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JULY 2013

M I S S I S S I P P I

4 Biloxi native’s career soared

as an Apollo astronaut 14 Cookbook commemorates

150th church anniversary 15 Learning is fun at

Infinity Science Center


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July 2013 I Today in Mississippi

Scotland trip finally emptied my golfing bucket list, or so I thought n my mind, there are three “crown jewels” of golf courses. These are the courses I have always dreamed of playing, my bucket list of golf courses. They are Augusta National, where the Masters golf tournament is played; Pebble Beach, where several major tournaments have been played; and lastly, the place where golf began, the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland. In November 2003, with lots of planning and scheming, I was able to play Augusta. While in San Francisco in July 2006, I was able to drive down and cross Pebble Beach off my list. It took less scheming, just a credit card and making sure I got the bill before my wife saw it. That left only St. Andrews. We have a group that goes on a golf trip every year, and every year we talk about going to Scotland. During our 2012 outing I was coming off hip surgery, so I told the guys, “I’m falling apart and you guys are getting older. We have to go to Scotland now, while we can still walk 18.” That’s all our fearless leader needed. Two months later we had recruited some other golfers, and on May 25 eight of us headed off to Scotland for the trip of a lifetime. We played seven rounds in seven days and walked all 18 holes. I even carried my own bag for six rounds, too cheap to hire a caddy. It was everything I had imagined it would be. The courses were beautiful, sitting by the sea carved by Mother Nature out of the natural landscape with not a tree to be found, and bunkers like pot holes that swallowed your ball—and you. The weather was sunny and 63 degrees one day, 40 degrees with winds gusting to 40 mph and raining sideways the next. One of my most memorable moments was walking up the 18th fairway at the Old Course. We had our picture made on the bridge, just like Palmer and Nicklaus. I had a putt for par

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Our Homeplace

My Opinion Michael Callahan Executive Vice President/CEO EPAs of Mississippi

on the 18th green and would like to tell you I made it, but I didn’t. I tapped in for bogey and got a small applause from the crowds that gather around the 18th green to watch the players finish. On the flight home I told my group that I was finished with golf. I had nothing left to accomplish; I had completed my holy trinity of courses and could not think of a better way to end my career. With the trip of a lifetime completed, I could hang up the clubs, no need to ever come back. They all laughed. Four days later, still jet lagged from the trip, my 16-year-old son comes to me with his St. Andrews hat, towel and ball marker and says, “Let’s go play 18.” Four hours later, I sink my par putt on the 18th green, thinking, why couldn’t I have done that at St. Andrews. As my son and I walk off the green, I have just shot an 82. He looks at me and says, “Dad, that’s as well as I’ve seen you play in two years. Where did that come from?” I shrug my shoulders and say, “Scotland inspired me.” As we get in the cart and drive to the clubhouse, my son asks, “So Dad, when are we going to Scotland?” Looks like one more trip of a lifetime. JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

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Today in Mississippi

Biloxi native Fred Haise, pictured at Infinity Science Center in Hancock County, is best known as a former Apollo 13 astronaut. But he also made important contributions to aerospace research and the space shuttle program. In Mississippi, he is a passionate supporter of the development of Infinity. Story begins on page 4.

OFFICERS Kevin Doddridge - President Brad Robison - First Vice President Wayne Henson - Second Vice President Randy Wallace - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - Executive Vice President/CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. Vice President, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Jay Swindle - Manager, Advertising Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Abby Berry - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

Vol. 66 No. 7

EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 450,321 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

The historic Byram Swinging Bridge recently opened to foot traffic following a restoration project completed by the Hinds County board of supervisors. Built in 1905 by residents to serve local farmers, the 360-foot bridge spans the Pearl River at Byram. In 1979 the bridge was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was closed to vehicles in 1987, the same year the American Society of Civil Engineers named it a civil engineering landmark. The restoration project included the addition of a parking lot, a picnic table, wheelchair access, lighting and a guard rail. Photo: Rebecca McMillan

Mississippi is ... ... a childhood home where memories abound: A place where pound cake and coffee offered visitors hospitality and warmth, A place where rolling pastures greeted horses and cattle, A place where garden rows boasted their rich bounty, A place where Friday night lights filled small towns with competition and excitement, A place where steeples dotted the skies with praise and worship, And, above all, a place where values and ethics were honored. Looking back, reminiscing, looking forward, I am a Mississippian filled with pride and gratitude for my heritage and my home. — Sandra Dixon, Petal Spending holidays and summers in Mississippi wasn’t just a vacation or quick getaway, but the place I often dreamed of living. I watched my grandmother enjoy the cool morning breeze, opening the windows at 6 a.m. and putting on a pot of coffee while smelling the thick slab of bacon frying in the hot castiron skillet was a way to start the day. Dreams do come true! I relocated, married a Mississippian and now I, like my grandmother, open the curtains and windows to feel and enjoy the morning breeze, listen to the birds chirping and watch the sun as it rises and sets. Life here is grand and peaceful, a place I now call home. — D.T. Malone, Lorman

What’s Mississippi to you? What makes you proud to be a Mississippian? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or email them to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing.

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Today in Mississippi



July 2013

MeetFred Haise

Mississippi’s moon voyager

By Debbie Stringer As student editor of the Perkinston Junior College newspaper, Fred Haise dreamed of life as a reporter. But with the nation at war in Korea, the Biloxi native decided to join the fight. In1952 he entered the Naval Aviation Cadet program to become a pilot, despite never having flown before. It was a life-changing decision. Soaring in a single-engine SNJ trainer, Haise forgot all about being an earth-bound journalist. He chose a career path that would lead him to become one of only 24 humans to fly to the moon—a feat restricted to science fiction in the 1950s. Haise, 79, a member of Singing River Electric Power Association who lives in Houston, Texas, and keeps a home in Gautier, is best known as a crew member of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Serving as lunar module pilot aboard Odyssey, Haise flew in April 1970 with commander Jim Lovell and command module pilot John “Jack” Swigert. Their “routine” mission became a struggle for survival when an oxygen tank exploded en route to the moon.

The explosion led to a string of catastrophic system failures that challenged the crew and NASA ground controllers (and the spacecraft) in ways they never expected. NASA’s struggles to keep the three astronauts alive and bring them home safely was dramatized in the 1995 film “Apollo 13,” with actor Bill Paxton playing the 36-year-old Haise. The factbased film is a nail-biter—even though viewers know the outcome—based on Lovell’s book, “Lost Moon.”

Career trajectory: from the Navy to NASA After amassing more than 9,000 hours of flight time as an aviator in the Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, Haise joined the newly created National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 1959. He began work as a research pilot at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was involved in early zerogravity research. In his seven years as a NASA research

Apollo 13 lunar module pilot Fred Haise

pilot, Haise flew about 80 types of aircraft. NASA selected the accomplished young aviator in 1966 to join 18 other astronauts for intensive training for Apollo and future missions. The space agency had assigned Apollo top priority status in 1961 when President John F. Kennedy pledged to land a man on the moon within the decade—even though nobody knew how to do it. After a year of general astronaut training, Haise was assigned to work with Grumman Aerospace on the develop-

ment and testing of the lunar-landing vehicle, or lunar module (LM). He would train as backup lunar module pilot for the Apollo 8 and 11 missions before flying in Apollo 13. Freddo, as Haise was known, was itching to fly a lunar mission. “Everybody was. That’s why you were there,” he said. In an interview with NASA in 1999, Haise recalled the anticipation as his Apollo 13 launch date approached: “Occasionally, you just sort of feel a few little butterflies here and there, during


July 2013

Commander Haise and pilot C. Gordon Fullerton, above left, pose with the Space Shuttle Enterprise in a 1976 photo. They became the first crew members for the space shuttle approach and landing tests. Haise trains for his upcoming Apollo 13 lunar landing mission, above. An activities checklist is attached to the cuff of his spacesuit. Members of NASA’s Mission Control team, left, confer after the Apollo 13 lunar landing had been cancelled en route to the moon. Their new task was to bring the crew home before the spacecraft’s life-support systems were exhausted. Historical photos: NASA

the day or whenever you start thinking about it [and] you look up at the sky.” Despite the fear she must have felt for her son’s safety, Lucille Haise never stood in his way. “I think she didn’t like to think about what may happen,” Fred Haise said, “but she knew it was something I wanted to do.”

Getting home becomes the mission In the early stages of LM development, Grumman engineers conceived

the idea of the lander doubling as a virtual lifeboat should a crew be forced to abandon their mother ship. The scenario became reality for the Apollo 13 astronauts when they were forced to abort their lunar mission. In a lengthy, tedious process, they powered down the crippled Odyssey, activated the lunar module Aquarius and moved in to take advantage of the lander’s life-support systems—and to stretch them beyond limits. “[This procedure] was never really fully developed, so there was a lot of ad libbing during our mission to make that really happen,” Haise said. The Apollo 13 crew were the first

American astronauts to face the real possibility of dying in space, wrote Andrew Chaiken in his book “A Man on the Moon.” The spacecraft’s limited functionality could have, on the return trip, caused it to miss Earth by thousands of miles and forever drift in space. Experience as a test pilot steeled Haise for handling the pressure of the lifethreatening crisis. “I’ve seen a lot of red lights in airplanes,” he said. Haise praised the movie “Apollo 13” for accurately conveying the teamwork and innovative response that brought his crew home, and for which the mission is remembered. The real team, however, encompassed far more than the flight controllers and astronauts depicted in the film. Some, like the University of Montreal professors who lent expertise in shock dynamics, had no connection to the space pro-

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gram, Haise said. Yet these professors’ calculations helped NASA engineers devise a way for the astronauts to disconnect the LM from the re-activated command module as they approached Earth, in order to safely enter the atmosphere. “No telling how many stories there are of people that were called on and asked to do something to work through some of the work-arounds that had to be done during the flight,” Haise said. Even foreign governments offered assistance as the Apollo 13 crisis unfolded. “At one point we were expected to go down in the Indian Ocean, until we made the manuever after we passed behind the moon,” Haise said. “Russia had volunteered to have some ships that would be available at anchor to retrieve us.” Haise’s discomfort in the cold, cramped LM was exacerbated by the development of a urinary tract infection and high fever. Yet for most of the sixday flight his mind was preoccupied not with his own plight but on the impact the failed mission might have on the space program. “In the back of my mind I worried that we may be the cause of the end of the program,” he said. “It was a failure in my mind. So I was Continued on page 8


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Mississippi Fairs & Festivals TICKETS: Adult Season: $20 • Adult Day: $12 Student Season: $10 • Student Day: $7 • Ages 5 and Under: Free Duck Dynasty Experience - Tickets $10 while supplies last Pre-fair reduced rates available June 24, 2013 to July 7, 2013 at PRR Welcome Center.

Wednesday, July 10 11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson and Guests 2013 Choctaw Indian Princess Pageant World Series Stickball

10:15pm

MAKE PLANS TO ENJOY MISSISSIPPI’S

Thursday, July 11

C h o c taw , M i s s i s s i p p i

11:00am 6:00pm 7:00pm 8:30pm 10:15pm

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson and Guests Jana Mashonee Josh Turner World Series Stickball

Friday, July 12

For More Information: 601.650.7450 www.ChoctawIndianFair.com This is a family, non-alcoholic event.

Gates Open Chief Phyliss J. Anderson and Guests Kari & Billy Pat Green World Series Stickball

Saturday, July 13 7:00am 10:00am 1pm-4pm

For More Information on Rez Run: 601.650.1765 www.racesonline.com

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Choctaw Indian Fair

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www.neshoba.org • 877-752-2643 Paid in part by the Mississippi Development Authority Division of Tourism !

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Experience a Good Ol’ Fashioned I I I I I

Harness & Running Horse Races (Sunday Thru Friday) Late-Night Dances I Philantic Post Office Ag And 4-H Displays & Exhibits Youth Talent Contest I Arts, Crafts & Needlework Exhibits Band Concerts

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July 26 thru August 2, 2013 Highway 21, 8 miles southwest of Philadelphia

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$40 season pass; $15 day ticket Children 9 & under FREE

JOE NICHOLS Thursday, August 1 - 8:00pm

CRAIG MORGAN Friday, August 2 - 8:00pm


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26th Annual

MS Pecan Festival Sept. 27, 28 & 29, 2013 Richton, MS

TOP ATTRACTIONS

Admission $10.00 (Children under 4 Free)

OPERATING HOURS

35th Annual

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July 19-20 601-733-2221 or 601-733-5647 www.mswatermelonfestival.com Until 3pm July 20, $5 adults & $3 children under 10 After 3pm, $7 adults & $5 children under 10 (Arm bands are good all day, day of purchase)

Talent Competition Friday night starting at 6pm Backroads Band Friday 8pm Entertainment all day Saturday with special guest

Jason Michael Carroll

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Car & Truck show “Hosted by the Smith County Cruisers Club” 5K MS Watermelon Festival Run Food • Arts and Crafts Bungee jump • Waterwalk Largest Watermelon contest Watermelon eating contest Seed spitting contest

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Geyser Falls Water Theme Park 209 Black Jack Road • Philadelphia, MS 39350 A Development of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians


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Today in Mississippi  July 2013

Fred Haise Continued from page 5

very happy when we got back and figured out that it had been perceived in the right light, as a real challenge that was overcome to get these people home. It took a lot of ingenuity and teamwork.” Was this NASA’s finest hour, as many claimed? “Certainly publicity-wise it was, but the team work was there every mission. We almost aborted two other [moon] landings: Apollo 14 and Apollo 16. Both had problems that could have stopped them from landing,” Haise said. Haise told a NASA interviewer the high point of the mission for him was seeing the back side of the moon, even though it appeared “rather lifeless.” “That was exciting. Jack Swigert and I both had cameras out and shot quite a number of pictures while we passed by briefly.” The day after their splashdown on April 17, Haise, Lovell and Swigert received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Nixon. Biloxi celebrated their local hero’s return to Earth (and to his hometown) with a parade and other special events. “That was traditional, I think for most people who flew missions. It was, in my view, much more than most because of the small town flavor,” Haise said.

Commands shuttle test flights Haise felt he would get another chance to fly to the moon, but it was not to be. NASA named him commander of Apollo 19, before the mission was canceled due to budget cuts. Instead, he moved into space shuttle management and approach-and-landing testing.

Fred Haise, left, with fellow Apollo 13 crew members Jim Lovell, center, and Jack Swigert, emerge from the recovery helicopter on board the aircraft carrier Iwo Jima. Photo: NASA

Haise’s contributions to the program’s development were significant and helped ensure its long life. He commanded five of the eight test flights of the Space Shuttle Enterprise. “So I got to fly Enterprise the first time it flew,” he said. “There was a lot of pressure on that flight. We had changed administrations from Nixon to Carter, and Carter wasn’t very enthusiastic about space. We worried if I crashed that we’d lose the bird. We didn’t have a backup vehicle,” he said. In 1973 Haise crashed a World War II training plane and was hospitalized with second-degree burns—the only injury of his entire flying career. Haise left NASA in 1979 to take a job in aerospace management at Grumman Aerospace. There he would devote the next 17 years to the business of aerospace. He retired in 1996 as president of technical services at Northrop Grumman. He served six years on the board of the Astronauts Memorial Foundation, which created the Space Mirror Memorial at Kennedy Space Center to honor astronauts who gave their lives to space exploration.

Picture your pet in ‘Picture This’ Our next “Picture This” reader photo theme is Funny Pet Photos. Photographers whose photos are selected for publication become eligible for a $200 cash prize drawing in December. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Sept. 10. Selected photos will appear in the October 2013 issue of Today in Mississippi.  Submission requirements • Photos must relate to the given theme and must be the original work of an amateur photographer. • Prints and digital photos are accepted, but sharp focus is essential. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files.

Looking to Infinity Today, Haise is a passionate advocate of science education for youth. For nine years, he has been a driving force behind the construction and development of Infinity Science Center, a family-friendly science learning center that opened last year in Hancock County. (See story on page 15.) The center, located off I-10 at Miss. Exit 2, represents a partnership between NASA and Infinity Science Center Inc., the not-for-profit organization responsible for funding the center’s construction, operation and exhibits. Haise serves as vice chairman of the foundation board and conducts fund raising, public outreach and marketing functions on behalf of the center. “It’s been a good way to get out of the rocking chair and still keep my mind engaged,” he quipped. While in that rocking chair, does he look back on his own days as an astronaut? “I’m forced to look back,” he said with a grin, “because I do a lot of talks.” Haise relates his space experiences to audiences for the benefit of Infinity. He donates fees from his motivational speak-

ing engagements to help support the center. “So obviously the talk is focused a little on Infinity but mostly on Apollo 13,” he said. A father and grandfather, Haise is keen on inspiring young people. Last month, for example, he spoke to a group of 10th grade space campers at Johnson Space Center, in Houston, where NASA’s Mission Control team had once worked furiously to save his life. Haise uses these opportunities to encourage young people to discover their own talents and obtain the necessary education or training to develop them into a satisfying career. “Your job is to figure out what God has blessed you with and make the most of that,” he tells them. Haise said he feels fortunate to have recognized his own best career path early in life. “I’m very, very lucky to have ended up in a profession that fit what I could do well,” he said. “I can’t complain. I’ve had a very good career. It’s been rewarding to me and I think I’ve done some things that helped. So I wish everybody could end up in a similar vein.” Haise considers Houston home, but he returns often to Mississippi to visit family or to work on behalf of Infinity. Sometimes he fishes the bayou where his father and uncle used to take him. “When I’m out there, it looks just like it did 65 years ago,” he said. Considering his early ambition to be a journalist and the uniqueness of his life as a moon voyager, one would think Haise ponders his memoirs while fishing the quiet waters. “I keep toying with it,” he said. For information on a Fred Haise speaking engagement, contact Keppler Speakers at 703-516-4000 or Linda McCarthy, Infinity Science Center, at 228-467-9048.

• Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

 How to submit

Mail prints to “Picture This,” Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Email digital photos to news@epaofms.com. Or, mail a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Call Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or e-mail news@epaofms.com.


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Crawling things and other apparitions

While not as celebrated as the stinging snake from my childhood, some might consider this critter from the woodpile a monster. Photo: Tony Kinton

ith apologies to those readers of last month’s column, I wish to continue in similar thought here. It seems that folklore and often bizarre occurrences are common in the alluring hinterlands we country dwellers call home. The stories available can be quite grand. As referenced last month, snakes play a key role in the scheme of monsters lurking about the countryside, or at least they did in my childhood. The ghostlike and ubiquitous stinging snake received a great deal of commentary. This is the one that buries in the mud and waits to be disturbed. Said disturbance was sure to evoke a violent attack that led immediately to the victim’s demise. That harpooned tail with barbed stinger never missed its intended target, and the only way to avoid such a hideous thing was to simply avoid the muddy spots along creeks and ditches. That avoidance, however, was the overriding problem. Muddy spots very much capture the attention of young country boys, so much so that the advised avoidance was not an option. Feeling that glorious oozing of mud between bare toes was sufficient reward to risk an encounter with this grave monster.

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Let me be clear here: It was the old men of the area who were constant in their warnings regarding such matters. And allow me to add that those old men were not then as old as I now am. Years have a way of changing one’s perspective. Still, the old folks knew with certainty that the stinging snakes were there and even knew someone who had fallen to them. But never were there any names that could be attached. “I don’t recollect the name; he was just some feller that used to come through these parts off and on. He was from somewhere else.” Oh, the ambiguity and intrigue that filled my young mind. A vagabond, a free spirit who simply came through from time to time. And from some distant locale—perhaps as far away as Kosciusko. I grew up in the Carthage area and had heard of Kosciusko, but could neither spell it nor had I been there. This added a surety to the stinking snake myth. Somehow all us managed to escape this angry adversary’s wrath and grew to adulthood with a bit of that swamp mud still residing between our toes. And there were the whompass cats! They, like the stinging snakes, resided in woods and tangles along the creek several hundred yards from our houses and

had this sinister and disagreeable habit of creeping into more civilized environs for the express purpose of waylaying lads who dared sleep Mississippi under the stars on musty quilts. Outdoors We never saw by Tony Kinton nor were molested by one, but we were regularly reminded that they were present in prodigious supply. “I hear ‘em squalin’ like a woman down there all the time.” Again, the old men. Before I completely abandoned the naiveté of adolescence, I grew enough courage to broach the subject of whompass cats with one of the neighborhood sages. I asked if perhaps what he and others referred to in quivering tones of impending disaster as a whompass cat could possibly be the shy and retiring bobcat. I was severely chastised, reminded fully of my ignorance. And by the way, he knew another one of those hapless travelers who was never seen again, this no doubt a result of the area whompass cats. And we must not forget quicksand.

None of the elders could show it to us, but it was there. They knew a guy who, already up to his chin, managed to grab a long, heavy stick and use it for support, thus enabling the extrication of himself from a prescribed doom in some unknown world beneath the muck. Now that I look back on all this, I realize that the only monster any of us encountered was one of my dad’s 2month-old bull yearlings. We were going to camp in my green canvas tent in the pasture, and with camp set we wandered off. As we got back near the tent, it began undulating and swaying, its poles popping like firecrackers. The apparition that had obviously inhabited it was much troubled and seeking escape. This apparition turned out to be no apparition at all but the yearling. He had stuck his head through an untied flap and elected to investigate inside. The return of noisy country boys caused him too much angst to find that open flap, so he made a new opening—several in fact. My tent destroyed, we had to close camp. That yearling was a real-life country monster! Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. “Uncertain Horizons,” book two in Kinton’s “Wagon Road Trilogy,” is now available. Order from your local bookstore, Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Today in Mississippi

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What’s cooking in Greenwood? trend is gaining popularity. Especially n the process of dusting for those who cooked from scratch. For my tree house computer years housewives were snapping, and vacuuming the pine floor, my man of surprises shelling, scraping corn off the cob, frying, stirring and washing dishes. appeared in the door. I’m betting that by 2030 houses “Let’s go to the Delta tomorrow. Some of our friends from that area want won’t waste square footage on building a full-size kitchen. We must admit that us to meet them in Greenwood for a cooking takes away our time, which has couple of days.” I turned off the vacuum, put away the become precious. As I have gotten older, time has increased in value dust cloth and turned off the and is now a prized possesair conditioner. sion. “Let’s go,” I said, as I How is your precious locked the door. time used? There are Next day after breakfast, I favorite TV shows to asked one of our friends, watch, grandchildren’s ball “Why did you sign up for the games or recitals to see, cooking school, Lou? You told late afternoon walks with me several years ago you gave your favorite husband, up cooking after reading Rick time in church, sitting on Warren’s book, ‘Purpose Grin ‘n’ the deck of a tree house, Driven Life,’ and discovered Bare It traveling, or visiting with that your ‘purpose’ was to stay by Kay Grafe friends and family, espeout of the kitchen.” cially if they haven’t given We stood in the lobby of up cooking. the Alluvian Hotel in Greenwood waitBack to Greenwood. This area is ing for our group of friends to arrive. called an alluvial plain, which is a Although the Viking Cooking School deposit of clay, silt, sand and gravel left and store were just across the street, our by flowing streams in a river valley or group decided to meet and walk over delta. The hotel was originally named together. You know how it is with us girls: We need a friend or friends to bol- the Irving and was constructed in 1917. It expanded to 100 rooms in the 1940s. ster our courage or keep us company. The Irving closed in the1980s. The Don’t ask me why—it’s a girl thing. Similar to tagging along with a friend to Viking Corp. acquired and completely renovated the old hotel in 2005 with 45 the restroom when dining out. spacious rooms. Giardina’s famous We teased Lou about her great sacrifice to renounce cooking chores. And we restaurant is also on site. Inside this cosmopolitan hotel are knew her reason for attending class was famed art displays in the lobby and to socialize and enjoy a plate of fancy food samples—a delicious bonus to all in other predominant areas. Directly across the lazy, quiet street is the Viking attendance. Cooking School and store, where you I thought about my hometown. In can purchase anything from a famous Lucedale restaurants are overflowing Viking stove/range to a potato peeler. because so many wives have thrown Next door is the Alluvian Spa. Oh, down their pots, pans and dish towels. If husbands want to eat, they eat out. This my.

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These grilled shrimp will get a lime glaze during this demonstration at the Viking Cooking School, in Greenwood. Photo: Kay Grafe

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Today in Mississippi  July 2013

Proudly serving members since 1938

Quality of life was, is, and will continue to be our goal I’m admitting up front that I am borrowing the subject and at least some of the material for this article from wiser people than myself. Also, I’ll be the first to admit that quality of life isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when talking about electricity. We all know that electricity provides power for lighting, heating and cooling, and other things that make life easier, but do you ever think about quality of life being dependent upon electricity? Last fall, I was reminded of the impact electricity has on the quality of life when I heard Glenn English, the retired CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, speak. He asked these questions, “What was the goal of the early pioneers in rural electrification? Was their goal to build power lines and sell electricity? Or were they trying to improve the quality of life for

themselves and their neighbors?” Those questions have run through my mind regularly as we’ve prepared for our 75th anniversary. While we can see how the two are linked, most of us really can’t fathom the sense of urgency and commitment that our early leaders had when they started securing loans and recruiting members to join the electric cooperative. Many, no doubt, had seen power lines in cities and towns. Were they thinking how great it would be to have poles and wire strung across their property? No, they had a vision of a better life provided by the electric power coming through those lines. They were thinking about drastically improving the quality of life for themselves and their neighbors. The point was further driven home when one of our linemen, Jason Holder, shared stories after spending two weeks in

Guatemala building power lines today. Electricity powers to people who never before had so many of the necessities access to electricity. Jason was and conveniences of life visibly moved by the appreciafrom refrigerators to MRI tion of those people and the machines to cellular sense of urgency of those who phones. It has changed would have to wait until the the way we store and next time a group of linemen cook our food, how we came. Sound familiar? communicate, and how I felt it again last month we receive health care. It when I heard Dr. John Christy Randy Smith, general manager is such an integral part of speak. Dr. Christy is a climate sciour lives and most of us entist who speaks about the fallacy of clitake it for granted. mate change, but that’s a topic for another Today, our goal is the same as it was 75 day. Among other things, Dr. Christy has years ago – provide quality of life for our been a missionary to Kenya where electric- members. On July 15, 1938, our associaity isn’t available; he has seen how tough tion incorporated and the first board and short life can be without electricity. members began knocking on doors to colFor those people, a better quality of life is lect $5 with a promise of a better life. only a dream. Hopefully, we are holding true to that We have so much to be thankful for promise 75 years later.


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Today in Mississippi

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Dixie Electric in the beginning

1930s In 1936 Roosevelt signed an executive order that made the Rural Electrification Administration a permanent federal agency. This order allowed REA to offer low interest loans to rural residents who wanted electricity. Rural residents in south Mississippi banded together, applied for and received a REA loan and formed Jones County Electric Power Association on July 15, 1938. Residents were asked to pay $5 to become a member of the electric cooperative, so they could receive electricity. Stover Smith became the first general manager.

Jones County EPA became

Dixie Electric Power Association

1940s 1950s To accommodate the growing number of members, Dixie Electric opened a second district office in Petal in 1952. Dixie Electric employed 48 individuals at this time. With the passing of the Public Utilities Act of 1956 by the Mississippi legislature, the electric power associations, municipal utilities and investor-owned utilities reached a compromise, and certificated areas were created. Certificated areas clearly defined the boundaries for the different utilities, so no two systems would serve the same area. For Dixie Electric, it clearly defined the seven counties that the association currently serves, including Jones, Wayne, Forrest, Perry, Covington, Jasper and Clarke counties.

Jones County EPA became Dixie Electric Power Association in 1949 after expanding into neighboring Wayne County. Jones County EPA already served portions of Forrest and Perry counties. Dixie Electric moved its headquarters in Laurel to South Magnolia Street where it remained until 1970 and opened its first branch office on Azalea Drive in Waynesboro in December 1949.

certificated areas created

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Today in Mississippi  July 2013

1960s General Manager Stover Smith retired, and Ora Beasley became manager of the association in 1964. For the first time in the cooperative’s history, Dixie Electric paid out capital credits to its member in 1964. Capital credits are profits made beyond what it takes for the cooperative to operate its business. Capital credit returns are one of the seven cooperative principles. Hurricane Camille struck south Mississippi on August 17, 1969. “Camille went up the Mississippi River and came across. It damaged most all of our system. It took us three weeks to get all of the power back on, but I don’t think everything was off. We had extra crews to come in,” retired General Manager Tim Dudley said.

1970s Dixie Electric received its first electric energy from South Mississippi Electric Power Association on August 1, 1970. SME is an electric cooperative owned by Dixie Electric and 10 other electric power associations in Mississippi. Until this time, wholesale power was supplied by investor owned utilities. James (Tim) Dudley, Jr. became the acting manager and later the permanent general manager in 1975; Ora Beasley retired. The association headquarters’ moved to Highway 84 East, now Highway 184 East, of Laurel in 1970. The building and surrounding facilities could better accommodate the growing number of employees and the addition of new equipment.

1980s Dixie Electric joined other electric cooperatives from around the nation by participating in the youth leadership program. Through this program, at least two high school juniors have gone to Washington, D.C. annually since 1987 to learn about the government first hand. On Saturday, Feb. 28, 1987, at tornado ripped through the Glade community, devastating everything in its path. The cost to repair the damage to Dixie Electric’s system was more than $450,000. The linemen from the time recall working through the night to restore power. Most of the distribution system in that area had to be rebuilt.

Dixie Electric joins the youth leadership program


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1990s Dixie Electric underwent a major change in 1996, when it joined Central Area Data Processing (CADP) and computerized member information, billing, service orders, accounting and other office procedures. Until this time period, Dixie Electric’s member records were housed on a computer system at Sanderson Farms, Inc., and many of the daily functions like service orders and meter reports were still done manually. The new computer system made way for hand held meter reading.

Dixie Electric joins Central Area Data Processing The first major change was the construction of a new Petal office on Highway 42, which opened in 2000. In 2004, the Waynesboro office moved next door on Azalea Drive to the former Great Southern National bank building; the Association purchased and remodeled the spacious building.

2000s 2010-Present In 2010, Bradley resigned, and Tim Dudley briefly returned to the Association. In July 2011, the board hired long-time employee and engineering manager Randy Smith as the new general manager. Under Randy Smith’s direction, management overhauled the billing and payment processes for members in 2011. The long-time bill card gave way to a new full-sheet billing statement. The website was updated as well to accommodate a pay online option for members. Pay online, which is has been well received, kicked off in October 2011. In 2012, an integrated phone system and an outage management system were adopted to better serve members with account information, pay by phone and power outage reporting and dispatching. A new logo was a major highlight for the employees and members of the association. The award winning logo became the registered service mark of Dixie Electric on July 1, 2012.

On August 29, 2005, Dixie Electric’s service area along with rest of south Mississippi was devastated by Hurricane Katrina. This was by far the most significant challenge that Dixie Electric faced in the first 75 years of its existence. Every meter was without electric service. More than 1,100 line workers came to aid in the repair of the system, which took 19 days. The total cost for repair was $45 million. After 40 years of service, James (Tim) Dudley, Jr. retired in 2008, and long-time engineering manager Alan Bradley became the new general manager.


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Today in Mississippi  July 2013

Hurricane Season

TOP TEN

began June 1

Every year at this time, people in Mississippi brace themselves for another potentially destructive hurricane season. The 2013 hurricane season began June 1 and continues through Nov. 30. “Hurricanes are a severe threat to our area,” said Randy Smith, general manager of Dixie Electric Power Association, “so, we want to ensure that we are well-prepared and know what to do in case one hits.” Dixie Electric is offering suggestions on what should be done to protect life and property if a hurricane threatens. We ask that our members consider these safety tips when a hurricane warning is issued.

 Make plans for action:

The best way to cope with a hurricane is to always be prepared for one. A hurricane warning is issued when hurricane conditions are expected in a specified area in 24 hours or less. If a warning is given, stay tuned to radio or TV for official bulletins. Secure lawn furniture and other loose material outdoors. Fill the bathtub with several days supply of drinking water. Turn up refrigerator to maximum cold and don’t open it unless necessary. Wedge sliding glass doors to prevent their lifting from their tracks. Check batteries in flashlights, stock up on canned foods and make sure you have plenty of medical supplies. Windows should be secured with either tape, plywood or

shutters.

 Stay or leave?

When a hurricane threatens your area, you will have to make the decision whether to evacuate or ride out the storm in the safety of your home. If local authorities recommend evacuation, you should drive carefully to the nearest designated shelter using recommended evacuation routes. Make sure the house is locked and the water and electricity are shut off at main stations. Leave food and water for pets, since many shelters do not allow them. Take small valuables with you, but travel light.

 Freezers/refrigerators:

First, open the freezer door as little as possible. With a freezer that’s full, foods can stay frozen up to 72 hours. A half-full freezer can still keep food frozen up to 24 hours after the power goes out. Should the power stay off for several days, dry ice can preserve the food in the freezer.

 Be cautious:

During high winds, electric lines can be torn down by limbs and trees. Any dangling line or lines on the ground can be deadly. Call Dixie Electric’s office to report a downed line, outage or any hazardous situation. “Dixie Electric is committed to providing its member-owners with dependable and safe service in all kinds of weather,” said Smith.

Dixie Electric continues to clear right-of-way Dixie Electric Power Association continues to trim trees and clear underbrush from the power lines. The lines extending out from the Hebron substation are currently being cleared. The Hebron substation serves the communities of Soso, Hebron, Centerville, Big Creek and a portion of Summerland. In addition to trimming, Dixie Electric has also con-

tracted for the underbrush to be sprayed. The areas served by the following substations will be sprayed: North Petal, West Moselle, Glade, West Laurel, South Hoy, South Waynesboro, Whistler and Clara. This project will continue from July until September. Dixie Electric clears the right-of-way to keep the electrical system reliable and to protect individuals from the dangers of electricity.

Hurricane emergency kit items 1. Emergency food, drinking water 2. Flashlights and batteries 3. Cash and credit cards 4. Medicine/prescriptions 5. First aid kit 6. Personal identification 7. Matches and lighters 8. Gas for generator or vehicle 9. Radio (battery-operated) 10. Cooler (with ice) VISIT www.ready.gov FOR MORE KIT IDEAS and SAFETY TIPS.


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Bylaws govern Dixie Electric’s director elections Section 3.05. Voting. Each member who is not in a status of suspension, as provided for in Section 2.01, shall be entitled to one vote only upon each matter submitted to a vote at any meeting of the members at which a quorum is present (including, but not limited to, a meeting of the members where directors are to be elected), which one vote may be cast in only one of three ways, to-wit: (a) in advance of the meeting by absentee ballot; or (b) at the meeting itself in person; or (c) at the meeting itself by proxy. Each member present at the meeting may cast his own vote plus those proxies executed in his favor pursuant to Section 3.07 of these bylaws. Voting by members other than members who are natural persons shall be allowed upon the presentation to the Association, prior to or upon registration at each member meeting, of satisfactory evidence entitling the person presenting same to vote. At all meetings of the members, all questions shall be decided by a majority of the members voting thereon, except as otherwise provided by law or by the Association’s Certificate of Incorporation or by these bylaws. Members may not cumulate their votes. Section 3.07. Representative Voting. Legal entity organizations and nonlegal entity organizations which are members of the Association may be represented at any meeting of the members and may vote only as follows: (a) Any director, officer or general manager duly authorized in writing may represent and cast the one vote of a corporation; (b) a trustee, steward, deacon, clerk or pastor duly authorized in writing may represent and cast the one vote of a church; (c) a school trustee, principal or superintendent duly authorized in writing may represent and cast the one vote of a school; (d) and any other association or organization not a legal entity may be represented by and have its one vote cast by any person duly authorized in writing who is a trustee, or manager or part owner, or any officer of such association or organization.

ARTICLE IV DIRECTORS Section 4.03. Tenure & Qualifications. (a) At each annual meeting of the members, approximately one-third (1/3) of the total number of directors shall be elected by ballot, by and from the members, to serve for a term of three (3) years as provided by law. If the election of directors shall not be held at the annual meeting or if such annual meeting is not held, each director shall hold office for the term or until his successor shall have been elected and qualified. (b) At any meeting, ballots shall not be necessary in the event the number of persons nominated for directors does not exceed the number of directors to be elected, but in such case if there be no objection, the directors may be elected in any other proper manner. Drawing by lot shall resolve, where necessary, any tie votes. (c) No person or non-natural member as described in subsection (e) of this section shall be eligible to become or remain a director or to hold any position of trust in the Association who is not an active member in good standing of the Association, has not been a bona fide resident of the district from which they are to be elected for one year immediately preceding the nomination to directorship, or who is in any way employed by or financially interested in a competing enterprise. (d) No person shall be eligible to become or remain a director who has been finally convicted of a felony or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude. (e) In order to be eligible to become or remain a director of the Association, a person must be a member of the Association and receiving service therefrom at his primary residential abode, and not be a close relative as defined in Section 4.08 of an incumbent director, or the director being replaced. However, the operating or chief executive of any non-natural member, such as a corporation, church, etc., or its designee, shall, notwithstanding that they do not receive service from the Association at their primary residential abode, be eligible to become a director, from the District in which such member is located, if he or

she or such designee (1) is in substantial permanent occupancy, direction or use of the premises served by the Association, and (2) is a permanent and year-round resident within or in close proximity to an area served by the Association; but provided further, that no more than one (1) such person may serve on the Board of Directors at the same time. When a membership is held jointly by a husband and wife, either one but not both may be elected a director; provided, however that neither one shall be eligible to become or remain a director or to hold a position of trust in the Association unless both shall meet the qualifications hereinabove set forth. No person shall take or hold office as director who is the incumbent of or a candidate for any elective county, beat, district, school district, municipal or state public office for which a salary is paid. (f) In order to be eligible to become or remain a director of the Association, a person must have the legal capacity to enter into a binding contract. (g) Upon establishment of the fact that a nominee for director lacks eligibility under this Section or as may be provided elsewhere in these bylaws, it shall be the duty of the chair presiding at the meeting at which such nominee would be otherwise voted upon to disqualify such nominee. Upon establishment of the fact that any person being considered for, or already holding, a directorship or other position of trust in the Association lacks eligibility under this Section, it shall be the duty of the Board of Directors to withhold such positions from such persons, or to cause them to be removed therefrom, as the case may be. (h) Nothing in this section contained shall, or shall be construed to, affect in any manner whatsoever, the validity of any action taken at any meeting of the Board of Directors, unless such action is taken with respect to a matter which is affected by the provisions of this section and in which one or more of the directors have an intent adverse to that of the Association. Section 4.04. Nominations, Committee on Nominations; Credentials and Elections. (a) Nominations by Petition. Any

fifty (50) members acting together may make other nominations by petition and the Secretary shall post such nominations at the same place where the list of nominations by the committee is posted. Any petition for nomination shall be submitted on a form designated and provided by the Association. Each member signing such petition shall place thereon the date of signing, printed name, address, account number, telephone number and service location of the member. Nominations made by petition, if any, received at least forty (40) days before the meeting shall be included on the official ballot. The Chairman shall call for additional nominations to be made from the floor. No member may nominate more than one candidate. (b) Committee on Nominations. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors to appoint, no less than fiftyfive (55) days nor more than ninety-five (95) days before the date of the meeting of the members at which directors are to be elected, a committee on nominations consisting of not less than five (5) nor more than eleven (11) members who shall be selected from different sections so as to provide equitable geographical representation. No existing Association employees, agents, officers, directors or known candidates for director, and close relatives (as hereinafter defined) or members of the same household of existing Association employees, agents, officers, directors or known candidates for director may serve on such committee. The committee may receive and consider any written suggestions as to nominees submitted by members of the Association. The committee shall meet at a time and place set by the Board of Directors. The committee shall prepare and post at the principal office of the Association at least fifty (50) days before the meeting a list of nominations for directors. The Secretary shall mail with the notice of the meeting or separately a statement of the number of directors to be elected and the names and addresses of the candidates nominated by the committee on nominations. A complete version of the association’s Bylaws are available on the Web at dixieepa.com or at Dixie Electric’s office locations in Laurel, Waynesboro or Petal.


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July 2013

Buttermilk Layer Cake

mississippi

ooks C RECIPES FROM OUR FEATURED COOKBOOK:

‘Celebration Cookbook’ In 1862, when Civil War battles and skirmishes began erupting across Mississippi, a small group of Summit residents organized a new Baptist church. Within a few months, the membership of Summit Baptist Church reached 13. Renamed First Baptist in 1944, the church added and renovated facilities through the decades to accommodate a growing membership. In 2011, its worship attendance averaged 902 members. As First Baptist Church of Summit marked its 150th anniversary last year, members published a commemorative cookbook, which includes a history of their church. Proceeds from the sale of “Celebration Cookbook” help fund church ministries. The hardcover, loose-leaf cookbook presents 800 recipes ranging from traditional southern dishes to contemporary, ethnic-inspired cuisine. Contributors are church members, friends, former members, and past and present church staff. “Many of the recipes are family favorites passed down from generation to generation,” said Jerry Russell, cookbook committee chairman. To order, send $15 plus $6 S&H per book to Celebration Cookbook, c/o First Baptist Church, P.O. Box 100, Summit, MS 39666. Please include your phone number. For more information, call 601-276-2396.

1 cup Crisco 2 cups sugar 3 large eggs 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. baking soda 2 Tbsp. vanilla, or to taste 1 1/2 cups buttermilk

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease and flour 3 (9-inch) cake pans. Beat Crisco with electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add sugar, beating well. Add eggs 1 at a time, beating until blended each time. Combine flour, salt and baking soda, and add to mixture slowly. Alternate, beginning with flour mixture, then buttermilk, and ending with flour mixture until all is well blended. Beat at low speed until blended after each addition. Beat at medium speed for 2 minutes. Stir in vanilla. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake in preheated oven for 22 minutes. (For a 9by-13-inch pan, bake about 40 minutes.) Note: Use frosting if desired, but this cake is delicious served plain.

Warm Chocolate Melting Cake 6 oz. dark chocolate 3/4 cup butter 4 eggs, room temperature

3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup flour

Preheat oven to 390 F. Melt chocolate and butter. In a bowl, mix the eggs and sugar; whisk for a few minutes, then add flour and mix. Add the egg mix to the melted chocolate; mix well. Pour mixture into greased ramekins. Bake in preheated oven for 14 minutes. This will be runny in the middle and cake-like on top. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top.

Eggplant Pyramids 1 eggplant, peeled and sliced 2 fresh tomatoes, sliced 1 large onion, sliced Olive oil 1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. dried basil 1/4 lb. mozzarella cheese 2 Tbsp. Parmesan cheese 1/2 cup bread crumbs

Preheat oven to 450 F. Spray casserole dish with cooking spray. Layer eggplant in casserole dish; stack tomatoes and onions on top of eggplant. Drizzle olive oil over all and sprinkle with salt and basil. Cover and bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes. Sprinkle with both cheeses and bread crumbs. Continue cooking (uncovered) for 10 minutes.

Honey Grape Chicken Salad 3 cups chicken, boiled and chopped 1 1/2 cups seedless, red grape halves 3 stalks celery, chopped 1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup almonds, slivered and toasted 1 1/3 cups mayonnaise 1/3 cup honey

In a large bowl, combine chicken, grapes, celery, cranberries and almonds; set aside. In a small bowl, combine mayonnaise and honey. Spoon mayonnaise mixture over chicken mixture; toss gently to coat. Cover and chill.

Mama’s Strawberry Pudding 2 (3.4-oz.) boxes instant vanilla pudding 2 1/2 cups milk 1 pt. sour cream

1 (16-oz.) carton Cool Whip, divided 1 qt. fresh strawberries, sliced 1 box vanilla wafers

Mix pudding and milk until thick. Add sour cream and half the Cool Whip, reserving the remainder for topping. Layer half the sliced strawberries in the bottom of a 4-quart container. Add a layer of vanilla wafers and a layer of half the pudding mixture. Repeat the process and top with the remaining Cool Whip. Refrigerate at least 2 hours (overnight is better) before serving. Garnish with strawberries. Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Egg Salad 6 eggs, hard boiled, peeled and grated 1/2 sleeve saltine crackers, crushed Celery, finely chopped, to taste Sweet pickle relish, to taste

6 drops hot sauce Salt & pepper, to taste Mayonnaise to moisten

Mix all ingredients. Refrigerate overnight. You may need to add a little extra mayonnaise before serving. Note: Serve as a sandwich spread. Great when you need to stretch your eggs, and no one will know it has crackers in it.


July 2013



Today in Mississippi



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The future of Infinity is endless

By Nancy Jo Maples Infinity isn’t a museum. It’s a science center filled with endless possibilities. The mathematical term seems a perfect fit for the name of Stennis Space Center’s new discovery facility designed to draw school-age children toward jobs in science industries. “We’re hoping to inspire youth to look at careers in STEM fields,” said Guy Johnson, of Coast Electric Power Association. Johnson serves on Infinity Science Center’s board of directors, and Coast Electric supplies electricity to the Stennis site. Johnson said one goal of Infinity is to motivate the next generation of scientists. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and math. Visitors can view the space suit worn by astronaut Fred Haise of Apollo 13, which was moon-bound in 1970 but due to technical difficulties circled the moon while Haise and fellow crewmen underwent an intense repair of their ship before successfully returning to Earth. (See story on page 4.) Among the exhibits is a replica of an international space station module, an omega flight simulator thrill ride and several hands-on activities for children. Certain days offer additional treats. Sometimes visitors can sample salads made from lettuce grown in a controlled environment, an experiment being done in anticipation of space travel and life on other planets. Like many spacedriven experiments this practice could be used one day in American homes. Guests are greeted at the entranceway by the Infinity Eagle, a bird crafted by coast artist Marlin Miller from spacecraft metals and from wood salvaged after Hurricane Katrina. Dotting the landscape surrounding a shaded outdoor picnic area are retired boats and buoys used in collecting weather data in the ocean. The center also has a restaurant with burgers, salads and Gulf Coast seafood dishes. Tish Williams, director of the Hancock County Chamber of Commerce, has been involved with Infinity since its onset in 1999. “The chamber has been an advocate from the beginning and is honored to be the managing

contractor. We’re interested in restoring lost tourism, fueling businesses, improving education and providing a better workforce. Those are components of Infinity’s mission and they are components of the chamber’s mission,” she said. A $10 million grant has been approved for completing the indoor and outdoor experiences of Infinity’s original vision. Those include a wetlands demonstration area, Mars and ocean exploration exhibits, lunar habitat missions and a heritage trail. Infinity tickets cost $10 for ages 18-54, $8 for ages 55 and older and for military, and $6 for ages 4-17. Younger children are admitted free. The ticket includes a bus tour of the Stennis Space Center, which is restricted from the general public. Stennis, NASA’s rocket testing site, opened in 1963 after 2,202 residents moved from their homes to provide land for the government to build an engine testing site. Promoters of the venture Visitors tour a full-sized International Space Station module, above, in the Space Gallery area of Infinity Science Center, as well as other coined the phrase, “If you want to go to the moon you space-related exhibits, left. Artist Marlin Miller and his son, Preston, created the 32-foot-tall Infinity Eagle sculpture, below have to go through left, which combines spacecraft metals from NASA’s Stennis Space Mississippi,” because every Center and wood salvaged after Hurricane Katrina. Infinity is a rocket engine is tested in member of Coast Electric Power Association. Hancock County. “In Hancock County, we like hearing the sounds of loud noises from Stennis,” Williams said. Stennis Space Center provides 5,300 jobs, covers 140,000 acres and is a federal city with a fire station, medical clinic, gas stations, banks and post office. It is Stennis Space Center, MS 39529. However, it has no citizens; everyone commutes into the city for work. Until last year a museum called StennisSphere was located inside a non-restricted portion of the site. Infinity replaced it and is located outside the gate at the Interstate 10 Welcome Center, giving easier public access. This positioning doubled the number of visitors StennisSphere had previously attracted. From its opening in April 2012 through its first anniversary, Infinity greeted 60,000 guests. Additional exhibits and enhanced publicity are expected to make those numbers climb to as high as 300,000 per year. Infinity pulls a large number of tourists from Louisiana because it sits near the state line at Exit 2 on I-10. Statistics predict its market includes 296,000 school children living within a 50-mile radius. A field trip for pupils from as far away as Mobile, Ala., is also feasible. Infinity’s name fits not only because of the math jobs it can inspire but also because the grant and visions that have made it reality make it a work in progress with possibilities that are…infinite. For more information call 228-533-9025 or visit the Infinity website at www.visitinfinity.com. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, MS 39452 or via email at nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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Seventy years without a

Fourth of July or 70 or so years after the side of town, bypassing the impregnable high surrender of Vicksburg to bluffs protecting Vicksburg from the river to the Union army on the the west. Fourth of July, 1863 (150 After coming ashore at Bruinsburg (which years ago this year), no longer exists) on April 30, 1863, Grant’s Independence Day wasn’t army fought battles at Port Gibson, Raymond, celebrated in Vicksburg. Jackson, Champion Hill (between Bolton and There were no fireworks, no picnics, no Edwards), the Big Black River and finally days off work. The post office didn’t even Vicksburg. close on the Fourth of July in Vicksburg There were two attempts made to storm the for decades. city. Both attempts to crash through the All of that indifference was in deference Confederate lines failed. So Grant surrounded to the fact that July 4 was the day Gen. Vicksburg and starved it out. It took 47 days Pemberton of the South chose to surrender for the town to be completely void of food and the city to Gen. Grant of the to give up, but the inevitable finally North. happened. Grant took aim on Pemberton took advantage of Vicksburg early in the war. the fact that Independence Day was Lincoln had declared upon them. He chose that day to Vicksburg to be the key to hand over the city thinking he’d get winning and said whoever had better surrender terms on the holithe key in their pocket would day from the Union army. I guess come out on top. So Grant set he did: The Southern army was Mississippi out to get that key. paroled and not taken captive. And Seen In April of 1862, a full year the Union army shared their food by Walt Grayson before he crossed the with the starving people of Mississippi River at Vicksburg. Bruinsburg, heading his army But the Fourth of July holiday eventually to the doorsteps of Vicksburg, was not celebrated in Vicksburg any more Grant won the Battle of Shiloh in southern until after the Allies won World War II. Some Tennessee just north of Corinth, big-name politicians came down from Mississippi. His aim was to cut the rail Washington for a few years and gave speeches lines between Memphis and the east foreon the Fourth. Dwight Eisenhower was the most, but also to start clearing a path last of them in the late 1940s. toward Vicksburg. The celebration died down again and never That path clearing and maneuvering really revived to levels approaching what it is took Grant’s army all over the Delta’s today—until the nation’s Bicentennial in waterways during the winter of 1862 into 1976. From about that time on, Vicksburg 1863, trying to find a way to get to the rejoined the Union in celebrating city. Independence Day to the point it is once again Most disastrous of the attempts was useless to try to buy stamps at the post office Gen. Sherman’s landing on the Yazoo on the Fourth. River above town and marching his army Thanks to Gordon Cotton, of the Old across the flooded lower Delta to the bluffs Courthouse Museum in Vicksburg, for the yarns above Chickasaw Bayou just after from which this tale was woven. Christmas of 1862. Sherman lost the battle. But his loss set the resolve of the Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” Union just that more to take the city. on Mississippi Public Broadcasting After months of failures, the final plan television, and the author of two “Looking Around was to march down the Louisiana side of Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: the river, cross somewhere below More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Vicksburg and come back up on the east Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

F

The clock tower at the Old Courthouse in Vicksburg would have made a great target for Union guns during the siege, if Union prisoners had not been housed in the courtroom below. If not for that, we may not have the Old Courthouse Museum today.


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Add mulch, compost to boost landscape health Using compost as a soil amendment or mulch around plants adds texture to the soil, improves its water-holding capacity, encourages earthworm populations and gives plants needed nutrients. ome summer days—OK, honestly, most summer days—seem just too hot to do anything in the garden and landscape. But a couple of tasks will pay off in the long run with better landscape performance. You guessed it: this column is all about mulching and composting. Whether you are an experienced gardener or have a brown thumb, you can mulch like a pro. Few gardening activities have as much of an impact as mulching. Mulch reduces erosion, influences soil temperature, helps control weed growth and gives your landscape a well-groomed look. Unlike many garden activities, mulching has no deadline. You can mulch in the spring or summer to give the landscape a fresh look for any garden gathering. Or, you can wait until the off-season when you may have more time available. Mulch must be permeable to allow both air and water to pass freely through it. There are two choices for mulch types, organic and inorganic. Organic mulches help conserve

S

moisture to keep soil temperatures cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Organic mulch decomposes or breaks down, which helps build better soil. For that reason, organic mulches need to be replenished every year or two. Classic organic mulches include pine Southern straw, bark Gardening and shredded by Dr. Gary Bachman leaves. Specialty mulches include pecan shells and coir chunks, which are made from the husks of coconut shells. Inorganic mulches tend to raise soil temperatures in the summer and lower them in the winter. They cause greater day-to-night temperature fluctuations. Stone and gravel are commonly used, or you can try products made from recycled tires. Weed barriers or ground fabric are

commonly used to block weeds growing from seeds already in the soil below the mulch. These products are initially effective when using organic mulch because weed seed will germinate but won’t grow through the barrier. The next year, however, weed seed blown in on top of the organic mulch will grow on top of the barrier. The garden is a vicious arena, a battle between you and the weeds. Ground fabric is more effective when using inorganic mulching materials. With our long gardening seasons, we are always cleaning up the landscape and generating piles of leaves, clippings and pruned branches. In many cities, this yard trash ends up at the curb for pickup. Some of this will be chipped and composted by the city for municipal use. The rest may end up in the landfill, which is not ideal. Why not put these materials in your compost bin? If you are not already composting, you should know the value of this homemade material. There’s a reason gardeners call compost “black gold.” The benefits of adding compost to

your garden and landscape are numerous, and your plants will be most appreciative. You can use compost as a soil amendment, as mulch around your plants, or both. When used as a soil amendment, compost adds texture and improves water-holding capacity in sandy soils. If you have a tight clay soil that doesn’t drain well, the addition of compost will improve soil drainage. Other benefits include keeping garden soil healthy with increased earthworm populations that help to aerate and loosen the soil. Composting also recycles essential nutrients that feed plants. Maybe the main benefit of interest to thrifty gardeners: Compost is free. No more buying bags of soil conditioners and amendments. Help your plants beat the summer heat with beneficial compost and mulch, and you will reap the rewards of a beautiful landscape year-round. Dr. Gary Bachman is MSU horticulturist at the Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi.


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PICTURE THIS

1

3

6 11 2 10

9 1 Somebody’s been mud riding: Avery Tate and Reece Ducrest, by Beth Ducrest, Belzoni; Twin County EPA 2 Tristin Trask makes country music, by Ariel Cobbert, Hattiesburg 3 Ana Deaton, of Madison, pulled this keeper from her Grandpapa’s pond, by Phyllis Smith, Yazoo City; Yazoo Valley EPA


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5

4

4 Maggie Claire Atkinson feeds a calf in Neshoba County, by Helen Atkinson, Philadelphia; Central EPA 5 Aaron Dorsey thinks big, by Kimberly Dorsey, Caledonia; Monroe County EPA 6 Fading country store catches photographer’s eye, by Mark Cliburn, Silver Creek; Southern Pine EPA 7 Cousins Sydnie Campo, Aidan Lagasse, Shane Michael Campo Jr. and Lola Serpas make some childhood memories, by Jacob Lagasse, Picayune; Coast EPA 8 This truck has been parked way too long, by Whitney Welch, Vaiden; Delta EPA

7 12

8 9 No shirt, no shoes, no problem for Archer Mitchell, by Kristen Breland, Wiggins 10 James Perry digs into a slice of summertime, by Angela Perry, Olive Branch; Northcentral EPA 11 A rainbow provides a beautiful respite between Hurricane Isaac’s downpours, by Elizabeth Shoemake, Sumrall; Pearl River Valley EPA 12 Showy and loud, the rooster is a country icon, by Patty Emfinger, Wesson; Southwest Mississippi EPA For details on our next “Picture This” feature, see page 8.


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Mississippi Marketplace Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, ten word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8604 or email swindle@epaofms.com.

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PLAY GOSPEL SONGS BY EAR! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95, Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, KS 66204. Call: 913-262-4982. DON’T LET YOUR FAMILY MEMORIES FADE AWAY! We can transfer your VHS, VHS-C, Betamax, Minidv ... to DVD. We provide Macintosh computer support with 28 years experience. Parrot Video Productions LLC. Call 601- 826-1168 or visit us at www.parrotvideoproductions.com. BECOME AN ORDAINED MINISTER, by Correspondence study. The harvest truly is great, the laborours are few. Luke 10:2. Free info. MCO, 6630 West Cactus #B107-767, Glendale, AZ 85304 http://www.ordination.org. MISSISSIPPI LAND OWNERS: Get updated information on 2013 Estate Tax Changes. Protect your Estate from Taxes & Probate. FREE Packet. Call Toll-Free 1-877-266-0500. 24/7.

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Join Walt and many other Mississippians as they open their life albums and share their memories in words and photographs. This collection from the readers of Today in Mississippi prompted Walt to pull related tales from his vault of experience, collected while living in and traveling throughout his home state. “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories with Walt Grayson” is a valued gift, and the book is sure to become a collector’s item.

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Events Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your event? Send it to us at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events of statewide interest will be published free of charge as space allows. Event details are subject to change, so we strongly recommend calling to confirm dates and times before traveling. For more events, go to www.visitmississippi.org.

“Ghosts and Other Abstractions”: Works by Bria Brown, through Sept. 27, Biloxi. Portraits, abstract works inspired by Anne Sexton poem “Ghosts.” Dusti Bongé Art Foundation Creole Cottage. Details: 228-432-7660; www.dustibonge.org. Gulf Coast Health Educators Kidney Smart Classes, July 9, Gulfport; Aug. 20, Gautier. Learn about kidney health and more; 5:30-7 p.m. Dedeaux Road Community Center in Gulfport; Gautier Public Library. Details: 228-860-7530. Cedar Hill Farm Pick-Ur-Own, July 1 - Aug. 31, Hernando. Ripe produce, playground, petting zoo, hayride to fields, homemade jams, more. Call for produce availability. Cedar Hill Farm. Details: 662429-2540; www.gocedarhillfarm.com. Dizzy Dean Fast Pitch World Series, July 1015, Southaven. Greenbrook Park. Details: 662890-7275 ext. 222; www.greenbrooksoftball.com. “Native Plants and Fabulous Flowers,” July 12, Picayune. Lecture about native plants, azaleas and new flowers, led by Dr. Allen Owings; 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Admission; register by July 11. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. “Hummingbirds: Understanding Rubythroated Hummingbirds in Your Yard,” July 13, Picayune. Hummingbird bander James Bell to lead talk; 10-11 a.m. Suitable for families. Admission; register by July 12. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. “Life Over Limbs” Benefit, July 13, Carthage. Motorcycle ride, kid zone, music, cake walk, auction; begins 11 a.m. Benefits quadruple amputee Dianne Harkins. Carthage Coliseum. Details: 601672-3656; 601-562-6510. “Beautiful Bayou Birds,” July 13-14, Ocean Springs. Educational family program; 10 a.m. Also: Storytelling Campfire 8 p.m. July 19; Tracks and Scat Walk 10 a.m. July 20-21. Free. Gulf Islands National Seashore Davis Bayou. Details: 228-230-4100; www.nps.gov/guis. James Meredith Book Signing, July 17, Hernando. Meredith to sign his new book, “A Mission From God,” and speak on education in Mississippi; noon. Hernando Public Library. Details: 662-429-4439.

Friends of the Library Book Sale, July 18 and 20, Columbus. Bestsellers, histories, cookbooks and more, priced up to $2. Columbus-Lowndes Public Library. Details: 662-329-5300; www.lowndeslibrary.org. The Whisnants in Concert, July 18, Newton. Love offering; 7 p.m. Ebenezer Baptist Church. Details: 601-896-2249, 601-683-3928. Mixed Martial Arts Event, July 20, Columbus. Doors open 6 p.m. Trotter Convention Center. Details: 601-750-0218. Mommy’s Secret All Season Consignment Sale, July 25-27, Olive Branch. Items for babies, kids and teens. Pleasant Hill Elementary School; 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Details: www.mommyssecret.com. 124th Neshoba County Fair, July 26 - Aug. 2, Philadelphia. Exhibits, livestock shows, PRCA rodeo, harness/running horse races, political speaking, entertainment, midway rides, more. Admission. Neshoba County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-656-8480; www.neshobacountyfair.org. Hank Williams Jr. in Concert, July 26, Southaven. Special guests Chris Young, Keith Anderson; 7 p.m. Snowden Grove Amphitheater. Details: 800-745-3000. Tuxedo Reunion, July 27, Meridian. Bring a covered dish; 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. The Church of the Mediator. Details: 601-483-6802. Mid-South Ice House Christmas in July, July 27, Olive Branch. Skate with Santa and Crush the Polar Bear; Christmas trivia, games, prizes; 1:30 - 4 p.m. Mid-South Ice House. Details: 901-881-8544. Bikes, Blues & Bayous, Aug. 3, Greenwood. Cycling event with 20-, 46- and 58-mile rides; 7 a.m. Themed rest stops, post-ride party. Details: 662-453-4152; www.bikesbluesbayous.com. “Carnivorous Plants of the Arboretum,” Aug. 2, Picayune. Richelle Stafne to lead lecture about secret lives of carnivorous plants; 11 a.m. - noon. Admission; register by Aug. 1. Details: 601-7992311. “A Gathering With Friends,” Aug. 3, Diamondhead. Shawn Keener to speak on “Men and Women of Purpose.” Breakfast, gospel music; 9 a.m. - noon. Free. Diamondhead Community Church. Details: 228-255-5556; www.dhcommuni-

We Are Homegrown What does “homegrown” mean to you? Fresh, ripe tomatoes? Soul-stirring gospel music or deep-fried catfish? “Homegrown” describes any number of Mississippi traditions—including rural electric service. If that surprises you, consider this: The state’s 26 electric power associations are rooted in a homegrown initiative that lifted rural residents from the “dark ages” of the early 20th century into a brighter future of social and economic progress. Without affordable and reliable electric service, we would not have a strong quality of life. It’s important to the members we serve and it’s the way to grow and develop our communities. Today, more than 1.8 million Mississippians enjoy the benefits of their electric power association, an enterprise owned and operated by the people it serves. Electric power associations grew up in Mississippi. We are home owned and homegrown.

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124th NESHOBA COUNTY FAIR Philadelphia, Miss. Mississippi’s Giant Houseparty

Fri., July 26 thru Fri., Aug. 2

Arts & crafts market, garden and field crop exhibits, home arts and crafts exhibits, needlework and quilt displays. State dairy cattle show, beef cattle and sheep shows. Petting zoo. Harper, Morgan and Smith PRCA Rodeo. Harness and running horse races, mule races & pony pull. Antique car show. Local and statewide political speaking. Nightly variety and Nashville entertainment. 34th Annual Heart O’Dixie Triathlon. Thacker Mountain Radio Show. Fireworks. Midway amusement and rides by Mitchell Bros. Amusements. For more information,

tychurch.org. Leukemia Cup Regatta, Aug. 3-4, Pass Christian. Competitive sailboat racing, golf holein-one, party, live auction. Benefits Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Admission. Pass Christian Yacht Club. Details: 504-837-0945; msla.lcr.llsevent.org. Greater Vision in Concert, Aug. 8, Pelahatchie. Pelahatchie Baptist Church; 7 p.m. Details: 601260-7114. Twice As Nice Kids Resale, Aug. 8-10, D’berville. Used clothes, furniture, equipment for children, infants, maternity. D’berville Civic Center. Details: www.2asnicekidsresale.com. Bright Lights, Belhaven Nights, Aug. 10, Jackson. Street festival with live music on five stages, art vendors, children’s activities, food; 5:30-9:30 p.m. Admission. Historic Belhaven Neighborhood. Details: 601-352-8850;

visit www.neshobacountyfair.org or call 601-656-8480 www.greaterbelhaven.com. Calhoun County Sacred Harp Musical Association, Aug. 10, Bruce. All-day singing from “The Sacred Harp” tunebook; begins 10 a.m. Bethel Primitive Baptist Church. Details: 601-9401612; mdavis@scott.k12.ms.us; www.fasola.org. Mississippi Coast Jazz Society Dance and Jam Session, Aug. 11, Biloxi. Non-member and student musicians may sit in; 2-5 p.m. Admission. Hard Rock Casino. Details: 228-392-4177.

COMING UP: Mississippi Gulf Coast Honor Flight VI to World War II Memorial, Oct. 1, Gulfport. Oneday free trip for WWII veterans to WWII and other memorials in Washington, D.C. Applications now being accepted. Leaves from Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport. Details: www.mgchonorflight.org or MGC Honor Flight, PO Box 1912, Gautier, MS 39553.




July 2013

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LOT NO. 66418/61364

SAVE $90

LOT NO. 66619/ 60338/69381 Item 69381 shown

89

$

MULTI-USE TRANSFER PUMP Item 66418 shown

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT NO. 95588/ 69462/60561 Item 95588 shown

SAVE 66%

R ! PE ON 220 LB. SU UP CAPACITY CO

16" x 30" STEEL SERVICE CART LOT NO. 5107/60390

SAVE 37%

9

$ 99

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE 69%

5 FT. 6" x 7 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP LOT NO. 953/69136/ 69248/69128/69210

LOT NO. 91616/ 69087/60379

SAVE $ 99 60%

7

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

LOT NO. 97181/93981

7

$ 99

1

REG. PRICE $3.99

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

4" x 36" BELT/ 6" DISC SANDER

SAVE $45 $

SAVE $ 99 50%

Item 953 shown

REG. PRICE $19.99

LOT NO. 96289

2799

Item 5107 shown

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

Item 91616 shown

1500 WATT DUAL TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN (572°/1112°)

$

REG. PRICE $29.99

Includes three AA NiCd rechargeable batteries (one for each fixture).

3 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED HIGH SPEED STEEL STEP DRILLS

4

99

REG. PRICE $13.99

3 PIECE DECORATIVE SOLAR LED LIGHTS

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE 64% $ 99

REG. PRICE $179.99

$

REG. PRICE $79.99

ON ALL HAND TOOLS!

20%

LIMIT 1 - Only available with qualifying minimum purchase (excludes gift value). Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Item 95275 shown

3999

FREE!

3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT NINE LED ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

• Over 25 Million Satisfied Customers! • 1 Year Competitor’s Low Price Guarantee • No Hassle Return Policy! • 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed! • Over 400 Stores Nationwide NOBODY BEATS OUR QUALITY, SERVICE AND PRICE! R ! PE ON SU UP CO

LIFETIME WARRANTY



27 LED PORTABLE WORKLIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

R ! PE ON U P S U CO

WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE OF $9.99

Item 65020 shown

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

Today in Mississippi

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

1/2" PROFESSIONAL VARIABLE SPEED REVERSIBLE HAMMER DRILL LOT NO. 68169/67616/60495

Item 68169 shown

Item 97181 shown

5499 $2499

REG. PRICE $25.99

REG. PRICE $44.99

REG. PRICE $99.99

REG. PRICE $49.99

SAVE 50%

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON Item 42292 SU UP shown CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO NEW!

TRIPLE BALL TRAILER HITCH

Item 94141 shown

LOT NO. 94141/69874

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER

19

$

SAVE 64% $ 99

AUTOMATIC WRIST BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR LOT NO. 67212

Requires two AAA batteries (sold separately).

SAVE 45%

1899

Not for overhead lifting.

REG. PRICE $13.99

SAVE 60%

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO Item

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE 28%

1799

$

REG. PRICE $24.99

LOT NO. 98085/69644/ 69890/60498 Includes 3.2V, 600 mAh Li-ion battery pack.

38119 shown

SAVE 44%

14" ELECTRIC CHAIN SAW

SAVE 40%

SAVE 59%

LOT NO. 67255

5

4999

$

REG. PRICE $89.99

4499

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON NO GAS SU UP REQUIRED! CO

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

R ! R ! PE ON PE ON SU UP 9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED SU UP O O C COMBINATION WRENCH SETS C

1500 PSI PRESSURE WASHER LOT NO. 68333/69488

LOT NO. 68887/61207

8999

$

Item 68887 shown

REG. PRICE $149.99

SAVE $60 LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Item 68333 shown

SAVE $50

79

$

99

REG. PRICE $129.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 60%

Item 42304 shown

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT NO. 42304/69043

METRIC

LOT NO. 47257

5

REG. PRICE $14.99

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

13999

$

REG. PRICE $249.99

18 PIECE T-HANDLE POINT AND HEX KEY WRENCH SET LOT NO. 96645

SAVE 33%

Includes two 1.5V button cell batteries.

1199

$

REG. PRICE $29 .99

REG. PRICE $17.99

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP O C

R ! PE ON SU UP 1000 LB. O C CAPACITY

MOVER'S DOLLY LOT NO. 93888/60497

LOT NO. 93897/69265

93897 shown

5999

$

REG. PRICE $129.99

LOT NO. 68751

$ 99

REG. PRICE $649.99

SAVE 66%

LOT NO. 42305/69044

YOUR CHOICE!

35999

$

2900 LB. CAPACITY HIGH GLOSS FINISH!

R ! PE ON SU UP BALL CO

6 " DIGITAL CALIPER

RETRACTABLE AIR/WATER SAVE HOSE REEL WITH Item $70 3/8" x 50 FT. HOSE

SAVE $110

SAE

WEIGHS 306 LBS.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

9

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $290

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$ 99

REG. PRICE $74.99

Item 68784 shown

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT NO. 4077

REG. PRICE $12.99

LOT NO. 68784/69387 REG. PRICE $29.99

LOT NO. 67455/ 69626/69925/96933

$ 29

LOT NO. 38119/ 44506/60238

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

90 AMP FLUX WIRE WELDER

1 2 VOLT, 250 PSI AIR COMPRESSOR

5 SPEED DRILL PRESS

$

9

$ 99

4 4", 13 DRAWER INDUSTRIAL I IN QUALITY ROLLER CABINET

Item 67455 shown

REG. PRICE $34.99

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

3 6 LED SOLAR SECURITY LIGHT

SAVE 66%

$

REG. PRICE $34.99

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Item 69644 shown

1 2 VOLT MAGNETIC TOWING LIGHT KIT

1399

$

4

REG. PRICE $54 .99

LOT NO. 97711/60658

Item 97711 shown

LOT NO. 42292/ 69594/69955

SAVE 63% 99

3/8" x 14 FT. GRADE 43 TOWING CHAIN

4 5 WATT SOLAR PANEL KIT

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

STORE LOCATIONS Biloxi

Item 93888 shown

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Pearl

SAVE 46%

7

$ 99

REG. PRICE $14.99

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 11/5/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Southaven

Tupelo



Today in Mississippi Dixie August 2013