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Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

The ice men cometh Winter brings world-class ice carvers to Ohio Also Inside:

Remembering John Glenn Hearty winter soups The iconic FFA emblem Member Interactive: It’s sooo cold!

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ohioec.org

ALL OF OUR LINES ARE CUSTOMER SERVICE LINES. Some deliver electricity. Others deliver information. All must deliver on the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives mission: to provide you with service that’s just as dependable as the energy you count on us for every day. Learn more about your locally owned and operated Ohio electric cooperative at ohioec.org.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.

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inside COVER STORY

23 THE ICE-MEN COMETH Perrysburg’s Winterfest will host the U.S. National Ice Carving Championship — which will help decide who provides decorations at the next Winter Olympics.

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F E AT U R E S

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A PATH OF SERVICE The Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives’ annual Youth Tour of Washington, D.C., has inspired generations of future leaders.

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HOMETOWN HERO

Even when orbiting the Earth, John Glenn always remembered his s rural roots in New Concord.

15 SOUP’S ON!

There’s nothing like a steaming bowl of hearty soup to chase away those wintertime chills.

30 UNIVERSAL LETTERING

A Van Wert company made (and still makes) history by producing the iconic blue jackets worn by Future Farmers of America.

32 A HELPING HAND

From the “Nigerian Prince” to Medicare schemes, older Ohioans often find themselves targets of con artists. Ohio non-profit group Pro Seniors can help.

30 D E PA R T M E N T S 2 COOPERATIVE CONNECTION

15 FOOD SCENE

4 POWER STATION

19 LOCAL CO-OP PAGES

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

34 JANUARY CALENDAR

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

38 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

14 OHIO ICON

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Cooperative Connection PAT O’LOUGHLIN, PRESIDENT & CEO • OHIO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES & BUCKEYE POWER

Ohio cooperatives look forward to

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LAST YEAR AT THIS TIME, I provided you with our 2016 cooperative to-do list. As we begin 2017, I’ll take a moment to reflect on the past year and provide a look ahead at our plans for 2017. During 2016, Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives successfully: • Brought modern electric service to the residents of the remote village of La Soledad, Guatemala. We left with memories of a lifetime and provided hope for generations to come. • Kicked off the OurSolar program and are nearly halfway through the construction of 20 community-based solar power systems across Ohio that will provide energy to our member-owners well into the future. • Worked collaboratively with your local electric cooperative, as well as with Ohio’s large investor-owned utilities (which control the high-voltage grid that we are connected to), and achieved significant reliability improvements in the delivery of power across Ohio. The result? Fewer power outages. • Provided grants for four community site development efforts, which we hope will result in the establishment of new businesses in the communities that we serve.

• We will work with state and federal officials to develop more flexible and cost-effective ways to achieve environmental goals. • As American Electric Power moves away from its traditional role as an Ohio power plant owner/operator, we will develop plans to transition our longterm partnership for the operation of our power plants. • We will continue to expand and improve our efforts to support job creation, economic development, and member satisfaction across the communities that we serve. We hope to keep you informed of these efforts through the year in this, your monthly member magazine. In March, look for an updated, redesigned publication, based on reader recommendations. Above all else, as we look ahead to next year, I thank you for your continued support and patronage of your local electric cooperative. Together, we are better and stronger. God bless you and yours in the New Year. 

• Via survey of our member-owners, achieved our highest-ever American Customer Satisfaction Index rating (85, for those keeping score). While the results from the past year are gratifying, we still have much work to do in the year ahead: • We will expand and improve our job training and development program for electric line workers.

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January 2017 Volume 59, No. 4

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Rhodes

President & CEO Dir. of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor

Contributors

Cheryl Bach, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Adam Specht, Damaine Vonada, Kevin Williams, Margie Wuebker, and Diane Yoakam COUNTRY LIVING (ISSN 0747-0592) is the official publication of Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the monthly communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without specific written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

ohioec.org Check out the mobile-friendly website and digital edition of Country Living, as well as other timely information from Ohio electric cooperatives.

JA N UA R Y 2 0 1 7

Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

JA N UA RY 2 0 1 7

Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

The ice men cometh Winter brings world-class ice carvers to Ohio Also Inside:

Remembering John Glenn Hearty winter soups The iconic FFA emblem Member Interactive: It’s sooo cold!

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12/16/16 10:30 AM

The ice men cometh Winter brings world-class ice carvers to Ohio Also Inside:

New website feature

Remembering John Glenn Hearty winter soups The iconic FFA emblem Member Interactive: It’s sooo cold!

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12/16/16 10:30 AM

All Country Living stories now published online For those of you who prefer reading on your tablets or smartphones, fret not — starting in December 2016, the Country Living staff decided to publish all the magazine’s print stories and features at www.ohioec.org so they can be enjoyed by readers across multiple platforms. Feel free to share our content on social media, too, so those who don’t receive the print version in the mail every month can still catch up on Ohio news.

Follow Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives on social media Search for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube to learn about careers with co-ops and how co-ops make a difference in communities across Ohio.

Alliance for Audited Media Member

National advertising representatives: NATIONAL COUNTRY MARKET, 800-NCM-1181 State advertising representatives: Sandy Woolard 614-403-1653 Tim Dickes 614-855-5226 The fact that a product is advertised in Country Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Country Living staff cannot process address changes.

DID YOU KNOW? When it comes to craft beer, Ohio ranks fourth in overall production among all U.S. states. Over 1,385,000 barrels of craft beer were brewed in Ohio in 2015, supporting nearly 11,000 Ohio jobs. A whopping 173 craft breweries are currently operating in Ohio, with nearly 70 more in the planning stages. To top it off, craft beer consumption per capita in Ohio is about 5.1 gallons per adult.

In this issue:

New Concord (p.6) Lancaster (p. 10) Dayton (p. 14) Perrysburg (p. 23) Van Wert (p. 30) Cincinnati (p. 32)

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POWER STATION

S T O R Y BY A DA M S P E C H T

A PATH OF SERVICE Youth tour inspired participant to a career in government FOR 38 YEARS, the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour to Washington, D.C., has given high school students a unique perspective on our nation’s capital and the electric cooperative world. It is a fundamentally different experience than any other youth trip to D.C. It is a more personal, more engaging, and more rewarding experience — one where participants can meet new people from around the state and Greg Moody the country while broadening their knowledge of our government institutions. Youth Tour changes lives and inspires careers in public service. And it is an experience only available to children of electric co-op members.

Catching the bug In 1983, Greg Moody was a teenager living on Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative lines. His family operated a farm just south of New Concord, on land that now sits within The Wilds wildlife preserve.

On June 10, 1983, Moody, who was selected by GuernseyMuskingum to represent the cooperative, departed for Youth Tour with 29 other teens from rural Ohio. “I remember it as my first experience with a group of people I didn’t know in advance,” Moody said. “The bus ride out was awkward — the ride back was filled with friends.” While in D.C., Moody had the opportunity to meet his House representative — Congressman Clarence Miller, a Lancaster Republican who served in Congress from 1967 to 1993.

Scholarships another example of co-ops’ commitment to education Times change, but one constant is Ohio electric co-ops’ commitment to youth education and development. Each of Ohio’s electric coops conducts a local scholarship program for high school students, and all 24 cooperatives have either

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maintained or increased their funding for scholarships over the past five years. In 2016, in addition to local scholarships, Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives awarded $69,600 worth of academic funding to Ohio students. That amount will grow

to $75,600 for this year’s program, with scholarships offered to children of cooperative staff and cooperative members. Between local and statewide programs, Ohio co-ops now grant well over $100,000 in scholarship awards to exceptional young people.

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Greg Moody graced the pages of Country Living magazine a couple of times in 1983 stories about the Youth Tour. In one (above), his group takes a rest on the Capitol steps, and in the other (at left), he’s shown speaking at Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative’s annual meeting.

Moody cites that meeting as a formative experience in his life. “It’s where I got the bug for political activity,” Moody said. “Youth Tour made government seem more accessible.”

From Youth Tour to the Kasich Administration A few years later, Moody applied as an intern in Congressman Miller’s office, and he credits his Youth Tour experience for giving him the insight and confidence to succeed in government. “When I applied for the internship, I could visualize Congressman Miller’s office and knew where it was relative to the Capitol,” Moody said. “That makes a difference in being able to imagine yourself involved in important decisions.” Moody’s career in public service officially began in the 1990s, when he became a budget associate for the U.S. House Budget Committee. The committee chair at the time, Congressman John Kasich, tasked Moody with researching the impact of Medicaid on federal spending. Since then, Moody has become an influential expert on government health policy, serving in both public and private sectors, working to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of government health programs. In January 2011, Kasich, by then the governor of Ohio, once again enlisted Moody to aid in efforts to improve health care, tapping him as director of the Office of Health Care Transformation. In this role, he is currently responsible for coordinating strategic planning and budgeting across six state health and human services-related agencies. Moody grew from a farm kid in rural Ohio to a

renowned and influential health policy expert — and Youth Tour helped make it happen.  Youth Tour 2017 will be held on June 9-15. Contact your local electric cooperative for full application details and to verify your cooperative participates in the program.

Looking ahead: Youth Tour 2017 Thirty-three years after Greg Moody’s Youth Tour experience, the program has grown and changed in a few notable ways, but the core focus remains: promoting the importance of government and public service to young electric cooperative members. Adam Specht, director of the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour, encourages any high school sophomore or junior from a co-op family to apply for the program. “In my five years assisting with Youth Tour, I’ve seen many shy, modest young people burst out of their shells — all within a five-day span,” Specht said. “It’s a fantastic opportunity for a high school student to learn more about government and meet some great new friends. “I cannot wait to see what these fantastic young people accomplish in the future. And I hope their experience on Youth Tour contributes to their future success.” —Jeff McCallister

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S T O R Y BY JEFF MCCALLISTER

John Glenn: 1921-2016

Native son remembered as hero, friend to rural America

NO MATTER HOW BIG A HERO HE BECAME, through his pioneering work as a test pilot and astronaut or his service to the state and country as a United States senator, John H. Glenn Jr. never forgot his rural roots — and that made him a friend to electric co-op members everywhere, says Darrel “Cubby” Cubbison, the retired longtime member services manager at Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative. “John’s father was a plumber in New Concord, and I think that, growing up, they both expected that John would follow in those footsteps,” Cubbison says. “Now, rural people of that time did not have electric water pumps — they didn’t have refrigerators, no electric gadgets, not even lights in the barn, but water, that was the main thing. “I was 4 years old when my family got electricity, right when John was going around with his father to install water pumps at farms all over, and so he was always well aware of what a big deal it was for electricity to come to the rural areas.” Glenn, of course, did not go into the family business. He became the first American to orbit the Earth and was elected to four terms in the U.S. Senate, where he was a champion of issues on aging, science, and nuclear proliferation, among many others. He died Dec. 8 at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. He was 95.

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Glenn was born July 18, 1921, in Cambridge, and his father moved the family to nearby New Concord two years later, to a home about a three-minute walk from what is now the GMEC office. He met his future wife, Annie, while both were still toddlers, and they remained together until his death. They both attended elementary and high school in New Concord and attended Muskingum College. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Glenn quit school to enlist and become a military pilot, and he and Annie were married in April 1943 — right after he finished his flight training and earned his commission in the U.S. Marines. After a successful run as a combat pilot and a test pilot, he was selected as one of the original seven Mercury astronauts. He was subsequently chosen to man the Friendship 7 and become the first American in orbit on Feb. 20, 1962 — cementing his status as an American hero. He won his first term in the U.S. Senate in 1974, and remained there until he retired in 1999. He was still a senator, in fact, when he returned to space at age 77 aboard the space shuttle Discovery in 1998. Cubbison’s parents had been friends with Glenn’s — their mothers were neighbors growing up — and Cubbison says he had plenty of contact with Glenn as part of his work for GMEC and in representing 4-H through Ohio State University Extension. “We went to Washington many times while he was there and he always made time for us because he knew what we were talking about was important,” Cubbison says. “You know, he was one of the most honest, honorable people I’ve ever known, and he was also one of the most down-to-earth,” Cubbison says. “Besides all the things everyone knows about, he did a lot of things silently and almost invisibly that made a lot of difference in the lives of everyone in the nation, including for rural America, and he was never very far away in his thoughts from New Concord.” 

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FOR YOUR NEW OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES MEMBER MAGAZINE

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TO A MAILBOX NEAR YOU

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 JANUA RY 2017

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Republicans gained one seat in both the Ohio House and the Ohio Senate in the November 8 election. Here is the roster of legislators who will convene Jan. 3 for the 132nd General Assembly.

OHIO SENATE Senator Cliff Hite Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Auglaize, Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Hardin, Henry, Logan, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert, Williams Senator Randy Gardner Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Erie, Fulton, Lucas, Wood

Senator Edna Brown Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Lucas Senator Matt Huffman Statehouse 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Allen, Auglaize, Champaign, Shelby, Darke, Logan, Mercer

Senator Kevin Bacon Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Senator Gayle ManningMajority Whip Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Huron, Lorain

Senator Bill Coley Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Butler Senator Bill Beagle Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Darke, Miami, Montgomery, Preble Senator Peggy Lehner Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Montgomery

Senator Joe Uecker Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Adams, Brown, Clermont, Lawrence, Scioto Senator Charleta B. Tavares- Asst. Minority Leader Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Senator Shannon Jones Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Butler, Hamilton

Senator Stephanie Kunze Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Senator Lou Tehrar Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Senator Bob Peterson Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Pickaway, Clinton, Fayette, Gallia, Highland, Jackson, Pike, Ross, Vinton, Lawrence

Senator Cecil Thomas Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

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Senator Bob D. Hackett Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Clark, Madison

Senator Kris Jordan Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Delaware, Franklin, Knox Senator Troy Balderson Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Athens, Fairfield, Guernsey, Hocking, Morgan, Pickaway, Muskingum Senator Larry Obhof Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Richland, Ashland, Holmes, Medina Senator Dave Burke Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Crawford, Marion, Morrow, Sandusky, Seneca, Union, Wyandot Senator Frank LaRose Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Wayne, Stark Senator Scott Oelslager Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Stark Senator Frank Hoagland Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Monroe, Noble, Vinton, Washington, Athens, Belmont, Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson, Meigs Senator Jay Hottinger Senate Building 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Coshocton, Holmes, Licking, Perry, Tuscarawas Senator Joe Schiavoni Statehouse 1 Capitol Square Columbus, OH 43215 Columbiana

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OHIO HOUSE Representative Scott Wiggam 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Wayne

Representative Bernadine Kent 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Niraj J. Antani 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Montgomery

Representative Mark J. Romanchuk 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Richland

Representative Hearcel F. Craig 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Jeffery S. Rezabek 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Preble, Montgomery

Representative Theresa Gavarone 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Wood

Representative Thomas E. Brinkman 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Mike Ashford 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Lucas

Representative Robert R. Cupp 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Allen

Representative Jonathan Dever 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Teresa Fedor 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Lucas

Representative Timothy E. Ginter 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Columbiana

Representative Louis W. Blessing III 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Michael Sheehy 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Lucas

Representative Adam Miller 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Bill Seitz 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Derek Merrin 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Lucas, Fulton

Representative Kristin Boggs 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Brigid Kelly 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Kirk Schuring 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Stark

Representative Anne Gonzales 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Catherine Ingram 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Thomas West 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Stark

Representative Heather Bishoff 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Alicia Reece 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Hamilton

Representative Christina Hagan 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Stark

Representative Mike Duffey 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Marilyn Slaby 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Stark, Holmes

Representative Wes Retherford 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Butler

Representative David Leland 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Fred Strahorn 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Montgomery

Representative Candice Keller 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Butler

Representative Laura Lanese 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Michael Henne 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Montgomery

Representative Margaret Conditt 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Butler

Representative Tim Hughes 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Franklin

Representative Jim Butler 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Montgomery

Representative Paul Zeltwanger 77 S. High St. 77 S. High St. Columbus, OH 43215 Lorain

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CO-OP PEOPLE

S T O R Y A N D P H O T O S BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

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RockmilL Brewery Lancaster-area business’s specialty saisons are good for what ales you “ROLLING HILLS” MAY BE AN apt initial description for the terrain surrounding Rockmill Brewery, but it hardly does justice to a bucolic landscape where knolls and valleys hug the Hocking River’s headwaters, and backroads snake past bountiful fields and whiteboard fences. In that splendidly rural setting near Lancaster, South Central Power Company customer Rockmill Brewery occupies 20 acres of a former horse farm. The stables now contain its brewhouse, and the barn has morphed into a rustically chic tasting room — complete with stone fireplaces and sweeping views 10

of a pristine pond. “Our brewery is only 30 minutes south of Columbus, but it offers an escape where people get out of the city and into the countryside,” says Matthew Barbee, who owns and operates Rockmill Brewery with his mother, Judy Jones. Because his maternal grandfather was a vintner, Barbee developed an appreciation for wine at a young age, and after studying business at Miami University, he even trained as a sommelier in Chicago. While working in California, Barbee discovered the possibilities of beer when he ordered a Saison Dupont at

a restaurant. “The server popped the cork and these wonderful aromatics wafted over me,” Barbee recalls, “I said to myself, ‘Whoa! This isn’t beer.’” Of course, he soon learned that, indeed, saison is beer — specifically a fruity, highly carbonated ale traditionally brewed by farmers in Belgium’s Wallonia region. After a test of the water on his family’s old horse farm revealed that its minerality was similar to Wallonia’s water, Barbee decided to tap that terroir. He returned to Ohio and started a microbrewery specializing in Belgian-style saisons.

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The back patio at Rockmill seemingly transports customers to a different time and place, with views of the nearby pond and woods.

Matt Barbee and his mother, Judy Jones, own and operate Rockmill Brewery near Lancaster, which draws in customers for a tasting of their specialty: saisons.

“I studied the Columbus craft brewing scene and had a lot of confidence in my palate,” says Barbee, “but I’m a self-taught brewer.” When the brewery opened in 2010, he made saison one barrel at a time. Today, Rockmill produces 30 barrels weekly, and its offerings include saison, witbier, dubbel, and cask-aged tripel. In homage to its heritage, the brewery’s logo and labels depict horses. Since its tasting room only serves Rockmill ales, customers bring their own food, experiment

with pairings, and enjoy the farm’s ambiance. Barbee, in fact, likens the brewery experience to picnicking. “People feel transported to another place when they’re here,” he says. “We’ve really created our own picnic culture.”  DAMAINE VONADA is a freelance

writer from Xenia. Rockmill Brewery, 5705 Lithopolis Road NW, Lancaster, OH 43130. For information about the brewery and tasting room hours, telephone 740-205-8076 or visit www.rockmillbrewery.com.

Rockmill Tavern Opened in autumn 2016, Rockmill Tavern is a bar and restaurant that brings Rockmill Brewery’s farmstead ales and aesthetic to Columbus’s Brewery District. The menu is small but focuses mightily on foods that complement saisons — cheeses, charcuterie, and Barbee’s personal favorite, ribeye. 503 S. Front St., Columbus, OH 43215; 614-732-4364; www.rockmilltavern.com

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WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Are

COYWOLVES

In 2009, nineteen-year-old Taylor Mitchell was a rising star in Canada’s folk-music world. She had just released her first album, had been invited to perform at the Winnipeg Folk Festival, and was nominated for a Canadian Folk Music Award as Young Performer of the Year. Her life couldn’t have been better. But her life suddenly and violently changed when, in October, she decided to take a break from touring and visited Cape Breton Highlands National Park in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY W. H. “CHIP” GROSS

headed for Ohio?

HIKING ALONE ALONG POPULAR SKYLINE TRAIL, Mitchell was savagely attacked by two, possibly three, coywolves. Two other hikers soon came upon the surreal scene, drove off the coywolves, and contacted park rangers. The mauled young woman was quickly placed on a medical helicopter to Halifax. Unfortunately, due to deep bite wounds over her entire body and extensive blood loss, she died. Wildlife biologists determined the grisly incident to be a deliberate act of predation on the part of coywolves. A cross between a coyote and a wolf, coywolves are wild hybrid canines that differ from coyotes in that they have longer legs, larger jaws, smaller ears, and a longer body (4 to 5 feet, including tail), as well as a bushier tail. Coywolves are also heavier than coyotes, weighing anywhere from 35 to 45 pounds or more. In addition, coywolves tend to hunt in packs like wolves, whereas coyotes hunt by themselves or in pairs. “Coywolves are definitely different from the coyotes we have here in Ohio,” said Suzie Prange, PhD, a furbearer specialist and research biologist with the Ohio Division of Wildlife. “They’re larger because they have a bit more wolf DNA in them. Ohio coyotes tend to have more dog DNA.”

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A coyote (pictured at left) is smaller and more dog-like, while a wolf (pictured below) is burlier and significantly heavier. Coyotes typically outlive wolves in the wild. A coywolf (pictured at top of page 12) is a cross between the two, taking on the wolf-like tendency to hunt in packs.

COYOTE

WOLF

Prange explained that the hybriding process began about a century ago when wolves became extirpated from most of the U.S. east of the Mississippi. As a result, coyotes from western states began moving east, filling that predator niche. When they reached the Great Lakes, the population split, with some coyotes going north of the lakes into Canada and some going south into and through Ohio. Those that went north interbred with wolves, picking up wolf DNA; those that went south interbred with dogs, picking up dog DNA. Coywolves now inhabit eastern Canada, the New England states, and a few states along America’s eastern seaboard. So, are coywolves headed for Ohio? Prange said that she wouldn’t be surprised. “Probably what we’ll eventually see, due to interbreeding, are animals that are a little larger than the current coyotes in Ohio,” she said. “Coywolves are not necessarily more aggressive than coyotes toward hu-

mans and domestic animals, but because of their size, they could potentially be more dangerous to both.” However, Prange quickly added that she is more afraid of coydogs (a coyote-dog hybrid) than she would be of coywolves (a coyote-wolf hybrid), because coydogs are less afraid of humans. “When I’m in the field trapping for research purposes, and I trap a coyote, I’m not afraid of it,” she said. “Using proper techniques, the animal can be easily and safely handled. But if I catch a coydog or even a feral dog, and other such animals are hanging around in a pack, that can be a dangerous situation because those animals have a reduced fear of humans due to the dog DNA they possess.”  W.H. "CHIP" GROSS is Country Living’s outdoors editor. He would like to hear from you about any outdoor-related story you might like him to investigate, and can be reached by email at whchipgross@gmail.com.

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ICON

S T O R Y A N D P H O T O S BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

The Pine Club Dayton Location: South of downtown Dayton near the University of Dayton campus. Provenance: Housed in an understated brick building that originally contained a grocery store, The Pine Club has been in the same spot ever since Jim Sullivan started the steakhouse in 1947. After buying The Pine Club in the 1950s, Lloyd Meinzer enlarged its bar and dining room but kept the knotty pine paneling that not only inspired the restaurant’s name but also enhances its cozy atmosphere. Current owner David Hulme purchased The Pine Club in 1979. Although he periodically updates equipment, Hulme has carefully preserved the restaurant’s retro character and steaks-and-chops menu. “The Pine Club looks exactly as it did in 1947,” says Hulme. “The bar has the same stools and wooden railing, which is well-worn after 70 years of our wonderful customers’ elbows.” Significance: Now a Dayton landmark, The Pine Club is nationally known for its food and service. In recent years, the Food Network selected The Pine Club as one of the nation’s top two steakhouses; the New York Times named it — along with the “21” Club in New York and Bouillon Chartier in Paris — one of the world’s greatest old dining institutions; and food critics for publications such as Gourmet and Saveur have praised it as a consummate American steakhouse. What’s the secret of its success? Says Hulme: “We work hard to consistently provide value for our customers and build relationships with them.”

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Currently: After 70 years in business and four generations of customers, The Pine Club still hand-cuts steaks and makes everything from salad dressings to its ever-popular stewed tomatoes in-house. “The restaurant has served stewed tomatoes every night for 70 years, and I think I’d be run out of town if we ever took them off the menu,” says Hulme. While filet mignon, strip-loin, and bone-in ribeye are The Pine Club’s best-selling steaks, other signature dishes include shrimp cocktail, onion rings, and creamed spinach. In keeping with its old-school atmosphere, The Pine Club doesn’t serve desserts, accept credit cards, or take reservations. Even President George H.W. Bush and wife Barbara had to wait for a table. It’s a little-known fact that: The Pine Club sells a variety of boxes containing its steaks, salad dressings, and stewed tomatoes online, and every order includes Pine Club placemats and cocktail napkins.  The Pine Club, 1926 Brown St., Dayton, OH 45409. Opens at 4 p.m. Mon.–Sat. For additional information, telephone 937-228-5371 or visit www.thepineclub.com.

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FOOD SCENE

SOUP’S ON! There’s nothing like a bowl of hot soup to chase away wintertime chills. Made in a slow cooker or a Dutch oven, a fragrant concoction of meat, vegetables, and other ingredients provides a hearty ‘welcome home’ at the end of the day — with leftovers ideal for later lunches.

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R E C I P E S BY M A R G I E W U E B K E R A N D D I A N E YOA K A M P H O T O S BY C H E R Y L B AC H

FOOD SCENE

Wintertime Beef and Barley Soup 2 lbs. beef stew meat, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 Tbsp. canola oil 5 cups water 4 medium carrots, chopped 4 celery ribs, chopped 1 large onion, chopped 1 can (14½ oz.) diced tomatoes, undrained 2 Tbsp. tomato paste 1/3 cup frozen peas 4 tsp. beef bouillon granules 1 tsp. dried oregano 1 tsp. thyme

1 tsp. basil 1 tsp. parsley flakes ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 1 cup quick-cooking barley In a Dutch oven, brown meat in oil on all sides; drain. Add water, carrots, celery, onion, tomatoes, tomato paste, peas, bouillon, and seasonings. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 50 minutes or until meat is tender. Stir in barley; cover and simmer an additional 10 to 15 minutes longer or until barley is tender. Yields 8 servings.

Bean and Barley Soup

4 tsp. olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 medium fennel bulb, cored and chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 1 tsp. dried basil 1 (15 oz.) can cannellini or other white beans, rinsed 1 (14 oz.) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes 6 cups low-sodium vegetable broth ¾ cup quick-cooking barley 1 (5 oz.) package baby spinach ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese ¼ tsp. black pepper

Heat oil in large pot over medium-high heat. Add onion, fennel, garlic, and basil; cook, stirring frequently, until tender and just beginning to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Mash ½ cup beans. Stir the mashed and whole beans, tomatoes, broth, and barley into the pot. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the barley is tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in spinach and cook until wilted, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in cheese and pepper. Yields 6 to 8 servings. Per serving: 322 calories, 3.9 g total fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 19.3 g fiber and 18 g protein.

Lite Chicken Chili

4 cups chopped yellow onions (about 3 onions) 3 tsp. olive oil, plus more for chicken 1/8 cup minced garlic 2 red bell peppers, cored, seeded, and diced 2 yellow bell peppers, cored, seeded, and diced 1 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. ground cumin ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper, or to taste 2 tsp. sea salt, plus more for chicken 2 (28 oz.) cans whole peeled tomatoes, undrained ¼ cup fresh basil, minced 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized pieces Freshly ground black pepper

In large pot, cook onions in oil over medium-low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add bell peppers, spices, and salt. Cook for another minute, until fragrant. Crush tomatoes by hand or pulse 6 to 8 times using food processor until coarsely chopped. Add tomatoes and basil to the pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add diced raw chicken and simmer another 20 minutes. Season to taste with black pepper. Makes 6 servings. Per serving: 244 calories, 8.5 g total fat (1.9 g saturated fat), 4.3 g fiber and 24 g protein.

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2 whole skinless ch icken breasts 6 cups water 2 chopped onions 1 medium green pepper, diced 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves, mi nced 2 to 3 4-oz. cans chopped green chilies 1 to 2 diced jalape no peppers (remove seed and membrane to lessen heat) 2 tsp. ground cumi n

1-1/2 tsp. dried or egano 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper 1/2 tsp. salt 3-lb. jar navy bean s, undrained* 1 to 2 cups shredd ed cheese Sour cream Salsa

Place chicken in 5-quart slow cook er. Add water. Cover and cook on low 3 to 4 ho urs or until t ender. Remove ch icken from slow cooker, leaving broth. Cube and se t aside. Sauté onio ns and green peppers in oil in skillet about 3 to 5 minutes until softened. Add ga rlic and cook un til fragrant, 30 to 60 seconds long er. Add chilies, ja lapeno peppers, cumin, oregano, pe pper, and salt. Saut é 2 minutes before transferrin g to chicken brot h in slow cooker. Add navy beans. Cover and cook on low 30 to 60 minutes. Add chick en and cheese be fore serving, allowing meat to warm and cheese to melt. Top with sour cream and sa lsa before serving. *Note: To use dried navy beans, cover 3 cups navy beans with water in a saucepan, so aking overnight. Drain in the morn ing and cover wi th fresh water. Cook in saucepan on low 7 to 8 hour s or until t ender. Drain exce ss moisture before stirring into chicken and brot h. Yields 6 to 8 se rvings.

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Exceeding members’ expectations every day

Lpocal ages COOPERATIVE NEWS FOR FIRELANDS’ MEMBER-OWNERS BOARD OF TRUSTEES PRESIDENT, DISTRICT 7 • Dan McNaull VICE PRESIDENT, DISTRICT 2 • Lowell Kreager SECY./TREAS., DISTRICT 3 • Donna Woodworth DISTRICT 1 • Dan Schloemer DISTRICT 4 • Bruce Leimbach DISTRICT 5 • Carl Ayers DISTRICT 6 • Larry Messmore DISTRICT 8 • W.E. Anderson DISTRICT 9 • Neil Winslow

MANAGEMENT GENERAL MANAGER • April Bordas abordas@firelandsec.com FINANCE & ACCOUNTING • Tabi Shepherd tshepherd@firelandsec.com MEMBER SERVICES • Andrea Gravenhorst agravenhorst@firelandsec.com OPERATIONS & ENGINEERING • Denny Marugg dmarugg@firelandsec.com

OFFICE LOCATION & HOURS One Energy Place, P.O. Box 32 New London, OH 44851-0032 Monday – Friday: 8 A.M. – 5 P.M.

OUTAGE HOTLINE • 800-533-8658 www.FirelandsEC.com

My kids and grandkids always combed their gradeschool report cards for EEs, which signified they had attained the coveted “exceeds expectations” rating in aspects of school life that couldn’t be assigned a letter grade. As they grew, EEs turned into (we hoped) A’s and B’s. Yet, I don’t think any of them lost that desire to exceed expectations. At Firelands Electric Cooperative, we also strive for EEs every single day. We don’t want to do what you only expect us to do — provide you with affordable, safe, and reliable electric service. We want to go further and do better, from providing superior member service to offering programs that help you April Bordas save time and money. General Manager, Firelands Electric’s lineworkers are the public face Firelands Electric of our mission to exceed expectations. They routinely work in rough weather and put in long hours. But they do it gladly, because they care about doing an exceptional job for you. However, we have many people behind the scenes who also make our co-op the best it can be. Our operations team continually explores new technologies to improve service reliability. The cooperative’s new metering system improves accuracy and performance with helpful realtime data, allowing a variety of advanced, cost-saving applications to become possible, including outage management and “blink” monitoring. The cooperative’s accounting, billing, and member services departments work to make bill pay easier and more convenient with programs like Automatic Bank Draft, Budget Billing, and SmartHub account access. Our representatives want to make sure you have a positive and satisfying experience when you contact us for help, ensuring you won’t encounter an automated system when you call our office. And because we’re a cooperative, we have a special responsibility to support the communities we serve and exceed expectations there, too. That means we aim to improve the quality of life by collecting pop tabs for the Ronald McDonald House of Akron, gathering donation items for the USO of Northern Ohio during the holidays, and providing over $10,500 in scholarships annually to local high school students. There is a familiar saying that goes “There is no I in team.” That may be true, but our employees know there is a “me” in team, and it takes all of us doing our part to serve our members. Our team goes above and beyond in serving, which shows in our consistently high survey scores. I receive many notes and e-mails from members letting me know how our employees have exceeded their expectations. As your general manager, I could not be more proud of working along side such dedicated people. Whether it’s a power outage, a billing question, or a community event, we’re working hard to achieve those EEs from you every day. If you hear from us this spring asking for you to participate in our member satisfaction survey, please do so. This way, we’ll know if we’re meeting your expectations, exceeding them, or need to improve in a specific area.

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Transforming cookies into artwork BY TRACY GIBB

Some of Stephanie Lang’s favorite childhood memories revolve around decorating cutout cookies with her mom. She also fondly recalls her greataunt’s large assortment of cookie cutters. As an adult, Stephanie started her own cookie cutter collection and eventually began making treats for family and friends. Today, Stephanie owns nearly 500 cookie cutters and is known as “The Cookie Lady” by those who live in the New London area. About nine years ago, Stephanie shared several trays of her holiday cookies with co-workers at New London Local Schools, where she was substitute teaching. The festively decorated goodies were a huge hit, and several teachers put in requests for cookie orders that Christmas. Stephanie soon launched a Facebook page and her home-based business, Stephanie’s Cookies, started to take off. Stephanie specializes in cutout sugar cookies with intricate, royal-icing decorations. Each cookie is made from scratch and is decorated completely by hand, using designs that Stephanie creates. Expanding on her client’s theme, Stephanie sketches out precise designs for each style of cookie. She then uses a combination of handmade “stencils” and freehand techniques to re-create the designs in royal icing. The perfect icing spreads smoothly onto the cookies, while also being firm enough for piping and other embellishments. “Consistency of the icing is very important,” Stephanie says. A self-proclaimed perfectionist, Stephanie’s decorating style is very detail-oriented. From the tiny windows and doors on a house to the ruffles on the edge of a baby’s bib, her cookies are an impressive work of art. Stephanie Lang, pictured in Stephanie modestly downplays her artistic contributions, though. “My her home kitchen, has nearly cookies are not necessarily good because of the decorations, but because I 500 cookie cutters in her have a good recipe,” she says. collection. Probably the most time-consuming cookies that Stephanie makes are those that include creating a company logo out of icing. She enjoys the challenge of these designs, but Stephanie’s favorite cookies to craft are those for baby showers. Baby and wedding shower-themed cookies actually make up the largest portion of Stephanie’s orders, with January through March being her busiest months. Clients request anywhere from two to forty dozen cookies per order. Stephanie’s largest job to-date was the 500 lightbulb cookies that Firelands Electric Co-op ordered for their 2016 Annual Meeting this past June. In addition to her cookie business, Stephanie also works full time in the insurance industry. She doesn’t mind the hectic schedule, however. “When people love what you’re doing, it makes it all worthwhile,” she says. Stephanie can be reached at 419-606-6142. She can also be contacted by e-mail at heyslang22@gmail.com, or by searching for Stephanie’s Cookies on Facebook.

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Firelands Electric moves forward into 2017 with new leadership Leimbach and Winslow bring diverse skills and experience to the board Your electric cooperative serves 9,055 members throughout rural areas of Ashland, Huron, Lorain, and Richland counties. Firelands Electric’s service territory is composed of nine districts, which are each represented by a member — a trustee — who is elected to serve on the board of trustees that governs the operations of the electric cooperative. Each trustee serves a three-year term. Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Board of Trustees meet monthly with management to review, discuss, and approve issues. The board determines the strategic direction for Firelands Electric, reinforce the cooperative’s business strategy. They also approve key investment decisions, and set the rates to ensure the cooperative meets its financial responsibilities and stays focused on its memberdriven mission. Bruce Leimbach During the cooperative’s Annual Meeting this past June, Firelands Electric’s members elected Bruce Leimbach to represent the members of District 4, which was vacant last year following the passing of former trustee Darwin Anderson. Bruce brings financial knowledge to the cooperative’s board. He is currently a financial consultant with Civista Wealth Management and has 30 years of experience as an agricultural lender for the farm credit system, as well as four years of experience as a financial advisor. Farmers and ranchers formed America’s electric cooperatives more than 80 years ago to secure electricity in rural areas in order to better their lives. Today, co-ops bring that same spirit of purpose and cooperation to the changing needs of a new generation of cooperative owners. Bruce says that looking ahead into the next 80 years, the challenge for Firelands Electric will continue to be maintaining reliable service at competitive rates, especially with stagnant growth and rising costs. Bruce and his wife, Dana, have two grown children and two grandchildren. In addition to being active in civic organizations, such as Norwalk Kiwanis and New London Ruritan, Bruce attends the United Methodist Church in Clarksfield. He enjoys traveling with his family, gardening, reading, kayaking, hiking, and farming.

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Neil Winslow As announced in October, former trustee John Copley resigned from the cooperative’s board due to a change in his residency. The board filled the position in November by appointing Neil Winslow to represent the members of District 9. Neil brings a vast amount of business experience to Firelands Electric’s board. He is retired and has more than 43 years of experience in the human resources Bruce Leimbach field, where he has held director, District 4 vice president, and other leadership positions throughout his career. Neil says an important issue facing electric cooperatives today is continuing to deliver reliable electric power that is cost-effective. The everincreasing environmental regulations on the use of coal will make this an enduring challenge, though it must remain a priority for the sake of the members. Neil and his wife, Vickie, have five grown children and seven grandchildren — with their eighth grandchild expected very soon. Neil Neil Winslow and Vicki enjoy spending time with District 9 their family that extends from the Buckeye State to New York and Georgia. In addition to his involvement in organizations such as the Fitchville Conservation League, Neil is also active on the Village Council of New London and with the New London Rails to Trails group. In his spare time, aside from being with his children and grandchildren, Neil enjoys woodworking and outdoor activities, such as hiking and snow skiing. Looking ahead Both Bruce and Neil look forward to working with the other seven trustees on the Firelands Electric board and, despite potential challenges, plan for a successful year serving members. One thing is certain — 2017 is here, and Firelands Electric’s team of leaders is ready to serve the co-op’s members.

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Local teen urges students to apply for Youth Tour Last summer, Carrie Smith became one of nearly 50,000 students to participate in the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour since the late 1950s. Like many, Carrie had already visited Washington, D.C., as part of a middle school class trip. But, as this junior from New London High School is quick to point out, Youth Tour is not your eighth-grade trip. While the historic sites may be familiar, the experience is not. During Carrie’s previous visit to the nation’s capital, students were hustled from one Carrie Smith location to the next over Firelands Electric’s 2016 the span of just a few days. Youth Tour representative The weeklong Youth Tour, on the other hand, gave Carrie an in-depth look into the U.S. government. In addition to visits to the Supreme Court, the Capitol, and other historically significant locations, students also had the chance to meet and talk with their U.S. Representatives. “With a whole week, instead of just 3 to 4 days, you learn so much more than on the eighth-grade trip,” Carrie says. One of Carrie’s favorite aspects of Youth Tour was having the opportunity to meet other participants. Although students join up to 1,600 other attendees from electric co-ops across the country for certain events, the majority of the trip is spent with around 40 students from Ohio’s electric cooperatives. Spending an entire week with this small group creates a close-knit comradery among the students. Not only did last year’s students share typical teenage banter, but they also had extensive conversations about plans for the future, politics, and other serious subjects. Listening to others’ views and perspectives on these topics left a positive impression on Carrie. “It was interesting to hear other students’ thoughts and experiences,” she says. Carrie’s one wish is that more students would take advantage of the Youth Tour experience. The 20 B

June 9-15 number of applicants has been declining the last few years. “It’s a great experience. It’s sad that there aren’t more kids who apply,” she says. Carrie, the daughter of Clark and Donna Smith of New London, is active in band, track, and National Honor Society, so she knows first-hand how difficult it can be to fit Youth Tour into an already busy schedule. But, as Carrie points out, it is definitely worth it.

What is Youth Tour? The Electric Cooperative Youth Tour is an annual leadership program coordinated by Firelands Electric Co-op and Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. It’s a weeklong, all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., that gives high school students the opportunity to meet with their congressional leaders at the U.S. Capitol, make new friends from across the country, and see many of the famous sights in and around our nation’s capital. Electric cooperatives from 43 states will send nearly 1,600 students on the 2017 tour. Firelands Electric will choose up to two students to represent the co-op on this once-in-a-lifetime trip.

Applicants for Youth Tour... • must be a high school sophomore or junior. • must be a son, daughter, or legal ward of a Firelands member living on the cooperative’s lines and receiving electric service from the cooperative at the time of selection. • must submit a completed application, including essay, which is available on the Youth Tour Experience page at www.FirelandsEC.com.

Applications due February 1

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High School Seniors... Are your parents Firelands Electric Co-op members?

You could earn up to $5,000 in scholarships Academic Scholarship • Available in both boys’ and girls’ divisions. • Applicants must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale. • Finalists in the Firelands Electric scholarship competition will be interviewed on February 20. • First-place Firelands Electric Cooperative scholarship is $1,500. Runners-up will also receive scholarships. • The two first-place winners are eligible to compete for up to $3,500 in additional scholarships from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives.

Touchstone Energy® Achievement Scholarship • Applicants must have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.75 or above on a 4.0 scale. • Applicants must be able to describe the unique and substantial personal challenges that he/she experienced, which made achieving academic success difficult. • First-place Firelands Electric Cooperative scholarship is $500. • Winner will be eligible to compete for an additional $2,100 scholarship from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives.

Application deadline is February 1 Complete rules and applications are available by visiting the Scholarship Opportunities page at www.FirelandsEC.com, contacting the member services department at 1-800-533-8658, or by visiting your high school guidance department.

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NEW program recognizes

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Education helps shape the leaders of tomorrow. That’s why Firelands Electric includes it as one of our seven core principles. During 2017, the cooperative is introducing a new program to encourage students to strive for academic excellence. Students in grades 6-8 are invited to become part of “The A Team” and be recognized for their hard work and dedication to education.

Here’s how it works! • Students in grades 6-8, whose parents or guardians are members of Firelands Electric Co-op, are eligible to apply. • Students must have a minimum of three A’s on their most recent report card (less than six months old). • A copy of the report card must be submitted by mail to: Firelands Electric Co-op, Attn: The A Team, PO Box 32, One Energy Place, New London, OH 44851. Report cards may also be e-mailed to members@firelandsec.com. • Be sure to include the following information with your entry: student’s name, age, school, grade, address, phone number, parents’ name(s), and e-mail address (if applicable). • Entries will be put into a drawing for each grading period. Drawings will take place on Feb. 10, April 10, July 10, and Dec. 10. • Three students will win an iTunes gift card at each drawing. • Students can win only one prize per 12-month period. • Winners from each drawing will also have their photo published in an upcoming issue of Country Living magazine and will be featured on the co-op’s website and social media.

Firelands Electric Co-op employees step up for soldiers For the ninth year, Firelands Electric recently participated in the USO of Northern Ohio — Step Up For Soldiers campaign. The USO donation box was filled with nonperishable care-package items to be given to our men and women serving in uniform and their families. “Electric cooperatives have a long tradition of giving and helping neighbors. We are honored to support the brave men and women who are returning home to their families after serving our country,” says Andrea Gravenhorst, Firelands’ director of member services and communications. Cooperative employees, pictured left to right, are Ashley Allen, Vicki White, Tracy Gibb, Stephanie Loescher, Diane White, Kurt Shepherd, Cindy Thompson, Andrea Gravenhorst, and James Miller. 20 D

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BOARD MEETING highlights

Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Board of Trustees met Oct. 25 and covered the following items: • Board President Dan McNaull reported there were 47 new membership applications for approval by the board. • Director of Finance and Accounting Tabi Shepherd reviewed October financials and reported on billing department activities. • General Manager April Bordas discussed construction of a new headquarters facility with the board. She provided updates from the building committee that was appointed by the board president. Upon discussion, the board decided to hire a consultant to assist management with analyzing proposals from builders. The board also agreed to look at an option for purchasing a piece of property. • The board reviewed the cooperative’s service locations and locations policy. Following discussion, the board approved the amended policy. • General Manager April Bordas provided an update on the cooperative’s metering system. • The board reviewed the cooperative’s firearm policy. Following discussion, the board approved the amended policy. • Management presented a preliminary budget to the board for the year 2017 and advised that the proposed budget be discussed further at the November meeting. • The board appointed nominees to serve on the cooperative’s Operation Round Up® Board: Rose Wurm from District 1, Irene Merrilees from District 3, and Kevin Reidy from District 6 were selected to serve a three-year term each. • Director of Electric Operations Denny Marugg reported on recent projects in the operations department. • Line Superintendent Don Englet reported on recent line crew activities in October. • Director of Member Services and Communications Andrea Gravenhorst reported on recent communications pieces and discussed upcoming activities involving the member services department. Firelands Electric is democratically controlled and governed by local people committed to policies that result in a safe and reliable electric system, fair rates, financial responsibility, and superior member service. The cooperative’s next board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 24, at Firelands Electric’s office, located at One Energy Place, New London.

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Firelands Electric Co-op researches cost for a new all-in-one building As mentioned in Board President Dan McNaull’s speech during the cooperative’s Annual Meeting this past June, Firelands Electric’s office building has major structural damage. For the past fifteen months, the cooperative’s board has been exercising due diligence — researching costs to maintain and repair our current three facilities versus building a new structure that would incorporate the office and warehouses all under one roof. After an extensive review of our current facilities (age of buildings, land-locked, located in a floodplain, future repair and maintenance costs, etc.) and the financial implications, Firelands Electric’s board has decided to move forward to acquire a purchase-option on property and hire a design build firm. This will give the cooperative’s board and management accurate cost estimates and will allow them to take advantage of currently low interest rates. Having the cooperative’s facilities under one roof would improve the communication and efficiency of our current workforce, and provide a longlasting structure that would serve the co-op for many years into the future. Your board of trustees will keep members informed. Please stay tuned for details.

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The power of Firelands Electric Co-op’s Operation Round Up program Among electric cooperatives, there is a time-honored tradition of giving. From the dawn of the electric cooperative movement, it was all about neighbors helping neighbors. In 1995, Firelands Electric Cooperative’s Board of Trustees established a charitable trust fund known as Operation Round Up®,

which is voluntarily supported by members of the cooperative and is governed by a separate board of volunteers appointed by the cooperative’s board of trustees. What started as a simple idea at one co-op 28 years ago has now expanded to more than 250 electric co-ops nationwide. “Rounding up co-op members’ electric bills to the next dollar and using the extra change to do good work in your community has been a very successful program,” says Firelands’ General Manager April Bordas. People Fund Board Member Annis Strine, left, and Tonda Hockenberry, the director of Ashland County Oral Health Services, stand next to a new M11 sterilizer used to sterilize instruments, which replaced a 12-year-old unit.

ORGANIZATIONS Operation Round Up funding can be used to help local fire departments or rescue organizations obtain critical life-saving equipment; support area food banks, educational projects, libraries, or child care programs; or add much-needed community programs. For organizations, the maximum amount awarded is $10,000 per year. The service area for organizations includes Ashland, Huron, and Richland counties and Rochester and Brighton townships in Lorain County. INDIVIDUALS Operation Round Up can provide financial assistance to individuals facing extreme hardships and circumstances, such as funding to a family devastated by a fire or special equipment for the blind, paraplegics, or others. It is meant to help with one-time needs that cannot be fully met through other agencies. For individuals, the maximum amount awarded is $2,500 per year. A grant must be used for a specific purpose, and the vendor must be paid directly. The service area for individual applications includes Ashland and Huron counties; Rochester and Brighton townships in Lorain County; and Blooming Grove, Butler, Cass, Madison, Mifflin, Monroe, Plymouth, and Weller townships in Richland County.

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The average contribution is just 50 cents each month, or $6 per year. Presently, 84 percent of eligible members support the fund. Firelands’ Operation Round Up collects more than $40,000 each year, which is then distributed through charitable grants to local organizations and individuals facing extreme hardships. Your cooperative’s seventh guiding principle is “Concern for Community.” By rounding up electric bills and contributing the difference to Operation Round Up, members are donating money that stays in our local area to help those in need. “Your spare change truly can change lives by benefiting those in need in our community,” says Bordas. “We thank all those who participate in this program and applaud your efforts to help make our community a better place to live for children, families, neighbors, and friends.” Each electric co-op decides how it wants to operate the program, and the vast majority are governed by a board of volunteers that is separate from the co-op’s board of directors. This ensures that the decisions are made in the best interest of the community. The program is always

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voluntary, and at any time, members can change their minds about participating. But once folks see the good work the program does in their community, they almost always keep contributing. “While each co-op must respond to the needs of its members, one of the great attributes of electric co-ops across the country is their willingness to collaborate and share information about the programs that have been successful,” Bordas adds. “Operation Round Up is a perfect MAKINGexample A BIG DIFFERENCE IN YOUR of that cooperative spirit.” LOCAL AREA . . . WITH SMALL CHANGE! Operation Round Up is a community service program that is not meant to pay electric or other recurring bills. It is not intended Firelands’ Operation Round Up donated funds to purchase three flag poles for to be a sole source of funding or to the new Veterans Memorial located in New London. Commander Dave Smith, provide normal operating expenses shown left, stands with past Commander John Longbrake and People Fund of already existing programs or Board Member Cheri Raphael. organizations. If you are affiliated with a local charitable organization, or know of an area family that has a special need, contact Firelands’ Operation Round Up at 1-800-533-8658. Applications and information are available at www.FirelandsEC.com. Operation Round Up Report:

Firelands Electric People Fund, Inc.

MAKING A BIG DIFFERENCE IN YOUR LOCAL AREA . . . WITH SMALL CHANGE!

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Assist with medical expenses — Huron Co.

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Assist with funding for medical center phone lines — Ashland Co.

$

645

Assist with HVAC repair/replacements — Huron Co.

$

2,750

Assist with purchase of Haz-Mat equipment — Richland Co.

$

5,000

Assist with charitable organizations — Huron Co.

$

2,500

Assist with purchase of educational equipment — Huron Co.

$

2,606

Assist with funding for fair building repairs/upgrades — Huron Co.

$

5,000

Assist with funding for athletic field repairs — Ashland Co.

$

3,700

Assist with purchase of medical center equipment — Ashland Co.

$

5,595

Assist with charitable organizations — Richland Co.

$

5,000

Assist with youth organizations — Huron Co.

$

950

Assist with funding for building repairs — Huron Co.

$

910

Assist with charitable organizations — Ashland Co.

$

10,000

Assist with funding for U.S. flag for school — Huron Co.

$

2,500

Assist with purchase of Veterans Memorial flagpoles — Huron Co.

$

2,335

Assist with medical expenses — Ashland Co.

$

630

Total (November 2015—November 2016):

$

52,252

Total since Operation Round Up started in 1995:

$

991,402

2,131

JAN UARY 20 17   COU NTRY LI V I N G

20G

12/16/2016 3:52:00 PM


ENERGY matters Kick off the new year with improved energy efficiency Is your home using energy efficiently? Unless it was built quite recently to stringent energy standards, there are bound to be areas of your home where you can improve efficiency, save money, and reduce your carbon footprint. How tight is your house, and how much insulation is in your attic and walls? Are you paying to heat and cool your neighbor’s yard with all the cracks and holes in your home? Firelands Electric’s energy advisors can help you answer these questions, and also help you make better choices when investing your hard-earned money to improve your home’s energy efficiency. If you’re looking for ways to reduce your utility bills, thinking about home improvements, or purchasing a new heating/air conditioning system, your first step should be to schedule an energy consultation with your cooperative’s energy expert. FREE home energy consultations are available to all Firelands Electric members. Your cooperative’s energy advisor will visit your home and discuss your concerns and ideas, while making recommendations to help you maximize your energy savings. Whether you are considering a significant investment to improve the energy efficiency of your home or business, or just looking for ways to save on your monthly utility bills, Firelands Electric’s energy experts are ready to assist you in getting the most value for your money. When you are ready to improve the energy efficiency of your home or business and save money, contact Firelands Electric’s member services department to schedule a FREE energy consultation by calling 1-800-533-8658. If your schedule is too hectic and busy to schedule a home energy consultation, there is a viable alternative. Firelands Electric’s online energy efficiency tools are user-friendly and take only a few minutes to complete. Visit the cooperative’s energy education page at http://www.firelandsec.com/ content/energy-education, where you can access appliance and lighting calculators. The energy education page also has a home energy calculator 20 H

that can provide an assessment of your home’s energy efficiency in less than 10 minutes, and offers helpful tips on where your energy dollars are going. A word of caution when accessing online energy audit software provided by organizations other than utilities, government agencies, or universities. Unfortunately, some companies may try to obtain information to sell their own products and services. If you see phrases like “Learn what your power company does not want you to know” or the site looks like a marketing page, your co-op suggests moving on. Never provide any personal information outside of your physical address (for data accuracy) or an e-mail address. The bottom line? Choose the energy audit and resource that works for you, then implement as many of the recommendations as you can. Even taking small steps can add up to significant results, and you’ll see the benefits in your utility bills for years to come.

Energy Efficiency tip of the month According to the Consumer Electronics Association, the average household owns 24 consumer electronics products, which are responsible for 12 percent of household electricity use. ENERGY STAR-certified audio/ video equipment is up to 50 percent more efficient than conventional models. Source: energy.gov

C OUN T RY L IVING     JA NUA RY 2017

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2017 MEMBER PROGRAMS

2017 MEMBER PROGRAMS Phone: 1-800-533-8658 • Email: members@firelandsec.com Check out our website for the latest energy advice – www.FirelandsEC.com

PROGRAM TYPE APPLIANCE REBATES Refrigerator & freezer Dishwasher & clothes washer

AMOUNT $100* bill credit $50* bill credit

COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL (C&I) C&I custom lighting $1* per watt reduced based on lamp wattages C&I custom energy audit

50% of audit cost, up to $2,000*

C&I custom energy improvement

50% of improvements, up to $3,000*

LOAD MANAGEMENT REBATES Air-source heat pumps $500* Rebate

Dual fuel heat pumps

$250* Rebate

Geothermal systems

$800* Rebate

Electric water heaters

$300* Rebate $100* Bill Credit

WEATHERIZATION REBATES Air-sealing upgrades $400* Rebate Insulation upgrades $800* Rebate

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS* Replace an existing appliance with an ENERGY STAR®labeled appliance purchased between July 1, 2016, and June 16, 2017. Required documentation includes: proof of removal of old appliance, copy of the new appliance receipt, and proof of ENERGY STAR certification. Program is applicable for commercial and industrial business facilities located on cooperative lines only. Lighting at the facility must be used a minimum of 1,800 hours per year. Pre-approval of the project is required prior to installation. Program is applicable for commercial and industrial business facilities located on cooperative lines only, including agribusinesses. Audit must be performed by a professional auditing or engineering firm and must include an audit of electric energy use. Pre-approval of the project is required prior to audit. Program is applicable for commercial and industrial business facilities located on cooperative lines only, including agribusinesses. Improvements made must be recommendations from a C&I Energy Audit (see above). New or replacement all-electric air-source heat pump system that meets or exceeds Firelands’ energy efficiency standards: Split SEER 15.0, EER 12.5, HSPF 8.5; Package SEER 14.0, EER 12.0, HSPF 8.0. New or replacement dual fuel heat pump unit added to any fossil fuel (gas/propane/oil) furnace that meets or exceeds Firelands’ energy efficiency standards. Installation of a new or replacement geothermal system that meets or exceeds Firelands’ energy efficiency standards: EER 17.1, COP 3.6; Open Loop EER 21.1, COP 4.1. New construction or switching from fossil fuel. Qualifying 80-gallon tank or larger with an Energy Factor (E.F.) of 0.91 or higher. Installation of a qualifying 50-gallon tank or larger with an Energy Factor (E.F.) of 0.91 or higher. Air sealing and insulation upgrades must be installed by a licensed contractor. Do-it-yourself projects are not eligible for this rebate. All qualifying insulation and air sealing upgrades must be installed in an electrically heated residential home.

*A complete listing of specific eligibility requirements for all incentives is available on Firelands’ website, www.FirelandsEC.com. The cooperative’s budget for rebate programs

is limited, and offerslisting expire when are depleted on a first-come, first-served basis, or when is discontinued. Load management rebates and *A complete offunds specific eligibility requirements forthe allprogram incentives is available onprogram Firelands incentives require members to participate in the cooperative load management program by having a PeakBuster device installed on the applicable electric appliance. Electric’s website, www.FirelandsEC.com. The cooperative’s appliance and C&I rebate budget is Communicating and ductless HVAC systems, as well as solar, heat pump, on-demand, and tankless water heaters do not qualify. limited, and the offer expires when funds are depleted on a first-come, first-served basis, or when the program is discontinued. Load management program rebates and incentives require members to participate in the cooperative load management program by having a PeakBuster radio controlled switch (RCS) installed on the applicable electric appliance. Communicating and ductless HVAC systems, as well as solar, heat pump, on-demand and tankless water heaters do not qualify.

1-17-January.indd 11

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21

12/16/2016 3:52:02 PM


(Federal Communications Commission, 2014)

(Harris Poll, 2011)

(National Safety Council, 2014)

(Distraction.gov, 2012)

(National Safety Council, 2014) 22

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S T O R Y BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

THE

ICE MEN

COMETH

Perrysburg’s Winterfest is one of several 2017 festivals that will feature some of the world's best ice sculptors

Chad Hartson sits in a 2017 Lamborghini he carved out of ice for the 2016 Detroit International Auto Show.

JANUARY 2017

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Courtesy Butler County Visitors and Convention Bureau

THE HIGHLIGHT OF February’s Winterfest in Perrysburg will be the U.S. National Ice Carving Championship, but Chad Hartson, who owns one of the nation’s largest ice-sculpting companies — Ice Creations in Napoleon — and is himself a former world champion, won’t be a contender. “The National Ice Carving Association (NICA) sanctions the event,” explains Hartson. “Since I’m president of its board and helping organize the championship, I can’t be competing too.” A veteran of more than 100 ice-sculpting contests, Hartson led a team that carved seven fullsized cars — ranging from a 1957 Chevy to a 2017 Lamborghini — out of ice for Detroit’s 2016 International Auto Show. At Winterfest, not only will he be demonstrating his talents, but his company also is supplying the blocks of ice for the U.S. Nationals. “It’s the qualifying event for the cultural side of the Winter Olympics and will bring top ice sculptors to Perrysburg,” says Hartson. 24

Like many professional ice sculptors, Hartson was introduced to carving in culinary school. As a teenager, he worked in a restaurant in his hometown of Wauseon and later enrolled in the University of Akron’s culinary arts program with the goal of becoming a chef. The curriculum included learning to carve fruits and vegetables into decorative shapes, but Hartson further honed his skills by studying sculpture at the university. “I was able to take sculpture classes at the same time as I was getting culinary training,” he says. “Those classes led me into other art forms like ice, sand, and salt, and they helped me to refine what I do.” After culinary school, Hartson shifted from chef to sculptor and started Ice Creations in 1998. Today, he appears in the Food Network’s food art competitions, and his company produces everything from bagged ice cubes to drink luges to elegant ice centerpieces with state-of the-art computerized equipment.

opposite: W.C. Johnston/Getty Images

Damaine Vonada (2)

The ice sculptures (above) are always a big draw at the Hamilton IceFest, coming January 20–21. Fans and festival-goers are treated to a nearly endless variety of subjects.

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opposite: W.C. Johnston/Getty Images

JANUARY 2017

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l cou purchases last. Non-transferable. Origina Offer good while supplies4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day. presented. Valid through

26

Courtesy Chad Hartson/Ice Creations Damaine Vonada

Ice-A-Fair, Vermilion, Feb. 4, 2017 — the harbor town provides a picturesque setting for 60+ ice sculptures, Lolly the Trolley rides, and a flaming finale, the “Fire & Ice” tower. 440-963-0772; www. mainstreetvermilion.org Winterfest, Bowling Green, Feb. 10-12, 2017 — besides ice sculptures, it offers ice skating and hockey. 800-866-0046; www.visitbgohio.org Medina Ice Festival, Medina, Feb. 18-19, 2017 — luminous ice sculptures make Medina’s town square seem magical. www.mainstreetmedina.com

For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

Mohican Winter Fest, Loudonville, Jan. 13-17, 2017 — showcasing carvings by Aaron Costic from Broadview Heights’s Elegant Ice Creations, it includes ice dancing and model trains. 419-994-2519; www.discovermohican.com IceFest, Hamilton, Jan. 20-21, 2017 — the “City of Sculpture” is ideal for ice carvings, and this biennial event will present space-themed sculptures. www.cityofsculpture.org; www.gettothebc.com/ events.

On All Hand Tools

More Really Cool Festivals

• No Hassle Return Policy

When Hartson began his business, ice sculptures were a luxury item only seen at highend weddings and country club parties. Recent advances in tools and technology have dramatically reduced the man-hours needed to complete an ice sculpture, making them more affordable and sophisticated. “Twenty years ago,” notes Hartson, “we didn’t have the power tools, specialty bits, or die grinders that have resulted in today’s much more detailed and elaborate structures.” As ice sculptures increased in popularity, so did seasonal festivals where artful carvings helped to chase away the winter blues. “Ice sculpting events are a good fit for towns like Perrysburg that are lively during winter,” says Hartson. “They get people out of the house, bring them downtown, and help them be more active.” According to chairperson Kati McDougle, Winterfest 2017 will feature about 200 different ice sculptures that are either created during the competition or commissioned by Perrysburg businesses and organizations. The three-day event also includes wine and beer tastings, unique edibles from local restaurants, and an entertaining children’s area complete with costumed superheroes. “At Winterfest,” says McDougle, “people can do some shopping, enjoy all the activities, and watch ice sculptors bring their beautiful carvings to life.” 

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hft_countr


SUPER COUPON

ITEM 90899 shown 98025/69096

7 FUNCTION DIGITAL MULTIMETER

$1645 VALUE

Customer Rating

$319.01

comp at 99 $159.99

ITEM 61258 shown 61840/61297/68146

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SUPER COUPON

WOW SAVE 105

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL $

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19"

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$

R PE ON SU UP CO

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7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP

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2

ITEM 69115/69137 69249/69129/69121 877 shown

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$

17999

$269

comp at

$9999

SAVE $169

ITEM 69445 61858/69512 shown

1 TON CAPACITY FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

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LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

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EMERGENCY 39 LED TRIANGLE WORKLIGHT

ITEM 62158 shown 62417/62574

Batteries included.

$

ITEM 62289 61807 shown

SAVE 65%

$57.37

comp at

Fits flat screen TVs from 37" to 70".

2999

.com or by calling stores or HarborFreight LIMIT 6 - Good at our used with other discount or coupon or prior 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase with original receipt. purchases after 30 days last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be Offer good while supplies4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day. presented. Valid through

$1999

Customer Rating

• 176 lb. capacity

TILTING FLAT PANEL TV MOUNT

WOW SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

SAVE 2799 $79.99 $299 $399 $12.80 76%

comp at

$1999

ITEM 69262 69094/61916 2745 shown

LOW-PROFILE CREEPER

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

RIP

SAVE

JUMP STARTER

99

ITEM 38391 62376 62306 shown

$

479959

SAVE NOW

$

R 3-IN-1 PORTABLE PE ON SU UP Customer Rating POWER PACK WITH CO

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$17.99 75%

comp at

$399

ITEM 47873 shown 69005/61262

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE CLAW

4

$ 99

YOUR CHOICE

ITEM 69006 60715/60714

SAVE 77%

Customer Rating

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ITEM 95659 shown 61634/61952

15999

• 580 lb. capacity

$9999

$

$

SAVE 219

26", 4 DRAWER TOOL CART

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

HEAVY DUTY HAND TRUCK

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8999

$119.99

$ comp at

$

QUALITY TOOLS LOWEST PRICES EVERYDAY VALID NOW ON 5,000 + ITEMS

Most Vehicles • Weighs 34 lbs.

WITH ANY PURCHASE

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ANY SINGLE ITEM

OFF

capacity

ITEM 95061 shown 62775/62776/62973

SAVE 41%

comp at

$59.99

$3499

4199

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

Customer Rating

R PE ON SU UP CO • 600 lb.

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, automotive lifts, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, Bremen, CoverPro, Creekstone, Daytona, Diablo, Doyle, Drummond, Earthquake, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Lynxx, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Quinn, StormCat, Union, Viking. Not valid on prior purchases. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17.

Customer Rating

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2.5 HP, 21 GALLON 125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR ITEM 69091/61454 61693/62803/67847 shown

SAVE 347 $

17999comp at $497

$14999

$

calling 800-423-2567. Cannot or HarborFreight.com or by LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original be used with other discount Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original day. purchase with original receipt. through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per coupon must be presented. Valid

SAVE $259

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comp at

19999 $399 $5999

$13999

ER N RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON 12" SLIDING COMPOUND P O DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW SCUOUP ALUMINUM RACING JACK ITEM WITH LASER GUIDE 62160/62496 62516/68053 Customer Rating ITEM 61969/61970 60569 shown $ 69684 shown • 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts

$

comp at

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the "comp at" price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

calling 800-423-2567. Cannot LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot or HarborFreight.com or by LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original be used with other discount Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original day. purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original purchase with original receipt. through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day. coupon must be presented. Valid

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day. coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Courtesy Chad Hartson/Ice Creations

On All Hand Tools

• 700+ Stores Nationwide • Lifetime Warranty

Damaine Vonada

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices? We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 700+ Stores Nationwide. R 8750 PEAK/ PE ON 7000 RUNNING WATTS SU UP CO 13 HP (420 CC) GAS GENERATORS ITEM 68530/63086 69671/63085 shown ITEM 68525/69677 63087/63088 CALIFORNIA ONLY

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SAVE 469 $

52999

comp at

59999 $999

$ $

• 76 dB Noise Level

Customer Rating Wheel kit and battery sold separately.

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/21/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • No Hassle Return Policy

12/16/16 2:36 PM 11/4/16 2:49 PM

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•  COU NTRY L I V I N G

JANUARY 2017


S T O R Y A N D P H O T O S BY DA M A I N E V O N A DA

UNIVERSAL

LETTERING

Van Wert company made – and still makes! – history with the FFA jacket WHEN GENERAL MANAGER Cory Hoops gives tours of the Universal Lettering Company’s Van Wert facility to Future Farmers of America (FFA) members, it’s often an eye-opening experience for them. “I remember this schoolgirl telling us she had no idea that so much labor goes into producing FFA jackets,” says Hoops. “She was excited and amazed to see how hers was made.” Started in the 1920s to provide agricultural education, work experiences, and leadership training to farmboys, the National FFA Organization has evolved

into a congressionally chartered, intra-curricular organization that now includes girls, with specific provisions for including minorities and city kids. Some middle school and collegiate chapters exist, but most FFA members are high-schoolers studying everything from aquaculture and agribusiness to food science and natural resources. While the Indianapolis-based organization has experienced growth and change over the years, two FFA icons have remained constant — the blue and gold

Le

ne

d

the

On the wall at Universal Lettering is a display of FFA jackets from different eras — though they have stayed mostly the same since their 1933 debut. 28

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Anatomy of the

EMBLEM

Dating back to 1928, the venerable Future Farmers of America emblem that appears on members’ jackets consists of several symbols representing the FFA and agriculture. Here’s a guide to the emblem’s elements and their meanings. Eagle: Freedom Adapted from the U.S. coat of arms, the emblem’s eagle stands for our freedom and our ability to explore new agricultural horizons. Agricultural Education and FFA: Learning and Leadership The words and abbreviation displayed on the emblem indicate the combination of learning and leadership necessary for progressive agriculture.

Owl: Knowledge Traditionally associated with wisdom, the owl denotes the knowledge required for success in the industry of agriculture.

Plow: Labor and Tillage of the Soil Cultivating the soil is the backbone of agriculture and the historic basis of our nation’s strength.

True Colors The FFA colors – national blue and corn gold – were inspired by the star-studded blue field of the American flag and the nation’s golden fields of ripened corn. National blue likewise is the color of the FFA’s jackets.

Rising Sun: Progress The image for a new day signifies the prospect of a future filled with opportunities.

Cross-Section of an Ear of Corn: Unity Grown in every state of the nation, corn is the foundation crop of American agriculture, and thus a fitting foundation for the FFA emblem.

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A it

Cory Hoops, general manager of Universal Lettering, shows off one of the iconic FFA jackets that his company helped bring to the masses. 30

•

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emblem that adorns the back of every FFA jacket, and the blue corduroy jackets themselves. The jackets have been part of FFA’s official dress uniform for 84 years, and countless young people have worn them with pride. “The jacket gives FFA members confidence and makes them feel that they’re part of something larger than themselves because it’s so steeped in tradition,” notes Lee Anne Shiller, division director of the organization’s membership and merchandise services. The jacket originated after the advisor of the Fredericktown FFA chapter contacted Van Wert’s Universal Uniform Company. “Dr. Gus Lintner had seen a blue corduroy jacket with a chenille bulldog on the back in a store window,” says Hoops, “and he asked Universal Uniform, which was our company’s predecessor, to produce a similar one for his chapter.” When the Fredericktown band members sported them while performing at FFA’s 1933 national convention in Kansas City, the new jackets looked so handsome that the delegates voted to adopt the design. Styled with long sleeves, a pointed collar, and buckle tabs at the waist, the FFA jacket has stayed basically the same since 1933. “There have been only subtle changes because the jacket is so important to FFA members,” says Hoops. While jackets initially had front snaps, square pockets, and an embroidered emblem, current jackets have a zipper, rounded pockets, and a patch emblem. Until hard times forced it into bankruptcy in the late 1980s, Universal Uniform made about 150,000 FFA jackets annually. Lima CPA Mark Hoops and other investors revived the business in 1991. They renamed it Universal Lettering, acquired high-tech sewing and embroidery equipment, and eventually moved its operations to a modern industrial park. Today, Universal

A Universal Lettering employee works to assemble a jacket before it goes onto the embroidery machine (below).

FFA by the numbers n n

n n n

n

Student members – 649,355 Local chapters in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands – 7,859 Alumni members – 225,891 Alumni chapters – 1,934 Members’ annual earnings through hands-on work – $4 billion Six states with largest FFA membership: • Texas – 115,630 • California – 83,917 • Georgia – 40,881 • Oklahoma – 27,205 • Ohio – 25,806 • Missouri – 25,784

Lettering produces branded apparel as well as custom chenille patches for clients that include 4-H clubs, varsity sports teams, marching bands, corporations, and clothing companies. As for FFA jackets, most are now made in Vietnam, but Van Wert workers still play a major role in producing and delivering them. “Universal Lettering cuts and sews about 25 percent of all the jackets, but we do 100 percent of the embroidery and shipping to FFA members,” says Hoops. “We’ll ship about 80,000 jackets this year.” Each FFA jacket consists of 26 individual pieces of cotton fabric, and from attaching the emblem on the back panel to double-stitching seams, Universal Lettering employees complete 35 separate sewing operations to make a jacket. During the busy season, they turn out 1,000 jackets with customized embroidery every day. “Starting the second week in September, we embroider 24/7 for two months,” says Hoops. Imported FFA jackets cost $50, but for an extra $15, members can buy a made-in-the-USA jacket from Universal Lettering. For additional fees, the company also tailors new jackets and, in a nod to its singular FFA heritage, re-letters vintage ones. “Our workers put a lot of care into every stitch,” says Hoops. “They think about the extraordinary number of FFA jackets that have been made in Van Wert over the years, and some are FFA moms themselves.” 

For more information Universal Lettering Company — 419-238-9320; www.universallettering.com National FFA Organization — 317-802-6060; www.ffa.org JANUARY 2017

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Pr se Te on

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PRO SENIORS

Cincinnati company helps older citizens resolve issues that can arise with aging

MIDDLETOWN WAS ONCE a bustling steel and paper manufacturing hub along the banks of the Great Miami River in southwest Ohio. The majority of manufacturing jobs disappeared in the downsizing waves of the 1980s and 1990s, leaving behind an older population — including many elderly on fixed incomes and government assistance. It was against this backdrop that T.E. Baines, a volunteer for Middletown-based advocacy group Ohio Pro Seniors, met Bill Rogers, a longtime resident of the area. 32

Baines had given a presentation on navigating Medicare, and during the question-and-answer session afterward, Rogers spoke up and remarked that he was a victim of the very Medicare fraud that Baines was counseling how to prevent. “Did you report it to police?” Baines asked. Rogers said he had. In fact, a Middletown detective had been trying to get to the bottom of it for quite some time to no avail. The man had been receiving statements showing that a provider he had never heard of had been billing him

la a m r s to is li h

BY K E V I N W I L L I A M S

and Medicare for services he never received, and it was causing problems for Rogers when he went for his various medical appointments. Baines decided to get Pro Seniors involved. Pro Seniors, founded in 1975, is a nonprofit organization with a mandate to help society’s oldest members with the sometimes complicated issues of aging. The organization dispenses legal assistance, serves as a Medicare watchdog, and offers an ombudsman service for those in long-term care. Pro ’ mission is to help the quality of life for Ohioans

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Pro Seniors often draws crowds at its presentations (left), while volunteers such as Ted Baines (at right) work with individuals on their issues.

over 60. After a lot of sleuthing and backand-forth with Medicare and the errant biller, Pro Seniors figured out the problem and recovered the man’s money. In this case, Rogers hadn’t been a victim of anything intentionally malicious. His is a relatively common name, and an innocent mistake (a wrong digit was entered by someone, somewhere) had snowballed into a big problem. “Medicare can be confusing, but the answers are there if you know where to find them,” Baines says. His role gives him a great deal of fulfillment. “I like the idea of helping, and I believe in service,” he says. “I think part of being a citizen is doing more than your share.” Life for those in the aging population can be one of dizzying change and speed, even for the sharpest minds. And in a predominantly rural area without the menu of services that many cities are able to offer, that can add to a feeling of isolation. Pro Seniors serves as a lifeline to those in rural areas, with help literally a phone call away. The phone line is busy at Pro Seniors’ Cincinnati office. Calls to the legal hotline, which has served the state since 1981, come in from all over the state. Pro Seniors serves as a vital line of defense for older Ohioans, and services are available to any Ohioan age 60 or over. Retirement communities and senior centers across the state, in fact, practically have Pro Seniors on speed dial as a means to connect their customers with the help they need. “I have worked with Pro Seniors for many years and have referred hundreds of older adults and their family members to Pro Seniors,” says Karen Hill, director of independent living for the Otterbein Lifestyle Community, a senior

residential living complex in Warren County. “They do a wonderful job of sharing information and helping people with all kinds of concerns with their many different programs.” Scammers take advantage of a trusting population that has wealth, and Pro Seniors has become a versatile and valuable resource to combat these scams. “There are just so many more different types of media today to reach victims,” says Mary Day, program associate for Pro Seniors. “All the different ways of communicating today have created more opportunities to try to victimize that target audience. They are home, they pick up the phone and read every piece of mail.” While someone taken in by the

Jamaican lottery scam and others of its ilk have little chance of recovering their money, Pro Seniors can help ensure it never happens again by dispensing sound advice: “Close the bank account, notify credit bureaus, and we highly recommend a credit freeze,” Day says, adding that for $5 one’s credit can be essentially “locked” so that a would-be scammer runs into a firewall when trying to take out a loan or open a credit card. “We provide victims with information as to what their next step is, what their rights are and what their responsibilities are,” Day says. “We equip people to take the next step.”  KEVIN WILLIAMS is a freelance writer from Middletown.

Pro Seniors at a glance Founded in 1975, Pro Seniors, Inc., is a Cincinnati-based nonprofit organization dedicated to serving all Ohioans over the age of 60, regardless of income. Services offered include but are not limited to: n Help resolving Medicare claims and fraud issues via Pro Seniors' Senior Medicare Patrol. n Help with long-term care issues via the Pro Seniors ombudsman program. n Legal guidance and help with a variety of issues ranging from identity theft to tenant-landlord issues. Website: www.proseniors.org Phone: 513-345-4160 or toll-free in Ohio at-800-488-6070

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JANUARY 2017 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST THROUGH JAN. 8 – Hayes Train Special Exhibit, Hayes Museum, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Mon.–Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $7.50, Srs. $6.50, C. $3. 419-3322081 or www.rbhayes.org. JAN. 1 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, 5–8 p.m. $3, C. $2. 419-4232995 or http://nworrp.org. JAN. 3 – America’s Boating Course, Sandusky Power Squadron, 215 E. Market St., Sandusky, 6 p.m. This course provides you with basic boating knowledge to decide what type and size boat you need, what to do when meeting another boat in a crowded waterway, and how to recognize and handle hazards. 419-626-6655 or www.usps.org. JAN. 6 – Silver Screen Classics: Gone With the Wind, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo,7:30 p.m. $5. 419-2422787 or www.valentinetheatre.com. JAN. 7 – Silent Movie Night: Harold Lloyd’s Safety Last, Pemberville Opera House, 115 Main St., Pemberville, 7:30 p.m. Featuring Lynne Long on the piano. 419-2874848 or www.pembervilleoperahouse.org. JAN. 7–8 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, free for members, under 18 free. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns, knives, hunting equipment, and associated collectibles for purchase. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org. JAN. 13–14 – 6th Annual Camp Perry Open: Civilian Markmanship Program, 1000 N. Lawrence Rd., Port Clinton. This year’s match will include a three-position air rifle competition, an international air rifle (all standing) event, a pistol course of fire, and an optional clinic. Spectators welcome. 419635-2141 or http://thecmp.org. JAN. 18 – Dance Theatre of Harlem, Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St., Toledo, 7:30 p.m. 419-242-3490 or www.valentinetheatre.com. JAN. 21–22 – Lima Symphony: Mozart by Candlelight. Two locations: Trinity United Methodist Church, Lima, Sat. 7:30 p.m. Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Ottoville, Sun. 4 p.m. $20, Stds. $10. 419222-5701 or www.limasymphony.com. JAN. 26–29 – Greater Toledo Auto Show, Seagate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave.,Toledo, Thur. 3–9 p.m., Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $7, Srs./Stds. $5, under 9 free. Displays of the latest and greatest models and automotive technologies from 26 different manufacturers. 419-255-3300 or http://toledoautoshow.org.

34

PLEASE NOTE:­ Country Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Country Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ ohioec.org. Country Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

NORTHEAST THROUGH JAN. 8 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Over 75 life-size, handpainted nutcrackers in an outdoor display. 866-301-1787. THROUGH FEB. 28 – After Christmas Sale at Tis the Season, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Berlin. Save 50% storewide (collectibles not included) at Ohio’s largest year-round Christmas shop. 330-893-3604 or www.tistheseasonchristmas. com. JAN. 4–8 – Ohio RV Supershow, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Wed.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $13, under 12 free. $10 parking. America’s largest indoor recreational vehicle show. 330678-4489 or http://ohiorvshow.com. JAN. 7 – Snow Dogs Train Show, presented by Cuyahoga Valley S Gauge Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 150 tables. Buy, sell, or trade new and used trains. Watch operating layouts. 440-526-9864, 330-405-1425, macsir@aol.com, or www.cvsga.com.

J THROUGH JAN. 5 – “A Storybook Christmas,” Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 6–10 p.m. Drive by or walk to view the storybook-themed decorations at nearly 100 participating businesses. 740-455-8282, 800-743-2303, or www.visitzanesville.com.

JAN. 14–15 – Medina Gun Show, Medina Co. Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m $6. One of the area’s largest gun shows, with 450 vendor tables. 330-948-4400, jim@ conraddowdell.com, or www.conraddowdell. com. JAN. 21 – Northern Ohio Fly Fishing Expo, Cuyahoga Valley Career Ctr., 8001 Brecksville Rd., Brecksville, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $10, C. (13–18) $5, under 12 free. Demos, seminars, fishing gear and supplies, and more. http://ncff.net/ expo2017. JAN. 21 – “Genealogy Hacks: Tips, Tricks, and Techniques for Online Genealogy Research,” Richland Co. Chapter, Ohio Genealogical Society Meeting, OGS Library, 611 St. Rte. 97 W., Bellville, 1 p.m. Lecture by Mary Jamba. Free and open to the public! 419566-4560, sunda1960@yahoo.com, or www. rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohrichgs/. JAN. 27–29 – Cleveland Motorcycle Show, I-X Center, West and East High Bay, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $16, free for 11 and under. $10 parking. 216-265-7005 or http://motorcycleshows.com.

JAN. 7 – Antique and Collectible Old Toy Show, Lakeland Community College (AFC Auxiliary Gym), 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $6, C. (6-12) $2. Pressed steel, diecast, Japanese tin, mechanical toys and robots, dolls, and much more. Contact Tom at 216-470-5780 or www.neocollectibletoys.com.

JAN. 28 – Winter End Train Meet, presented by Great Lakes Division, Train Collectors Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. All-gauge show with over 175 tables. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. Watch operating layouts. Single ticket $6, Family $8, under 12 free. Parking free. 440-665-0882, emularz1124@aol.com, or www.greatlakesTCA.com.

JAN. 8 – Mohican Winter Hike, Mohican State Park, 3116 St. Rte. 3, Loudonville, 10 a.m–1 p.m. Choose from 5K, 10K, or a guided nature hike led by a park naturalist. Trails run from moderate to difficult. Campfire, hot soup, cookies, and drinks will be provided after the hike. 419-994-5125 or http://parks.ohiodnr. gov/Mohican.

JAN. 29 – Winter Model Train Show and Swap Meet, presented by Norwalk & Western Railroads, Eastern Division ,German’s Villa, 3330 Liberty Ave., Vermilion,10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 10 free. All scales, operating layouts and displays, model train supplies, railroad historical items, DVDs, videos and, books. 419706-8038 or www.norwalkandwesternrr.com.

JAN. 12–16 – Mid-America Boat Show, I-X Center, 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Thur.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.11 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, Srs. $12, free for 12 and under. 440-899-5009 or www.clevelandboatshow.com.

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Annual Collison Festival of Lights, 5601 Westfall Rd. SW, Lancaster, dusk to 10 p.m. 740-969-2283.

JAN. 13–15 – Mohican Winter Fest, 131 W. Main St., Loudonville. Free. See over 25 elegant ice sculptures. Ice carving demos, fire spinning, Train Expo, and entertainment. 419994-2519 or www.discovermohican.com.

CENTRAL THROUGH JAN. 2 – State Auto’s Christmas Corner, 518 E. Broad St., Columbus. Free. Historic life-sized Nativity display. Lighting times: Mon.–Thur. 6–8 a.m., 5–11:30 p.m., Fri. and Sat until 12:30 a.m. 614-464-4946 or www.facebook.com/ christmascorner.

JAN. 6–8 – Columbus Build, Remodel, and Landscape Expo, Greater Columbus Convention Ctr., Halls E and F, 400 N. High St., Columbus, Fri. 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, under 18 free. JAN. 6–15 – Ohio RV and Boat Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th St., Columbus, Wed.–Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $12, C. (6–13) $3, 5 and under free. www.ohiorvandboatshow.com. JAN. 7 – “Tea Blending for Wellness,” Ohio Herb Education Ctr., 110 Mill St., Gahanna, 1–2 p.m. Learn about dried and fresh herbs and how to mix them for healthful teas. 614-342-4380 or www.gahanna.gov. JAN. 20–22 – Midwest Sports Spectacular, Cardinal Hall, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave, Columbus, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. followed by auction, Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission on Fri., $10 for Sat./Sun. pass. Sports collector cards, vintage and new collectibles, memorabilia, autograph signings. http://goldstarsportsmarketing.com/MWSS-2017. JAN. 22 – Mutts Gone Nuts, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 3 p.m. Comedy duo Scott and Joan Houghton and their hilarious pack of pooches have created a comedy dog thrill show like no other. $15–$25, Stds. $10. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. JAN. 27 – Gas Pump Jockeys, Marion Palace Theatre, May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $15. Super-charged oldies/retro band takes audience on a musical journey back in time. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. JAN. 26–28 – 47th Annual Ohio Power Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $10/carload. Displays of new agricultural, construction, and outdoor power equipment from more than 500 companies. Educational seminars every day. 614-889-1309 or www.omeda.org/ powershow. JAN. 27–29 – Johnson’s Log Home and Timber Frame Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Rhodes Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 1–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Registration Sat./Sun. at 9:30 a.m. $12, under 18 free. www.loghomeshows.com. JAN. 29 – Wedding Expo and Show, Hilton Polaris, 8700 Lyra Dr., Columbus, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Fashion shows 12:30 and 2:30. $5 advance, $8 at door. 937-550-4138 or www. ohiobridalexpos.com.

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SOUTHEAST THROUGH JAN. 2 – Dickens Victorian Village, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge. Outdoor display of Dickens-era scenes and life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. THROUGH JAN. 2 – Guernsey Co. Courthouse Holiday Light Show, Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. JAN. 15 – Bridal and Prom Showcase, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 12–4 p.m. $5. 740-4397009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. JAN. 21 – Hocking Hills Winter Hike, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. See the beauty of Hocking Hills in the winter as you hike from Old Man's Cave to Ash Cave, with a stop at Cedar Falls for soup and muffins. 740685-6841 or www.hockinghills.com. JAN. 28 – Country on the Carpet, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 7 p.m. Put on your dancing shoes and enjoy a night full of country and bluegrass music. 740-439-7009 or www. pritchardlaughlin.com.

C O M P I L E D BY C O L L E E N R O M I C K C L A R K

JAN. 28 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, 3-4:30 p.m. $20. Tours depart from the monument on the Courthouse lawn and are guided by a costumed interpreter who leads the group from building to building. 740705-1873 or www.ohiomadegetaways.com.

JAN. 13–15 – Cincinnati Golf Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–9:30 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Deals on equipment and clothing, pro tips, and info about the best places to golf near and far. www. cincinnatigolfshow.com.

SOUTHWEST

JAN. 13–15, 18–22 – 60th Annual Cincinnati Travel, Sports, and Boat Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati. www.cincinnatiboatshow.com.

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Holiday Lights on the Hill, 1763 Hamilton-Cleves Rd., St. Rte. 128, Hamilton, Fri.–Sun. 6–10 p.m. $25 per car. 513-868-1234 or http://pyramidhill.org/ holiday-lights. THROUGH JAN. 3 – Christmas at the Junction, EnterTRAINment Junction, 7379 Squire Court, West Chester. Take a “Journey to the North Pole,” where you'll meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. 877-898-4656. JAN. 7–8 – Wedding Expo and Show, Dayton Convention Ctr., 22 E. Fifth St., Dayton, 11 a.m–4 p.m. $5 advance, $8 at door. Fashion shows 12:30 and 2:30. 937550-4138 or www.ohiobridalexpos.com.

JAN. 14–15 – 69th Annual Lebanon Antique Show and Sale, Warren Co. Fgds., 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Browse antique American and Continental furnishings and decorative arts, textiles, jewelry, primitives, folk art, and fine art. $8 at the door, $6 online. Good both days! Free to WCHS members. www.wchsmuseum.org. JAN. 14 – "A 2,000 Mile Voyage Down the Yukon River," Cedar Bog Nature Preserve, 980 Woodburn Rd., Urbana, 10 a.m. $10, $5 CBA/OHC members. Presented by Dave Dyer, Curator of Natural History, Ohio History Connection. 937-4843744, caerwin23@gmail.com, or www. cedarbognp.org.

JAN. 20–21 – IceFest, 345 High St., Hamilton. The largest ice carving festival in the region. This year’s theme: “To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before.” ice carving competition, ice sculptures on display. 513-844-8080 or www.cityofsculpture.org/icefest.html.

WEST VIRGINIA THROUGH JAN. 8 – Oglebay Winter Festival of Lights, Oglebay Resort and Conference Ctr., 465 Lodge Dr., Wheeling, Sun.–Thur. until 10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. until 11 p.m. World-famous light show covering 6 miles and featuring 80 larger-than-life displays. Per car donation is requested and is valid for the entire festival season.Trolley tours offered. 877-436-1797 or www.oglebay-resort.com/festival.html. JAN. 28 – 2017 Honey Bee Expo, West Virginia University–Parkersburg, Rte. 47. $20 advance, $25 at door, C. (under 12) $8. All-day conference dedicated to the honey bee and the hobby of beekeeping. Classes for all levels. www.movba.org.

Send us your photos! If we use your photo in our Member Interactive section, you’ll get a Country Living tumbler. For July, send us your favorite patriotic pictures depicting the American Spirit by Feb. 15. For August, send us photos of “It’s so hot!” by March 15. Guidelines: 1. One entry per household per month. 2. Upload your photos at www.ohioec. org/memberinteractive or by U.S. mail: Editor, Country Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. 3. Include your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, the month you’re submitting for, and who the person(s) in the photo is, as well as an explanation of the photo. If you do not provide this info, we cannot print your submission. 4. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want anything returned.

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MEMBER INTERACTIVE

IT’S SO

Much to our surprise, our cat, Chester, used to lie on the back of our dog, Rufus. I guess Rufus was much warmer than that cold ground! Needless to say, they were great friends.

COLD! Yellow shafted flicker in the snow. Janet E. Tyler Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

Lynne Smith Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

This is how cold it got in January 2015. It’s the Muskingum River at the dam near the Y-Bridge in Zanesville, Ohio. The falls pushed the thick ice and made it crack! Myron and Sharon Dawson Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative members

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My husband, Doug Miller, and me — this was taken about 50 yards straight out from the Marblehead lighthouse. It seemed like a balmy winter day with the hint of spring in the air when we decided to walk down, and we were shocked to find about 50 to 100 people already there. Lorie A. Wilber Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

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Janice Thomas South Central Power Company member

Four of the five Nestor children enjoying a cold 1970s winter day in New London. Margaret Nestor Firelands Electric Cooperative member

My granddaughter Rachel so bundled up, she couldn’t get up! Beth Schey Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member

Dakota Kiefer playing for the Butler County RedHawks. Karen Rupp Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member

My daughter Leonora tastes some snow and finds out it’s really cold! Lisa Zemancik Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative member

JANUARY 2017

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•  COU NTRY L I V I N G

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My son James Ferris in 2006, clearly too cold! Dawn Ferris Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

My granddaughter Aubrey Schwartz is too cold to move her arms to make a snow angel. Donna Montgomery South Central Power Company member

Wintry day at Jackson Lake in Oak Hill. Bobby Barnett Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

Send us your photos! If we use your photo, you’ll get a Country Living tumbler. For July, send us your favorite patriotic pictures depicting the American Spirit by Feb. 15. For August, send us photos of “It’s so hot!” by March 15. Guidelines: 1. One entry per household per month. 2. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive or by U.S. mail: Editor, Country Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. 3. Include your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, the month you’re submitting for, and who the person(s) in the photo is, as well as an explanation of the photo. If you do not provide this info, we cannot print your submission. 4. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want anything returned.

40

Our family dog, Baylee, out in the snow. Michael Hardin Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

C OU N TRY LIVING  JANUARY 2 01 7

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www.ohioec.org

DEMOCRATIC MEMBER CONTROL Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their consumer-members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions by electing fellow members to the board of trustees. These elected representatives are accountable to the entire membership.

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Country Living January 2017 Firelands  

Country Living January 2017 Firelands

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