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10 ⁄8 1013⁄16 3 10 ⁄4

University Cover and More team

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[contents]

May 2016 [cover]

Stock art. Grand Junction is a town that loves its baseball. Read more starting on page 16. F T lo L O

Kansas City 00499 Leat All 30 team

4

16

4 Viewpoint

20 Recipes

5 Letters

22 Gardening

Make sure you are ready to cast your ballot in this fall’s elections

6 Calendar 7

Co-op News

12

News Clips

Treat mom to a special breakfast in bed this Mother’s Day A few changes can help pollinators propagate in your garden

M 0 A

24 Outdoors

Use a Goddard caddis fly to catch a hungry, fat lake trout

ection 14 Power is GoodRefl Leather Co

Electric co-ops meet the challenge of providing reliable electricity

25 Energy Tips 29 Funny Stories 30 Discoveries

16 For the Love of Baseball

Grand Junction is one town that loves to cheer for theSeasons boys of summer of the

20 x x

Extra content:

coloradocountrylife.coop

This month’s online extras ➤D  ISCOVER things to do in May throughout Colorado ➤ LINK to more GJ Rockies baseball facts ➤ READ about Grand Junction’s Challenger baseball team for youth with disabilities ➤ FIND more recipe suggestions for mom’s special breakfast ➤ LEARN more about this month’s fun Discoveries in YouTube videos

00739 Leather and Labels - 00

Price

❏ Logo & Address

76%

of moms want flowers for Mother’s Day, according to a FTD survey

Job Code

June 17 the GJ Rockies 2016 season begins

Blue One Leat

®

Tracking Code

Scro Burg 0003 Labe

Yellow Snipe

$15 billion

increased annual crop value from bee pollination, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.

The official publication of the Colorado Rural Electric Association || Volume 47, Number 05 COMMUNICATIONS STAFF: Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor@303-455-4111; mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, Designer; cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING: Kris Wendtland@303-902-7276, advertising@coloradocountrylife.org; NCM@800-626-1181 SUBSCRIPTIONS: info@coloradocountrylife.org

❏ EDITORIAL: Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216; Phone: 303-455-4111 • Email: mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org • Website: coloradocountrylife.coop • Facebook: facebook.com/COCountryLife • Twitter: @COCountryLife Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly for $9/$15 per year by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 N. Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado.

Shipping POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 N. Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 Service

Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural ❏ electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual.

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[viewpoint]

Co-ops Vote

Make sure you are ready to cast your ballot in this fall’s elections BY KENT SINGER

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CREA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

We take a lot of things for granted in this country. We just assume that when we walk into grocery stores, we’ll be able to choose from an incredible variety of fresh produce, meat and dairy products. We assume further that whenever we pull up to Kent Singer a gas station, we can buy as much gasoline as we need, to go wherever we want. We know that every morning when we get up to start our day, the lights in the house will come on, the furnace and air conditioner will keep us comfortable and most of us will have clean water to drink and food in the refrigerator. We assume that in most cases the traffic lights will work and the roads, while sometimes congested and in need of repair, are still adequate to get us to our offices, schools or other destinations and back home again. While we’re moving about our communities to do our daily work, we assume that we are protected by our law enforcement officers and first responders and know that if we need help, it is generally just a phone call away. We assume that our elected leaders and governmental institutions, while certainly imperfect, will continue to protect our freedoms and look out for those among us who need a hand up. Most importantly, we assume that our votes will count in local, state and national elections and that the leaders we elect are legitimately empowered to represent us. But in order for our votes to be counted, we have to take the time to vote. Do you

4

MAY 2016

KSINGER@COLORADOREA.ORG

know what percentage of voting-age Americans voted in the last presidential election? According to a study done last year by the Pew Research Center, voter turnout in the United States in the 2012 presidential election was 53.6 percent. (That is 129.1 million votes cast for president out of an estimated voting-age population of 241 million.) So, just over half of the eligible voters in the United States voted in the 2012 presidential election. And while that number is not significantly different than in past elections (and, in fact, higher than elections in years without a presidential election), it strikes me that it is still a shockingly low number and one that all Americans should seek to improve. To that end, our national trade association, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, came up with a program that it calls “Co-ops Vote.” The intent of the program is simply to encourage all Americans, and especially electric co-op member-owners, to register and vote. I believe that in most electric co-op service territories across Colorado, our member-owners already have a much higher rate of civic participation, including voting, than most communities. Co-op folks are highly engaged in political matters and more likely than most to make the effort to vote. Nonetheless, if you have not registered to vote, you can go to the web page vote.coop and find out how to get registered.

Co-ops Vote is not a partisan political program. Neither NRECA nor the Colorado Rural Electric Association are advocating voting for any particular candidate or party. We are encouraging co-op member-owners to exercise their precious right of the franchise. Even if, like me, you are disgusted with the current level of “debate” in the presidential campaign, remember that you will also be voting for many state and local candidates who will be deciding important policy issues in Colorado for years to come. It’s easy to take the simple task of voting for granted since it’s a right that is so engrained in our lives. From the time we are children, we learn that decisions are made in a democracy by a vote of the people and that the right to vote is as fundamental to our way of life as freedom of speech and religion. This right is not recognized in many parts of the world. I am reminded of the images that came out of Iraq a few years ago where people who voted for the first time in their lives proudly displayed the purple ink on their fingers indicating they voted. Thankfully, we don’t have to risk our lives to exercise our right to vote. We hope you will live up to the promise of Co-ops Vote and make your voice heard this fall. As Benjamin Franklin famously said, we only have this great republic “if we can keep it.” Voting is the one way to preserve our democracy.

Kent Singer, Executive Director

coloradocountrylife.coop


[letters] Thanks for using my funny story (March ’16). You made my day. I’ve lived in Fowler all my life. My husband and I bought our place in 1953, so I have used Southeast Colorado Power forever. Enjoy the magazine very much.

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Praising the Electric Car

Since we own a 2012 Nissan LEAF, I read with interest the article “Comparing Plug-In Electric Vehicles to Conventional Vehicles” (April ’16). The electrical operation of the LEAF has been flawless and we have saved far more than the quoted 35 percent in maintenance. We have had no maintenance expense in the three years of operation. The tires came with a warranty that included free tire rotation at recommended intervals. Also, shortly after purchase we received a letter from Nissan extending our battery warranty to eight years or 80,000 miles. We regularly plug our LEAF into a conventional 120-volt, 20-amp circuit every night and have ample driving range for each day, approximately 100 miles. The increase in our monthly electric bill has averaged about $10 a month. Of course we don’t drive a lot, but we live in Nebraska and electricity is much cheaper than at our Colorado summer cabin. Since we charge at night we are using power from the wind farms that generate the most power at night. There couldn’t be a better solution for reducing greenhouse gases and for the electric utility to put excess night capacity to good use. Electric vehicles are a win-win solution for their owners and the power company. Loyal C. Park Sangre de Cristo Electric member Lincoln, Nebraska

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The Heritage Advantage

Generally, site built homes are more expensive, not because of what you get, but because of the inefficiencies of the building process!

Send Us a Letter Send your letter to the editor to 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. You must include your name and address to be published. Letters may be edited.

coloradocountrylife.coop

The Heritage System, using custom built modulars in conjunction with our local builders will save you money and assure you a higher quality home than what is possible when your home is built outside in the conventional manner. Not only can we guarantee you a FIRM PRICE, but Heritage Homes are 35% more energy efficient than requirements of existing building codes, which ends up saving you even more money! Call 1-800-759-2782 for a free catalog or to schedule a tour Monday through Friday 9am-4pm and Saturdays

your Life, your Home, your Heritage. 4

MAY 2016

5


[calendar]

May May 6 Mancos Mancos Valley Chorus Spring Concert Mancos United Methodist Church • 7 pm • 970-946-1267 May 7 Alamosa Generosity on Tap San Luis Valley Brewing Company • 6 pm • 719-588-5678 May 7 Greeley Kentucky Derby Gala The Barn on Lily’s Pond • 2 pm 970-356-5000 May 7-8 Pueblo Mother’s Day Weekend Special Pueblo Zoo • 9 am-4 pm pueblozoo.org May 8 Mancos Pictorial Copper Enameling Class Law Home Studio • 10 am-4 pm schoolofthewest.org May 12 Durango “Strategies for More Efficient Piecing” Quilting Class First United Methodist Church 5:30 pm • 970-247-9704 May 14 Evergreen Fly-Fishing Extravaganza Blue Quill Angler • 9 am-4 pm 303-674-4700 May 14 Grand Lake Gardeners’ Exchange Grand Lake Community House 12-4 pm • 970-627-3435 May 14 Limon Bingo Hub City Senior Center • 2-5 pm joyjohnson2012@gmail.com May 14-15 Livermore Craft and Art Show Historic Livermore Community Hall • 970-493-9262

6

MAY 2016

May 14 Loveland Plant Sale/Antique and Artisan Market All Saints’ Episcopal Church 9 am-2 pm • 970-342-9341 May 14 Peetz Energy Healing Class Peetz Community Center • 9:30 am-12:30 pm • practicalnatural life.com May 14 Salida Open House/Free Admission Salida Museum • 11 am-5 pm 719-539-7483 May 14 Sterling Tread for Trails Bike Ride Pioneer Park • 9 am • 970-522-9700 May 15 Drake Pancake Breakfast Big Thompson Canyon Association Building • 8 am-2 pm bigthompsoncanyonassociation.org May 20 Granby Celebration of Charles Lindbergh Transatlantic Flight Emily Warner Field Aviation Museum • 11 am-2 pm drpenny.hamilton@gmail.com May 21 Colorado Springs Colorado Craft Spirits Festival Dusty Loo Bon Vivant Theater 6-9 pm • 719-255-3232 May 21 Grand Junction Llama and Alpaca Show Mesa County Fairgrounds 8 am-4 pm • cajwdj@aol.com May 21 Silver Cliff and Westcliffe Brew With a View and Vino, Too Downtown • 1-5 pm • 719-371-3208 May 27 Fort Garland Fun Fridays at the Fort Fort Garland Museum & Pike’s Stockade • 10:30 am-3 pm 719-379-3512 May 27 Granby Around Granby History Author Book Signing City Market • 11 am-2 pm drpenny.hamilton@gmail.com

B-17 War Bird Tours and Flights

May 10, 10 am-5 pm, at the Jet Center at Colorado Springs Airport, Colorado Springs Don’t miss an opportunity to see one of the few remaining flyable World War II B-17s. Tours of the B-17G Flying Fortress Aluminum Overcast cost $10 per individual; $20 for families; free for military and children under age 8. For a price of $409 to $475, guests can even take a flight in this magnificent war bird. For more information, call 800-359-6217 or visit eaa72.org. May 28 Castle Rock Farm and Ranch Day CALF’s Lowell Ranch 10 am-2 pm • thecalf.org

June 4 Falcon Poker Run Various Falcon locations • 9 am 719-270-0896

May 28 Grand Lake Season Opening Kauffman House Museum 11 am-5 pm • 970-627-8324

June 4 Fort Collins “An Evening with Jack Slade & Friends” Benefit Hilton Hotel • 5:30-10 pm 970-495-1828

May 30 Grand Lake Memorial Day Parade Sombrero Stables to Grand Avenue • 10-11 am • 970-627-3402 May 30 Howard Memorial Day Pancake Breakfast • Howard Fire Station 7:30-10:30 am • 719-942-4213

June June 3 Buena Vista First Friday Wine Share Casa Del Rio Clubhouse 6-7:30 pm • 1stfridaywineshare.com June 3-4 Mancos Radical Dimensions in Glass Mosaic Class Mancos School of the West • 9 am-5 pm • schoolofthewest.org June 3 Pueblo Ansel Adams Classic Images Gala Sangre de Cristo Arts and Conference Center 719-295-7200 • sdc-arts.org

June 4 Glade Park Cowboy Poetry and Music Festival Community Center • 5-8 pm 970-263-4803 June 4 Palmer Lake Kids Fishing Derby Palmer Lake • 8 am-12 pm 719-648-0241 June 4 Trinidad Fishing Tournament Monument Lake Resort • 9 am 719-868-2249 June 8-11 Cortez Ute Mountain Roundup Rodeo Various Cortez Locations utemountainroundup.org

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS

TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE TO: Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303455-2807; or email calendar@ coloradocountrylife.org. For more information on these activities, visit coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Community Events and discover what’s happening. coloradocountrylife.coop


K.C. ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

[Country News] Plan to Attend K.C. Electric’s 70th Annual Meeting BY DAVID CHURCHWELL || GENERAL MANAGER

O

rum where you can let us know Once again, it’s annual meeting how we can better serve you. time. On behalf of K.C. Electric This is an occasion to discuss Association, I want to personally and learn more about the issues invite you to join us on Thursaffecting our local communiday, June 2 at Stratton High ties. It’s also an opportunity for School for our 70th Annual you to exercise one of the greatMeeting. There are 22 electric est benefits of being a member cooperatives in Colorado. K.C. of an electric cooperative: Electric, organized in 1946, is David Churchwell voting for the upcoming year’s the youngest electric cooperaboard of directors. tive in the state. I look forward to gathering K.C. Electric is not owned by faraway with you, the members of our cooperative investors and it is not run by an appointed community, to catch up, hear what you board of directors. It is run by a democrathave to say and enjoy some good food and ically-elected board of directors — a board fellowship. that has the privilege of serving because of This event is not only a chance to visit your vote. with members of our cooperative comOur directors are members of your community, it’s also a great opportunity to hear munity. They are concerned with the issues about programs offered by K.C. Electric you face every day because they face them, and get to know your cooperative staff. Our too. And don’t forget that members of K.C. annual meeting makes it possible for us to gather feedback from you by providing a fo- Electric are eligible to run for the board,

including you. A democratic and open election is one of the many elements that make our electric cooperative stand out from other utilities. Having a voice in who makes the major decisions that directly affect your life and your family is a right we all share as Americans. We all vote for our state and federal congressional representatives, but not every American has the right to vote for those who will represent community interests within their electric utility. You have that right, so why not exercise it? Rest assured, no matter what happens, we remain dedicated to providing you with safe, reliable and affordable electric service, but we encourage you to take part in helping us improve how we deliver that service. So make it a point to join us on June 2 at our 70th Annual Meeting. We promise we will make it worth your while. (Matthew Thelen acct# 603250005)

th K.C. ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION’S

ANNUAL MEETING THURSDAY, JUNE 2 STRATTON HIGH SCHOOL 6:30 P.M. REGISTRATION 7 P.M. MEETING

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE

coloradocountrylife.coop

4

MAY 2016

7


[Country News]

Capital Credits — We Need Your Help

O

One of the many things that sets K.C. Electric apart from an investor-owned utility is the fact that members are owners and therefore are entitled to a capital credit refund if financial conditions are favorable. K.C. Electric is currently trying to locate members who have unclaimed capital credits. In many cases, envelopes containing refunds were returned because of insufficient or incorrect addresses. Please look through the following list of members with unclaimed capital credits. If there is anyone on this list you can help us locate, please contact Kristie Constance at the Hugo office at 719-743-2431 or 800-700-3123 Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Annette Weber acct# 1119140000) Allen, Joe Allison, C Anne Anderson, Tiffany Annis, Jeff Apperson, Ed Ashcraft, Dawn Bachechi, Fred Banister, Wendy Barbey, William & Kimber Beattie, Darcy Beilman, Betty and Hogue, Barbara Belden, Michael Bellegarde, Shirley Bellis, Jerry Jr. Bishop, Donald Booher, Jerrold Borders, Floyd Carter, Melvin Colby, Charles & Candia Computer Data Services Connelley, Virginia Corliss, Verlin Cramblett, Troy & Rachel Cullens, Wayne & Jane Custer, Don D L Diesel Inc./Daniel Boswell Daldegan, Mark Davis, Kelli & Gain, Jay De Freese, Wade & Sybil Draht, Alice Duffield, Esther E Z Manufacturing Eastern Colo Preservation Society Esquibel, Perfeto Estep, Shane Etchart, Mary Ann Everist, Jaryl Fannin, Rodney Farley, Patrick Flos, Charles E. Forrestt, Alexander Fortune, Sheri & Harris, Mike Franklin, Mary Gadberry, Delores Galaxy Cablevision Gardner, Elva Garner, Dean & Rachelle Garner, Marvin Gibson, Michael Goodwin, Jamie

8

MAY 2016

Grosshans, Edward Hallaford, Gala Harrel Brothers/Dave Harrel Harrel, Mary Harris, Michael Hartley, Patsy Heartland Childcare Center Herrera, Carlos & Esneide Herring, Robert & Sharon Hill, Holly Hinkhouse, Leile Hittle, Mary Hoffman, John Hopper, Chris Howe, Chris Jackson, Phillip & Wendy Johnson, Bobby Johnson, David L. Jordan Drilling Fluids K N Gas Gathering Inc. Kampf, Henry Jr. Keener, Sue Koch, Gregory & Dawn Lance, Brandon Laverenz, Duane Leaming, William Lee, Jerome or Laurie Leger, Louis & Rose Legg, Germaine Lowe, Lara Luttrell, James Lyons, Gerry Mabe’s Café/Beth Bogenhagen Major, Brent Martinez, Melissa Mathies, Steven Mayo, Earl or Lori McKelvie, Leigh Ann Merkel, Laura Meyer, Edgar Molinaro, Sammie Myers, Gene Nadolski, Michael Newsam, Jackie O’Neal, Ron Ordonez, Daniel Palmer, Robert or Francine, D. C. Parr, Renee Pearson, Kristine Pharo, Trapper Phillips, Mark & Tracie

Phipps, William Pitts, A. J. Pratt, Stan & Melanie Prior, Gretchen Reed, Jennifer Reed, Ray Reilly, John Ritchey, Margaret Rivas, Joe & Ann Rodriguez, Carlos Rodriguez, Donna Salazar, Michelle Sanders, Rob & Marci Schneider, Melinda Schreiber, Fran Sellman, Howard Sheppard, Judy Sherman, Roberta Shull, Gladys Silvey, Gaylon & Kathy Simmons, Alice Simpson, Bryon Small Business Administration Smith, Steve & Linda Soto, Jesus & Alma

Sparks, Robert & Marilyn Spencer, Kirklin Sponsel, Ellen Sponsel, Ellen Stage Stop Motel/Susan Rumsey Stirewalt, Terri Stoker, Eldon Taylor, Gary The Flagler Inn Inc./Merlyn McDonald Thompson, Ida B. Thorade, Margaret Uhl, Michael and Robbie Van Cleave, Emmett Varela, Jose Louis Vela, Sherry Vick, Ronald Video USA/Ronald Robinson Webb, Edward & Nancy Wilk, Robert & Judy Wilmeth, Robert Wimmer, Ronald Wininger, Carol Wohlers, Gertrude Yonts, Keith

ALWAYS CALL 811

Even if you previously had utilities located by calling 811, it is best to call before every digging project. Underground utilities can shift, and it is important to be certain of where they are before ever putting a shovel in the ground.

coloradocountrylife.coop


[Country News] Controlled Burns and Power Poles are a Dangerous Mix

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Properly controlled burns can have many benefits for agricultural land. However, if these burns are not managed safely, they can result in property damage, power outages, injury and even death. K.C. Electric urges you to make safety a priority and shares important information on the special considerations that need to be taken around power lines. First, make yourself aware of laws and regulations. Burns should only be conducted by those who are experienced with fire and burn paths. Avoid burning near public roads or airports, as this can create a potentially dangerous visibility hazard. Alert all those who may be potentially affected by the burn, including neighbors, the local fire department and law enforcement. Depending on local regulations, you may also need to obtain a burn permit. Take special note of power poles and lines. Burning a power pole could result in a widespread power outage and be costly for the individual responsible for the fire. Cut down grass and weeds, and water the area near the poles to discourage fires from encroaching. Be careful to keep water streams out of power lines. If a power pole catches fire, call the fire department and alert your utility to handle the possible electrical dangers. Even if you think you put out the fire yourself, alert the utility to the fact that it caught fire. The creosote, a preservative, on the inside could still be burning the pole from the inside out. In addition, if the pole catches on fire, it could create shock or electrocution

hazards to those who may be nearby or spark fires in unintended directions from downed lines. Carbon particles in smoke can conduct electricity, and it is also possible for smoke produced during the burnings to conduct electricity and cause an electrical discharge from the line. To reduce this risk, the fire should not cross under power lines. Also keep environmental factors, such as temperature, humidity and wind direction and speed, in mind. The wind speed in the area should be low and in a steady direction to prevent the fire from getting out of control. As environmental factors are subject to change, check forecasts, as well as actual conditions, before you begin the burn. Ensure that you have the proper clothing, equipment and tools. For personal safety, all those near the flames should wear clothing made of natural fibers or approved for fire fighting. (Glenda Jaackson acct# 514400002)

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SAFETY AROUND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, VISIT SAFEELECTRICITY.ORG.

MAKE THE MOST OF CEILING FANS BY TURNING ON THE FAN, YOU CAN TURN UP THE SAVINGS! If you are like most Americans, you have at least one ceiling fan in your home. Ceiling fans help our indoor life feel more comfortable. They are a decorative addition to our homes and, if used properly, can help lower energy costs.

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TIPS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR CEILING FANS. 1. F  LIP THE SWITCH – Most ceiling fans have a switch near the blades. In warm months, flip the switch so that the blades operate in a counter clockwise direction, effectively producing a “wind chill” effect. Fans make the air near them feel cooler than it actually is. In winter, move the switch so the fan blades rotate clockwise, creating a gentle updraft. This pushes warm air down from the ceiling into occupied areas of the room. Regardless of the season, try operating the fan on its lowest setting. 2. A DJUST YOUR THERMOSTAT – In the summer, when using a fan in conjunction with an air conditioner, or instead of it, you can turn your thermostat up three to five degrees without any reduction in comfort. This saves money since a fan is less costly to run than an air conditioner. In the winter, lower your thermostat’s set point by the same amount. Ceiling fans push the warm air from the ceiling back down toward the living space, which means the furnace won’t turn on as frequently.

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3. CHOOSE THE RIGHT SIZE – Make sure your ceiling fan is the right size for the room. A fan that is 36-44 inches in diameter will cool rooms up to 225 square feet. A fan that is 52 inches or more should be used to cool a larger space. 4. TURN IT OFF – When the room is unoccupied, turn the fan off. Fans are intended to cool people - not rooms.

coloradocountrylife.coop

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[Country News] THE COUNTRY KITCHEN CALIFORNIA SUNSHINE CAKE 1 box lemon supreme cake mix 1 box lemon Jell-O ¾ cup water ¾ cup oil 4 eggs Glaze ¼ cup lemon juice 1 cup confectioners’ sugar Mix all cake ingredients and bake in a 9- by 13-inch baking pan at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Mix glaze while the cake is baking. While the cake is still warm, prick all over with toothpick and pour glaze over baked cake. (Use all the glaze—that’s what makes this cake so moist.) (Ethel McCaffrey acct# 1111205001) Lian Emmerling, Hugo

RAISIN COOKIES

STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION K.C. Electric Association is the recipient of federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, veteran status and any other status protected by law, reprisal or because all or part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD). This association is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a civil rights complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form found online at http://www. ascr.usda.gov/complaint_ filing_cust.html or at any USDA office or call 866-632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter by mail to U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax to 202-690-7442 or by email to program.intake@ usda.gov.

CLAIM YOUR CREDIT ON YOUR BILL

1 cup water 2 cups raisins 1 cup shortening 1 ¾ cups white sugar 2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 ½ cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup chopped nuts Bring water and raisins to a boil, cook 3 minutes and let cool (do not drain). Cream shortening and sugar until well blended, then add eggs and vanilla. Sift flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt and gradually stir into creamed mixture. Stir in the nuts and the raisins and liquid and mix well. Drop by teaspoon about 2 inches apart on greased or nonstick cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-14 minutes. Leave on baking sheet for a minute and then finish cooling on wire racks. Makes about 6 dozen. (WIN Dallas Vaughn ACCT# 940750003)

Each month, K.C. Electric offers consumers a chance to earn a $10 credit on their next electric bill. If you recognize your 10-digit account number in this magazine, call 719-743-2431 and ask for your credit. It couldn’t be easier. In March, William Kernan of Cheyenne Wells, Phil Stolz of Bethune and Duane Charles of Flagler called to claim their credits and Carl Randel of Kit Carson called to win a prize. Get acquainted with your account number, read your Colorado Country Life magazine and pick up the phone. That’s all the energy you’ll need to claim your energy bucks. You must claim your credit during the month in which your name appears in the magazine (check the date on the front cover).

Yvonne Schallenberger, Kit Carson 10

MAY 2016

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2-Year TV Price Guarantee Offer Terms and Conditions ASK ABOUT ASK ABOUT HIGH-SPEED INTERNET Offer available for new and qualified former customers HIGH-SPEED Qualification:INTERNET Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 8/3/16. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $49.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 Plus programming package, Local channels and Regional Sports Networks (where available), and monthly 1st receiver and HD service fees. Included in 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($64.99 for AT200, $74.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($7 per additional TV, higher fees may apply for advanced receivers), and monthly DVR service fees ($10). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or $49.99 advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), Protection Plan, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: Subject to credit qualification. After 3 mos., you will be billed $60/mo. for HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8/mo. for Protection Plan unless you call to cancel. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard Ask about high-speed internet professional installation only. © 2016 DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC.

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[news clips] Colorado Country Life Bringing Electric Co-op News to You

For more than 60 years, Colorado Country Life (originally called the Colorado REA News) has brought electric news and a variety of other consumer information to members of electric cooperatives throughout Colorado. The magazine, now sent to more than 218,000 co-op members across the state, is the most effective and economical way for your local electric cooperative to send FEATHERED you, a member of SKIES that co-op, information on a monthly basis. You will find information on your co-op, its board, its annual meeting, its rates and more inside the magazine throughout the year. There are also articles on ways to save money on your electric bill, how to make your home more energy efficient and what you may need to know if you are thinking of adding solar panels to your home or switching to a geothermal heating system. The information varies and is new each month. And all of this information comes to you for a cost of only 37 cents per magazine. By working cooperatively, your electric co-op is keeping you connected. Let us know how we are doing. Send letters to info@coloradocountrylife.org. Or mail them to 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216. February 2016

U.S. Electric Use Drops in 2015 Total retail electricity sales in 2015 fell 1.1 percent from the previous year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is the fifth time in the past eight years that electricity consumption has fallen. The lower usage reflects declining industrial use and little or no growth among residential and commercial customers, despite a boost in the number of households and building space. EIA attributes the drop to increasing efficiency of electricity-using equipment, a slowing economy and weaker manufacturing. —CFC Solutions 12

MAY 2016

Governor Signs Co-op Election Bill

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Two minor changes in electric co-op election law became official once Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) signed Senate Bill 16-055 into law in March. The bill, supported by the Colorado Rural Electric Association and its member co-ops, clarified that ballots for co-op elections can be counted whether or not they are inside the provided secrecy envelope. SB 16-055 also clarified how candidates can inspect ballots after an election. On hand for a photo of the governor signing the bill were Jaclyn Terwey of Intermountain Rural Electric Association, CREA Executive Director Kent Singer, CREA Board President Jack Schneider, John Liss of IREA, CREA Director of Government Relations Geoff Hier and Senate sponsor Sen. Kevin Grantham (R). House sponsor Rep. Dominick Moreno (D) was unable to attend.

Best Batteries for Energy Storage? TRY LITHIUM-ION A new study from Lux Research finds that lithium-ion batteries will likely remain the standard for stationary energy storage well into the future. The report, “The Next Generation Battery Roadmap,” claims that the biggest growth in battery storage will come from “gradually evolving lithium-ion batteries that incorporate incremental innovations like higher-voltage cathodes and electrolytes, paired with higher-capacity active materials like silicon-containing composites.” Forecasts have the lithium-ion battery storage market growing from $775.4 million in 2015 to more than $15.8 billion by 2024.

BEWARE OF SCAMS One of the latest scams electric co-ops members are reporting involves someone calling to say that a new energy provider has taken over the co-op. That is not true. The caller then requests that payments be sent to the new company. When those payments are sent to the new address, the unsuspecting co-op member then gets a past due notice from the co-op. Other scams reported involve a co-op member being called and warned that a bill is past due. The member is then asked to pay via phone immediately so that the power will not be shut off. If you have a question about whether or not a caller is actually from the co-op, hang up and call your electric co-op directly. coloradocountrylife.coop


[news clips]

Co-ops Search for Best LEDs By Michael W. Kahn, Electric Co-op Today

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By Derrill Holly, Electric Co-op Today

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at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Michigan to help develop LPN Optimal Resiliency Model software, Spiers said. “The tool will identify the most costeffective upgrades that utilities can make to improve grid resiliency.” Plans call for completion of the project by the end of the 2018 fiscal year. “Modernizing the U.S. electrical grid is essential to… keeping the lights on,” said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz in a prepared statement announcing funding for a number of grid improvements and research projects. Moniz added that public-private partnerships are key in strengthening the nation’s electrical infrastructure for the decades ahead. —ECT.coop

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Co-ops Work to Lessen Outages

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Figuring out which LEDs to buy can be harder than assembling IKEA furniture. “There are a lot of LED options out there, and options are often viewed as a luxury to have. But the only problem is you have to sift through them, because there are better LEDs than others,” said Joshua McGhee, strategic communications manager at Touchstone Energy. Electric co-ops around the country are working with their local municipalities and other governmental units on updating street lighting and other outdoor lights with LED lamps. It is important for the co-ops to recommend what is going to work best for the situation and be most cost effective because outdoor lightening is a big expense for cities, towns and schools. “What I would encourage is informed skepticism. You’ve got to know the right questions to ask,” said David Korow, senior lighting specialist at the General Electric Lighting Research Center. “And then you need to be able to verify what was said.” A key issue is life span. Many in the industry base it on LED lumen maintenance, a measure of how well a lamp maintains its light output over time. Korow likened that to “basing the life of your computer on the backspace key. “What about everything else?” he asked, rattling off a long list including drivers, controls, connections, gaskets and housings. Korow said GE’s research shows the weak link in the system is not the LEDs. Instead, researchers are finding that the driver often goes first. Korow suggested testing LEDs and getting public feedback, which is what Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association did when Windsor city officials approached the co-op about replacing some 550 streetlights. “We had samples provided by the vendors,” said David White, member relations manager at Fort Collins-based PVREA. After a review by co-op engineering and operations staff, the samples were deployed, mainly in parks. The town put a map of where to find them on its website. This was to raise public awareness of what the co-op and town planned, White said. PVREA really encouraged residents to take a look at these different lights and share their views on the amount and color of light. “The public really got to participate,” White said. “We received a lot of positive feedback.”

Electric cooperatives are playing a key role in developing strategies to reduce economic losses caused by weather-related power outages while improving the resiliency of the nation’s power grid. Under a $1.8 million U.S. Department of Energy grant, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association is helping develop open source software designed to identify cost-effective upgrades for electric grid components to reduce damage and speed recovery from extreme weather events. “With more than 2.5 million miles of distribution line and transmission components serving 47 states, our member cooperatives face every weather extreme common to North America,” said Jim Spiers, NRECA’s vice president of business and technology strategies. NRECA will work with research partners

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[industry]

Power is Good Reliable electricity is becoming even more reliable BY PAUL WESSLUND

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Your electricity is on almost all the time. You know that. But you might not know the amount of time it’s on is getting better every year. Electricity has become so reliable that the numbers for a typical American home sound crazy. For most people, the total amount of time without power because of an outage is less than two hours a year. That means their electricity is on 99.977169 percent of the time. “You can’t have 100 percent reliability all the time on something as large as an electric distribution system,” says Tony Thomas, principal engineer at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. And although the U.S. electric service on-time number is just a decimal point from perfect, Thomas says, “Reliability has been getting much better.” To understand the improvements in electric utility reliability, you need to be introduced to what Thomas says are known as “the three sisters”: the acronyms SAIDI, CAIDI and SAIFI. Those stand for different ways to measure how power outages affect consumers. Here’s what they mean: SAIDI shows how long an average customer goes without power during a year. It stands for System Average Interruption Duration Index. It’s calculated by dividing all of a utility’s power interruptions by the number of customers that utility serves. Analysts caution against citing a national SAIDI average because of the huge differences in utilities across the country and how data is collected. But a report from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers puts the typical customer as being without power 115 minutes a year. SAIDI numbers do not include extremely long or short outages, since they could drastically skew the results among utilities and

make the numbers less useful. Extremely long outages, like those caused by a major storm, can sometimes last more than a day. The short outages that are not included in SAIDI are, for example, cases like a utility circuit breaker quickly opening and closing. SAIFI shows how often the power goes out for each customer. It stands for System Average Interruption Frequency Index. It’s calculated by dividing the number of customer interruptions by the number of customers. CAIDI shows the average time it takes to restore power after an outage. It stands for Customer Average Interruption Duration Index. It’s calculated by dividing SAIDI by SAIFI. All three of those reliability measures improved over the past few years, according to IEEE reports. The amount of time a utility customer was without electricity for the year (SAIDI) declined about 20 percent in the most recent four years of figures — from 143 minutes in 2011 to 115 minutes in 2014. The number of outages per typical consumer in a year (SAIFI) went down from 1.16 to 1.07. And how long each of those outages lasted (CAIDI) declined from 117 minutes in 2011 to 104 minutes in 2014. Thomas credits advances in utility technology for those improvements. More and more mechanical electric meters are being replaced with automated meters that do more than just measure the bulk use of electricity coming to the meter at your house. They can also monitor whether electricity is delivered to your house at all, as well as the voltage quality of that electricity. “With automated meters, utilities can know a consumer is out of power before the consumer knows it,” Thomas says.

“Reliability has been getting much better.”

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Another step toward utilities spotting and solving outages faster is the more widespread adoption of high-tech monitoring systems. These SCADA systems, or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems, are typically set up as several computer monitors in a control room, each showing a different view of the utility’s service area, including weather maps and detailed schematics of each power line, substation and home or business served. “Prices have dropped for SCADA systems, just like for all software in the last few years,” Thomas says. “Utility technology has gotten a lot better in the last 10 years.” Thomas credits electric cooperatives with making special use of technology to overcome the barriers of long distances between members. Outages and other routine changes in power flow can be more quickly and easily addressed remotely, without having to make a long drive to a home or substation. “Rural electric co-ops have done an amazing job of adopting technology and putting it to use,” Thomas says. “And all this technology just translates into better operation of the electric system.” Colorado Rural Electric Association Executive Director Kent Singer agrees: “Co-ops have a great track record when it comes to keeping the lights on.” But what about the future? “Co-ops will be challenged to continue this amazing level of service as more intermittent sources of electricity are integrated into the grid,” Singer said. “That will not be easy.” Paul Wesslund writes on cooperative issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, based in Arlington, Virginia.

coloradocountrylife.coop

[industry] The Rise of Reliability The reliability of electricity has improved over the past few years. The chart below shows about a 20 percent decline in the amount of time a typical consumer in the United States was without power. This number is known as SAIDI, the System Average Interruption Duration Index. The time of each power outage decreased to 104 minutes. This is called CAIDI, Customer Average Interruption Duration Index. And the number of outages experienced by a typical consumer declined to an average of 1.07 a year. This number is called SAIFI, System Average Interruption Frequency Index.

SAIDI

2011 2012 2013 2014

(minutes) 143 126 115 115

CAIDI

(minutes) 117 110 107 104

SAIFI

(number of interruptions) 1.16 1.08 1.08 1.07

Source: IEEE Benchmark, 2nd and 3rd quartiles.

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[feature]

FOR THE LOVE OF

BASEBALL Grand Junction cheers on the boys of summer BY SHARON SULLIVAN

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Grand Junction has long been a baseball town. Signed bats and balls are displayed in residents’ homes; special jerseys are pulled out of closets for specific games; and doors are opened to players who come to town to play the game they all love. The home of Linda Romer Todd and her husband, Buzz Washington, is one that prominently displays a variety of baseball memorabilia. A dozen framed and autographed photographs of Todd’s favorite major league players cover an entire wall. Another wall is dedicated to their hometown team, the Grand Junction Rockies, a minor league affiliate of the Colorado Rockies. Two dozen signed baseballs and numerous bats and baseball caps from team members take up the space. Their granddaughter, Todd says, has a jersey from a Junior College (JUCO) Baseball World Series player. Apparently, a love of baseball runs in the family. Dick and Charlie Monfort, principal owners of the GJ Rockies, bought the baseball franchise in 2011, when it was located in 16

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Casper, Wyoming, and the team was called the Casper Ghosts. The following year, the owners moved the team to its current home and renamed the organization the Grand Junction Rockies. “A lot of municipalities were interested in securing the minor league enterprise,” says GJ Rockies General Manager Tim Ray. “The owners knew when they bought it they eventually wanted to move the franchise to Colorado. Number one on their list was Grand Junction because of the history of baseball here, set by JUCO. Our community takes a tremendous amount of pride hosting the JUCO tournament.” The Junior College Baseball World Series came to Grand Junction in 1959, a year after JUCO’s first-ever tournament, which took place in Oklahoma. The athletic director of what was then Mesa College was at that game and was determined to bring JUCO to Grand Junction, Ray says. He and the college’s baseball coach, plus Dale Hollingsworth, former executive director of the Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce, succeeded in putting coloradocountrylife.coop


[feature] JUCO games, a weeklong tournament that starts Memorial Day. Referred to as the short season rookie team, the GJ Rockies play at the first level of professional baseball in Colorado. Players advance from there to Class A, High A, Double A and Triple A leagues, with the goal of eventually playing for the Colorado Rockies major league team. It is a journey that typically takes three to five years, Ray says. The GJ Rockies will kick off its 2016 season at home June 17, when it competes against the Orem Owlz, a minor league affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels. The 76-game season wraps up September 8, followed by about three weeks of playoffs. When the minor league team arrived in Grand Junction in 2012, the organization sought community members to host both the players and coaches for the season. Todd immediately volunteered her home and was assigned former GJ Rockies Manager Tony Diaz, who was later named development supervisor. She and her husband are looking forward to their fifth summer of hosting Diaz. “We’ve become like family,” Todd says. “I get Christmas, Thanksgiving and happy Mother’s Day calls from wherever he is” — even when he’s in the Dominican Republic visiting his mother. Approximately 20 Grand Valley families open their homes to the young men who come from all over the country to play baseball for the summer. Strong bonds are formed between players and their host families, many of whom end up following the players throughout their careers. Carma Brown says she never expected together a winning bid to host JUCO. The tournament has been held in Grand Junction ever since. “It made $157 profit that first year,” says Jamie Hamilton, JUCO chairman and chief executive officer of Home Loan Insurance Company in Grand Junction. “Last year cash flow (was) about $310,000.” Hamilton played professionally with the California Angels before returning to Grand Junction in 1981, where he coached Mesa College baseball for four years and co-directed JUCO. Linda Romer Todd and her husband buy season tickets each year to the GJ Rockies — whose season spans the summer — and the Alpine Bank-sponsored coloradocountrylife.coop

to become a baseball mom after her own kids grew up and moved out. She laughs when she tells how she initially declined when asked to host a GJ Rockies player for the season. Brown and her husband, Nick, had recently become empty nesters. However, after repeated requests, Brown reconsidered. She consulted her husband who surprised her with his reply: “Baseball has been good for our family, with our boys. If these kids need help, of course they can live here.” They agreed to take in two players that first summer four years ago. A week later a representative of player development for the Colorado Rockies called, asking, “Our first round draft player is coming to Grand Junction. Can he live with you? You’re the perfect fit for him.” That’s how the Browns ended up with three players that summer and every year since. One of these rookies was Eddie Butler, who has 19 starts in the major leagues with the Colorado Rockies. “We’re still really close, four years later,” Brown says, who beams when she talks about any of the players she’s hosted, all of whom she considers like family. “We were there when Eddie made his debut in the big league two years ago when he pitched against the Los Angeles Dodgers. It’s so fun when kids get moved up because we know them.” Four of the 10 players the Browns hosted over the years were in spring training in Scottsdale, Arizona, this year. “We try and go to spring training every year to see all the boys,” Brown says. Brown, a personal insurance manager for Home Loan Insurance, met Butler and his girlfriend in Scottsdale for several days recently when she went there for work. In October, she’s planning to travel to South Carolina to attend the wedding of another former GJ Rockies player and houseguest.

Linda Romer Todd shows off a variety of baseball memorabilia in her Grand Junction home.

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SUPLIZIO FIELD AT STOCKER STADIUM

Home of the Grand Junction Rockies and JUCO World Series Photo courtesy of the Grand Junction Rockies

While host families are not paid, the baseball franchise provides the players’ lunch before the games and dinner afterward — which helps keep host families’ food costs down. “We do it for the love of baseball and kids,” Brown says. Even players like Butler, who end up with a big sign-

2016 ALPINE BANK JUNIOR COLLEGE WORLD SERIES MAY 28, 2016 - JUNE 4, 2016

Suplizio Field, Grand Junction, CO The Alpine Bank Junior College Baseball World Series has been a staple event in Grand Junction for over 50 years. JUCO draws amazing young baseball players full of talent, commitment and enthusiasm. Players, coaches and fans are all swept up in the thrilling moments of America’s favorite pastime.

TICKET INFORMATION

• Fans purchasing tickets for the first time can buy online at monumentalevents.com, clicking on the information link for the tournament, or at jucogj. org, clicking on ticket information under the “Visitor Info” tab. First-time season ticket buyers can also pay by phone with a credit card by calling 800-626-8497. • Fans who are renewing the same seats they had last year may call 800-626-8497 and renew with a credit card over the phone. • Reserved grandstands series passes are $76 through the end of January, with reserved “Tower” seats $152. • General admission passes are also on sale online at $35 for adults or $25 for students and senior citizens.

JUCOGJ.ORG Information above from jucogj.org and monumentalevents.com

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MAY 2016

ing bonus, “at home, they’re just another kid,” she says. Several former baseball players found their way back to Grand Junction after playing in the JUCO tournament and other summer leagues. Suplizio Field in Stocker Stadium, where both the GJ Rockies and JUCO games take place, was named for Sam Suplizio, who played for the former Grand Junction Eagles team, before being drafted by the New York Yankees. When an arm injury cut his career short, the Pennsylvania native returned to Grand Junction and immediately became involved with JUCO. Andy Weaver is a former JUCO player, originally from Kansas, who also decided to make Grand Junction his home. At a JUCO banquet before the start of the 1994 tournament, Weaver noticed a pretty blonde waitress who was serving the table where he was seated. He ultimately asked her to dinner, and she came to the games to root for his team. Although Weaver’s team lost that year, he won a girlfriend. The couple conducted a long-distance relationship for the next two years while he played minor league baseball around the country. “JUCO has given me an amazing wife and four great kids,” says Weaver, who currently serves on the JUCO committee. “Our boys have been very active in baseball.” More than 100,000 spectators attend the JUCO tournament, Weaver says. “The economic impact is great for our community. We can showcase what western Colorado life is like.” The all-volunteer JUCO committee, comprised of 80-plus community members, presented the Grand Junction City

Council with $800,000 toward the remodel of Stocker Stadium and $30,000 for a new scoreboard. JUCO also financially contributed to the Tower, a multiuser complex at the stadium, serving sports and civic audiences. JUCO proceeds have provided $50,000 in scholarships to local students to further their education, and $250,000 for Colorado Mesa University’s clubhouse. Additionally, JUCO funded dugouts at Grand Junction High School and a scoreboard for Grand Mesa Little League. Grand Junction’s minor league team contributes financially to the community as well. Each year, the GJ Rockies buys the varsity uniforms for Grand Valley’s four high school baseball teams. The organization also donates to various local nonprofits and gives money to JUCO. In 2013, the GJ Rockies won the national John Henry Moss Community Service Award. Only one out of 160 teams across the nation receives the award each year. “It signifies our ownership is very committed to the community of Grand Junction in terms of time, energy and resources,” Ray says. Todd says she prefers watching JUCO and GJ Rockies games to major league baseball because of the closeness between players and community members. “At JUCO and Rockies levels, you can still touch the players,” she says. “It’s fun watching players from both the Rockies and JUCO go down on their knees to talk to a child. It’s pretty special.” Local Little Leaguers accompany their adult minor league counterparts onto the field to sing the national anthem before the GJ Rockies games. Local teenagers are hired to be batboys for the season. coloradocountrylife.coop


2016 HOME SEASON SCHEDULE

GJ Rockies’ new president, Joe Kubly, says his goal is to provide a family friendly atmosphere that’s affordable, and where fans will leave with a smile at the end of the day. And, with that, a town can enjoy the summer filled with the game it loves.

(Below) Carma Brown and Eddie Butler at a game during his 2012 rookie year with the Grand Junction Rockies.

Photo courtesy of Darrell Gilbert

Photo courtesy of Carma Brown

Photo courtesy of Carma Brown

Freelance writer Sharon Sullivan is based in Grand Junction and enjoys exploring what makes the Grand Valley the special and unique place it is. Her work appears in several Western Slope publications and now in Colorado Country Life.

Friday, June 17

Orem

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 18

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Friday, June 24

Idaho Falls

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 25

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Sunday, June 26

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Monday, June 27

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Monday, July 4

Orem

6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, July 5

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Friday, July 8

Ogden

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 9

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Sunday, July 10

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Monday, July 11

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Thursday, July 21

Billings

7:05 p.m.

Friday, July 22

Billings

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 23

Billings

7:05 p.m.

Sunday, July 24

Billings

7:05 p.m.

Monday, July 25

Great Falls

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday, July 26

Great Falls

7:05 p.m.

Wednesday, July 27

Great Falls

7:05 p.m.

Thursday, August 4

Missoula

7:05 p.m.

Friday, August 5

Missoula

6:30 p.m.

Saturday, August 6

Missoula

7:05 p.m.

Sunday, August 7

Missoula

7:05 p.m.

Monday, August 8

Helena

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday, August 9

Helena

7:05 p.m.

Wednesday, August 10

Helena

7:05 p.m.

Saturday, August 20

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Sunday, August 21

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Monday, August 22

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday, August 23

Idaho Falls

7:05 p.m.

Above left: (left to right) Dylan Stamey, Nick Brown, Carma Brown, Correlle Prime (behind Carma), Ryan McMahan, Dom Nunez and Jordan Patterson.

Sunday, August 28

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Monday, August 29

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday, August 30

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Wednesday, August 31

Orem

7:05 p.m.

Above right: The Colorado Rockies MLB mascot, Dinger, stops by the Grand Junction Rockies game for “Mascot Day.”

Monday, September 5

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday, September 6

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Wednesday, September 7

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Thursday, September 8

Ogden

7:05 p.m.

Left: The view of Suplizio Field from the stands.

PIONEER ALL-STAR GAME Tuesday, August 2

Ogden

Photo courtesy of Darrell Gilbert

READ about how the GJ Rockies support the Challenger program for kids with disabilities at coloradocountrylife.coop. coloradocountrylife.coop

For more information or ticket pricing visit

GJROCKIES.COM

4

MAY 2016

19


[recipes]

Serving Up Love and Gratitude

This Mother’s Day, treat mom to breakfast in bed BY AMY HIGGINS Drop a Line In addition to your culinary masterpiece, express your love for mom by putting it in writing. Spell out “I Love You” or create a simple heart using whipped cream, syrup or pieces of fruit somewhere on the dish. Have more to say? Slip a short note with your sentiments next to her cup of coffee.

B

RECIPES@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

Breakfast in bed is a surefire way to make mom feel special this Mother’s Day. This simple gesture will keep her smiling on this special holiday and for weeks to come, all the while creating a fond memory that lasts a lifetime. So start her day on a high note with one of these quick yet scrumptious breakfast recipes. Just don’t forget to do the dishes and clean up when you’re done.

Skillet Eggs and Polenta Breakfast 1 cup mushrooms, sliced

1 cup red bell pepper, cut into strips 1 cup zucchini, halved lengthwise and sliced into half-moons 1 jar (32 ounces) marinara sauce 2 1/2 cups low fat or fat free milk salt, to taste 1/2 cup finely ground polenta 2 teaspoons olive oil 4 eggs Fresh basil, chopped Spray a large nonstick skillet. Over medium-high heat, cook mushrooms, bell pepper and zucchini until vegetables soften slightly, about 3 minutes. Add marinara and simmer to heat through. Reduce heat to low and

TIP

Lose the Grit Is food sticking to your nonstick skillet? Try using baking soda along with your normal soap and water. If that doesn’t work, fill the skillet with water and a half cup of vinegar and bring it to a boil. The residue should lift more easily.

20

MAY 2016

Savory Oatmeal With SoftCooked Egg and Bacon

keep warm.

1 cup low fat milk 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats, uncooked 1 pinch sea salt 1 teaspoon cooking oil (or 1/2-second spray) 1 large egg 1 tablespoon cheddar cheese, shredded 1 slice cooked bacon, coarsely chopped 2 teaspoons green onion, sliced salt and pepper, to taste

constantly to prevent lumps from forming. Cook until

Combine milk, oats and salt and cook according to package instructions. While oats cook, heat small, nonstick skillet over medium heat. Lightly coat with cooking oil. Add egg and cook about 3-4 minutes for runny yolk. Place oatmeal in a bowl and top with egg, cheese, bacon and green onion. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately with 8-ounce glass of milk. Courtesy of Milk Life

Bring milk and salt to a boil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Slowly whisk in polenta, stirring thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and keep warm. Heat olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Carefully crack eggs into pan and cook until whites are set and yolks are cooked to desired doneness, 4 to 6 minutes. To serve, divide polenta among four shallow serving bowls; top with marinara and an egg. Sprinkle with chopped basil. Serve with 8-ounce glass of milk and whole wheat toast with jelly.

Courtesy of Milk Life

For more tasty special breakfast recipes, visit coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Recipes.

coloradocountrylife.coop


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4

MAY 2016

21


[gardening]

Help Pollinators Propagate in Your Garden Your garden can care for bees, butterflies and birds BY VICKI SPENCER

O

MASTER GARDENER

Over the past few years, we heard a lot about declines in native pollinator populations. This is a serious matter since there are multiple stressors and the world’s food production relies on pollinators. But sitting in my Gunnison backyard, I have to admit, it doesn’t feel like there is a crisis looming. Bees are buzzing everywhere. Hummingbirds are visiting during their migration and native birds are flocking to bathe in the pond. Last year, I even saw an increase in butterflies and butterfly moths. Why all this activity? My backyard is one big, incredible pollinator garden. I wish I could take full credit, but the previous owner provided the basic design. The yard is only 30-by-50 feet and is well-protected from the wind. My house sits on the west, juniper trees border the north with a 50-foot-high blue spruce in the northeast corner, wild roses and golden currant bushes grow against a tall brick wall on the east and a 6-foot fence borders the south. Tall grasses grow in a natural area under the conifer trees, and dried needles, branches and flowering woody shrubs provide plenty of pollinator shelter and nesting sites. The yard is divided into five different garden beds with narrow, grassy paths that guide you from one bed to another. On the north, there is a cluster of three aspen trees, bunches of raspberry bushes, flowering vines, bleeding heart, yarrow and strawberries. Just to the south is a small pond surrounded by more raspberry bushes, pascal flowers, flax and lilies. The center garden bed is a focal point for most of the activity. Bees swarm to lavender, lupine, lilies, blanket flowers and Rocky Mountain penstemon. Russian and silver sage, clover and various ground covers keep the weeds at bay. To the south is my columbine garden with five colorful varieties, sticky geraniums, harebells and asters. Morning glories and hops grow up the trellises that run along the patio, connecting the gardens, and provide the perfect perch for birds waiting to dip into the pond. The fifth garden borders the shrubs along the

22

MAY 2016

GARDENING@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG east wall and includes western yarrow, butterfly milkweed, blue flax, wild roses and sunflowers. If you want to turn your garden into a haven for pollinators, you can find all kinds of information on the Internet, but here are a few tips: • Consider planting flowering shrubs along the borders to provide protection from the wind. Some good choices are rabbitbrush, serviceberry, Wood’s rose and American plum.

butterflies, you should research their host plants. For example, monarch butter• Choose plants that flower at different flies lay their eggs on milkweed plants. times of the year so there will be nectar Most bees nest in the ground, in wood and pollen sources throughout the or dry plant stems. When pruning, you growing season. A good rule of thumb can provide bee nesting sites by cutting is to begin with nine plant varieties: stems that are hollow or soft inside, like three that bloom early, three that bloom raspberries, roses, sumac and coneflower, midsummer and three that bloom and leaving some stems about a foot high. late. The flowers should be of different Instead of cutting back dead plants in the colors and shapes to attract different fall, leave them over the winter to provide pollinators, but you want to plant each a seed source and habitat for birds and variety in clusters, rather than single as other wildlife, then cut back in the spring. plants. The colors will stand out more The Xerces Society website, xerces.org, and attract pollinators more effectively. is a good resource for planning your pollinator garden. Look for the techni• Finally, you should choose native cal note, “Plants for Pollinators in the plants whenever possible. This is Intermountain West.” It includes a table because native plants will attract of plants, their colors, when they bloom more native pollinators and can serve and which pollinators they attract. If you as larval host plants for some of the already have a flower garden, you might pollinator species. Native plants have only need to add a few new plants, or the added benefit of being wellmake some simple adjustments in how you adapted to local soils and climates. garden. It won’t be long before you can watch all the pollinators busily at work. Don’t feel compelled to cover the entire yard with plants and grass. Instead, Love gardening? preserve some natural areas with bare, Read previous gardening columns well-drained soil and dead or dying plants. at coloradocountrylife.coop. Hummingbirds typically nest in trees and Click on Gardening. shrubs. Butterflies often lay eggs on specific plants. If you want to attract certain

coloradocountrylife.coop


[ gardening] Put Some Buzz in Your Landscape BY GEORGE WEIGEL Did you know that the pollination efforts of bees are behind one of every three bites of food we eat as a typical American? That accounts for some $15 billion a year in U.S. crop services, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But pollinator populations have dwindled in recent years. Home gardeners can help remedy the situation with a few simple gardening habits. Start by eliminating invasive plants. Most of these are aggressive, nonnative species that aren’t that attractive to pollinators to start with. Their biggest threat is elbowing out natives that are of high pollinator value. Some of the worst invasive plants throughout much of the United States are tree of heaven, Oriental bittersweet, Japanese honeysuckle, the oxeye daisy, Russian olive and the multiflora rose. But while you are busy pulling out the invasive plants, don’t be too much of a “neatnik.” Tolerate cosmetic and temporary plant damage because some of that damage is from caterpillars that are in the larval stage of becoming butterflies and moths. Let leaves break down in landscape beds to serve as shelter for beneficial insect eggs, as well as insulation for plants and a way to enrich soil. Don’t deadhead all of the spent flowers immediately because birds use seed as food, especially in winter. And wait

100 YEARS

AND COUNTING coloradocountrylife.coop AAC_CoCountryLif_100yrs_Corn_7.375x5_4c.indd 1

until spring to remove frost-killed grasses and perennials. That vegetation also shelters overwintering beneficial insects and serves as nest-building material for birds. Finally, give pollinators a water source. Birdbaths and water features are two good ways. Shallow puddles are also excellent if you refresh the water every few days to avoid mosquitoes. George Weigel is a Pennsylvania-based horticulturist, garden consultant, author and newspaper garden columnist.

We’ve been here since 1916 helping you grow, raise, harvest and nurture the future of agriculture. Here’s looking forward to our next century of shared success.

Call 800.799.6545 today or visit AgLoan.com A part of the Farm Credit System. Equal Opportunity Lender.

4 MAY 2016 23 12/21/2015 9:08:19 AM


KILL LAKE WEEDS Before

After

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Mimic Those Manic Caddis Pupae

50 lb. bag treats up to 20,000 sq.ft. $327.00.

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AQUACIDE CO.

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MAY 2016

[outdoors]

Catch a fat, hungry lake trout this spring

I

OUTDOORS@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

It’s fairly common in these parts for many anglers to fish lakes while they’re waiting for the runoff to “run off” on their favorite trout streams. While our backcountry trout lakes can remain frozen well into June or July, the majority of low lying lakes and reservoirs at lower altitude are typically ice free by early March, and most are stocked with trout, but may also hold bass, walleyes, catfish and a variety of panfish: perch, bluegills or crappies, depending on specific conditions and circumstances. All of them are fun to fish. Among fly fishers though, it’s the high prairie lakes that generate the most excitement. Sagebrush lakes, as they’re sometimes called, pepper the high, intermountain valleys and cattle country of North and South Park, and are in prime fly fishing condition from ice-out in late April through June and July. Spinney Mountain, Eleven Mile, Delaney Buttes and Lake John are so well-known in Colorado, they’re almost legendary. The trout in these lakes can grow up to an inch a month on the incredible abundance and diversity of food produced in their nutrient-rich waters. Callibaetis mayflies, chironomids, caddis flies and damsel and dragon flies are supplemented by leeches, minnows, snails, crawfish and scuds. Trout grow fat on all of them. In midsummer, the focus of attention on these lakes is often the damselfly. Or more correctly, the big trout that eat the damselflies. The annual damselfly hatch can really get the trout and fishermen worked up, but sometimes the real story on these lakes is the highly-animated caddis flies some old fly fishing books refer to as lake sedges. These are big, fat bugs — up to an inch long and usually tan, light

tan or grayish brown in color with long, tapered antennae that wave around when they fly, like a pair of tiny errant kite strings flopping in the breeze. But it’s not so much the bugs’ size as it is the maddening antics they go through before they get airborne that drives trout wild. Upon emergence, the caddis pupae swim up from submerged weed beds, pop through the surface and immediately begin to taxi frantically across the lake like spastic little motorboats with their throttles locked on full and no one at their helms. They spurt erratically in all directions, seemingly unable to launch themselves into flight. Unless, of course, a hungry trout is bearing down on them, at which point they fairly leap into the air, to the great dismay of the trout who now will snap in frustration at virtually any hapless bug in the vicinity. Of all the fly patterns that would work during this hatch — and there are several — the Goddard caddis must be considered one of the best for the job. Its silhouette and natural color are perfect, but it’s the buoyant, clipped, deer hair body and stiff hackle collar that make it ideal for mimicking that crazy, skittering behavior of the lake sedge. Next time you head for a plains lake to fish a damselfly hatch, take a couple of Goddard caddis patterns with you. If you don’t, you may end up even more frustrated than the trout.

Miss an issue? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors. coloradocountrylife.coop


[outdoors]

KILL LAKE WEEDS Before

After

New Reduced Price!

10 lb. bag treats up to 4,000 sq.ft. $85.00. 50 lb. bag treats up to 20,000 sq.ft. $327.00.

FREE SHIPPING! Certified and approved for use by state agencies. State permit may be required. Registered with the Federal E. P. A.

KillLakeWeeds.com Order online today, or request free information.

Our 61st year

AQUACIDE CO.

PO Box 10748, DEPT 580 White Bear Lake, MN 55110-0748

WiseSavers

The cost to purchase new, energy efficient windows can be astonishing. If new windows aren’t in your budget, install energy efficient window treatments or coverings to save energy and money on your electric bill. 24

MAY 2016

Mimic Those Manic Caddis Pupae Catch a fat, hungry lake trout this spring BY DENNIS SMITH

I

OUTDOORS@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

It’s fairly common in these parts for many anglers to fish lakes while they’re waiting for the runoff to “run off” on their favorite trout streams. While our backcountry trout lakes can remain frozen well into June or July, the majority of low lying lakes and reservoirs at lower altitude are typically ice free by early March, and most are stocked with trout, but may also hold bass, walleyes, catfish and a variety of panfish: perch, bluegills or crappies, depending on specific conditions and circumstances. All of them are fun to fish. Among fly fishers though, it’s the high prairie lakes that generate the most excitement. Sagebrush lakes, as they’re sometimes called, pepper the high, intermountain valleys and cattle country of North and South Park, and are in prime fly fishing condition from ice-out in late April through June and July. Spinney Mountain, Eleven Mile, Delaney Buttes and Lake John are so well-known in Colorado, they’re almost legendary. The trout in these lakes can grow up to an inch a month on the incredible abundance and diversity of food produced in their nutrient-rich waters. Callibaetis mayflies, chironomids, caddis flies and damsel and dragon flies are supplemented by leeches, minnows, snails, crawfish and scuds. Trout grow fat on all of them. In midsummer, the focus of attention on these lakes is often the damselfly. Or more correctly, the big trout that eat the damselflies. The annual damselfly hatch can really get the trout and fishermen worked up, but sometimes the real story on these lakes is the highly-animated caddis flies some old fly fishing books refer to as lake sedges. These are big, fat bugs — up to an inch long and usually tan, light

tan or grayish brown in color with long, tapered antennae that wave around when they fly, like a pair of tiny errant kite strings flopping in the breeze. But it’s not so much the bugs’ size as it is the maddening antics they go through before they get airborne that drives trout wild. Upon emergence, the caddis pupae swim up from submerged weed beds, pop through the surface and immediately begin to taxi frantically across the lake like spastic little motorboats with their throttles locked on full and no one at their helms. They spurt erratically in all directions, seemingly unable to launch themselves into flight. Unless, of course, a hungry trout is bearing down on them, at which point they fairly leap into the air, to the great dismay of the trout who now will snap in frustration at virtually any hapless bug in the vicinity. Of all the fly patterns that would work during this hatch — and there are several — the Goddard caddis must be considered one of the best for the job. Its silhouette and natural color are perfect, but it’s the buoyant, clipped, deer hair body and stiff hackle collar that make it ideal for mimicking that crazy, skittering behavior of the lake sedge. Next time you head for a plains lake to fish a damselfly hatch, take a couple of Goddard caddis patterns with you. If you don’t, you may end up even more frustrated than the trout.

Miss an issue? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors. coloradocountrylife.coop


[energy tips]

ADVERTISEMENT

Caulk is used to seal small gaps and cracks where air can escape. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force

Seal for Satisfaction, Savings BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND AMY WHEELESS

S

Sealing air leaks is one of the easiest and most cost-effective improvements you can make in your home. Weather-stripping doors and windows is a great first step and one that will likely pay for itself within a year. However, there are less obvious sources of air leakage that can cause significant discomfort in your home. The average home leaks about half of its air every hour through various cracks and gaps. These air leak openings add up to a 2-foot square hole in the average home; that’s like having a window open all day, every day. Sealing your home can help keep heated and cooled air indoors, making your home more comfortable and reducing your energy bill. To find air leaks, you can start with a visual inspection, checking for gaps and cracks where air could escape. Walk around your home’s exterior and closely examine where different building materials meet, such as around the foundation perimeter, around outdoor water faucets and where the siding and the chimney meet. Indoors, examine common sources of air leakage, including electrical and water service entrances, baseboards, door and window frames and attic hatches. Once you find the air leaks, the next step is to seal them up. The materials you need will depend on what gap is being sealed. Your co-op’s energy advisor, an energy auditor or your local hardware store can help guide you to the right products.

Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to learn more energy-saving tips. Look under the Energy tab for Energy Tips. coloradocountrylife.coop

4

MAY 2016

25


WHO RESCUED WHOM?

Do you have a fascinating story about how your pet became a member of your family? Tell us about it! Your story could get published and you could win a $25 gift card! Guidelines are listed below.

AMAZING RESCUE PET STORIES

Entries Due August 1

Selected stories will be published in the October 2016 magazine and winners will receive a $25 gift card.

COLORADO COUNTRY LIFE Who Rescued Whom? ENTRY FORM

Rules: Please follow all guidelines carefully. All

photos and files become the property of Colorado Country Life and will not be returned. Selected stories will be published in the October 2016 magazine.

1.

250 word maximum per story.

2.

Each story and photo must be accompanied by the entry form (right). It must be signed.

3.

Include a picture of your pet. Digital: Photo of your pet must be at least 8- by 10-inches in size and at least 300 dpi. Printed: Photos must be at least 8- by 10-inches and printed on glossy paper.

Pet’s Name Name

Phone

Address City

State

ZIP

Electric co-op you are a member of

4.

Do not write any information on front or back of photo. Do not paperclip to photo.

Email

5.

Submit your SIGNED entry form, photo and story to: Colorado Country Life - Who Rescued Whom? 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 info@coloradocountrylife.org

By submitting this story and photo/s, I am giving Colorado Country Life permission to use the submitted photo/s and story in the magazine and/or on its social media sites.

6.

Photos printed on home printers will not be accepted.

7.

Entries must be received by August 1.

Signature

Date


[marketplace]

IL R P A & H C R MA ST E T N CO S R E N WIN SOLAR

®

COMPATIBLE

Automatic Gate Openers

MARCH

Linda Ellis, Pueblo West

Won a 58-inch-by-88-inch Ruggable rug

Marianne Crooks, Fort Collins

Won a Handy Camel Renegade Broom

OPEN YOUR GATE WITH THE PRESS OF A BUTTON

APRIL

www.SolarMade.com 800-246-7012

Sunnie Iacovetta, Deer Trail Amanda White, Peyton Glenn Whiteside, Monument

2807 North Prospect • Colorado Springs, CO 80907

Each won a Thames and Kosmos educational science kit

STAY CONNECTED WITH

COLORADO COUNTRY LIFE Enter Monthly Contests

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facebook.com/COCountryLife twitter.com/COCountryLife pinterest.com/COCountryLife youtube.com/COCountryLife1

mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org funnystories@coloradocountrylife.org

CONTACT US

5400 Washington Street Denver, CO 80216 303.455.4111 coloradocountrylife.coop

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MAY 2016

27


[classifieds] TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

Please type or print your ad on a separate paper. Indicate how many months you would like your ad to run and which month to start. There is a minimum of 12 words at $1.63 per word/month. Be sure to include your full name and address for our records. Check MUST accompany this order or call to pay by credit card. Send your ad to: mail: Colorado Country Life 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 phone: 303-455-4111 fax: 303-455-2807 email: classifieds@coloradocountrylife.org

ANTIQUE RESTORATION CHAIR CANING Hand caning, machine caning, fiber rush caning. Pueblo West, 719-547-0723. chaanita@q.com (858-10-16)

ANTLERS

ANTLER CHANDELIERS made only from REAL antlers. We are the manufacturer and we sell all of our products at wholesale prices; save as much as 60% from store prices. Many other antler products and mounts, including 56” elk mount, giant moose paddles, and elk antlers. Showroom now open year ’round in Granby, CO. 18 years at this location, over 900 satisfied customers! Designers: We can provide you a single item or a whole houseful. Call ! (970) 627-3053. (085-09-16)

ART

HANDMADE METAL ARTS: Doors, fine art, backsplashes, bar fronts, mantles… LarsMetalArts. com 303-249-3218. (286-05-16)

BOOKS/CDs/DVDs

CHANT OF A CHAMPION: Auctioneering DVD from World and International Champion Auctioneer John Korrey. Let John show you how to improve all aspects of your auctioneering chant. Order online at www. chantofachampion.com (210-08-16)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

(These opportunities have not been investigated by Colorado Country Life.) HEALTH FOOD STORE & DELI: 2 turnkey businesses in one. Strong income/customer base. Colorado mountains (970-641-5175), leave name & number. (252-08-16)

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MAY 2016

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

PIANO TUNING PAYS. Learn with American School home-study course. Tools included. Call for info. 800-497-9793. (158-11-16)

CLOCK REPAIR & RESTORATION

www.clockrepairandrestoration. com DURANGO AREA. CLOCKS of all kinds repaired. Antique and modern. Clocks bought and sold. bob.scott@usa.net Call Robert 970-247-7729. (109-05-16)

FOR SALE

OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS - $380 with warranty. Also sell portable concentrators and oxygen supplies. Repair and service of equipment. Aspen Concentrator Repair Service 719-471-9895 (040-08-16) SELLING 60A & 60B (used, good condition) Hesston Stakhands and parts. Stan 719-829-4425 or clineher efordfarms@gmail.com (292-06-16)

FREE

FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon the “Mark of the Beast” will be enforced as Church and State unite! Let the Bible reveal. The Bible Says, POB99, Lenoir City, TN 37771. thebiblesaystruth@ yahoo.com 888-211-1715. (814-08-16)

HEALTH

LOOK GREAT, lose weight, gain energy, feel better. Contact me www.advocare.com/14123779 Lifestyle Wellness Nutrition Program. Endorsed by Major League Players. 970-630-4393. (281-05-16)

HELP WANTED

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME opportunity. No sales, investment, risk. Training/website provided. Monthly income plus bonuses, benefits. Call Carrie 303-5794207, www.workathomeunited. com/ourabundance (932-02-17)

IMPROVEMENTS & REPAIRS

I CAN MAKE YOUR LOG HOME like new! Chinking, caulking, staining, log repairs. 30 years experience. References available. 970-389-0995 (285-06-16)

REAL ESTATE

WE BUY LAND and/or mineral rights. CO TX NM KS. 1-800-316-5337 (099-03-17)

www.sawmillexchange.com SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial equipment for woodlot owners and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. THE place to sell equipment. 800-459-2148. (267-09-16)

YEAR ROUND LOG HOME, 32759 W Hwy 14, Poudre Canyon. Roomy living area, 2bd, 1.5ba. Beautiful 17’ ceiling in living area, stairs to open loft & out of sight storage. Full walk-out basement, appliances, cabinets, 2 furnaces (propane & wood). Outside porches N & W. Concrete pad, storage shed, 30amp RV hookups, riding mower for ½ acre property, 300 yds to Cache la Poudre River. Good fishing. 970-881-2476. aapachuck@aol.com (296-08-16)

POULTRY & GAMEBIRDS

TICKETS

MACHINERY & PARTS

FREE COLOR CATALOG. 193 varieties, Cornish Cross, standard breeds, fancy chicks, ducks, geese, turkeys, bantams, guineas, pheasants, quail, supplies, video. 417-532-4581. PO Box 529, Lebanon, MO 65536. www. CackleHatchery.com. (876-08-16)

REAL ESTATE

BAYFIELD / VALLECITO – Beautiful mountain retreat, 4bd, 3ba, approx. 3436sf on 1.2 acres, well water, septic, 5 minutes from Vallecito Lake. $467,900. 970-884-9324. (163-08-16) CHEYENNE, WYOMING DUPLEX – 2, 1 bedrooms. $1175 monthly income, tenants pay utilities. Great downtown location. $139,000. Dave 303-881-2411. (297-08-16) OWN PROPERTY? NEED INCOME? We’ll rent exclusive hunting rights from you. Looking for antelope, goose, duck, coyote, & prairie dog habitat. Encourage young sportsmen by providing safe, private access. You make the rules. 303-460-0273 (069-08-16) READY TO RETIRE? +-13 acres near Mancos, Co. Trout-stocked canyon lake, commercial greenhouse, gardens, lots of water, passive solar timber frame home. $509,000. Jim, 970-769-1391, for pictures. (282-05-16) SANTA FE FIVE STAR EASTSIDE CONDO - very private, weekly rates. 970-570-0320 (293-05-16) TIME TO VISIT DENVER – Enter for CHANCE to win a $25 gift card. Email the number of ads on this page to classifieds@coloradocountrylife.org with “MAY $25” as the subject. Deadline: May 16. VERO BEACH, FLORIDA, CONDO. Incredible views. One block to beach. 970-570-0320. (293-05-16)

NFR & PBR RODEO TICKETS – Las Vegas. Call 1-888-NFR-Rodeo (1-888637-7633). www.NFR-rodeo.com A+ rated BBB Member. (912-04-17)

VACATION RENTAL

BAYFIELD ATTIC INN – A vacation rental in downtown Bayfield, Colorado. bayfieldatticinn.com 970-759-6957, bayfieldatticinn@ gmail.com (263-09-16) KAUAI VACATION RENTAL, 2bdr, full kitchen. Minutes from beaches. $600/wk. 808-2456500; mokihana@hawaiian.net; kauaiweddings.com. (756-05-16)

WANTED TO BUY

BUYING AUTOGRAPHS (all kinds), sports cards (pre-1980). Vintage sports and music collectibles (albums, etc.). Cash paid. Established dealer since 1986. Mike 720-334-0206, mmunns1@hotmail.com (245-05-16)

WANTED TO BUY

CAST-IRON COOKWARE (Wagner & Griswold). Pyrex. Old toys in good condition. Vintage signs. Anything cowboy and Indian – hats, boots, rugs, etc. Before the yard sale and after family gets what they want, we’ll buy the rest. Antiques, collectibles, furniture, glassware, etc. We come to you! 970-7593455 or 970-565-1256. (871-08-16) NAVAJO RUGS, old and recent, native baskets, pottery. Tribal Rugs, Salida. 719-539-5363, b_inaz@ hotmail.com (817-06-16) OLD COLORADO LIVESTOCK brand books prior to 1975. Call Wes 303-757-8553. (889-08-16) OLD GAS AND OIL items: Gas pumps, advertising signs, globes, etc. Pieces, parts, etc. considered. Also 1932-34 Ford cars and trucks, parts and pieces, too. Any condition. Brandon, 719-250-5721. (519-11-16) OLD MODEL AIRPLANE ENGINES, unbuilt airplane kits. Cash. Will pick up or pay shipping. Don, 970-599-3810. (233-05-16) OLD POCKET WATCHES – working or non-working and old repair material. Bob 719-859-4209. (870-12-16) VINTAGE FISHING TACKLE. I buy rods, reels, lures, creels, etc. Gary, 970-222-2181 (170-10-16) WANT TO PURCHASE mineral and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201. (402-03-17) WANTED: JEEP CJ OR WRANGLER. Reasonably priced. No rust buckets. 888-735-5337 (099-04-17) WE PAY CASH for minerals and oil/ gas interests, producing and nonproducing. 800-733-8122 (099-02-17)

FIND HIDDEN TREASURE IN THE CLASSIFIEDS Read through the ads and FIND the CCL classified explaining how to WIN a $25 gift card. It’s easy. You could WIN. The classified ads April winner was Steve Magill of Fort Collins. He counted 37 classified ads. coloradocountrylife.coop


[funny stories] Rick Sobottka recently trav , Colorado Springs, Poland, via Geled to Bydgoszcz, dansk.

Last fall, I was painting the west side of my house, which adjoins a wild area. I was on a ladder about 8 feet up. I heard a noise, turned around and saw a large black bear standing upright looking at me. I swear I could hear him thinking, “This can’t be good to eat.” Just then, he fell to his feet and ambled off. No more painting that day! Chris Wiggins, Durango

with her sister Heidi Brugger of Cor tez sits , Pennsylvania. at the IKEA in Conshohocken

One evening at dinner I said, “Let’s go around the table and everyone say something amazing that happened today.” With a big grin on his face, Sam, my witty 3-year-old son, said, “OK, Mommy, my turn. Something amazing that happened today.” It took a moment, but then everyone burst into laughter. Kate Wilmhoff, Boulder Mary Gilmer (midd daughter Gloria of le) of Buena Vista, close friend, There Lopez Island and a Morrison enjoy timsa Garin (right) of Islands, Washingto e on the San Juan n.

) stands empin (right Tish Linke- Kr guide in the Costa Rican ur to with her mountains.

This month’s winner is Karen Ellison of Grand Junction. Karen is at the beach in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

TAKE YOUR PHOTO WITH YOUR MAGAZINE AND WIN! It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo and your name and address to info@coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win a $25 gift card each month. The next deadline is Monday, May 16. This month’s winner is Karen Ellison, a Grand Valley Power member, who sent this photo at the beach in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. coloradocountrylife.coop

After repeatedly helping to clean the surprising amount of snow we received over the winter in our Four Corners area, my son turned to me and said, “Boy, I can sure use some of the climate warming right about now.” Judy Cain, Cortez Recently my husband had all his top teeth pulled and replaced with implants. We told the grandchildren he did not take good care of his teeth when he was young, so that is why he had this done now. One night, my daughter was getting our granddaughter, Aubrey, ready for bed and brushing her teeth. Aubrey told her mommy, “Be sure to brush my tongue, too, so they don’t have to pull it out.” Penny Reed, Aurora We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2016 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@ coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check.

$15 4

MAY 2016

29


[discoveries]

Get Rolling Stop staring at those tech devices, grab your family and friends and head outdoors for a game of Rollors. Rollors takes components of bowling, bocce and horseshoes, and combines them all in one game. To play the game, divide in to two teams and take turns rolling the discs, aiming for the target. The team or individual whose disc is closest to the target gets the points. The team that reaches 21 points first wins. Rollors costs $49.95 and comes in a convenient carrying case. For more information, visit rollors.com. See how to play: https://www.you tube. com/watch?v=sz-SjeT_pd8

Take a Seat Wherever you go, take Matador with you. This water repellent, puncture resistant blanket is lightweight and ultra portable, so you can have it with you at all times. After all, you never know when the opportunity to take a seat and enjoy the scenery will arise. Designed and engineered in Boulder, Matador comes in a pocket size for $29.99 and a mini for $19.99. For more information, visit matadorup.com.

A Unique Impression Golf courses are crowded this time of year, so be sure your golf balls don’t get jumbled with the others’ by using a Tin Cup system. Tin Cup is a stainless steel ball marker bedecked with an engraved design. Before playing a round of golf, place your ball marker atop your golf balls and use a fine-tip Sharpie to outline the design. Come game time you’ll have a uniquely patterned marker and golf balls that stand out from the rest. Prices start at $19.95 for individual Tin Cups, $30-$95 for customized gift packages. For more information, call 888-9846287 or visit tin-cup.com.

ENJOY THE RIDE Family summer excursions are much more exciting on Mobo Cruisers. These impressive threewheeled “bikes” have adjustable seats and frames and no chains, and they come in an array of amazing styles and colors. With sizes to accommodate ages 2 and older, the whole family can enjoy cool, comfortable cruising. Prices range from $139.99 to $599. Available at several brick-and-mortar retail stores and online stores. For more information, call 877-869-6451 or visit mobocruiser.com. Check out the Mobo Cruiser Triton in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEhpYpmY9PU

WIN YOUR OWN MATADOR BLANKET Colorado Country Life is giving away a Matador blanket. Go to coloradocountrylife.coop/may-2016-contest for instructions on how to enter. 30

MAY 2016

coloradocountrylife.coop


650+ Stores Nationwide

WOW SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

SAVE $73

SUPER COUPON

1650 PSI PRESSURE WASHER

LOT 68333 69488 shown

• 1.3 GPM

54 $9999

$76

comp at

$149.99

.com or by calling our stores or HarborFreight t or coupon or prior LIMIT 3 - Good at used with other discoun 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase with original receipt. days 30 after Original coupon must be purchases s last. Non-transferable. day. Offer good while supplie 9/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per presented. Valid through

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72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET LOT 66537 shown 69505/62418

5

$ 99 Customer Rating

comp at

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R 1.5 HP ELECTRIC PE ON POLE SAW Customer Rating SU UP CO

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$

• Extends from 6 ft. to 8 ft. 10"

comp at

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills,  storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking.  Not valid on prior purchases. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/16.

R PE ON SU UP O C

LOT 95578 69645/60625 shown

11

99

comp at

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12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE LOT 61256/60813/61889 68142 shown

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31999 comp at

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LOW-PROFILE CREEPER

Customer Rating

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7 FUNCTION DIGITAL MULTIMETER LOT 90899 shown 98025/69096

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15

VALUE

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R PE ON SU UP O C Customer Rating

LOT 69262 69094/61916 2745 shown

WINNER

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OILLESS PANCAKE AIR COMPRESSOR LOT 95275 shown 60637/61615

– Truckin' Magazine

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" 40

Customer Rating

26", 4 DRAWER TOOL CART LOT 95659 shown 61634/61952

19"

• 580 lb. capacity

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R PE ON SU UP CO

• Weighs 74 lbs.

$

7999

Tools sold separately.

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SETS COMBINATION WRENCHMET RIC

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SAE

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8 .97

$ 99

comp at

$

$17

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27 LED PORTABLE WORKLIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

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TTS 900 PEAK/700 RUNNING2 WA 2 HP (63 CC) CYCLE ERATOR GAS RECREATIONAL GEN8/693 81 shown

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LOT 69684 shown 61776/61969/61970

13499

2

comp at $ 99 $7.15

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Customer Rating

comp at

$

$399

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers

R PE ON SU UP CO

comp at

12" SLIDING COMPOUND DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW WITH LASER GUIDE

$89

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

15999 $199

.com or by calling our stores or HarborFreight t or coupon or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at used with other discoun 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase with original receipt. days Original coupon must be purchases after 30 day. s last. Non-transferable. Offer good while supplie 9/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per presented. Valid through

LOT 69043 LOT 42305 69044 42304 shown 63171

$5

PORTAB CAR CANOPY

4999 comp at

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$119

$155.95

SUPER COUPON WOW 9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED

$

99

$

99

1999

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LOT 62858/63054 60728/69034 shown

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YOUR CHOICE

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SAVE $79

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SAVE 66%

• 300 lb. capacity

WOW SUPER10 COFT.UPx 20ONFT.LE

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

LOT 69227/62116 62584/62590 68048 shown

$

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 650+ Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP O C

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R PE ON SU UP CO

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ONE FAMILY POWERED BY MANY. At Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, we believe affordable and reliable power, responsibly generated and delivered, is the lifeblood of the rural West. The farms, ranches, small towns and resorts that our members serve are closely tied to the landscape and their power supply. TRISTATE.COOP

Colorado Country Life May 2016 KC  

Colorado Country Life May 2016 KC

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