as cell phones, plugged in and charging, according to the Residential Energy Consumption Survey by the U.S. Energy

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On the cover Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association member Chic King welds decorative bowls using new and vintage pieces of hardware. An avid tinkerer, King collects parts from antique mule-drawn plows to make some of his favorite bowls. Meet King and see his unique artworks on page 4.

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Our Homeplace

My Opinion Michael Callahan Executive Vice President/CEO EPAs of Mississippi

Information Administration. In the past 30 years, the amount of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics has increased from 17 percent to 31 percent. More homes than ever use major appliances and central air conditioning. Digital video recorders (DVRs), computers, and multiple televisions have become ubiquitous. Clearly, our appetite for electricity shows no signs of slowing down. So the next time you flip a switch, use your toaster or run your washing machine, remember the value electricity holds. And know that your electric power association—a locally owned, member-owned cooperative—is looking out for you. The folks at your cooperative work every day to keep electric bills affordable, control costs through innovation and put you, our members, first. ••• Oppressive summertime heat has arrived. Now more than ever, electric power association members should be conscious of their energy use. Take steps now to lessen the impact of summertime energy bills on the budget. We want your electric service to remain affordable so we do our part to control costs in every way possible. But you can exert control over costs yourself by using electricity more efficiently. Contact your electric power association for specific ways to reduce your energy use without sacrificing comfort this summer.

Today in Mississippi

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

O N FAC E B O O K Vol. 65 No. 6

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi

OFFICERS

EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is 601-605-8600 published eleven times a year (Jan.Acceptance of advertising by Today in Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi does not imply endorsement Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeof the advertised product or services by land, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Power Associations. Product satisfaction Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical EDITORIAL STAFF and delivery responsibility lie solely with postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and Michael Callahan - Executive Vice President/CEO the advertiser. additional office. The publisher (and/or Ron Stewart - Senior Vice President, Co-op Services • National advertising representative: its agent) reserves the right to refuse or Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services National Country Market, 800-626-1181 edit all advertising. Jay Swindle - Manager, Advertising POSTMASTER: Send address changes Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Circulation of this issue: 431,758 to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS Abby Berry - Communications Specialist Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year 39158-3300 Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Visit us at: Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

Darrell Smith - President Kevin Doddridge - First Vice President Brad Robison - Second Vice President Wayne Henson - Secretary/Treasurer

www.todayinmississippi.com

Farmers markets across Mississippi are filling with homegrown fruits and vegetables as fast as producers can pick them. Many also offer fresh eggs, dairy products, herbs and homemade preserves and jams. Shopping at a farmers market is good for your health and the local economy. Discover how to use locally grown peaches in a chicken salad recipe on page 14. Read more about farmers markets throughout Mississippi on page 15.

Mississippi is . . . Church on Sunday, dinner on the ground, Come on children, gather ‘round. Dumplin’s, greens, corn and peas, Pass that pie, if you please. Freckled faces, skinned knees, Cane poles, climbin’ trees. Chickens scratchin’, biddies hatchin’, Roosters crowin’, cows a-lowin’. Red dirt roads, pine trees, Mississippi, it’s home to me! — Angela Palmer Guy, Richton My Mississippi is looking out our kitchen window with my granddaughter, Danielle, and watching the hummingbirds feed from the feeders she hung on the pine trees. Waiting for family from Georgia and Louisiana so we can all go to the crab festival in the Bay in July. Shopping, ball games on Friday night and church on Sunday morning for the peaceful feeling that we belong. — Patricia O’Brien Turner, Bay St. Louis

What’s Mississippi to you? What makes you proud to be a Mississippian? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Please keep your comments brief and send them to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or email them to news@epaofms.com. Submissions are subject to editing for space and clarity.

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Chic King’s welded bowls hold memories of a time when plows were pulled by mules and metals were forged by hand.

King will use these trace chains, mule bits, hub rings, hooks, swivels—most from old mule-drawn plows—as components in future welded bowls. Among the hand-forged pieces are interesting variations in shape and design.

‘To think about how people used to have to work, it’s hard to believe. It would take them an hour just to hook up the plow. The first thing would be catching the mule. The mule knows what’s going on and he’s thinking, man, I don’t want that thing on me.’ — Chic King

By Debbie Stringer The first thing you’ll notice about Chic King’s handmade metal bowls is their beauty. But a closer look reveals their surprising makeup: King assembles them from various pieces of hardware and tools, both antique and modern, all welded together in a thoughtful process that elevates them from the commonplace to the artful. Working at his neatly organized home shop in the hills near Yazoo City, King builds metal bowls measuring around 15 inches in diameter. Some are boldly geometric, made of metal washers, nuts, bolts and hand tools to evoke a feel of industrial precision. But his favorite bowls couldn’t be more different. Their highly irregular, free-form designs emerge from a mix of chain links, buckles, bits, swivels, hooks and other hardware from mule-drawn plows of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most of the pieces were forged by hand on a blacksmith’s anvil. King, a member of Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association, is an avid tinkerer and collector of old tools, hardware, petrified wood, old whiskey jugs, scrap metal and other items that rouse his imagination or curiosity. By day he works at a chemical plant in Yazoo City. In 2000, when his wife, Kathy, gave him a chain saw wheel for his grinder, King ventured into woodworking. He came up with a naturalistic design for a decorative vessel by gouging dead limbs, old cedar fence posts and cut firewood while retaining the woods’ natural contours and colors. “I think the uglier the piece of wood, the prettier it wound up being,” King said. King’s skill as a woodworker earned him membership in the Craftsmen’s Guild of Mississippi. One day, King saw a photograph of a simple bowl made of metal washers welded together. “I thought, I


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Hub rings from old buggies form the base of two of King’s chain-link bowls, above and left. Other components are bits, buckles, hooks and chains, all from old mule-drawn plows. For the bowl at right, King used modern nuts and washers. His bowls measure about 15 inches in diameter.

can do that. Then I got to thinking I was copying somebody else and I wanted to do something different,” he said. King took his own version of the bowl to the next level by welding together a mix of hardware types and even hand tools. Then he hit upon another idea. King has always been drawn to objects that show wear from hard use over time. So why not use his pieces of old, worn plow parts for a bowl instead of shiny new washers? These rustic chain-link bowls, as he calls them, hold a special meaning for King. Their components are the relics of manual farm labor, tangible evidence of the hardships endured by the small farmer when man and

thinking, man, I don’t want that thing on me,” King said. “Somebody got up every day, hitched up that mule, went down a little trail or road to a half-acre field to plow. And on the way, he used a kaiser blade to clear the right of way and keep the brush from taking over his field.” Fingering the links of a hand-forged chain pocked by rust and distorted from hard use, King speculated about its history. “This chain, the way it’s worn out, could have been used to pull a wagon from Virginia to Mississippi when somebody settled here.” Making a bowl from metal in such poor condition is a tedious, labor-intensive process King called a “total pain.” He needs about 100 pieces to make a bowl, and each one requires special attention—cleaning, rust removal and, in some cases, repair—before it can be welded. “But when I’ve finally got a pile of junk to work with, it’s fun,” King said, grinning. King uses an inverted woodturning bowl blank as a form on which to shape his bowls. He improvises feet from twisted chain links or hooks, which he bolts to the blank until the bowl is completely welded. (He may choose instead to make a base from a small hub ring from an old buggy.) King begins a bowl by bolting old plow hooks to an inverted woodturning bowl blank. WorkThen, working toward the bowl’s rim, ing outward, he arranges chain links and hardware on the blank. After he joins the pieces he continues adding hardware and chain with a wire welder, he will remove the bolts. The hooks will serve as the bowl’s feet. links, making design choices and welding as he goes. mule toiled together to subsist in rural Mississippi. Rings from a mule bit become handles, and a length “To think about how people used to have to work, of chain usually forms the rim. it’s hard to believe. It would take them an hour just to The final touch is an application of polyurethane hook up the plow. The first thing would be catching spray. the mule. The mule knows what’s going on and he’s

King’s most productive sources for old hardware is The Old Store, in Bovina, and local junkyards that deal in scrap iron. “I’m a junkyard junkie. I go about every Friday,” he said. But finding parts is becoming more difficult. “The way it used to be at junkyards, it was all man operated. Now, when a guy pulls up with a truck load of scrap iron, a big magnet will pick it up and throw it in a big pile. Nobody sees the neat little pieces in there that are just being thrown away.” King exhibited his metal bowls for the first time at the 2011 Chimneyville Crafts Festival, in Jackson. Only shoppers of a certain age recognized the mule bits welded into his bowls. “The young people think it’s pretty and neat, but they don’t see the significance of the piece that used to be in a mule’s mouth, and [understand] how somebody had to walk behind that mule.” King has yet to see other handmade bowls similar to his chain-link versions, and he believes he knows why. “I don’t think anybody else would go to this much trouble.” Chic King’s bowls are available in the gallery at the Mississippi Craft Center, in Ridgeland. He will exhibit natural wood and metal bowls Nov. 30 - Dec. 2 at the 2012 Chimneyville Crafts Festival, in Jackson. For more information, or if you have old plow or buggy parts to discard, call King at 662-571-4100 or 662-746-7463.


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Trying my hand at growing Grandma’s ‘shellybeans’ o one has ever accused me, even in kidding, of being a master gardener. Now, I do raise some things—lots of flowers and even some stuff we can eat. Mostly tomatoes. But this year for some reason I got carried away and decided I wanted a garden. Nothing giant. So I staked of a plot in a sunny place in the side yard and my son-in-law Brad brought over his tiller to break it up for me. Actually he broke up about twice what I marked off. So when it gets choked with grass I’m blaming Brad for making it too big. Shortly after I Mississippi got my little bare Seen spot rowed up and by Walt Grayson about halfway planted, I went early one morning to Noxubee County and met Gene Moore, who calls Shuqualak his home. He took me see 89-year-old Christiana Clark for a story I’m doing for “Mississippi Roads” about how her farm is nearly self-sufficient. And it probably could be if her son Joe hadn’t fallen in love with all the cows they’ve raised. Now he doesn’t have the heart to transfer any of them from the pasture to the freezer. He has about 30 head of pets now. But Joe does milk every morning. Between him and the calf, he gets to take home enough for Mrs. Clark to make butter every other day. Across the road they already have potatoes big enough to eat. Huge onions and garlic. Tomatoes, of course. Mrs. Clark told me of another world that existed here in Mississippi just a couple of generations ago when things like gardens weren’t hobbies. They were a necessity of life. You had to have a garden in order to eat. She told me there were good points about those days but quickly added that she didn’t want to have to live like that again. I envied her garden. Not a blade of grass in it anywhere. I am trying an experiment in my garden to see if some grass growing will keep the roots of the

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Christiana Clark of Noxubee County works her garden nowadays because she wants to, not because she has to in order to live, like it was years ago. And not a blade of grass in it! I started to ask how she kept it so clean but I was afraid she'd hand me a hoe and let me learn first hand. Photo: Walt Grayson

vegetables cooler, helping them grow better. But there is one kind of bean I want to make sure I grow successfully in my garden this year. Even though I just set them out the other day, I noticed yesterday that they are already coming up. These particular beans have been in my family for generations. Grandmother called them shellybeans. My brother-inlaw, Hank, who lives in North Carolina, sent me enough of the beans a few years ago to get a stand going for myself. They’ve been in the freezer until just a few days ago. I was relieved that they would still grow. Some of my ancestors discovered these beans in the wild when they were hired to accompany the Trail of Tears. When they got back home, they packed up and moved to northeast Mississippi, where they had found these beans. Fortunately they gathered plenty of the beans and planted them because the beans never came back in the wild again. But Grandmother cooked them every time we went to her house. And I haven’t had them since my last aunt died. So although I don’t have to have a garden in order to live (and I hope it

doesn’t kill me to try to keep this one up this summer along with all the other stuff I have to do), I am a little excited to be reviving a part of my past with four rows of the bean that brought my family to Mississippi to begin with.

Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” To contact Grayson, send email to walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Thursday, July 12 11:00am 2:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Stay at Dancing Rabbit Inn for packages that include discounted

Gates Open R.J. & Jay Paul from “Swamp People” Chief Phyliss J. Anderson and Guests Steve Azar Chris Cagle World Series Stickball

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The Holy Land belongs to the world n May I wrote a column called Dome of the Rock. Only Muslims about the lighter side of are allowed inside. They think MohamIsrael. This month I will give mad ascended into Heaven from that more detail and comment spot. Our tour group told us to leave our on my inner feelings regard- Bibles in the bus and hide our crosses as ing our trip there. Since Mr. we entered this area. Roy and I were there in FebruMt. Mariah is the area ary, we’ve had over three where Abraham was told by months to reflect on the holy God to sacrifice Isaac. But sites that the Bible describes. the Muslims believe it was We’ve discussed and retraced Ishmael he was to sacrifice. our journey by studying phoIf we had to choose an tographs and our journals. area that touched us the Most people make mental most spiritually and emoGrin ‘n’ pictures of places they read tionally, it was around the Bare It about, and the Bible is no Sea of Galilee, where our by Kay Grafe exception. What would Lord spent most of his life impress and touch one person on earth. Eighty percent of might not affect another the same way. his ministry took place there. Dr. Britt, Mr. Roy and I tried to decide what we our guide, said that the Galilee area had liked best but soon realized that wasn’t not changed as radically as Jerusalem. the approach to take. The Holy Land Churches were built over most holy trip was not like a vacation. This was the areas to protect the sites. We visited the actual birthplace of Christ, where His Church of the Nativity that marks the ministry took place and where He died place of Jesus’ birth. Also, the Church of for our sins. the Holy Sepulcher marks one of the In the midst of Christianity in Israel, places where most scholars think He was we rubbed shoulders with Judaism and crucified and buried. We also saw the Islam religions. We saw where people Garden Tomb, the other location where lived and watched diverse factions coexsome believe He was crucified and ist. I finally comprehended that some of buried. the Christian holy sites were also Jewish The churches were decorated with and Muslim holy sites. huge ornate columns and statues of marFor example, on the high ground ble, art work and chandeliers that were called Mt. Mariah in Jerusalem where awesome, though it took away my ability the two Jewish temples were destroyed, to visualize Jesus on the cross. I underone by the Babylonians and one by the stand the need to protect and mark Romans, the Muslims built a temple important places.

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I had a feeling of contentment in Jerusalem as we strolled around the Garden of Gethsemane and walked up the Mount of Olives. We stood in the courtyard of the Palace of the High Priest where Peter denied knowing Jesus three times. We looked down the hill from the courtyard toward the Kidron Valley at the stone walkway that dated back to Christ’s time. He would have walked on those very stones going to and from the Temple. Here we walked, and my tears fell. In Jerusalem, Constantine’s mother made certain that the holy sites were marked and creditable. The city has been in constant habitation for 5,000 years. No other city has been the cause of so many armed conflicts. It was totally destroyed two times, besieged 23 times and captured and recaptured 44 times. In Jerusalem we walked the Via DolorRosa, the narrow road where Jesus carried the cross. Several in our tour group floated in the Dead Sea. I waded and picked up salt crystals. A few of us climbed to the summit of Masada; others took a tram. Herod’s excavated palace was on Masada. The Zealot Jews were trapped there. They

Visiting the Sea of Galilee area was the most moving experience of our Holy Land tour.

held out for three years before the Romans completed a ramp and entered, but the Jews committed suicide rather than be captured. From Masada we visited Qumran, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found. The places our Lord ministered near Galilee gave me a peaceful feeling I’d never felt before. When I was standing above the Sea of Galilee, my eyes roamed over water, hills and valleys that looked much like they did 2,000 years ago. I pictured Christ teaching the Sermon on the Mount to thousands. We stood on the shore where He told his disciples to put their net on the other side of the boat. This was His third appearance to the disciples after he arose. The large rock he used as a table was imbedded in the earth next to where he cooked the fish for them. Mr. Roy and I said a prayer and laid our hands on the rock. I enjoyed wading in the Sea of Galilee and floating in a boat on the beautiful blue water. The sea is actually a large lake, 13 miles long and 7.5 miles wide. There’s so much more to tell, but I must close. The Holy Land trip was a life-changing experience for Mr. Roy and me. Note: Thank you, American Business Women’s Association, for your invitation to speak in Hattiesburg. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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… invites you to enjoy Life on the Mississippi The Key To History Step back in time as you walk the homes and hallways of history. Immerse yourself in vivid portraits of the past and explore the history of our country as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War’s Siege of Vicksburg at America’s most monumented military park.

The Key To SHOPPING Vicksburg offers an abundance of specialty shops throughout the city. You will find incredible bargains and selections at the Outlets at Vicksburg and Vicksburg Mall as well as a host of shops and restaurants in our Downtown Historic District.

The Key To ENTERTAINMENT Venues throughout Vicksburg present a wide variety of musical entertainment. Get up close and personal with Old Man River on a cruise on the mighty Mississippi. Enjoy the excitement of waterfront casinos.

www.keytothesouth.com www.facebook.com/visitvicksburg @VisitVicksburg Scan the QR code to visit Vicksburg's mobile site.


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Try Million Bells in landscape, container illion Bells is one of my hot and humid summer months of favorite flowering plants Million Bells. Million Bells are suitable for both in the early summer. I the landscape and containers and think you’ll find this will create landscape interest wherevplant to be a good choice for the summer landscape in your er they are grown. They are easy to care for in hanging baskets, Mississippi garden. containers and landscape Million Bells are known borders, or as accent botanically as Calibrachoa, ground covers in small and you may see them called areas. by either name in garden Million Bells is a tender centers. Regardless of what perennial that may overname they go by, you need winter in coastal to have some of these garden Southern Mississippi. During the past performers in your landscape. Gardening few winters, I heard of one Million Bells cannot be by Dr. Gary Bachman garden center where Million Bells tolerated sevbeat for full-sun locations eral freezes in large, unprotected where even petunias seem to fade out containers. later in the summer. In full sun, the If you are planting Million Bells plant will live up to its name by producin the landscape, amend the soil ing an unbelievable number of colorful flowers approaching an inch in diameter. using 3 inches of organic matter These SuperBells Cherry Blossom are an excellent selection of Million Bells, which thrive in full-sun locations and produce an unbelievable number of colorful flowers. Petchoa, such as this Neon Rose, is a hybrid that combines petunias’ vigorous growth and large flowto improve drainage. Finish the The plants grow up to 10 inches tall ers with Million Bells’ prolific flower production and tolerance of tough growing conditions. Photo: MSU Extension Service/Gary planting with a good bark mulch and have trailing stems that will spread Bachman to create a beautiful groundcover mat or to keep the soil cool, slow evaporation and retain moisture. This sprawl over the edge of containers or only light fertilization using a couple with a 20-10-20 or 20-20-20 water-soluhanging baskets. If the plant gets a little plant may actually thrive on a little neg- tablespoons of good, slow-release fertiliz- ble fertilizer. This helps keep the plants’ lect. Water only when the top of the soil er. This controlled-release fertilizer will out of hand, prune it to generate more prodigious flower production going feels dry. Too much water can lead to growth and, more importantly, more maintain floral production in the landstrong. root rot problems, especially when plant- scape. flowers. It will tolerate part shade, but Dr. Gary Bachman is MSU ed in the landscape. flower production will decrease accordWhen growing them in containers or horticulturist at the Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. In the landscape, Million Bells needs ing to the level of shade. hanging baskets, feed every other week Many selections of Million Bells are marketed under different series names. All are available in shades of blue, violet, purple, magenta, red, orange, bronze, yellow and white. Though it puts on a show of literally hundreds of flowers, deadheading is not required, as the plant is self-cleaning. Million Bells do not grow as vigorously as petunias, but they tolerate the summer heat better and have few insect pests. Unlike petunias, the leaves of Million Bells are not sticky. They also tolerate drought better and have a bushier and more compact growth habit than do petunias. Plant breeders have been hard at work and have introduced a really wonderful Million Bells hybrid called Petchoa. This hybrid has all of the best growing traits from both Million Bells and petunia. Petchoa has the vigorous growth and large flowers of petunias; it also has prolific flower production and high tolerance of tough growing conditions in the

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Louisville 662.773.5741

Meridian 601.581.8600

Quitman 601.776.6271

DeKalb 601.743.2641

Preparation, power and community e all remember August 2005 when Hurricane Katrina came barreling through our state. I know I sure do, and I know the rest of the folks at East Mississippi Electric Power Association do as well. But that was almost seven years ago, and, even with the tragic tornadoes we experienced last April, it’s easy to get caught in complacency. At EMEPA, we work continuously to stay prepared for major disasters and provide our members with a safe and quick response. We revise, update and improve our disaster preparedness manuals each year. We make advanced contacts with contractors in January each year and have standing arrangements with other electric cooperatives around the country to provide proper assistance in the case of a major disaster. Additionally, we run emergency practice drills with the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi every year to prepare for various types of natural disasters ranging from hurricanes and tornadoes to earthquakes. We maintain many pieces of specialized equipment vital to power restoration efforts following a major disaster; however, equipment cannot replace well trained, experienced and committed employees. The employees at EMEPA are the most crucial element of our successful response and restoration during these times of urgent need. They are your neighbors, your friends, your allies. They care about your local community because it’s their community too. Hopefully, we won’t need all these preparations, but it’s prudent to prepare. To stay safe after a major storm or natural disaster strikes, we urge you to develop a family action plan. Designate a place for everyone to meet after an event. Map out ways to evacuate your home. Create a laminated card with emergency contact names and numbers for

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each family member. Consider listing a relative or friend who lives far from your community as the point of contact—if your family gets separated, that person can let others know who is safe. Until the light switch doesn’t work anymore, we often take for granted the quality of life we enjoy. When a major weather disaster strikes our community, it’s no longer a simple task to pump gas or run to the grocery store. And we share our community with victims from around the state. But, I’ve seen from experience, that we also share our compassion, our willingness to bring aid to those victims and our overall spirit of community. It’s not hard to understand why safety remains a top priority for EMEPA —working Wayne Henson, around electricity is a life-or-death situation General Manager/ CEO every day for many of our employees. As a result, we work hard to instill a culture of safety that our folks can take home with them and live 24/7. We also strive to raise safety awareness among EMEPA members. Visit your local EMEPA office from June 4 to June 8 during Severe Weather Safety Week, look for safety tips in Today in A dispatcher will remain on duty Mississippi each to respond to emergency calls. month, and check emepa.com for more information.

East Mississippi Electric Power Association

offices will be closed Wednesday, July 4, in observance of Independence Day.


Compassion worth a million By Jessica Nester In 2001, as Aline Haynes, of Winston County, watched Thanksgiving Day lunch being served to communities in need on television, a thought crossed her mind, “I could do this for my community.” After many sleepless nights and much prayer, Haynes knew it was the right thing to do. Starting in 2002, this idea began to weigh heavy on her heart, and she began writing down the things she would need like green beans, turkey and dressing. Haynes found it difficult at first to sacrifice her holiday, but she knew that there are people with no family that can be lonely on a day like Thanksgiving. During the month of October 2002, the plan started to develop. She saved $1,000 from ironing clothes and used the money as a start for her

Above: Aline Haynes has won several awards for her community service including Winston County’s Woman of the Year.

Above: Haynes and her family have been feeding and bringing aid to the needy in their community for over ten years.

Thanksgiving luncheon. After writing letters to individuals, businesses and churches in her community seeking donations, she received enough money to fund the event only having to spend $200 of her own money. That Thanksgiving over 800 individuals were

served and delivered a meal in Winston County. Ten years later, Haynes and more than 200 volunteers feed 1,520 people during the annual Thanksgiving Day “Feed The One Thousand” event. Although Haynes’ luncheon is the

most popular event she organizes, she does not stop there. She has often opened her home to sell plate lunches as fundraisers. In the past 10 years, she has raised over $1 million for families and individuals in need. The money is raised to help families with van repairs, home fire replacements, unpaid bills due to unemployment, sickness, medical and construction costs, just to list a few. Haynes is recognized for her stewardship throughout Winston County, winning several awards including Winston County’s 2007 Woman of the Year and the NAACP’s Vernon Dahmer Award for outstanding service to her community. Haynes’ volunteerism has opened many doors for her ministry, as well as allowed her to get to know the needs in her community. Most of the food needed for her community service is cooked in Aline’s family kitchen. Her oldest daughter says she is trying to learn how to cook

June 2012 I Today in Mississippi

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the meals too. “My mom always tells my little sister and me about how important it is to treat other people right –– in the best way we can,” says Chastidy in an essay she wrote about her mom entitled “A Dedicated Servant.” Haynes youngest daughter Kiaa writes, “My mom is always more concerned about others than herself. I sometimes ask her why she cares so much, and her answer is always that Jesus wants us to deny ourselves for others.” Although she spends a lot of time volunteering, Haynes also works to support her family. She is quick to remind people that she could not do this on her own. “It was a calling, and only through God am I able to carry out these events every year,” says Haynes. She also gives thanks for churches that allow her to host her events, as well as those that donate their time and money. Aline Haynes has truly earned the respect and admiration of all those she’s touched, both directly and indirectly, for her kindness, compassion and dedication to the people in her community.


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Today in Mississippi I June 2012

Thunder and lightning rolling your way? Weather summer storms safely with these helpful tips June is here and with it come potentially dangerous summer storms. At East Mississppi Electric Power Association (EMEPA), we want to remind our members about summer storm safety. All thunderstorms produce lightning and all have the potential for danger. Those dangers can include tornadoes, strong winds, hail, wildfires and flash flooding, which is responsible for more fatalities than any other thunderstormrelated hazard.

In the United States, lightning kills 300 people and injures 80 on average each year. In the United States, lightning kills 300 people and injures 80 on average each year. And lightning's risk to individuals and property increases because of its

unpredictability—it often strikes outside of heavy rainfall, up to 10 miles away. “During the summer months, summer storms can occur suddenly,” said Wayne Henson, general manager of EMEPA. “Even though these storms may not last long, they still have the potential of producing dangerous lightning, high winds and other hazards.” Ready America, a national public service campaign from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), champions the 30/30 Lightning Safety Rule. Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder. It’s also important to be familiar with the terms used to identify thunderstorm hazards. For instance, a thunderstorm watch means there is a possibility of a thunderstorm in your area. A thunderstorm warning means a thunderstorm is

What can I do to prepare? • Learn about your local community’s emergency warning system for severe thunderstorms. • Discuss thunderstorm safety with all members of your household. • Pick a safe place in your home for household members to gather during a thunderstorm. This should be away from windows, skylights and glass doors that could be broken by strong winds or hail. • Make a list of items to bring inside in the event of a severe thunderstorm. • Protect your animals by ensuring that any outside buildings that house them are protected in the same way as your home. • Put together an emergency preparedness kit: water, food (non-perishable), flashlight (battery powered), first aid kit, medications and medical items, sanitation/personal hygiene items, cell phones (with chargers), family/emergency contact information, copies of personal documents and extra cash. • Get trained in first aid and learn how to respond to emergencies.

occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to take shelter, do so immediately. There are several things you can do to prepare your home for summer storms: • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm. • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage. • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains. Finally, as with all emergency situations, listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials. For more tips on weathering storms safely, visit www.ready.gov.

Hurricane season begins June 1

The 2012 hurricane season begins June 1 and we want you to be prepared. Even if you donʼt live near the coastline, hurricanes have the potential to produce dangerous hazards such as tornadoes, high winds and flooding for inland areas. Stay safe by learning about your local alert/warning system and have an emergency preparedness kit on hand.

2012 hurricane names Source: American Red Cross

Alberto Beryl Chris Debby

Ernesto Florence Gordon Helene Isaac

Joyce Kirk Leslie Michael Nadine

Oscar Patty Rafael Sandy

Tony Valerie William


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Follow the rules to safely use portable generators Portable generators can be helpful during an extended power outage. But if not operated properly, you can place yourself as well as line crews from East Mississippi Electric Power Association at risk of injury or death. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that 190 non-fire carbon monoxide-poisoning deaths occurred in 2008, according to its most recent data. Most were related to portable generator use. First rule of thumb? Never, ever use a generator indoors—even with windows open—or in an enclosed area, including an attached garage. Locate the generator where fumes cannot filter into your home through windows or doors—even 15 feet is too close.

Carbon monoxide, which is odorless and invisible, can build up to lethal levels in a matter of minutes. If you plan to use a generator, install a carbon monoxide detector, and test the batteries monthly. To avoid risk of shock, use your generator only on a dry surface where rain or snow can’t leak or puddle underneath. If precipitation poses a problem, create an open-air, tent-like structure above the unit, but make sure to leave at least 3 to 4 feet of space above and around it to vent carbon monoxide. You also need to protect folks working to restore power. Never plug your portable generator into a wall outlet in your home. This produces “backfeed-

ing”—a dangerous risk to the safety of lineworkers because it can energize power lines thought to be dead. For stationary generators that are permanently installed, a licensed electrician will need to install a “transfer switch” that complies with the National Electric Code. The switch safely cuts the electricity to the power lines. And be sure to call EMEPA before you install a generator to ensure safety for yourself and lineworkers. A few other rules are important to keep top of mind: • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and safety tips for your generator. • Plug appliances into the outlet on the generator using only heavy-duty extension cords marked specifically for

outdoor use. Check the wattage use of each appliance plugged in and make sure the total does not exceed the cord’s wattage rating. In addition, the cords should have three prongs and should not be frayed or cut. • Shut down the generator and let it cool down before you refuel—gasoline or kerosene spilled on a hot generator could start a fire. • If you’re buying your first portable generator, plan ahead. Count the wattages for the lighting and appliances—you’ll want to purchase a generator that can handle the load. Source: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, American Red Cross, Electrical Safety Foundation International

EMEPA’s Severe Weather Safety Week begins June 4 The time to prepare for severe weather is now. The 2012 hurricane season begins on Friday, June 1. Are you prepared to protect your family? Stop by your local EMEPA office from June 4 – 8, 2012 for East Mississippi Electric Power Association’s Severe Weather Safety Week. Pick up educational materials on preparing for hurricane season as well as other severe weather occurrences. This storm safety information, such as proper use of a generator, will better equip you to provide for and protect your family during a severe weather situation.

The time to prepare is now.


10d Today in Mississippi I June 2012

Stay cool, $ave money Cooling a home on hot, humid days energy efficiency ratio (EER)—the can be an energy-intensive process. In ratio of the cooling capacity in British fact, cooling generally becomes the thermal units (Btu) per hour to the largest energy expense homeowners face power input (in watts )—measures during the summer. A room air condieach unit’s efficiency. The higher the tioner may seem like an easy-to-install, EER, the more efficient the air condilow-cost way to add comfort, but it’s tioner will be. National appliance staneasy to waste energy and money in the dards require room air conditioners built process if you’re not careful. after Jan. 1, 1990, to have a minimum A room air conditioner is an encased EER of 8.0 or greater. assembly—a self-contained box, basicalENERGY STAR–qualified appliances ly—designed to be mounted in a winboast advanced compressors, drawing dow, through a wall or as a console. more heat efficiently from the air. In These units deliver conditioned air to an addition, the high-efficiency motors in enclosed space or zone. these devices use less energy to circulate Costing between $100 and $1,000, air and run more quietly. However, they room air conditioners can be purchased do cost slightly more. at home improveNationally, an ment centers, big average consumer box retailers, even saves approxiNationally, an average yard sales and flea consumer saves approximately mately 76 kilomarkets. They tend watt-hours per 76 kilowatt-hours to last a long time year—about $8— with minimal mainper year—about $8—with an with an ENERGY tenance, so selecting STAR-rated room ENERGY STAR-rated the right model can air conditioner. room air conditioner. save significant Residents in hot amounts of energy. and humid states Room air condicould save up to tioners rated by ENERGY STAR, a pro- $30 annually. So over the life of the gram run by the U.S. Environmental appliance a consumer could save Protection Agency and U.S. Department between $50 and $250, depending on of Energy, deliver the same or better per- the model and climate. formance and use 10 percent less energy Consumers should look for room air on average than comparable models. An conditioners with timers and program-

ENERGY efficiency tip Want to beat the heat? Run appliances like dish washers and dryers late in the evening to keep the heat from affecting your comfort. Use cold water to wash clothes, and remember to unplug electric chargers, televisions and appliances when you are not using them. Learn more ways to save at TogetherWeSave.com. Source: U.S. Department of Energy

mable thermostats. These features offer better temperature control, allowing users to cool spaces according to their preferences. For example, you can set the unit to turn on 20 minutes before bedtime to make your bedroom comfortable. Installing a room air conditioner is typically an easy job. Most can be fit into a window in a matter of minutes. Another option is to create a custom opening in a wall. Large-capacity units often require a dedicated electric circuit or may have specific wiring and breaker requirements. They may need to be installed by a professional. Room air conditioners come in a variety of sizes. Many people buy the largest one they can afford, assuming more power is better. While that may be

true in racing, it’s not necessarily the case with an air conditioner. A unit too large will cool a room too quickly to properly remove humidity, leaving the space feeling cool but also wet and clammy. Most room air conditioner purchases are “impulse buys,” bought during hot weather by consumers who have conducted little research. Most retail displays do not promote the benefits of ENERGY STAR models. So buy a unit from a knowledgeable retailer who will help you select the right size equipment for your room. Consumers replacing an existing unit with a more efficient model should not immediately throw the old one away. Air conditioners contain a refrigerant that should be removed by a trained technician first. Contact a local solid-waste organization for information on how to properly dispose of old air conditioners. Air conditioning will raise your monthly electric bills; what type you choose, climate and length of use will determine the full impact. Making smart energy choices will leave you happier, cooler and with a couple of extra bucks in your pocket.

Before you buy... Before buying a room air conditioner, make some easy and inexpensive energy-saving improvements in your home. Any of these will maximize the cooling power of your air conditioner: • Caulk and apply weather stripping around doors and windows. • Add insulation to attics and exposed walls. • Move furniture or obstacles away from room air conditioners. • Close blinds or curtains during the day.


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Children’s coloring contest winners Congratulations to the winners of EMEPA’s first electrical safety children’s coloring contest!

Above: Allison Beard, Age 8 Parents: John & Karen Beard Lauderdale County Above Right: Dakota Castillo, Age 6 Parent: Sheila Castillo Lauderdale County Bottom Right: Micah Carr, Age 4 Parents: Allen & Kelly Carr Lauderdale County Bottom Left: Katie Nichols, Age 8 Parents: Jeffry & Cindy Nichols Clarke County

Member participation encouraged at annual meeting East Mississippi Electric Power Association will conduct its 74th Annual Meeting of the membership Saturday,

Oct. 6, 2012. Notices will be mailed later this summer to invite you and all EMEPA members to attend our annual meeting. The annual meeting will inform our members of the actions taken during the

past year in addition to conducting the association’s business and the election of three directors. In accordance with the bylaws of East Mississippi Electric Power Association, a quorum of the membership must be represented in person or by proxy in order to conduct the business meeting and hold the election of the directors. Any member of EMEPA may obtain a

complete set of bylaws by contacting their district office in Louisville, DeKalb, Quitman or the main office in Meridian. Mark your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 6 and make plans to attend our 74th Annual Meeting. If you have any questions about the annual meeting or just want to know more, please contact EMEPA at 601-581-8600 or visit our website at www.emepa.com.


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June 2012 I Today in Mississippi

Dog Graveyard: Paying respect

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to good friends

to her owner, Dr. Ed Carruth. Her passing was sad. “Barnie’s burial was the most upsetting to me,” says Dr. Carruth. “I think I cried three days. I still shed a tear when I stop by her grave.” That, in my opinion, speaks well of the man. Doc acquired Millbrook Head guide Stanley Herring stands in the Dog Graveyard at Millbrook Plantation, a member of East Mississippi Electric Power Association. Plantation at Photo: Tony Kinton Stonewall many years ago and has transformed it into a “And burying Kellis, my big ole chocoquail habitat, and the setting is ideal. quail hunter’s delight. He has dedicated His staff, consisting of Randy Freeman, late lab, who flushed and retrieved for us, approximately 800 acres to enhanced was also pretty painful. Her epitaph is hunt master/farm manager; Stanley simple: She Was a Good Ole Dog. She Herrington, head guide; John Kennon spent a lot of time riding with me in my and Greg Chandler, guides; Carol truck. Kellis lived to be 14.” Bateman, cook; Myra Southern, houseHard, Invest Right, GROW your MONEY with Fixed Indexed Annuities Work The grave markkeeping; and Sammy Donald, who does and the Sky’s the Limit. (IRA, TSA, NQ, CD, 401K and Pension Rollovers) ers and epitaphs are chores and is responsible for cleaning (Free no-obligation statewide in-home consultation!) many, and as years quail, all take their jobs seriously and proSafe, Secure, Retirement Solutions pass these will surevide exceptional service to quail hunters. INCREDIBLE RATES OF RETURN ly grow. But that is “The Dog Graveyard idea started with Richie Culotta all a part of living. Tip, my first German Wirehair Loss is a given. It is (Drathaar) who died I think about 1999,” Serving Mississippi & Louisiana never easy or minus Carruth recalls. “He was my introduction Culotta Insurance & Investments S TATEW I DE Since 1992 www.culottainsuranceandinvestments.com to the breed and was a top bird dog. But Mississippi pain, but the joy in addition to that, he was my pet and Outdoors that comes before the sorry is worth my friend, too good a dog to be buried by Tony Kinton the hurt. Pleasant just anywhere. So I picked that spot on a recall grows richer and more intense as well-drained piney hill overlooking a favorite quail plot and the pond he loved the ache gradually subsides. And there can be no better way to to swim. honor and remember these special ani“He deserved and received a marker mals that lived for quail hunting than to and short epitaph: Tip – Friend and make their final resting place a secluded Companion. After that, it was only natuSHIPPING For a Limited Time ral to bury our dogs next to Tip. And for hillside overlooking the habitat that felt all I tried to create a short epitaph fitting their foot falls and reverberated with their enthusiasm. The Dog Graveyard at CLEAR OVERGROWN PROPERTY FAST! to each individual dog.” ® Take control with a DR FIELD and BRUSH MOWER. Carruth reflects once more on Barnie. Millbrook is well done. For information on Millbrook “She is the only one who got a customREMOTE CONTROL lets you CUT A 44"-WIDE PATH Plantation, call 601-659-9922 or 601made pine casket with velvet lining. Her manage all blade, clutch, and Attaches easily to your ATV or engine functions from riding mower. 659-9956, or go to www.millbrook epitaph is exactly what I always told her your towing vehicle! MOW WEEDS, BRUSH, even plantation.com. she was: The Best Dog in the Whole 2"-thick saplings — with up to 20 HP Wide World. I think she would actually Powerful Self-Propelled of V-Twin power! Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer Brush Mowers also smile when I told her that. ™ OUTRIGGER TOW BAR for 30 years. His books, “Outside and Other available! “The next most tearful for me [after enables cutting 100% outside the Reflections,” “Fishing Mississippi” and his new path of towing vehicle to mow along Barnie] was Gussie, a Drathaar. She was Christian historical romance novel, “Summer fences, under trees. also a combination working dog and pet 75107X © 2012 CHP Lightning Distant Thunder,” are available in and stayed in the house with us. The Call for a FREE DVD & Catalog! bookstores and from the author at TOLL Drathaars make good companions and FREE 1-888-212-1083 www.tonykinton.com, or P.O. Box 88, Carthage, pets and can still be top hunting dogs. ZZZ'5¿HOGEUXVKFRP MS 39051.

arnie is the only dog buried here that I knew well. She got her unlikely masculine name because the Carruth family found her abandoned at their barn. And not unlike her name, what she became was unlikely as well. Barnie developed into the finest flush dog I have ever seen. She would sit patiently on the wagon, trembling with anticipation as high-strung pointers sorted out the quail. Upon command, Barnie was off like a bolt of lightning, putting up a covey or singles that rocketed from the well-manicured bird cover at Millbrook Plantation. And when some hunter connected, Barnie was the first to rush in for a retrieve, proudly toting a quail in her whiskered jaws and gingerly delivering it

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Today in Mississippi

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June 2012

Gourmet Chicken Salad With Fresh Peaches

Cooks Mississippi

FEATURED COOKBOOK:

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More producers than ever are marketing their products directly to consumers at farmers markets across the nation. Since 1996 the number of farmers markets in this country has increased by more than 300 percent. With consumers’ growing demand for locally grown foods comes a need for fresh ideas in preparation and serving. A new cookbook from Quail Ridge Press, in Brandon, can help. The “Recipe Hall of Fame Fresh from the Farmers Market Cookbook” presents some 400 recipes chosen from QRP’s highly successful “Best of the Best State Cookbook Series.” The focus is on fruit and vegetables used in recipes for every course, from appetizer to main dish to dessert. The “Extra Help” section offers buying and storage tips and a chart of seasonal availability. Both seasoned and beginner cooks should find “Fresh from the Farmers Market” a valuable resource for preparing healthful meals centered on local farm products. The cookbook is available from bookstores and other retailers, online at www.quailridge.com or by calling 800-3431583. Price for the comb-bound version is $16.95.

Send your best shots to Picture This Select your best camera work on any subject for our next Picture This theme: My Best Shot. We will choose some of the most creative, eye-catching photos for publication in the July issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be postmarked or emailed by June 18. Photographers whose work is selected for publication will be entered in a drawing for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in December. Submit as many photos as you like. Photos must be in sharp focus and accompanied by identifying information, including photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people in the picture. To submit prints or a photo CD, mail to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Or, email photos (as an attachment to your e-mail message) to news@epaofms.com. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one e-mail message, if possible. Questions? Call Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8600 or e-mail news@epaofms.com.

2 cups chicken, cooked and cubed 3/4 cup chopped celery 3/4 cup white seedless grapes 3/4 cup peeled and cubed fresh peaches 1/2 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup sour cream Seasoning salt to taste Fresh peach slices Parsley

Lightly toss chicken, celery, grapes and peaches together. Mix mayonnaise and sour cream and pour over salad. Add seasoning salt and mix gently. Store in refrigerator until ready to use. Garnish with fresh peach slices and parsley. Makes 6 servings.

Always Requested Cornbread Salad 1 (9-by-13-inch) pan cooked cornbread, crumbled 1 1/2 cups mayonnaise 2 cups sliced celery 1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped 1 (5-oz.) jar green olives and pimentos, drained, rinsed and chopped

3/4 cup chopped green onions 3/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted 2 large tomatoes, chopped 1 teaspoon sage Pepper to taste 10 slices bacon, fried crisp and crumbled 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and chopped

In a bowl, combine all ingredients. Refrigerate 3 to 4 hours before serving. Serves 12.

Dilled Tomato Soup 2 medium onions, chopped 1 garlic clove, chopped 2 Tbsp. margarine 4 large fresh tomatoes, peeled and cubed 1/2 cup water

1 chicken bouillon cube 2 1/2 tsp. fresh dill, or 3/4 tsp. dried dill 1/4 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. pepper 1/2 cup mayonnaise

In a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat, sauté onions and garlic in margarine for 3 minutes. Add the next 6 ingredients; cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Blend half in blender. Mix the second half with mayonnaise. Combine both mixtures. Cover and chill overnight. Soup is good served hot or cold. Makes 5 cups. Garnish with additional dill.

Okra Fritters 1 cup sliced okra 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes

1/4 cup cornmeal 1 egg Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients together. Salt and pepper to taste. Drop by spoonful into hot oil to fry.

Zucchini Beef Skillet 1 lb. ground beef 1 cup chopped onion 3/4 cup chopped green bell pepper 1 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. pepper 1 tsp. chili powder

5 cups sliced zucchini 2 large tomatoes, chopped 1/2 cup water 2 cups fresh corn kernels 2 Tbsp. chopped pimento 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Sauté beef, onion and bell pepper in a large skillet until browned. Drain. Add remaining ingredients. Cover and simmer 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Lemon Blueberry Bread Pudding 6 cups torn French or Italian bread (1-inch chunks) 3 cups milk 4 eggs

3/4 cup sugar, divided Juice and grated rind of 2 lemons 1 1/2 pints fresh blueberries 1 Tbsp. butter, softened

In a large bowl, soak bread in milk for 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 F. Beat eggs with all but 2 tablespoons sugar. Beat in lemon juice and rind. Pour egg mixture over soaked bread and mix well. Add blueberries and mix. Pour into buttered shallow 3-quart baking dish. Sprinkle remaining sugar over top. Bake about 40 minutes, until top is lightly browned and crusty. Serve warm or cooled.


Farmers markets sell well

June 2012

By Nancy Jo Maples “You can stop at produce stands all along Highway 49 to get fresh Locovores can find luck in Lucedale and lots of other Mississippi produce, but at our market you get to interact with the farmer,” Will towns with today’s trend toward farmers markets. Scarborough, manager of the Mississippi Farmers Market in Jackson, “This whole locovore movement is spreading across America,” said. Lucedale farmer Royce Armstrong said. A few markets operate all year, but most open seasonally and are The term locovore was coined in 2005 as a reference to someone staged underneath tents or shade trees in parks or along blocked streets. who wants to eat locally grown food. The Mississippi Farmers Market operates 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. year“We’re seeing two groups of people at the market,” Armstrong round on Saturdays and seasonally on Tuesdays and Thursdays in an said. “One is an older group who remembers the types of food 18,000-square-foot building on High Street. An estimated 500 cusgrandma prepared without all of the hybrids. Then we have the tomers shop there on Saturdays. younger generation who is interested in safety and doesn’t want Since it falls under the umbrella of the Mississippi herbicides and genetically modified foods.” Department of Agriculture and Commerce, the Mississippi Lucedale started a farmers market last year on Saturday mornFarmers Market oversees the certification program for ings at its courthouse square. It runs April through the state’s markets. About 20 of June and October Mississippi’s 60 markets are certified. through “Certification gives farmers’ marNovember. kets an identity,” Scarborough said. Armstrong believes “It basically requires them to be one key to its succonsistent and to have a certain cess has been the location and a certain time of operavailability of selecation.” tions not typically Certification mandates that at found in grocery least 50 percent of the crops are stores. For example, raised in Mississippi and that a farm he sells Chinese cabrepresentative is present during marbage. ket hours. The market must be Fresh fruit and operated by a growers’ associafriendly faces make tion, a certified non-profit organfarmers markets enticization, or a government entity. ‘Freshness is the draw to a farmers market. The ing events. Mississippi showcases at least One example of a certified mardifference in eating a peach picked two weeks ago 60 markets where growers sell locally ket is the Natchez Farmers and eating one picked yesterday or today is huge.’ harvested produce and craftsmen vend Market, which operates —Joe Buckley their hand-made goods. The markets Tuesdays through often become outings for socializing and Saturdays year-round for promoting a healthier living style. inside a building near “We have a strong community of healthy living and our farmers the downtown business district. market fits well with that. We sell things, but it’s much more. It’s a “We average five to seven vendors a day and ‘must-be-at-event’ every Saturday,” Shelly Johnstone, Hernando can have 25 or 30 on Saturdays. A lot of farmCommunity Development director, said. ers work in other jobs, so Saturday is the best Hernando’s event runs May through October. With more than day for them to come to the market,” market 56 vendors it ranks seventh nationally in the large category for coordinator Helen Brooks said. Favorite Farmers Markets. Hernando won that spot in a 2011 conThe Natchez market, which opened in test sponsored by the American Farmland Trust, an organization 1999, functions as an outreach center for the that promotes the preservation of farmlands and encourages people Alcorn State University Extension Program. to eat locally grown foods. Laurel began its sponsorship three years ago. “We’re a full-service market with eggs and milk. Brown’s Dairy While most markets that are open only one day a Farm from Oxford brings fresh milk that has been pasteurized, but week operate on Saturdays, Laurel chose a weekday not homogenized. People stand in line for it,” Johnstone said. “The afternoon. Vendors can be found lining a section of cream actually rises to the top.” the historic downtown 4 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. on Thursdays The Pass Market in Pass Christian operates year-round on May through Aug. 24. In addition to produce and home-made goods, Saturdays from 8 a.m. until noon at War Memorial Park. Laurel’s market features canning and gardening demonstrations, live “Freshness is the draw to a farmers market,” said Joe Buckley, music and an occasional movie. Pass Market manager. “The difference in eating a peach picked two For more information and to view a listing of Mississippi Farmers weeks ago and eating one picked yesterday or today is huge.” Markets, visit the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce Another distinction between a farmers market and a produce website at www.mdac.state.ms.us/departments/ stand is that the market allows customers to communicate directly ms_farmers_market/index.html. Another Internet source about eating with the grower of those fruits and vegetables. healthy, locally grown food is www.localharvest.org.

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Mississippi Marketplace Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone (601) 605-8600.

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Mississippi

vents E Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your event? Send it to us at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events of statewide interest will be published as space allows. Event details are subject to change, so we strongly recommend calling to confirm dates and times before traveling. For more events, go to www.visitmississippi.org.

Opening of Greenville Farmers Market and Delta Catfish Races, June 2, Greenville. Locally grown vegetables, entertainment, kids’ activities. Downtown. Details: 662-3783121. Grabuone Outfitters Third Annual Snake Rodeo, June 2, Chatham. Bare-handed snake-catching competition, evening reception with entertainment. Lake Washington. Details: 601-383-2795; www.grabuone.com. Thunder on Water Safe Boating Festival, June 6-10, Grenada. Music, fireworks, carnival and crafts. Grenada Lake. Details: 662448-0985; www.thunderonwater.net. 26th Annual Coast Coliseum Summer Fair, June 7-17, Biloxi. Shows, live music, water flume ride, Ferris wheel and more rides. Free admission. Mississippi Coast Coliseum. Details: www.mscoastcoliseum.com. Blueberry Jubilee, June 8-9, Poplarville. Arts and crafts, blueberry recipe contest, storytelling festival, entertainment, car and truck show, 5K run, dog show, USDA tours. Downtown. Details: 601-795-0578; www.blueberryjubilee.org. Sunset River Tours, June 8, 22; July 6, 20; Aug. 3, 17, 31; Moss Point. Boat tours on Pascagoula River; 6-8 p.m. Leaves from Pascagoula River Audubon Center. McCoy’s River and Marsh Tours. Details/reservations: 228-475-0825. Junior Ranger Programs, June 9, 16, 23, 30; Ridgeland. Hands-on crafts and games relating to Natchez Trace Parkway history and nature; 10 a.m. Natchez Trace Parkway Information Cabin, milepost 102.4. Continues in July. Details/schedule: 601-898-9417; www.nps.gov/natr. Summer Campin’ and Jammin’, June 10-16, Foxworth. Covered shed for jamming; RV hookups. Hickory Hill Bluegrass Park. Details: 601-441-1544, 225-241-5521. Father’s Day Weekend Smooth Grooves Music Fest, June 16, Southaven. Featuring

The Isley Brothers, Kem and Fantasia; 8 p.m. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 800-7453000; www.landerscenter.com. 40th Bentonia Blues Festival, June 16, Bentonia. Live blues, family contests, games, arts and crafts. Holmes Farm. Details: 800381-0662; www.facebook.com/ bentoniabluesfestival. Gangs of Outlaws Tour, June 19, Southaven. Featuring ZZ Top, 3 Doors Down and Gretchen Wilson. Admission. Snowden Grove Amphitheater. Details: 662-892-2660; www.snowdengroveamphitheater.com. Daughtry in Concert, June 20, Southaven. Admission; 7 p.m. Snowden Grove Amphitheater. Details: 662-892-2660; www.snowdengroveamphitheater.com. Tony Kinton Book Signing/Reading, June 26, Columbia. Kinton to read from his new novel, “Summer Lightning Distant Thunder,” and present program on Daniel Boone; 6:308:30 p.m. Columbia-Marion County Library. Details: 601-736-5516. Puckett-Fest, July 6-7, Puckett. PCA-sanctioned rodeo at 7 p.m., arts and crafts. Details: 601-825-0832, 601-825-8074. Summer Aquatic Plant Sale, July 7, Picayune. Non-invasive aquatic plants, including water lilies, Louisiana iris; 9 a.m. to noon. Free admission. The Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. Mississippi Coast Jazz Society Jam Session and Dance, July 8, Biloxi. Casual dress; 2 to 5 p.m. Hard Rock Casino. Details: 228-3924177. 63rd Annual Choctaw Indian Fair, July 1114, Choctaw. Princess pageant, World Series Stickball and performances by Clint Black, Steve Azar and others. Admission. Details: 601-650-7450; www.choctawindianfair.com. Bruce Sawmill Festival, July 12-14, Bruce. Golf tournament, Show and Shine Car Show, entertainment, 5K run/walk, arts and crafts. Bruce Square. Details: 662-983-2222.

OPERATING HOURS SATURDAY ONLY May 12 & August 4 - September 1 11am - 5pm

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BUY ONE, GET ONE 1/2 OFF Valid Sunday - Friday Only

MAY 19 - JULY 29 Present this coupon at the Geyser Fall ticket booth to receive half off one admission with the purchase of a $38.00 (tax inclusive) general admission ticket. No Junior discount. Kids 3 years and under are FREE. Sunday - Friday only, not valid on Saturday. Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. Not for re-sale. Coolers, food and beverages may not be brought into the park. Hours of operation and available attractions are not guaranteed. Offer valid May 19 - July 29, 2012.

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$5/mo credit for Blockbuster @Home (regularly $10/mo for one disc at a time) plus $5/mo credit for core programming package (prices vary).

See below for details.

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WE DAYS              W E ARE OPEN 7 D AYS A WEEK WEEK Ä‘ ĉ  Ģ     Ä‘   ÄŠ  Ģ     Ä‘                  Blockbuster Blockbus ter @Home (1 disc at at a time): Only aavailable vailable with new new qualifying qualifying DISH service service activated activated between between 5/21/12 and 7/31/12. 7/31/12. FFor or the first first 3 months months of your your subscription, you you rreceive eceive a bundle of Blockbus Blockbuster ter @H @Home Home for for $5/mo $5/mo (regularly (regularly $10/mo) $10/mo) and yyour our pr programming ogramming package package at at a promotional promotional bundle price. price. Pr Promotional omotional prices prices continue continue for for 3 months months provided provided you you subscribe to to both components components of the bundle and do not do downgrade. wngrade. Aft After er 3 months, months, then-current then-current prices prices apply ttoo eachh component component (unless a separate separate pr promotional omotional price price still still applies to to your your programming programming package). package). Requires Requires online DISH account account for for discs by by mail; maail; broadband broadband Internet Internet to to stream stream content; content; HD DVR DVR to to stream stream to to TV. TV. Exchange Exchange online rentals rentals for for free free in-store in-store movie movie rentals rentals at at participating participating Blockbuster Blockbus ockbuster stores. stores. Offer Offer not available available in Puerto Puerto Rico Rico or U.S. U.S. Virgin Virgin Islands. Str Streaming eaming ttoo TV TV and some channels not available available with select selecct packages. packages. Digital Home Advantage Advantage plan requires requires 24-month 24-month agreement agreemeent and credit credit qualification. qualification. Cancellation Cancellation fee fee of $17.50/month $17.50/month remaining remaining applies if service service is terminated terminated before before end of agreement. agreement. With qualifying qualifying y packages, packages, Online Bonus credit credit requires requires AutoPay AutoPay with Paperless Paperless Billing, lling, email opt-in opt-in for for DISH E-Newsletter, E-Newsletter, and online redemption redemption aatt www.mydish.com/getonlinebonus www.mydish.com/getonlinebonus no later later than 45 45 days days from from service servvice activation. activation. After After applicable promotional promotional period, then-current then-current price price will apply apply.. $10/mo $10/mo HD add-on fee fee waived waaived for for life life of current current account; account; requires requir e es 24-month 24-month agreement, agreement, continuous continuous enrollment enrollment in AutoPay AutoPay with Paperless Paperless Billing. 3-month 3-month premium premium movie movie offer offer value value is up to to $132; $132; after affter 3 months months then-current then-current price price applies unless you you downgrade. downgrade. FFree ree Standar Standardd Professional Professional Installation Installation only. only. All equipment equipment is leased and mus mustt be returned returned to to DISH upon cancellation cancellation or unr unreturned eturned equipmen equipment ment fees fees apply. apply. Upfront Upfront fee, fee, monthly monthly ffees, ees, and limits on number andd type type of receivers receivers will apply. apply. HD programming programming requires requires HD television. television. Prices, Prices, packages, packages, programming programming and offers offers subject subject to to change without notice. notice. Offer Offer available available ffor or ne new w and qualified former former customers, customers, and subjec subjectt to to terms terms of applicable Promotional Promotional and RResidential esidential Cus Customer tomer agreements. agreements. AAdditional dditional restrictions restrictions may may apply. apply. Offer Offer ends 7/31/12. 7/31/12 /31/12. HBOÂŽ, CinemaxÂŽ and related related channels and service service marks are are the property prroperty of Home Box Box Office, Office, Inc. SHOWTIME SHOWTIME is a registered registered trtrademark ademark of Sho Showtime wtime Networks Networks Inc., a CBS CCompany. ompany. STARZ STARZ and rrelated elated channels channnels and service service marks are are property property of Starz Starz Entertainment, Entertainment, LLC. LLC. $25 VisaÂŽ gift car cardd requires requires activation acctivation and $2.95 $2.95 shipping and handling handling fee. fee. YYou ou will receive receive a claim vvoucher oucher within 3-4 weeks weeks and the voucher voucher o must must be returned returned within 30 days. days. Your Your VisaÂŽ gift car cardd will arrive arrivve in approximately approximately 6-8 weeks. weeks. InfinityDISH InfinityDISH charges charges a one-time $49.95 $49.955 non-refundable non-refundable processing processing fee. fee. Indiana C.P.D. C.PP.D. Reg. Reg. No. No. T.S. T.S. 10-1006. 10--1006. *Certain *CCertain restrictions restrictions apply. apply. Based Based on the availability availability in your your area. area.


Today in Mississippi East June 2012