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The

WREN August 2010

Wyoming Rural Electric News

News source for Wyoming co-op owners since 1954

magazine

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THE WYOMING

STATE FAIR

The fair kicks off on August 13 for a week of fun-filled activities in Douglas. You'll find the full schedule on pages 10, 18 and 22, and a story about two of the fair's long-time champions, Earl and Jewell Reed, on page 12.


 

 

 



 

      



 

  

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THE WREN MAGAZINE, WYOMING RURAL ELECTRIC NEWS ­-- Ê£ä™n‡ÓnÇÈ®Ê6œÕ“iÊxÈÊUÊ œ°ÊnÊUÊÕ}ÕÃÌÊÓä£ä The official publication of the Wyoming Rural Electric Association The WREN Magazine, Wyoming Rural Electric News, is owned, controlled and published monthly, except in January, by rural electric cooperatives in the interest of the economic progress of rural areas specifically and the entire population of Wyoming and the nation generally. The WREN magazine has a total average monthly paid circulation of 40,944 for 11 months ending August, 2009. WREN is delivered to rural electric member/ consumers and other subscribers throughout the entire state of Wyoming and the nation. Postmaster - Send address changes to: Linden Press, Inc., 223 S. Howes St., Fort Collins, CO 80521, (970) 221-3232. Include 3-digit co-op code. Periodicals postage paid at Fort Collins, CO (original entry office) and at additional mailing offices. Acceptance of advertising by WREN does not imply endorsement of the product or services advertised by the publisher or Wyoming electric cooperatives. WREN STAFF Publisher: Linden Press, Inc. Editor: Cara Eastwood MEMBER AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE Carbon Power, Joe Parrie, Chairman Basin Electric, Michael Riedman Big Horn REC, Jeff Umphlett Bridger Valley Electric, Betty Applequist High Plains Power, Jeff Milton High West Energy, Clint Farrar Niobrara Electric, Sheldon Albertson Powder River Energy, Kristin Kelly Tri-State G&T, Jim Van Someren Wheatland REA, Al Teel Wyrulec Company, Rollie Miller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Lower Valley Energy, Afton, Linda Schmidt, President Wheatland REA, Wheatland, Bill Teter, Vice President Garland Light & Power, Powell, Ike Eastman Big Horn REC, Basin, Tom Delaney Bridger Valley Electric, Mountain View, Gary Nix Carbon Power, Saratoga, Jerry Rabidue High Plains Power, Riverton, Hearley Dockham High West Energy, Pine Bluffs, Clint Farrar Niobrara, Lusk, Andy Greer Powder River Energy, Sundance, Leo Ankney Wyrulec Company, Lingle, Dewey Hageman Basin Electric, Bismarck - ND, Reuben Ritthaler Deseret Power, South Jordan - UT, Jud Redden Tri-State G&T, Westminster - CO, Charlie Monk ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO 7, Ê>}>∘iÊUÊÓΣÓÊ >ÀiÞÊÛi°ÊUÊ …iÞi˜˜i]Ê79ÊnÓää£ Phone (307) 634-0727 Fax (307) 634-0728 E-mail wren@wyomingrea.org

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Office of WREN owner: ÓΣÓÊ >ÀiÞÊÛi°]Ê …iÞi˜˜i]Ê79ÊnÓää£ÊÊ Office of WREN publisher: Linden Press, Inc., 223 S. Howes St., Fort Collins, CO 80521 P R I N T E D W I T H V E G E TA B L E I N K

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SUBSCRIPTION RATES $12 per year, Single copies $1.50 each ADVERTISING To purchase contact Linden Press, Inc.: Phone: (970) 221-3232, Fax: (970) 221-0375 E-mail: wren@wyomingrea.org

By Shawn Taylor



PdaNaa`oS]raB]nasahh RapJkpao6E`ajpeÙ_]pekj]j`Pn]_a]^ehepu By Donald Cobb, DVM

>kkgNareas Bunkhouse Built: A Guide to Making Your Own Cowboy Gear Reviewed by Alta Hepner

Summer - Sydney Chilson Showers of Blessing - Karen Wayman BNSF - Charlotte M. Smith

Grape Salad - Nancy Zimmerer Apricot-Cheese Delight Salad - Carole Blakeman Two-Fruit Smoothie - Anne Metzler Chokecherry Upside Down Cake - June Wilson Read

By Sherry Jesperson

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WREA Notes

PqnjKbbpdaHecdpo In the absence of any real domestic energy policy coming out of D.C., which should look something like this … “support with financial incentives and with proper oversight but limited bureaucratic redtape/redundancy/double talk, the safe domestic production of on-shore and off-shore oil and gas; continued production of domestic coal with the goal, and federal financial support, of zero-emissions coal fired generation; coal SHAWN TAYLOR gasification (which we are working on here in Wyoming); carbon capture and sequestration EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (which we are also ahead of the curve here in Wyoming); increased nuclear power; continued use of hydropower and, continued development of renewable resources absent any mandates, as well as continued conservation and efficiency efforts…)" …there is a recent move to enact legislation that would curb carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from electric utilities only in the name of saving/protecting/improving the worldwide environment and formalizing a domestic energy policy. I cannot comprehend how anybody in their right mind would think that this is sound energy policy, or that it will do a thing to reduce greenhouse gasses in the global atmosphere. I could spend the rest of this editorial talking about the differing scientific “facts” about climate change, but that would not sway anybody’s opinion on the issue. Instead I would like to focus on not our dependence on foreign oil, but rather our dependence on electricity. It’s not a bad thing to be dependent on electricity. It’s a sign of a developed and advanced culture. The problem occurs when we start taking electricity for granted and losing sight of just what it takes to produce enough electricity on such a huge scale and to do it as reliably as possible and in an affordable manner. I believe many of us in the co-op family still understand and have a great appreciation for the privilege of having affordable and reliable electricity. Unfortunately there are some people who view it as a right, and still others who see it as a tool to be used to implement various agendas. And for some peculiar reason, most of those people live on the east and west coasts and are elected officials. (Some are even

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creeping into the Rocky Mountain Region as well.) For example, in California they have passed legislation that pretty much prohibits electricity produced by coal – the cheapest and most reliable source of electricity – to be sold into the state. This is where Silicon Valley is, people, the birthplace of the computer age. And what do computers need? Not just electricity but reliable electricity. In the Pacific Northwest, home of the fantastic and massive federal hydro-power system, there are those who actually want the damns torn down in order to save the fish. Never mind the physical impact this would have on the people who live near the damns and reservoirs, and the fact that they would now have to look elsewhere for electricity, but at least the fish would be o.k. Oh and by the way, the amount of dollars that electric utilities – co-ops, investor-owned our municipal utilities, coal or hydro or natural gas powered – have already spent to save the fish or to comply with ever increasing regulations is staggering! Over on the other coast there are those elected officials who, as I said earlier, want to implement a tax on electric utilities that emit over a specified amount of CO2. (Details were still sketchy at the time this column went to print.) This is the use of electricity as a tool mentioned above, where those pushing this legislation want to raise the cost of electricity high enough so people will start using less of it. Social engineering through legislation is another way to put it. Even if the country wasn’t dealing with a faultering economy, this would still be a bad idea because it attempts to address a problem (some would say a contrived problem) on the backs of electric rate payers without any chance of actually fixing the problem. There are those who say we should just turn off the power in D.C. and in those states that pass ill-conceived energy legislation (and whose budgets border on implausible) and maybe they would change their minds. Well I can’t promise they would change their minds but I would hope that they would at least have a little better perspective on what it takes to power the country.


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The Current

Courtesy of NRECA

JasobnkipdaJNA?=]j`_kklan]perao]nkqj`pdaj]pekj KjpdaDqjpbkn LksanLkhaR]j`]ho , "]ʏ°Êq An Illinois G&T and a distribution co-op are each offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for chopping down six power poles in their service territory in July.

UkqpdPkqn.,-, Eight students from Wyoming attended this year’s Electric Cooperative Youth Tour in Washington, D.C in June. Above, a photo commemorates their visit with Wyoming’s U.S. Senators. Pictured from left in the back row are: Senator John Barrasso, Myriah Holmes, Cody Bremer, Donavon Valentine, Jessica Anders, Senator Mike Enzi. Sitting from left are Rachel Stanworth, Hannah Gorman, Jessica Stanworth and Taiya Cheney. Read more about the Youth Tour in the September and October issues.

Vandals used a chain saw to cut down six power poles owned by Southern Illinois Power Co-op, a G&T based in Marino, and SouthEastern Illinois Electric Co-op, Eldorado. Three 69-kilovolt transmission poles belonging to the G&T were destroyed, and SouthEastern Illinois lost three distribution poles. Damage estimates from the downed lines were $10,000 for the G&T and $5,000 for the co-op. The incident caused a power outage for 3,000 accounts, but service was restored for most consumers by early the next day. The July 11 event marked the second act of vandalism this month at Southern Illinois. A week earlier, vandals cut through a fence at a substation and opened a sample-valve on a large power transformer to drain its oil. Alarms alerted dispatchers, who quickly opened circuit breakers remotely to avert a possible explosion. Staff on the scene stopped the flow of oil after several hundred gallons had spilled. That incident occurred during a heat wave, which was already straining the system. The G&T said the grid was just one more event away from a multicounty blackout. Scott Ramsey, president and general manager of Southern Illinois Power Co-op, said officials have some leads on the vandalism but the incidents have shaken the community. “A lot of people are upset,” he said. “People think they live in a peaceful and quiet rural community, and they are quite appalled that something like this has happened. We are pretty disgusted, too.”

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WE SAVE THE DAY. NOT ONLY BY SAVING ENERGY, BUT BY SAVING MOM MONEY. Yo u don’t ha ve to be the d ynamic duo to s a v e e n e r g y. W h e n you’re not using them, turn off the l i g h t s , t h e T V, and unplug the radio or the fan. It pays t o p a y a t t e ntion. Wha t can you do? Find out ho w t h e l i t t l e c h a nges add up a t TogetherWeSa ve.com. A

basinelectric.com touchstoneenergy.coop U G U S T

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E N M A G A Z I N E TOGWE TR HERW E S AV E .C OM 3


Cowboy State Buzz BENEFIT

{Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; AUGUST 20-21, DUBOIS TOWN PARK

The Chance Phelps Foundation and the Needs of Dubois charity are holding a two-day benefit filled with fun activities for the public: Shoshone & Arapahoe dancers, pig wrestling, chainsaw competition wood carvers, bed races and live local bands. There will also be vendor booths selling food, drinks and wares. Friday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert will feature Michael and Kevin Bacon in their band â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bacon Brothers,â&#x20AC;? and Saturday features the legendary Ian Tyson. Both shows begin at 7 p.m.; tickets are $40 for one night or $70 for both. The Chance Phelps Foundation was created in honor of Marine Lance Corporal Chance R. Phelps who was killed in Iraq. The goal of the foundation is to raise awareness about the plight of our military and their families and to assist the wounded once they return home. Their current goals are to raise funds to

build or purchase a ranch/retreat in the Wind River Valley to be used for recreational activities for veterans and their families. They also hope to become involved with both the Shoshone and Arapaho tribes to work with veterans living on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Needs of Dubois was formed to give the community a way to help when a local young mother needed a heart transplant, and it was continued because there are others in Dubois who would also benefit from community assistance for vital needs like housing, medical care or food. The organization supports daily survival needs for those who are disabled by illness, injured in an accident, victims of crime, unable to engage in employment or otherwise not able to secure reasonable and ordinary financial support.

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WYOMING PERSPECTIVE 

"  Ă&#x160;6°Ă&#x160; /9Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x160;  "Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;1°-°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;`iVÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; V>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â?>Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;yÂ&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;-iVÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;`Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;

â&#x20AC;&#x153; [The] decision is a victory for people in Wyoming and all Americans who value our right to keep and bear arms. No level of government should have the right to take away our individual Second Amendment rights.â&#x20AC;? qĂ&#x160;-iÂ&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153; â&#x20AC;&#x153; Finally, after years of fighting in the courts, the Constitution has prevailed. This ruling helps ensure that whether you live in Cheyenne or Chicago or any other place in the U.S., youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re allowed to protect yourself.â&#x20AC;? qĂ&#x160;-iÂ&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;âÂ&#x2C6;

â&#x20AC;&#x153; Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ruling affirms what we in Wyoming already know: the U.S. Constitution guarantees law-abiding American citizens the right to keep and bear arms, regardless of where they make their home. The reinforcement of this basic right is an important win for all Americans.â&#x20AC;? qĂ&#x160;,i°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; 4

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THIS MONTH IN HISTORY AUGUST 4, 1910 /Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â?>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;TROUT FISHINGâ&#x20AC;?


ENERGY TIP Ebukqqoa]en_kj`epekjejc(] _aehejcb]jsehh]hhksukqpk n]eoapdapdanikop]poappejc ]^kqp0Â&#x153;Bsepdjkna`q_pekj ej_kibknp*>qpnaiai^anpk pqnjkbbukqn_aehejcb]josdaj ukqha]rapdankki*B]jo_kkh laklha(jkpnkkio(^u_na]pejc ]sej`_dehhabba_p*

COMMUNITY GAME AND FISH ACCEPTS AIS DONATION; BOATERS ASKED TO HELP STOP THE SPREAD Fremont Lake, one of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular boating destinations, was identified as a priority water for Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) prevention efforts because of its multiple water users, higher boater use and relative suitability for invasive mussel establishment. While the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Forest Service were able to provide planning and construction for the necessary inspection site, funding for road base and gravel was still needed, and the Pinedale Boat Club stepped up to assist.

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Often called "nuisance" or "exotic" species, these mussels can attach to equipment, boats and clothing used in the water, and can then be transferred from one body of water to another. The Game and Fish is focusing its attention on two particular aquatic invasive species that are posing an immediate threat to Wyoming â&#x20AC;&#x201C; zebra mussels and quagga mussels. "There are no known populations of these mussels in Wyoming to date, but they have invaded waters across the country and are now present in three of our neighboring states â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Colorado, Nebraska and Utah," says Darren Rhea, Pinedale Fish Biologist with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. "These species have had tremendous impacts to water bodies, recreation and even drinking water supplies in other states." Boat inspections are in full swing at Fremont Lake as well as other popular boating destinations across the state. Boaters are reminded to purchase their AIS decal prior to boating on any water in Wyoming. Watercraft users can help fight the continuing spread of these and other invaders by following the precautionary steps â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drain, Clean and Dry.â&#x20AC;? To kill adult mussels, a boat must dry for at least 10 days. ivÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â?i>Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Â?>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;>Â?Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;\

r %Ä&#x2020;*/ UIF XBUFS GSPNUIFCPBU  MJWFXFMMBOE UIF MPXFS unit. r $-&"/UIFIVMMPGZPVSCPBU SFNPWFBMMQMBOUBOEBOJNBM material. r %3:UIFCPBU Ä&#x2014;TIJOHHFBSBOEFRVJQNFOU To purchase an AIS decal or learn more, visit the Game and Fish AIS website at http://gf.state.wy.us or call 307-777-4600.

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Brad Willford Financial Officer

Jim Palm

Connie Ramey

Financial Officer

Country Home Loan Officer

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Cowboy State Buzz 79" Ă&#x160;-// Ă&#x160;,Ă&#x160;-  1 Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x160; 6 /-\Ă&#x160;11-/Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C; " 9]Ă&#x160;19Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6; Open Show Entries Due

, 9]Ă&#x160;11-/Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; 12:30p: Animal Health Inspection Begins 1:00p: Begin arrival of Quarter Horses 6:00p: Antique Tractor Show 7:00p: Antique Tractor Show and Pull (Grandstand Arena)

SATURDAY, AUGUST 14 x\ää\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS 7:30a: Quarter Horse Show (1 & 2) (Horse Arenas) 9:00a: ABGA Boer Goat Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) Sheep Dog Trial (Grandstand Arena)

10:00a: Kidz and Kars Fair Parade, Downtown Douglas 10a-6p: Entries accepted for Creative and Home Arts (Exhibit Buildings) 12:00p: FFA Advisors/ County Agents FAX WSF with number of head of youth livestock entries 12-2p: Weigh-ins for Arm Wrestling (North Stage) Ă&#x17D;\ää\Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; 7Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;­ Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>}iÂŽ Ă&#x2C6;\ää\Ă&#x160; 9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;

i>`Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i Ă&#x2021;\ää\Ă&#x160; "/" Ă&#x160; , 9Ă&#x160; ­Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;>ÂŽ

Puzzle Search for your favorite summertime cuisine among the letters below. Words are backward and forward, horizontally, vertically and diagonally. Bon appĂŠtit! Answers on page 29. T B B U A A D Z M T P S E N U

SUNDAY, AUGUST 15 x\ää\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS 7:30a: Quarter Horse Show (3) (Horse Arenas) 8:00a: Superintendents and Show Coordinators Meeting (McKibben Cafeteria) 8:00a: WSF Dairy Goat Show and WDGA Dairy Goat Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) Cowboy Church (North Stage) 9:00a: Deadline for Youth Livestock Specie Numbers 9:30a: Wyoming Stock Dog Cattle Trials (Grandstand Arena) 10:00a: ARBA Rabbit Show (Event Tent) IBGA Boer Goat Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 10a-6p: Entries accepted for Creative and Home Arts (Exhibit Buildings) ÂŁ\ää\Ă&#x160;  -"1/ Ă&#x160;`i>`Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160;viiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;]{Â&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; 9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192; Youth Dormitories Open Begin arrival of Youth Livestock 3:00p: Ranch Rodeo (Grandstand Arena) 4:00p: Begin arrival of Youth Show Horses 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

E K A C L E N N U F C P D R C

MONDAY, AUGUST 16

E A F K NW B R N G O I A O F

x\ää\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS Ă&#x2021;>Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŤ\Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; `Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; 7:30a: Ranch Horse Competition (Grandstand Arena) 8:00a: 4-H Dog Show Check-In (Horse Arenas) Youth Horse Show checkin Youth Rabbit Show Check-In (Event Tent) Open Culinary judging (Ft. Reno, lower level) Open Needlework judging (Ag Hall, upper level) 8a-5p: Youth Exhibit Buildings open to receive entries (Access Limited for the Public: Ft. Reno, Ft. Steele, Ft. Caspar and Ft. Fetterman) 9:00a: 4-H Dog Shows and Showmanship Contest (Horse Arenas) Youth Rabbit Showmanship followed by Youth Rabbit Show (Event Tent) £ä\ää>\Ă&#x160; "*  Ă&#x160; , "  -Â&#x2021; ­>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;ViÂŽ Commercial Vendors/ Buildings Open Open Crafts judging (Ft. Fetterman)

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L R D R MA K T O P T R N C G W S N B I E C D X C T A O E O MUWO Y E N H A F O L M L H NW C L C R D N O C N S E T T F F E R O A D C V S C P L T X H G E C I Y T O A K A U A E L I S I F AM L N X N N D I K S B B Q P O R K S A N DW I C H E O P V D L L N I

I Y Y H U Z

Q L MA E R C E C I D N B X Q E O N I O N R I N G S N U A T S N O C O N E I G R D G I L R BBQ pork sandwich

Funnel cake

Nachos

Candy apple

Ice cream

Onion rings

Corndog

Indian taco

Snocone

Cotton candy

Kettlecorn

Spiral spud

Fried candy bar

Lemonade

Turkey leg

Open Floriculture judging - (Ft. Reno lower level) Open Fine Arts judging (Ft. Fetterman) 4-H Clothing judging begins (Ft. Caspar) FFA Exhibit Building open to receive entries. (Ft. Laramie access limited for the public) Youth Horse Show Showmanship (Horse Arenas) Youth Horse Show Halter Classes (Horse Arenas) Youth Horse Show Programmed Ride (Horse Arenas) Youth Horse Show Trail Classes (Trail Arena) 12:00p: Exhibit Buildings Open 1:00p: 4-H Foods Judging - (Ft. Caspar) Open Horticulture Judging (Ft. Reno lower level) 3:00p: Open Photography Judging (Ft. Fetterman) WY Fed Beef Contest Check-in (Longhorn Pens) 5:00p: All 4-H/FFA exhibits and all Youth Show Livestock must be in place. 5-7p: Youth Dairy Goat and Meat Goat Check-in (Goat Barn) 6:00p: Fed Beef Contest and WBCIA Fed Beef Live Evaluation Contest (Longhorn Show Ring) Ă&#x2021;\ää\Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x153;>}Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; ­Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;>ÂŽ 8:00p: 4-H Chaperone/Agent Meeting (Cafeteria) 9:00p: FFA Member/Advisor Meeting (Cafeteria) Exhibit Buildings Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

TUESDAY, AUGUST 17 Laloe@]u

x\ää\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Youth Horse Show 7:30a: Check-in 7:30a: Youth Horse Show Performance Classes (Horse Arenas) 8:00a: 4-H Clothing judging continues (Ft. Caspar) 4-H Home Ec/Misc. judging begins (Ft. Caspar) 4-H Foods Judging continues(Ft. Caspar) 4-H Horticulture Exhibits judging 4-H Exhibits judging begins (Ft. Caspar &Upper Ft. Reno) Open Culinary judging (Ft. Reno-lower level) Process All Youth Market Beef (Livestock Pavilion)

continued on page 18 -,

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PdaJatpWDa]pLqilY Cajan]pekj6 B Y A L I C E C L A M P, C O O P E R AT I V E R E S E A R C H N E T W O R K

Cold showers arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a pleasant way to start the day, and hot water plays a hefty role in cooking and cleaning too. As a result, water heating has become the second largest user of energy in an average home, accounting for approximately 20 percent of residential energy consumption. To save energy, consumers have wrapped water heaters in blankets or wrapped hot water pipes in insulation. While those practices should continue, a new type of water heating product is entering the market, promising to lower energy consumption and save consumers money. Heat pump water heaters, while not a new technology, are experiencing a rebirth. A handful of small companies produced units in the 1980s and 1990s. But random failures and other issues (such as the need for utilities to install special electric service to power the devices) soured consumers on the technology. In addition, many electric co-ops offered (and still offer) load management programs that depended on briefly shutting off standard electric resistance water heaters (which can store hot water for many hours) as a way to cut electric use during times of peak demand when power prices skyrocket. These programs, in turn, helped co-ops keep electric bills affordable. Heat pump water heaters, unfortunately, could not be used in these efforts. Now, new and improved generation of heat pump water heaters have entered the market. Many electric cooperatives

are currently testing these products for possible deployment in their service territoriesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a critical step in determining whether they will really help consumers save energy and trim electric bills.

Energy Focus The Rheem HP50 heats 50 gallons of water while earning the Energy Star label for improved energy efficiency. Source: Rheem (Parent company of Marathon)

A heat pump water heater needs space of at least 10 feet square to ensure adequate air exchange. An open basement, a utility room, orâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as seen with this GE Hybrid Water Heaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a garage, will work. Source: GE

Dkspdauskng Heat pump water heaters come in two types. The more expensive â&#x20AC;&#x153;integratedâ&#x20AC;? model replaces an electric resistance water heater with one that combines a heat pump with a storage tank. The second version adds a heat pump unit to an existing electric water heater. In both versions, a heat pump circulates a refrigerant, which absorbs heat from continued on page 15

Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;}Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;­fĂ&#x2030;9i>Ă&#x20AC;ÂŽ Based on average household of 2.6 occupants, U.S. Census Bureau, 2006

This graphic shows the difference fĂ&#x2C6;ää in energy costs between standard fxää Â?iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; electric water heat,iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Vi ers and heat pump f{ää 7>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;i>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC; water heaters, t Cos while highlighting fĂ&#x17D;ää l a i Init the increased price fĂ&#x201C;ää tag for the heat ENERGY STAR pump version.

$$$

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f£ää

Source: Energy Star

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Cindy Hill Superintendent of Public Instruction Leadership

CINDY HILL is a CONSERVATIVE who has the strength of character to do what is needed in education.

Proven Results

Dear Voter: We cannot continue with the status quo in education.With my years of experience in improving schools, I will: s Advocate for rural education:)WILLMAKESURETHATTHEVOICES OFRURALSCHOOLSAREHEARD s Reduce testing:7EARETESTINGTOOMUCH ANDTESTINGISGETTINGIN THEWAYOFOURFUNDAMENTALMISSIONÂ&#x2C6;TEACHING s Focus on classroom instruction: 7ITHEVERYDECISION )WILLASK h(OWISTHISBENElTINGTHECHILDINTHECLASSROOMv4HISHOLDSTRUE ESPECIALLYFORTHEFUNDINGOFEDUCATIONASWEMUSTENSURETHATTHE DOLLARSAREACHIEVINGRESULTS s Support parental choice in education: )SUPPORTPARENTS CHOOSINGWHATISBESTFORTHEIRSTUDENT INCLUDINGCHARTERSCHOOLS

HOMESCHOOLING PRIVATESCHOOLS ANDOTHEREDUCATIONALOPPORTUNITIES s Listen to parents, teachers, and students: 0ARENTS TEACHERS ANDSTUDENTSMUSTBEPARTOFTHESOLUTIONS ANDWEMUSTHAVEAN EDUCATIONALSYSTEMTHATSERVESSTUDENTSANDPARENTS

4OLEARNMOREABOUT#INDY(ILL VISITWWWHILLEDUCATIONCOM OR#!,,(%2ONHERDIRECTLINEAT   Paid for by Committee to Elect Cindy Hill A U G U S T

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BY SENECA RIGGINS

PdaNaa`oS]raB]nasahh The Wyoming State Fair and Rodeo’s Wool Barn is known for its sheep shearing demonstrations, informative talks and in-depth sheep wool history. This year The Wool Barn will lose two of the Fair’s well-respected and honored members. Earl and Jewell Reed’s current positions with the State Fair, dating back more than 30 years, are coming to an end. According to the Wyoming State Fair staff, the Reeds have made many important contributions to the Fair over their years of service. Earl Reed designed the wool rack and organization system used by both the Wyoming and Montana State Fairs while serving as Wool Superintendent. Jewell Reed served as the Wool Annex Manager at the State Fair. The two admitted, weighed and organized fleeces, in addition to creating a rich learning environment for the whole family. State Fair Director James Goodrich called the Reeds’ dedication to the Fair -.

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unprecedented. Their lifelong involvement as leaders in the 4-H program, he said, “doesn’t come along often.” The couple has participated in the State Fair for more than 30 years, as well as having been members of the Wyoming Wool Grower’s Association and 4-H. Moreover, many see the Reeds’ sheep wool knowledge as invaluable to the state’s sheep wool industry and economy. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Wyoming is the third-largest sheep and lamb producing state in the United States. Director Goodrich said he will especially miss the couple’s sheep wool industry historical knowledge. Goodrich said knowledge like theirs often does not get written down, preventing it from being taught to future generations. He also observed generally that many people become dependent on the longevity of older generations to safeguard important information, and often forget to document it. Earl Reed currently serves as Deputy County Fire Warden, Zone 1 Fire Warden, and chair for the Converse Coun-


ty Predator Board. Jewell serves as treasurer of the Thunder Basin Grassland Prairie Eco System Association and is a charter member of the Converse County 4-H Foundation. The couple has been 4-H Leaders in Converse County, as well as Key Leaders for 4-H Shooting Sports. The first Earl Reed invitational Shooting Match was held in April 2010, and honors his contribution to shooting sports. In 2008, the Reeds were awarded the Association of Fairs Hass Wilkerson Heritage Award for their dedicated and outstanding fair service. The Reeds will certainly be missed, but the organizers and participants of the Wyoming State Fair wish them well and look forward to the good works they will share in the coming years. Seneca Riggins is a freelance writer and photographer based in Cheyenne.

You’re working harder. You’ve tightened your belt.

Government needs to do the same. That’s why I’ll bring

zero-based budgeting to Wyoming government.

www.micheliforgovernor.com Paid For By Micheli For Governor

maximize exposure!

More than 40,000 households receive the WREN, enjoying poetry, recipes, and great articles about Wyoming and the places Wyoming people find interesting.

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Vet Notes

DONALD COBB, DVM

E`ajpeÙ_]pekj]j`Pn]_a]^ehepu Since the National Animal Identification System was discontinued and individual states were put in charge of initiating their own, we have seen lingering confusion and lack of interest in animal identification systems. The discussion whether to make these systems mandatory or voluntary continues. Opposition to a mandatory system remains and is still a significant roadblock to progress. However, any voluntary system will only be partially effective. Thus, for a system to account for true traceability of a species, mandates have to be included.

Pn]_ejccnkqlo]j` ej`ere`q]h]jei]ho Now that each state has the ability to determine what is best for their producers and how to implement that system, we need to have a method of accounting for groups of animals. There is a tremendous difference between large shipments of calves destined to enter the feeding channels held together as

a group and set to slaughter within a short timeframe, and individual animals moving between locations and owners. With that idea in mind, cattle commonly trade owners during their lifetime, and those are the ones we need to trace.

Olna]`kb`eoa]oa Looking back to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease) case that entered this country from Canada should show that we are no better equipped to account for all of the animals in any given shipment today than we were then. One of the most serious issues faced with that case was the total inability to account for the cattle in the shipment, which were lost because of poor records. If we do not have the ability to account for and trace every animal moving, what good is any system in providing accurate data? We do have the brucellosis tags applied to heifers, but anyone can attest that the retention of these is not ideal. For the present they work fine, but we still lose far too many tags, making them somewhat unreliable for permanent identification. Once lost, they are replaced with a silver tag and that number is recorded. Anyone who has seen many trader cattle knows that cows may have several silver tags in their ears – and that the application of several tags destroys the ability to trace that animal.

PdaO_n]lealnkcn]i If we look at the Scrapie program in sheep and how it has been applied, we see feeder lambs, both male and female, that are allowed to move without indi-0

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vidual identification. Then we see that all breeding and exhibition sheep are required to have a Scrapie tag prior to movement. These tags are not required until and unless that sheep leaves the premise of origin. Each tag has a premises identification number as well as an individual identification number for each animal. When moving in larger groups, it is possible to list the numbers from first to last on the records. Once this was implemented and accepted, it became very effective and workable. There is every indication that some system like that could be implemented in the cattle industry with little effort and minimal expense to the producers.

P]gejcpdaÙnopopal Considering the fact that traders and smaller operations are going to sell through sale barns rather than direct in large groups, maybe the first step would be to implement identification at the sale barn with records made and kept of animals tagged, which would be similar to – but more effective than – back tags. There is every indication this trace back system is going to be needed at some point, and the fact remains that there is presently no system in place to adequately account for information needed. The longer the delay, the more susceptible the industry is to serious issues if a disease occurs. Donald Cobb is a practicing veterinarian and contributing columnist. He resides in Casper.


PdaJatp$Da]pLqil%Cajan]pekj surrounding air before it passes through a compressor to maximize heat output. Essentially, heat drawn from the air transfers to water in the tank. While a heat pump water heater can produce most of the hot water a family requires, a backup electric resistance element in the tank takes over when outside air becomes too cold or when consumers need extra hot water. In summer, cool exhaust air can be released into the vicinity where the heat pump water heater is located, assisting home cooling, or it can be returned outside via ducts. Because a heat pump water heater uses electricity to move, rather than generate, heat, it consumes roughly half the electricity of a conventional electric resistance model.

But this added efficiency comes with a high price tag. Integrated units sell for $1,400 to $2,000—more than twice the cost of standard electric resistance water heater. Depending on your coop’s electric rate and the installed cost of a heat pump water heater, including any financial incentives, payback for the purchase can takes little as three years. In areas with low electricity rates and limited financial incentives, though, the payback period can be much longer. A heat pump water heater needs space of at least 10 feet square to ensure adequate air exchange. An open basement, a utility room, or – in some areas – a garage, will work. Noise becomes another consideration when deciding where to place a unit. While conventional electric resistance water heaters operate

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quietly, most heat pump water heaters boast noise levels similar to window air conditioners. Heat pump water heaters are not a universal option. Residents in colder climates will see decreased performance during winter. In the Pacific Northwest, for instance, if the heat pump is designed to work at ambient air temperatures of 45o F or higher, the water heater’s electric element will operate whenever air temperatures drop below that level, reducing energy savings. To learn more visit energystar.gov, and search for heat pump water heaters. Alice Clamp is a technology writer for the Cooperative Research Network, a service of the Arlington, Virginia-based National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. The mission of the Cooperative Research Network is to monitor, evaluate, and apply technologies that help electric cooperative utilities control costs, increase productivity, and enhance service to their consumer-members.

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SukiejcPannepkne]h LneokjÐoOpk_gB]niAn]6 3,Ua]nokb=cne_qhpqn]h=`r]j_aiajpo Photographs by Noel V. Hayes, Jr.

B Y E L L A M A R I E H AY E S

When Wyoming entered the Union in 1890, the control of Wyoming Territorial Prison (WTP) was transferred to the state and a new penitentiary was built in Rawlins. As early as 1900, University of Wyoming (UW) Ag Experiment Station Director Elmer Smiley began encouraging state leaders to consider the WTP grounds for their agricultural research center.

The UW Stock Farm began its livestock research with sheep, primarily the Rambouillet breed, as its attributes best fit the climate of Wyoming. Experiments focused on feeding and breeding. Increased interest in studies on sheep and wool was seen in 1907, with the $3,000 purchase and installation of a wool scouring plant. Sheep and wool dominated the focus of the stock farm until after WWII. The former broom factory became the main sheep facility with additional barn space tacked on. A boxcar structure was moved out of the stockade and rooms added for “shepherd’s quarters.” The 1875 Warden’s House was utilized for stock farm offices, and the “judging pavilion,” also known as the “sheep pavilion,” became part of the facilities.

When the last prisoners were moved to Rawlins in 1903, the State Board of Charities and Reform (SBCR) passed a resolution that transferred use of the prison grounds to the UW Agricultural College and Experimental Station. SBCR also purThe brick prison building An antique Fanning chased the “old broom Seed Cleaner, donated was converted into a dairy factory” from former by the University of facility by removing the prison warden N.K. BoWyoming Stock Farm is cells. The dairy cows were swell, who personally displayed in the Judging mostly Guernsey and JerPavilion building. owned the broom–maksey breeds and were kept ing business. Included in the south wing of the in this purchase were several “boxcar prison and milked twice daily. There structures” and other inventory. An experimental stock farm was established were also beef cattle, mainly shorthorn and the following year, $10,000 (about bred for show and siring for the establishment of premium bloodlines. $200,000 by today’s standards!) was requested: $5,000 for remodel work and In contrast to the many Territorial Pris$5,000 to stock the farm with “suitable on buildings adapted for use by the stock animals.” farm, the horse barn was one of the site’s -2

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first major new construction projects. It was designed in 1910 with room for horses, storage of hay and grain, and carriages. Over the years a number of other structures were also added to meet the stock farm’s needs. In addition to horses and cattle, UW researchers also studied swine and the economical value of raising pork. The poultry department studied turkeys and chickens, with research including hatching eggs at high altitudes. Much of the experimental stock farm’s focus was unique to the area. A 1907 Annual Stock Farm Report stated that an outstanding feature of the UW facility was its 7,000-foot altitude – valued for conducting experiments that test the effects of high altitude on plants and animals. Other rewarding experiments included study of alkali soils, and their effect on seed germination and plant growth. Farm lands were reclaimed by drainage experiments, and about sixty acres of the worst alkalized portions of the 190acre farm were plowed and sowed to a mixture of wheat and oats. By 1912 (field) peas and oats had been successfully planted on the reclaimed land, and it was recommended that more research be conducted with further drainage of alkalized land surrounding the prison. Stock farm animals were fed peas grown on site, as well as sunflowers.


If there is a Wyoming topic that interests you, and you’d like to see a feature about it in the WREN, please send your story tips, questions, photos or manuscripts to wren@wyomingrea.org or WREN Magazine, 2312 Carey Ave., Cheyenne, WY 82001. Our editorial staff will contact you if we decide to follow-up on your lead.

Misty Stoll, WTPSHS Museum Curator, holds part of a harness that was probably used for a UW Stock Farm Percheron draft horse during parades.

Around 1913 a study compared native grass hay to alfalfa hay and utilized horses on hand. These horses were mostly Percheron draft horses used for hauling, plowing, harvesting, etc.

In 1919, the War Department appointed a remount board of army officers, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) representatives, civilian horsemen, and breeders to oversee a nationwide breeding project that would remedy the nation’s depleted horse herds. Four years later saw the distribution of 279 high quality stallions to 42 states. Wyoming received the second highest number of stallions, behind Texas. Earl B. Krantz was appointed to the Federal Bureau of Animal Industry – USDA’s veterinary division – and one of his first assignments was to oversee the federal horse breeding project recently moved to the UW Stock Farm for the purpose of breeding utility horses for light ranch work and the US Military Remount program.

-45.Lneokj ej`qopneao ^qeh`ejc B Y E L L A M A R I E H AY E S

In 1923, Station Director John Hill reports that “the horse breeding experiment in cooperation with the USDA added twenty-six head of light horses to the livestock equipment of the station. Most of the stallions were Thoroughbred, with an occasional Standardbred, Saddlebred, Arabian, or Morgan.”

on training and experiments in all phases of agriculture for UW students as well as for providing information for ranchers and home owners. By the early 1970s, the old prison was vacated once more, but this time due to substantial deterioration of the building. UW research work was moved to other locations.

The same year the stock farm partnered with the USDA, Director Hill reported “new prime breeding Percheron livestock – four mares and a stallion.” No evidence suggests that the stock farm’s Percheron mares were bred to the military’s Thoroughbred stallions, but such practices were very commonplace. The Thoroughbred/Percheron combination was an almost ideal crossbreed, producing extremely versatile offspring for farm, ranch, and military use.

Just as the early UW Stock Farm programs once advanced agricultural knowledge, today’s expanding stock farm exhibits at WTPSHS will promote public understanding of agriculture’s progress. Readers are invited to come to Laramie to help celebrate the 100th anniversary of the horse barn and learn more about the Stock Farm Era.

The breeding experiment discontinued operation at the stock farm in 1925 “on account of no funds being provided by the last Congressional appropriation bill.” The project moved to Montana and Earl B. Krantz went with the government horses. Other programs over the years included testing animal feed for digestibility and nutrition, livestock judging competitions at home and afar, and other hands-

Wyoming Territorial Prison became a State Prison with Wyoming’s Statehood in 1890. Prison operation was contracted out, but the lessee needed income from prison industries to cover expenses. Inmates were asked what skills they had when being admitted to the prison. Resulting industries were as varied as taxidermy, cigar-making, candle-making, shoemaking, furniture-making, leather goods, horsehair braiding, farming, and baking, but broom-making was the prison’s major industry, as it was most profitable. In 2010, the building’s name was changed to reflect other industries. The days were long, the work repetitive and conditions rough, but for prisoners the opportunity to work in the broom factory was probably better than wasting away in a cell. In 1900, the factory’s peak year, records indiA Uday, G U S T cate 720 brooms were finished per and

For more information, call WTPSHS, 307-745-6161, or visit wyoparks.state. wy.us.

Antique farm equipment from the UW Stock Farm Era is on display in the Judging Pavilion at WTPSHS in Laramie.

Ella Marie Hayes is a freelance writer and Carbon Power & Light customer based in Saratoga. She and her husband, Van, enjoy contributing historical articles and photographs to the WREN as part of their travels around the state.

shipped by boxcar to markets as far away as San Francisco, and even overseas. Today some original WTP broom-making equipment is on display, while replica pieces are used by WTPSHS volunteers to demonstrate the step-by-step process of broommaking as it was done over 100 years ago. Brooms are made in a series of orderly steps – attaching broom corn to the handle with wire on a “winder,” putting it in a vise or press to hand-sew it, and trimming the uneven broom straw ends. Pictured left: A replica shows one type of broom “winder” for attaching broom corn (straw) to the handle. Replica equipment was constructed by staff and volunteers to be used for demonstrating broom making in the restored “1892 Prison Industries” building (formerly called Broom Factory) at WTPSHS. Note the foot pedal near the bottom of the leg. 2 0 1 0 W R E N M A G A Z I N E

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Cowboy State Buzz (continued from page 10) 79" Ă&#x160;-// Ă&#x160;,\Ă&#x160;11-/Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C; 8:00a: 9:00a:

10:00a:

10:30a:

11:30a:

12:00p:

1:00p:

Process all Youth Market Swine (Swine Center) Youth Poultry Check-in/In Place (Event Tent) Youth Meat Goat Showmanship followed by Youth Breeding Meat Goat show followed by Youth Market Goat show (Goat Show Arena) FFA Ag Mechanics judging (Ft. Laramie) Hay Show judging (Ag & NR Center) Commercial Vendors Buildings Open Process all Youth Market Lambs (Livestock Pavilion) Youth Poultry Showmanship followed by Youth Poultry Show (Event Tent) Weigh-in for Performance Pork Contest (Swine Center) Weigh-in for Performance Lamb Contest (Livestock Pavilion) Exhibit Buildings Open Youth Exhibit Buildings Open (Youth ExhibitBuildings have limited access to guests due to judging) Natural Colored and Spinning Wool Judging (Wool Pavilion)

!

!

Youth Pocket Pet Show (Event Tent) 1:30p: Performance Lamb Evaluation Contest (Livestock Pavilion) 3:00p: Youth Beef Fitting Contest (Beef Arena) 3:30p: Performance Pork Evaluation Contest (Swine Show Arena) Ă&#x2021;\ää\Ă&#x160; *Ă&#x160;Âź Ă&#x160;1 Ă&#x160;7, -/ Ă&#x160;

*" -*­Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;>ÂŽ n\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160; 7, Ă&#x160;-ÂŤÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2030; £ä\ää\Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; Ă?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160; ­ >viĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;ÂŽ 9:00p: Exhibit Buildings Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18 =nia`Bkn_ao@]u ?kjranoa?kqjpuIkpkno@]u ?]pphaEj`qopnu@]u

ÂŁÂŁ\ää>\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS-YOUTH DAY 7:30a: 4-H Livestock Judging Contest (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 8:00a: Open and Youth Wool Show Judging (Wool Pavilion) 4-H Cat Show Check-in (Event Tent) Judging of 4-H Exhibits (if needed) (Ft. Caspar)

9a-12p:

9:00a:

10:00a:

12:00p: 12:30p: 1:00p:

3-5p:

3:00p:

FFA Agronomy, Classroom judging (Ft. Laramie) 4-H and FFA Dairy Goat Showmanship Contest followed by Youth Dairy Goat Show (Goat Arenas) Wyoming Livestock Board meeting (Cafeteria, East Wing) 4-H Cat Show and Showmanship Contest w(Event Tent) Commercial Vendors Buildings Open Commercial Heifer Show (Longhorn Pens) Wyoming Ropefest 2010 (Silver Arena) Open and Youth Exhibit Buildings Open 4-H Livestock Judging Reasons (Ft. Steele) All Other Breeds Cattle (AOB) Show followed by Wyoming Maine-Anjou Market Beef Show followed by Murray Grey Show (Beef Arenas) WLR Wyoming Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Conference Miss Rodeo Wyoming Horsemanship (Equine Arena) Shorthorn Cattle Show followed by

Shorthorn Steer Show (Beef Arenas) 3:30p: Natural Fiber Arts Judging (Wool Pavilion) 4:00p: 4-H Swine Showmanship followed by Youth Breeding Swine Show followed by Champion of Champions Market Swine Show followed by Pen of 5 Market Swine (Swine Arena) Champion of Champions Market Lamb Challenge followed by Pen of 5 Market Lambs followed by WVATA Youth Jackpot Market Lamb Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 5:30p: Wyoming Livestock Roundup & Farm Credit Services Gathering 6:30p: 4-H Livestock Judging Awards (Livestock Arena) Ă&#x2021;\ää\Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;vwiĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; }Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192; 9:00p: Exhibit Buildings Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

THURSDAY, AUGUST 19 SukiejcLekjaan@]u

ÂŁ\ää\Ă&#x160; , /, Ă&#x160; , 6Ă&#x160; OPENS 8:00a: PRCA Steer Roping (Grandstand)

continued on page 22

Renewable(Energy(Storage( ! Steffes Heating Systems allow for full utilization of power from renewable energy sources such as wind and solar by serving as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;thermal batteryâ&#x20AC;? to harness this energy for heating. ! These innovative heating products enhance the efficiencies obtained from heat pumps. ! Steffes Heating Systems can also be integrated with utilities smart grid technologies to maximize efficiencies.

! Clean ! Green ! ! Affordable ! !

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Learn more by contacting your local Power Company or go to heatforlessnow.com for more information. M A G A Z I N E

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Book Review >qjgdkqoa>qehp6 =Cqe`apkI]gejcUkqnKsj?ks^kuCa]n By Leif Videen. 2009. Mountain Press Publishing. 142 p.

Kn`anejcejbkni]pekj - \ʙÇn‡ä‡nÇn{Ӈxx{‡™Ê *>«iÀL>VŽ°Ê œ˜Ì>VÌʜ՘Ì>ˆ˜Ê *ÀiÃÃ\Ê*°"°Ê œÝÊÓΙ™]ʈÃÜՏ>]Ê /Êx™näÈ]Ê{äȇÇÓn‡£™ää°Ê6ˆÃˆÌÊ ÜÜÜ°“œÕ˜Ì>ˆ˜‡«ÀiÃðVœ“

Book reviews are reprinted with permission, courtesy of Wyoming Library Roundup Magazine. ÊLœœŽÊ`À>܈˜}ʈÃʅi`ʜ˜Ê̅iÊ Óx̅ʜvÊiÛiÀÞʓœ˜Ì…°Ê/œÊi˜ÌiÀ]Ê wÊœÕÌÊ̅iÊi˜ÌÀÞÊvœÀ“ÊœÀÊV>Ê ÎäLJÈÎ{‡äÇÓÇ°Ê"˜iÊi˜ÌÀÞÊ«iÀÊ …œÕÃi…œ`]Ê«i>Ãi°

?kjcn]pqh]pekjopkFqja#o sejjan6J]opah@a]jkbQlpkj

Leif Videen spent his years growing up in Northwestern Wisconsin buckskinning, canoeing, and dogsledding. After spending two years in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan attending a community college, he then headed to Wyoming to work for an outfitter. Living in cowcamps and guiding pack trips in the Wind River and Gros Ventre Ranges he took jobs that kept him learning about horses, tack, gear, and cowboyin’ in the mountains. Leif ’s love of fixing and making cowboy gear is shown in this book as he gives in great detail how to make everything from tool pouches to rope halters and saddle bags plus everything in between using leather. His knowledge is outstanding in tying knots for the trail so gear does not come apart.

If you would like to know how to make an antler belt buckle or a hitch for a wagon you will find his words soothing and his techniques easy to follow. The projects that he offers are not only for the cowboy on the trail but for the enthusiast who loves to work with leather. He also gives you secrets showing you how to cut edges on your projects to make them look like a professional did them. This is a wonderful publication for the hobbyist who loves making things out of leather, and if you have never worked with leather this book will make it very easy. I never knew there was so much that a true cowboy had to have on the trail and the things that could go wrong with their equipment. Alta Hepner, Library Technician, Wyoming State Library

S E J  =  ?K LU  Lha]oaajpaniaej]`n]sejcbkn>qjgdkqoa>qehp*

Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Please print clearly, or use a return address label. ˜ÌÀˆiÃʓÕÃÌÊLiÊÀiViˆÛi`ÊLÞÊÕ}ÕÃÌÊÓx° -i˜`Ê̜\Ê Book Drawing – Bunkhouse BuiltÊÊUÊÊVɜÊ7, Ê>}>∘iÊÊUÊÊÓΣÓÊ >ÀiÞÊÛi°ÊUÊÊ …iÞi˜˜i]Ê79ÊnÓää£

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Pen to Paper Oqiian

Odksanokb>haooejc

Warm and Sunny Breezy and Cool Summer varies Do you? There are ups, And also Downs, Sunbeams play Shadow tag. The sun is pleasant, Waving and tumbling, Clouds play tag At incredible speed, Some days, the wind Screams Unhappily, Wind whispers and Tumbles, dances and Falls. All of these things are in summer Is it a dream?

The heavenly redolence Of cloudburst freshened air Aromatic sagebrush bruised Its pungent fragrance share A summer storm brief respite brings Flagging spirits fortify And drenching rains do stimulate In many ways electrify Arid earth so parched with thirst Precipitation quench Welcome relief from summer’s heat Perfumes with cleansing scent And for this cause the dog days pause A downpour interrupts The doldrums of the old humdrum Fatigue of sun disrupts >Ài˜Ê7>ޓ>˜]Ê>ÀÀˆÃLÕÀ}]Ê

-Þ`˜iÞÊ …ˆÃœ˜]Ê/œÀÀˆ˜}̜˜]Ê79

Oaaukqnj]iaejlnejp We share a selection of WREN readers’ creative writing (poems, limericks, haiku, short verse and prose) in every issue as space and content allow. To be considered for publication, please include the author’s consent to be submitted, his or her mailing address, and confirmation that the work has not been published elsewhere. If you would like us to return your work, include a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. SEND SUBMISSIONS TO: wren@wyomingrea.org OR 2312 Carey Avenue Cheyenne, WY 82001

>JOB Can you hear it? How can you not hear it? It rumbles through the town in the dead of night. Oh, the tales it could tell, of places been and things seen. It’s the BNSF whistling clear and loud, as it shakes the doors and rattles the windows Would I miss it if it ceased to run? Probably, but probably I’ll never know. As it snakes beyond the town, it’s back to sleep for me. Until tomorrow, when the BNSF rumbles through the dark once more.

…>ÀœÌÌiÊ°Ê-“ˆÌ…]ÊœÀÌÊ>À>“ˆi]Ê79

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Country Cooks /   -Ê" /\Ê- 1  ,Ê ,1 /

Cn]laO]h]` This scrumptious and sweet salad will impress your guests! 2 lbs. green seedless grapes

=lne_kp)?daaoa@ahecdpO]h]` 1 can (29 oz.) apricots, drained and cut fine (reserve juice)

2 lbs. red seedless grapes

1 can (29 oz.) crushed pineapple, drained (reserve juice)

/œ««ˆ˜}\Ê 1/2 c. sugar

8 oz. sour cream

2 small pkg. orange gelatin

3 Tbsp. flour

8 oz. cream cheese, softened

2 c. hot water

1 egg, lightly beaten

1/2 c. sugar

1 c. combined apricot and pineapple juice

1 c. combined pineapple and apricot juice

3/4 c. marshmallows

2 Tbsp. butter or margarine

1 tsp. vanilla /œ««ˆ˜}\Ê 1 c. brown sugar 1/2 c. crushed pecans Wash and stem grapes. Set aside. Mix sour cream, cream cheese, sugar and vanilla by hand until blended. Stir grapes into mixture and pour into a large serving bowl. For topping: Combine brown sugar and crushed pecans. Sprinkle over the top of the grapes to cover completely. Chill overnight.

Nancy Zimmerer, Lingle, WY

Drain and chill the fruits. Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Add 1 cup fruit juice (reserve remaining juice for topping). Chill until thickened, but not set. Fold in fruit and marshmallows, then pour into 9 x 13 dish. Chill until firm.

Carole Blakeman, Burlington, WY

Psk)BnqepOikkpdea 4 c. vanilla yogurt

Calling all cooks! For October, send us your favorite Trick or Treats. What spooky treats do you make for Halloween? Send by August 25 to Country Cooks at our new address:

2 10-oz. pkg. frozen strawberries or raspberries, partially thawed 2 medium bananas

8 oz. Cool Whip 3/4 c. grated cheddar cheese Combine sugar and flour, blend in beaten egg, and stir in juices. Cook over low heat until thickened, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and stir in butter or margarine. Allow to cool. After cooled, fold in Cool Whip and spread over chilled gelatin layer. Sprinkle top with grated cheese and chill.

?dkga_dannuQloe`a @ksj?]ga 1 c. Bisquick 1 c. milk 1 c. sugar 1/2 c. melted butter or margarine 1 qt. chokecherries, cooked and sweetened

Place all ingredients in blender. Cover and blend about 30 seconds or until smooth. Makes 8 servings.

Anne Metzler, Riverton, WY

Make a batter of the Bisquick, milk and sugar. Put the melted butter in the bottom of a casserole. Pour the batter in. Top with chokecherries. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-60 minutes.

June Wilson Read, Greensboro, NC

wren@wyomingrea.org 2312 Carey Avenue Cheyenne, WY 82001. Please include your name, co-op and a phone number (in case we have questions). A U G U S T

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Cowboy State Buzz (continued from page 18) 79" Ê-// Ê,\Ê11-/Ê£ÎÊqÊÓÓ 8:00a:

4-H Breeding Sheep Showmanship followed by Youth Breeding Sheep Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 9:00a: Equine Extravaganza Shows (Horse Arenas) 4-H Fashion Revue judging-Douglas High School WVATA Youth Jackpot Market Goat Show followed by Champion of Champions Market Goat Show (Goat Arenas) 10:00a: Commercial Exhibits Open Hereford Cattle Show (Beef Arenas) followed by Pen of 3 Bulls and Wyoming Hereford Steer Show Wyoming Pioneer Assn. Meeting (Cafeteria) 12:00p: Open and Youth Exhibit Buildings Open Wyoming Pioneer Assn. Luncheon (Cafeteria) 2:00p: Angus Cattle Show followed by Wyoming Angus Steer Show and WJAA Heifer Show (Beef Arena) 3:00p: FFA Swine Showmanship followed by YouthMarket Swine Show (Swine Arena) 5:00p: Champion of Champions Market Beef Show followed by WVATA Youth Jackpot Beef Show (Beef Arenas) Supreme Champion Beef Bull and Female Selection (following Angus Show)

6:00p:

Performance Pork Awards (Swine Center) MRW Autograph signing (North Stage) Ç\ää«\Ê *, Ê ÝÌÀi“iÊ ÕÊ,ˆ`ˆ˜}Ê­À>˜`ÃÌ>˜`ÊÀi˜>® 9:00p: Exhibit Buildings Close Commercial Exhibits Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

FRIDAY, AUGUST 20 £\ää«\Ê , /, Ê , 6Ê"* 7:30a: Miss Rodeo Wyoming Horsemanship (Horse Arenas) FFA Sheep Showmanship and 4-H Market Lamb Showmanship followed by Youth Market Lamb Show (Sheep/ Goat Arenas) 8:00a: PRCA Rodeo Slack (Grandstand Arena) Weigh-in for Open Prospect Calves (Livestock Pavilion) 9:00a: Equine Extravaganza Shows (Horse Arenas) 4-H Beef Showmanship Contest followed by Youth Breeding Beef Show followed Youth Pen of 5 Breeding Heifer Show followed by N.I.L.E. Merit Heifer Showcase, followed by Open Prospect Calf Show (Beef Arenas) 10:00a: Commercial Vendors/Exhibit Buildings Open 11:00a: Exhibit Buildings Open Texas Longhorn Cattle Show (Longhorn Ring) £\ää«\Ê 7ޜ“ˆ˜}ÊÕÃÌ>˜}Ê >ÞÃʘÊ>˜`Ê>˜`Ê *iÀvœÀ“>˜ViÊ­œÀÃiÊÀi˜>î

1:30p:

“A Living Legacy” Tree Program dedication (Ag Hall) Wyoming Market Steer Futurity (Beef Show Arena) 3:00p: Sheep Lead Contest (Event Tent) {\ää«\Ê 7 ÊÜ>À`ÃÊ,iVi«Ìˆœ˜Ê­}ÊEÊ >̽Ê ,iÜÕÀViÊ ÌÀ® 6:00p: Youth Sheewp Fitting Contest (Sheep/ Goat Arenas) 6:30p: WVATA Youth Jackpot Market Swine Show (Swine Show Center) WYOMING AGRICULTURE AWARDS , " /" Ê­À>˜`ÃÌ>˜`Ê-Ì>}i®Ê Ç\ää«\Ê *, Ê," "Ê­À>˜`ÃÌ>˜`ÊÀi˜>® 4-H Fashion Revue - (Douglas High School Aud.) n\ÎäÊqÊ 7, Ê-«œ˜ÃœÀi`Ê{‡ÉÊ Ý…ˆLˆÌœÀà £ä\ää«\ÊÊ >˜ViÊ­ >viÌiÀˆ>Ê œ““œ˜Ã® 9:00p: Exhibit Buildings Close 10:00p: Commercial Exhibits Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew

SATURDAY, AUGUST 21

SukiejcB]ni>qna]q@]u Op]paB]enL]n]`a@]u ££\ää>\Ê , /, Ê , 6Ê"* 8:00a: FFA Beef Showmanship followed by Youth Market Beef Show followed by Pen of 5 Market Beef Show, followed by Bred, Fed and Owned show (Beef Arenas) Open Class Sheep Show and Natural Colored Sheep Show (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 8:30a: Equine Extravaganza Shows (Horse Arenas) 10:00a: WYOMING STATE FAIR PARADE Downtown Douglas Commerical Vendor Buildings Open 11:00a: Exhibit Buildings Open Wyoming Farmer’s Market (Event Tent) Lamb Evaluation Contest Awards (Sheep/Goat Arenas) Fed Beef Contest Awards Presentations held during Youth Mkt. Beef Show (Beef Arenas) 1:30p: Sheep Shearing Demonstrations (Wool Pavilion) SACO Soup Contest judging (Lower Ft. Reno) 2:00p: Rubber Chicken Race/Stick Horse Rodeo (Grandstand Arena) Bonsai Demonstration (Lower Ft. Reno) Wyoming Mustang Days Activities (Horse Arenas) 3:00p: FFA Round Robin Showmanship followed by 4-H Round Robin Showmanship followed by Over the Hill Showmanship (Sheep/Goat Arenas) 5:00p: All Breed Sheep Sale (Sheep Barn) 7:00p: PRCA RODEO (Grandstand Arena) CROWNING OF MISS RODEO WYOMING 2011 (Grandstand Platform) 9:00p: Exhibit Buildings Close 10:00p: Commercial Exhibits Close 10:30p: 4-H/FFA Curfew 12:00a: Carnival Closes

SUNDAY, AUGUST 22 5:30a:

McKibben Cafeteria Open for Breakfast 6:00a: Livestock Exhibits Released 7:00a: Begin Release of Home Arts Exhibits 10:00a: Dormitories Close

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Watch here in coming months for new voices commenting on Wyoming and energy-related issues.

Enlighten Us

EpP]gao =N]j_d BY SHERY JESPERSEN

“It takes a village to raise a child,” so goes a popular cliché. In the Cowboy State, the saying can read a little differently but would convey the same meaning. It takes a ranch to raise a child in rural Wyoming. Beyond the ranch a child calls home is his or her “village.” I’m not referring to the nearest town. I’m speaking of the ranching community of neighbors. These are the folks who help shape opinions and ideals. I don’t know about your locale, but ours is rich in local color! Children are keen observers and everything they witness is part of the process that molds their character. One of the key ingredients for success in anyone’s life is acquiring a good work ethic. Secondly, a healthy handle on etiquette will serve you better than money ever will. These days, manners and respect seem to have gone out of style with coffeemakers that last. Sadly, many of today’s young folk are slipping into an unhealthy mindset that has a loose grip on both items. This troubling attitude has branches too, and the whole of it will harden with age. But, the good news is that the values and the ‘moral compass’ that made the U.S.A. the greatest country in the world is alive and well on our ranches. Children are the same as they’ve always been. Kids are like carrots. To be strong and sweet, they need good, deep dirt, rain, and sunny love. They are still bright with hope and quietly thrilled when they feel needed, valued and important in the grand scheme of

things. They want to think rightly and achieve mastery over the many things that each year introduces them to. Something that seems to be a problem nowadays is forgetting that children need to be outside. They learn academics in the schoolroom, but they learn about “life” outside. Fresh air, like nothing else, enhances brain function. Kids need to work hard and play hard outside and sometimes those two things happen at the same time – like at brandings. Dirt and everything that lives in it or on it is where many of the secrets of life can be found.

during not one, but two World Wars and the Great Depression. Winston Churchill once said, “Keep calm and carry on” and people did…the best they could. Those words are just as fitting today. Take heart Wyoming, our kids are growing up in a great place and they can be just as ready as we were for whatever the future brings. I feel encouraged when I remember a song that our generation learned in Sunday school. “He’s got the whole world in His hands.” Our world, our times and our kids.

I have a thousand fond memories from my childhood and most of them are outdoor scenes. I was lucky to experience the full meaning of the word “idyllic.” I wonder if my grandparents, who were members of the “Greatest Generation,” worried about my future. They knew far more about the trials and tribulations of life than our generation does. They were young adults A U G U S T

2 0 1

Shery Jespersen's ancestors homesteaded in northeast Wyoming after the Civil War. She and her husband, Lynn, ranch for a living in the same locale. Shery has been a horse lover all her life and also enjoys history, heirloom poultry, making artsy things from 'junktiques' and collecting Victorian china. She's been a freelance writer and designer for 20 years and is a contributor for MaryJanesFarm publications. Read her blog at: http://reataroseranch.blogspot.com. 0 W R E N M A G A Z I N E ./


What's Happening =ph]jpe_?epu

?k`u

AUG 1

FIRST THURSDAYS

° °Ă&#x160; *Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Pioneer Church, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

AUG 14

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;

-iVÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; ->Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x152;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; ->Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; -Â&#x2C6;Ă?Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x2C6;ääĂ&#x160;iiĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; 7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; ,Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; ,>Â&#x2DC;}i\ 6p, $20, Minerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delight Inn Bed & Breakfast, info 307-332-0248, bandb@minersdelightinn. com, or www.minersdelightinn.com

Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160; Industrial Building, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

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AUG 7-8 7,\Ă&#x160;Outdoor Arena, 1700 Fiargrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

AUG 14-15

THURSDAYS

-Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160; 10:30a (preschool 0-5 yrs.), free, branch library, 346 Fish St., info 307-276-3515



7Ă&#x160;   Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Indoor Arena, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

AUG 21

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iĂ?Â&#x2C6;V>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Vi\Ă&#x160; Antonio Jimenez. Hall of Champions, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307235-5775

Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;VÂ&#x2026;iÂ?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;vvii\Ă&#x160;Enjoy coffee & discussions on history. 1p, free, Senior Ctr., 671 W. Fetterman, info 307-684-9331

AUG 22

ONGOING

AUG 22

SECOND TUESDAYS

Ă&#x20AC;>âĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; 7Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;LÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Icons and Other Observationsâ&#x20AC;? through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contemporary Realist Paintingsâ&#x20AC;? by Aaron Wuerker, Richard McKown and Tom Tomc. Aug 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oct 27, (Open house Aug 27, 5-7p), info wuerker@wyoming.com or 307-217-1322

TUESDAYS

Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; ,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;\Ă&#x160; 7p, Johnson County Fairgrounds, info 307-684-7357

WEDNESDAYS 7i`Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;\ 7p, Johnson County Fairgrounds, info 307-684-7357

THURSDAYS Â?Ă&#x2022;i}Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Local musicians play bluegrass, western & folk. 6p-?, free, Occidental Saloon, 10 N. Main, info 307-684-0451

AUG 1-8

iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;L\Ă&#x160;Parking Lot, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

AUG 28 >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; ,>`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Industrial Building, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307235-5775

- */Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;xĂ&#x160; 7 \Ă&#x160; Year End Show. Indoor Arena, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

SEPT 4 >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;i`ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160;Industrial Building, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

?ajpajje]h SATURDAYS

nĂ&#x2030;ÂŁ\Ă&#x160;Dog Show featuring obedience and agility, 8a nĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x160;Horse Show, 8a; Cat Show, 10a

AUG 14

nĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x17D;\Ă&#x160;Exhibit hall opens 1p; Open Sheep Show, 3p; Sheep Feed with all the fixings, 5p; Public Style Show featuring the sewing talents of Johnson County's 4-H clubs, 5p; Sheep Lead and Stock Dog Trials, 7p

Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;>}iĂ&#x160; ->Â?i\Ă&#x160; Look for the Centennial Library used book sale table! 8a, Nici Self Museum

AUG 18

nĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x160;Youth Rodeo, 9a; Pie Contest, 10a; Talent Contest, 2p; Stick Horse Race, 3p; Fun-On-TheGo, 7-11p (Prosinski Park); Dance, 8p (Prosinski Park)

Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160; -ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;>}}\Ă&#x160; Come for a BBQ dinner and stay for a reading from the Cody authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly published Bone Fire. BBQ 5:30p, author presentation 7p, Dinner $10, presentation free; donations accepted to benefit the Centennial Library, Trading Post Dinner House, 2755 Hwy 130, info 307-7215074 or 307-742-7731

nĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x2021;\ Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast, 7:30-9:30a (Clear Creek School); Parade, 10a; Rodeo, 1p

?dauajja

nĂ&#x2030;{\Ă&#x160;Team Penning, 7p nĂ&#x2030;x\ All County Roping, 9a; Team Roping Slack, 6p

nĂ&#x2030;n\ Rodeo, 1p

AUG 7 Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;,Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äÂ&#x17D;\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;The Johnson County YMCA welcomes runners of all ages to run the picturesque courses for the 5k (3.1 miles) or 10k (6.2 miles), info 307-684-9558 (YMCA)

AUG 21 -VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;,Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\ hosted by Sheridan College in Johnson County featuring barrel racing, team and breakaway roping. All proceeds go to benefit Johnson County students who will attend Sheridan College in Johnson County. 9a, Johnson County Fairgrounds, info 307-684-2001 (Ashlea Redding)

W R E N

M A G A Z I N E

THURSDAYS

7iÂ?Â?Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; LÂ?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160; 7-11a, Indian Hill Business Ctr., 611 Carlson, Ste. 112, info 307638-7890

AUG 7-8

Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x17E;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;iÂ?`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;½Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;iiÂ&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;\ Registration Sat 7-10a, Curt Gowdy State Park, info (307)221-0950 (Bob Day) or www.cheyennefieldarchers.org

?ha]nikjp TUESDAYS

-Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;i\Ă&#x160;4:30p (grades K-4), free, branch library, 1240 Front St., info 307-758-4331

A U G U S T

Ă&#x20AC;>ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160; Ă?ÂŤi`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Explore natural history, resources, conservation, management & related issues of Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (no food or drinks allowed). 12:15-1p, free, Buffalo Bill Historical Ctr., Coe Aud., 720 Sheridan Ave., info 307-587-4771

WEEKDAYS CÂ&#x153;`Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;i>}Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x160;>Â?Â?iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;hours 9-5p, 836 Sheridan Avenue, info 307-587-3597

@arehĂ?oPksan AUG 21 ,>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Lecture by Chavawn Kelly. 7p, Free but park admission fees may apply, info 307-467-5283 x224 (Hugh Hawthorne)

@kqch]o AUG 19

-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;iÂŤÂ&#x2026;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x153;ÂŤ>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;\Ă&#x160;Pioneer Church, 1700 Fairgrounds Rd, info 307-235-5775

ÂşĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VÂť\Ă&#x160;A different band from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Postâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? past will play every Sat. night through Labor Day in celebration of its 20th anniversary. 8:30p, free, Trading Post Dinner House and Saloon, 2755 Hwy 130, info 307721-5074 or 307-742-7731

Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;\ All events take place at Johnson County Fairgrounds unless otherwise specified, info 307-684-7357

.0

?]olan

2 0 1 0

7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; *Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; 7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Authors of "Images of America: Douglas," Linda Graves Fabian and Carol Price Tripp will be signing books at the Pioneer Memorial Museum, info 307-358-9288

@q^keo " °Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;/1,-°Ă&#x160;/,"1Ă&#x160;1°Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2122;

Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;7>}Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;\Ă&#x160;6:30p, KOA Campground, 225 Welty St., info 800-5620806 or www.circleupchuckwagondinnershow.com

TUESDAYS -ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\Ă&#x160;all ages and experience levels welcome. 8-9:30p, 12 and under $2, adults $3, Rustic Pine Frontier Room, 123 Ramshorn, info 307-455-2772

/1 -°Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;-/°

Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;10a-6p, free, 909 Ramshorn, info 307-455-2284

WEDNESDAYS *Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;i\Ă&#x160; 10:15a, free, public library, 202 N. 1st Street, info 307-455-2992

FRIDAYS

Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;\Ă&#x160;8p, $7, Clarence Allison Memorial Arena, Hwy 26, info 307-455-2556, 307-455-3603, www.duboiswyoming.org

AUG 4-6 i>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; -VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Walk-in only, NO appointments. Dubois Health Fair, 7a-10a daily, Dubois High School Auditorium, info 307-455-2243

AUG 6 Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;>iÂ&#x153;Â?Â&#x153;}Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;\Ă&#x160; Dr. Richard Adams of the State Geologistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office will talk about this summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exploration of the Wind River Mountains in search of new high-elevation pre-historic Indian village sites. Free, 7p, Dennison Lodge

AUG 7 1Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â?iĂ&#x160;

Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; ,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; -Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤi`iĂ&#x160; ,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;\ Tickets $5, info 307-349-6400, howlrodeobulls@yahoo.com and www.howlrodeobulls.com


1Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;ÂŁx

Ă&#x2022;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160;Open to all former students of DHS. nĂ&#x2030;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;\Ă&#x160;4p sign-in at Rustic Pine, cash bar, snacks provided; 8p rodeo, Clarence Allison arena, $7. nĂ&#x2030;ÂŁ{\Ă&#x160; 10a golf tournament, Antelope Hills, info 307-455-3548 (Lynn); 10a, Chariot Races, info 307-455-2262 (Scott); 4p buffalo BBQ, $8, City Park; 8p dance and live music at Rustic Pine, cash bar (no cover). nĂ&#x2030;ÂŁx\Ă&#x160; 8-10a breakfast at Rustic Pine Steak House, info 307-455-3946 (Michelle)

1Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;ÂŁx +Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;i>`Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;\ info 307-4553683

AUG 14 Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;,>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160;All-day tour of the Elk Trails and Finley ranches, sponsored by the Museum and the Wind River Program of the Jackson Hole land Trust. Meet at the museum at 9a, $35

AUG 14 Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;ÂżĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;vv>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; +\ 4-7p, City Park, info 307-455-2556

AUG 16

Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;-Â&#x2026;iiÂŤĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Meredith and Tory Taylor demonstrate the types of food Sheep Eater Indians ate at their high-elevation villages in the Wind River Mountains. 7p, free, Dennison Lodge

AUG 20-21 Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\ benefit the Chance Phelps Foundation and NOD. Family fun, food, games contests, Native American dancers, bed races, log carving & pig wrestling. Concerts include Bacon Brothers and Ian Tyson, see page 8 for info

AUG 21 i>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; -VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;\ Walk-in only, NO appointments. Dubois Health Fair, 9a-12p, Dubois High School Auditorium, info 307455-2243

SEPT 5-6 -Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;>LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;\Ă&#x160;Sun 7p and Mon 4p, Shoshoni Activities Association Arena, South Maple Street, info 307- 840-0209 or thacker_d@wbaccess.net

onstrations held throughout the day. Sat 10a to Sun 4p, Fort Laramie Historic Site, 965 Gray Rocks Road, Fort Laramie, info 307-837-2221

Cehhappa ONGOING

Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;>`Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;° Visit www.avacenter.org for schedule & fees. 509 W. 2nd St., info 307-682-9133

>Â&#x201C;ÂŤLiÂ?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;°Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;LĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ety of programs & classes for youth & adults. Visit www.ccpls.org for schedule. 2101 S. 4-J Rd., info 307-682-3223

/Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;iÂŤĂ&#x160; /Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;\ Suite Escape, 211 S. Brooks, Gillette

AUG 12

AUG 28

"ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160;Heritage Christian School. All of August, 8:30a-12p, 510 Wall Street Ct. Gillette. 3K, 4K, Kindergarten, Elementary, Jr. High and High School, info 307686-1392 and www.hcsgillette.org

TUESDAYS

¸Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;"ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}¸Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; 7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160;We will be sharing information there with visitors regarding our events and activities, and lodging properties available in Campbell County. 9a5p, on I-90 near Vore Buffalo Jump

SEPT 4-5 , Ă&#x160;9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;`Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?Ă&#x160;,>VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;V\Ă&#x160;10a5p, Cam-plex East Pavilion info 307-682-0552 or cam-plex@vcn.com

SEPT 8-12 6Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;7>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x152;i\Ă&#x160;The American Veterans Traveling Tribute includes a 360-foot long, 80% scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, DC. In addition, there will be displays honoring all vets from WWII through present-day conflicts and the victims of 9/11. Featured events include a caravan, guest speakers, student organizations, the US Army Band, parades, local bands, and a Fire Department Memorial Tribute and Picnic. Open 24hrs, Cam-plex Park, info www. gro2010.org

SEPT 9-12  /,Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\ 9a-5p, info 307-672-6201 (Vicki Benedict) or cam-plex@vcn.com

Dqhapp

Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; -Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;i>Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; featuring guided tours, living history demonstrations, interpretive programs and special events. Summer hours: park open dawn to dusk each day, visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center open 8a-7p, 965 Gray Rocks Road, Fort Laramie, info 307-837-2221

Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`\ offers historical displays on the town, Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tower and the surrounding area. 8a5p, free, 115 Hwy. 24, 307-467-5292

AUG 14

9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160;Classes for toddlers age 5 and under. 10:30-11:15a, free for members or w/ museum admission, Natâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Museum of Wildlife Art, Chrystie Classroom, 2820 Runguis Rd., info 307-733-5771

Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; /Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160; Visitors will see many characters associated with the rich history of Fort Laramie. Park guides will meet visitors in the parking lot area, give a short orientation, and then lead groups through a series of vignettes. Bring bug spray and flashlight. 7p, free, Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Fort Laramie, reservations and info 307-837-2221

AUG 14-15 Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; 7iiÂ&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;`\Ă&#x160; 1860s era soldiers take you on a journey into Civil War period infantry and cavalry daily life. The Fort will come alive with programs, demonstrations, historic camps, displays and more. Living history camps and historic weapon dem-

AUG 18

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;>Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2026;\Ă&#x160; Ecologist Luke Bruner and Drew Reed, executive director of the Wyoming Wetlands Society, will discuss the values of wetlands and present information on several local programs including wetland enhancement, â&#x20AC;&#x153;problemâ&#x20AC;? beaver relocation, and trumpeter swan restoration. Bring lunch; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll provide drinks and snacks. 12-1p, free, Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance conference room, 685 S. Cache, info 307733-9417 or heather@jhalliance.org (Heather Mathews)

BknpH]n]iea ONGOING

wildlife expert Jeff Hogan leads a sunrise trek up Ditch or Cottonwood Creek to observe beaver habitat, introducing participants to the basics of wildlife photography. Bring your camera and binoculars. RSVP before Aug 13. Sunrise (about 6:30a) to 12p, $15 for Conservation Alliance members, $25 for non-members, meet at Schwabachers Landing near Jackson, info 307-733-9417 or heather@jhalliance.org (Heather Mathews)

WEEKDAYS

F]_gokj MONDAYS

>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â?iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Ken Thomasma of the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance and Pete Simpson will discuss the history of cattle grazing on public lands from the perspectives of conservation and ranching in this presentation sponsored by the Wyoming Humanities Council. 2p, free, Teton Science Schools Kelly Campus, info 307-721-9246 (Sheila BricherWade)

H]j`an

/1 -°Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;-/° *Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160;summer hours start May 1. 10a-6p, free, 1443 Main St., 307332-3373

WEDNESDAYS >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; -Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; >}Â?iĂ&#x160; -ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;\ 7p, Museum of The American West, 1445 Main Street, info 307-335-8778 or www.amwest. org

WEDNESDAYS -Â&#x2026;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x192;ÂŤi>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; *>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;\ Wyoming Shakespeare Festival Company presents a different work each week. Bring a blanket and a picnic. 7p, free, Lander City Park, Fremont St. & 2nd, info 307-332-2905 or www.wyomingshakespeare.com

AUG 14 Ă&#x2022;vv>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; +\ Fremont County Pioneer Association. 5-7 p, Museum of the American West, 1445 West Main St. Tickets available at the Museum and Lander Chamber of Commerce, 307-335-8778 or www.amwest.org

H]n]iea TUESDAYS

*Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; EĂ&#x160; -ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;\ Quilt-making for those in need. 9-noon, free, Hunter Hall, Gild Rm. Downstairs, 104 S. 4th St., info 307-742-6608

WEDNESDAYS

AUG 11 Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160; ,i>`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\Ă&#x160; former Jackson resident and award-winning environmental journalist Craig Welch will share an excerpt from his new book, Shell Games. Snacks and beverages provided. 5:30-6:30p, free, Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance conference room, 685 S. Cache, info 307-733-9417 or heather@jhalliance.org (Heather Mathews)

AUG 14 -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;*Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;->v>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;ivvĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;}>Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160;Professional cinematographer, photographer and

A U G U S T

>Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤ>Â?Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`\Ă&#x160; 7:30p, free, Washington Park Bandshell

Hqog

THROUGH SEPT /Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â?`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;79\ Daytime tours are available by appointment any day of the week May through September. Hwy 85 between Lusk and Lingle, donations requested, contact 307-322-2839 (Hazel Mudgett) or 307-735-4364 (Marjorie Sanborn)

2 0 1 0

W R E N

M A G A Z I N E

.1


What's Happening AUG 1-7 ˆœLÀ>À>Ê œÕ˜ÌÞÊ >ˆÀ\ all events at Niobrara County Fairgrounds unless otherwise specified, complete schedule of events and info 307-334-2950 (Chamber) or 307-334-3534 (fairgrounds) nÉÓ\ÊStyle Show, 8p nÉÎ\ÊBBQ, 5p; Swine Show, 6:30p nÉ{\ÊMeet the Candidates, 5p; BBQ 6p; Heritage and Ribbon Roping nÉx\ÊBreakfast, 6:30a; Ice Cream Making Contest, 3:30p; BBQ for Jr. Livestock Buyers, 4p; Livestock Sale, 6:30p nÉÈ\ÊBBQ, 5p; Pig Wrestling, 7p; Dance, 9p nÉÇ\Ê Parade, 10a; 4-Wheeler Rodeo & Lawn Mower Races, 1p nÉn\Ê Co-ed Softball Tournament & BBQ, 10a (Northside Park)

1Ê£xÊEÊә >À“iÀÃÊ >ÀŽiÌ\Ê 10a, Downtown Lusk, info 334-2950 (Chamber)

SEPT 2-4 -i˜ˆœÀÊ*ÀœÊ,œ`iœ\Êtimes TBA, Niobrara County Fairgrounds, info 307-334-2950 (Chamber) or the 307-334-3534 (fairgrounds)

I]jeh](QP AUG 14

/œÜiÀÊ ,œVŽÊ ,՘\Ê 10K & 5K race through Sheep Creek Geological Loop. Parking is limited, please carpool. 8a, $20 to participate (plus $3 for online registration; late fee after 8/9, day-of registration available), free to attend, meet at Navajo Cliffs Picnic Area, Just off Hwy 44 - 7 miles outside of Manila, info (435) 7843218 x 134 or www.towerrockrun.com

SEPT 4

>}}iÌÌÊ >âiÊ *>À>`iÊ EÊ V̈ۈ̈iÃ\Ê 10a, free admission, but craft, food and activity costs may vary, parade is along Hwy 43, fair in Daggett County Park, 40 North 2nd West, info 435-784-3218 x 134 (Brian) or www.daggettcounty.org/laborday

Jas_]opha SUNDAYS

ˆ˜}œ\Ê4p, free, Corpus Christi Catholic Church, 19 W. Winthrop, info 307-746-4219

AUG 10 >}Ê>`ÞÊ >Å\ÊLive Music, Hog & Beef Feed. 12p-?, Flying V Cambria Inn, North of Newcastle on US 85 8 miles

AUG 17 7…iÀiÊ Ì…iÊ œ““ˆiÃÊ Ài\Ê (grandmas and aunts, too!) While the children play, learn about "a playgroup with a purpose" forming in Newcastle. Refreshments and door prize. Bring a lawn chair. 9:30-11a, freewill donation, Frontier Park (near the bypass), RSVP and info marvbark@aol.com or 360-490-1677 (Robin)

AUG 20-22

>“LÀˆ>Ê œÜ…Õ˜ÌiÀÃÊÓÇ̅ʘ˜Õ>ÊÎ ÊÀV…iÀÞÊ /œÕÀ˜>“i˜Ì\ÊRegistration 8a, starts 2p, Flying V Cambria Inn, info 307-746-8840

L]rehhekj AUG 28

*>ۈˆœ˜Ê 9œÕÌ…Ê ,œ`iœÊ ÃØ\Ê 8a, free, Pavillion Arena on South Main, info 307-349-6400, howlrodeobulls@yahoo.com and www.howlrodeobulls.com

Leja>hqbbo TUESDAYS

ˆ˜}œ\Ê new players welcome. 7p, 25¢ per card, 14 games, rec. mtg. rm., 217 W. 3rd St., info 307-245-3301

Leja`]ha WEEKDAYS

ÕÃiՓʜvÊ̅iʜ՘Ì>ˆ˜Ê>˜Ê}>iÀÞʅœÕÀÃ\ 9a-5p, free, 700 E. Hennick, info 307-3674101

Lksahh

FIRST SATURDAYS œœŽÊ->i\Ê10a-1p, free, public library, 217 E. 3rd, 307-754-8828

SEPT 4

Neranoe`a

*>À>`iʜvʈ}…ÌÃÊEʈÀiܜÀŽÃ\ÊBoats decorated with lights start from the Lucerne Marina and travel around the Stateline Cove. Starts after sunset (9p), free, Lucerne Marina 5570 E. Lucerne Valley Rd., deadline for registration is Aug 30, info 435- 882-3274 (Dennis Spicer) or www.daggettcounty.org/laborday

AUG 28

xÌ…Ê ˜˜Õ>Ê ,ˆÛiÀÈ`iÊ *>ÀÌÞÊ >Þ\Ê 4p concert featuring David Romtvedt and the FireAnts, barbeque begins at 5p, free, Rick Martin Memorial Park, info 307-327-5266

SEPT 6

" °ÊqÊ-/°

>˜ˆ>Ê -i˜ˆœÀÊ i˜ÌiÀ½ÃÊ *>˜V>ŽiÊ Ài>Žv>ÃÌ\ Fundraising breakfast for Manila Senior Center. 7-10a, $5, Manila Senior Center, 165 E. Hwy 43, info 435-784-3143

Iaapaapoa SEPT 4

iiÌiiÌÃiÊ LÃ>ÀœŽ>Ê …>i˜}iÊ œÕ˜Ì>ˆ˜Ê ,՘\Ê5K, 10k, and the Trophy Series 15k sponsored by Trail Runners Magazine. 10a, info and registration 307-868-2603 or meetrec.org

Ikkn_nkbp WEEKDAYS

7iÃÌÊ/iÝ>ÃÊ/À>ˆÊÕÃiՓʜ«i˜Ê>ÊÞi>À\ÊHistory of 1800s largest cattle-shipping point on Texas Trail. 9a-5p, free, 100 E. Weston, info 307-756-9300

Neranpkj

TBA ÓÈ̅ʘ˜Õ>Ê ˆ}Ê7ˆ˜`Ê*œÜܜÜ]Ê ÀœÜ…i>ÀÌ\ 7p, Wind River Indian Reservation, info 800645-6233 and info@wind-river.org

O]n]pkc] AUG 21

-Ìiˆ˜iÞÊ Õ«Ê "vwVˆ>Ê -Ì>ÌiÊ ˆVÀœLÀiÜiÀÞÊ

œ“«ï̈œ˜]Ê …ˆˆÊ œœŽ‡"vvÊ >˜`Ê ->À>̜}>Ê ÕviÃÌ\Ê Live music and great eats. Veterans Island in Saratoga and Buck Springs outside town, $20 for participants, $10 for food only, info 307-326-8855 (Steinley Cup) and 307-3265053 (Bullfest)

AUG 26-28 7ޜ“ˆ˜}ʈ“ÊiÃ̈Û>\ÊParticipate in screenings of new films, discussion groups, and workshops by the pros. Open to the public. Fri 6p, Sat 11p, Platte Valley Community Center Theater, info 307-328-9274 (Tera) or m.ducker@yahoo.com

Odane`]j

WEDNESDAYS iÜÊ 6>Õ`iۈ>ˆ˜Ã\Ê comedy, magic, singing and dancing - it’s fast paced, it’s fun, it’s new vaudeville in the oldest vaudeville theater in Wyoming and it’s an event you won’t want to miss. Every Wednesday throughout the summer you’ll see a new show with different acts, different sounds and different people. 8p, $10 adult, $8 senior, military, student, $5 12 and under, The Marquee, 42 North Main, info 307-672-9084 or www.wyotheater.com

AUG 14 Ïii«Ê >ÌÊ Ì…iÊ 7…ii\Ê The famed westernswing, boogie, and roots-music outfit that’s been around for nearly 40 years, turning out an incredible 25+ albums while playing an unrelenting schedule of one-nighters that would make even a New Vaudevillian dizzy will be back at the WYO for a show that promises to be a rip-roarin’ good time with Claire Small, a Kerrville Folk Festival New Folk Finalist opening. 8p, $27 adults, $25 senior, military, student, 12 and under, The Marquee, 42 North Main, info 307-672-9084 or www. wyotheater.com

AUG 19 >˜Ê/Þܘ\ÊDon't miss this one-of-a-kind concert by a one-of-a-kind performer. Spanning 5 decades, Tyson has forged a trail of musical innovation. 8p, $39, The Marquee, 42 North Main, info 307-672-9084 or www.wyotheater. com

OkqpdL]oo?epu

7ˆ˜`Ê ,ˆÛiÀÊ iÀˆÌ>}iÊ i˜ÌiÀ\ÊMountain man & fur-trapping museum, summer hours start Memorial Day. 10a-6p, 1075 S. Federal, 307856-0706

WEEKENDS

7 °ÊEÊ/1,-°

Oqj`]j_a

-̜ÀÞ̈“i\Ê 10:15a Wed. Babies-n-Books (0-3 yrs.), 10:15a Thurs. (3-5 yrs.), free, branch library, 1330 W. Park Ave, info 307-856-3556

" °]Ê7 °ÊEÊ,° *œÜܜÜÊ «iÀvœÀ“>˜ViÃ\Ê Northern Arapaho Cultural Experience featuring traditional tepees, dancing and storytelling with a spectacular view of the Wind River Reservation and the Little Wind River. 6:30p, Free, Wind River Casino, info (866) 657-1604 or (307)856-3964, wrcinfo@windrivercasino.com and www.windrivercasino.com

>ÀˆÃÃ>ʈ˜iÊ/œÕÀÃ\ÊSaturday reservations required. 10a, free, info 307-332-3684 or www. southpasscity.com

SEPT 17

Փ>˜ˆÌˆiÃÊ«Àœ}À>“\Ê"My Horse, My Gun, My Libraries" by Lynn Swanson. 7p, free, Crook County Library, 414 Main Street, info 307-2831006

Pdaniklkheo AUG 7-8

ˆvÌʜvÊ̅iÊ7>ÌiÀÃÊ*>}i>˜ÌÊEÊ*œÜܜÜ\Ê7p, Hot Springs State Park, info 800-645-6233 and info@wind-river.org

Pkoq^iep Email wren@wyomingrea.org, call (307) 634-0727 or write 2312 Carey Ave., Cheyenne, WY 82001. Send complete informationAfor October events by September 10! Each month we select an event for our Featured W R E N M A G A Z I N E U G U S T 2 0 1 0 .2]jarajpÄ Event listing. These events have regional appeal and must be submitted with high-resolution photos.


Pknnejcpkj SATURDAYS >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;\Ă&#x160; through Oct 30. 7:30-11a, Main St. between 20th and 21st Ave., info 307-837-2477

THURSDAYS vĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;\Ă&#x160; 3:30-6:30p, Goshen County Extension Office, 4516 US HWY 26/85, info 307-532-2436

AUG 10

>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;`>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; iL>Ă&#x152;i\Ă&#x160; Sponsored by Goshen County Chamber of Commerce, Goshen County Workforce Alliance and Eastern Wyoming College and KGOS/KERM Radio. 7p, EWC Auditorium, info 307-532-3879

AUG 12 -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;yÂ&#x153;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;}Ă&#x160; /Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?\Ă&#x160; Qualifying trial for nationals. Watch great cattle dog work by some of the best dog handlers in the nation, 15-20 states represented. 8a, free, Goshen County Fairgrounds, 7078 Fairgrounds Road (Highway 26 West), info 307-532-2525 (Fairgrounds Manager Stephanie Lofink)

1Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;ÂŁx Â&#x2C6;}Ă&#x160;7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂŤ>Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;\Ă&#x160;7:30a, spectators free, Goshen County Fairgrounds, 7078 Fairgrounds Rd. (Highway 26 West), info 307-532-2525 or www.bwaphc.com

AUG 28-29

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ\Ă&#x160; Starts in the morning, open play all day, Municipal Golf Course, Golf Course Road and West 15th Avenue, Torrington, info 307-532-3868 or www.city-oftorrington.org/golf_course.htm

7Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i\Ă&#x160; 11a-6p, Town Hall, info 307-464-1312

Sda]ph]j`

AUG 7 Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160;7--Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2030;6 Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;\Ă&#x160;8a, Haycreek Golf Club.

AUG 10

AUG 7

>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;`>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;\ Wright races â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mayor/City Council Races and County Coroner/ County Attorney/County Sheriff Races, 6p, Wright Town Hall

*Â?>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; EĂ&#x160; ,Â&#x153;`iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x160; *>Ă&#x20AC;>`i\Ă&#x160; 10a, downtown Wheatland

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; *Â?>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;\Ă&#x160; 8:30a-12p, Pocket Park, downtown Wheatland

AUG 11

AUG 26-28 Ă&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â?\Ă&#x160;Entertainment at the band shell every night at 7p, farmers market & flea market Sat 9a-2p, duck races, quilt show, workshops (topics include: wind power, farmers markets, waste to energy power plants, and energy efficiency), a garden tour, kids pet parade, bed races, carriage rides and more

SEPT 4 *Â?>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;\Ă&#x160; 8:30a-12p, Pocket , downtown Wheatland

-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;`>Ă&#x152;iÂżĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>Â&#x17D;v>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160;8a, Wright Town Hall

AUG 11

>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;`>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;\Ă&#x160; Campbell County Commissioners, 6p, Wright Town Hall

1Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; "Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iÂ?iLĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160;Summer Trip Adventure to Gillette. 12p, Wright Rec Center

AUG 17

Sknh]j`+PajOhaal

*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â?iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Vote at Town Hall. 6a-7p -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;`Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?\ 11a-5:30p, Wright Rec Center

"Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;`Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;/>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\ sponsored by Torrington Main Street, next to Wyoming 2 Theater, 126 East 20th Ave.

Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160;*iÂŤĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; +Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;i}Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â?\Ă&#x160; All day, BBQ Competitors Awards 4p, free admission, Washakie County Fairground, info www.wyobbb-bluegrass.com

1Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;ÂŁx

AUG 21

AUG 14

"Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; ->Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2021;xĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;\ Sat 5:30p Vespers Service followed by introductions and evening meal. Our Savior Lutheran Church 2972 East B St, Torrington, RSVP by Aug 1; Sun 2p special worship service featuring LCMS President Dr. Gerald Kieschnick, Eastern Wyoming College Fine Arts Auditorium, 3200 West C St, info 307-5325801 (Pastor Marvin Temme)

AUG 20-22 7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\ classes Fri 4p, Sat 8a, and Sun 8a-3p, entry fees begin at $295 (dependent on skill level), free to spectators, Goshen County Fairgrounds, 7078 Fairgrounds Road (Highway 26 West), 308-458-8917 (Clark Geary)

AUG 21 7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â?\Ă&#x160;Tour local vineyards throughout Southeast Wyoming, experience viticulture growing practices and techniques and enjoy an evening of wine, food, music and souvenir wine glass. Presented by Table Mountain Vineyards Winery and the Wyoming Grape and Wine Association, info and tickets at wyogrape.com or 307-459-0233.

AUG 24-26 Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`\Ă&#x160;The Building Blocks of Success. Designed to unite livestock and alternative crop producers and small and beginning operators together in a unique workshop experience. Learn how to address practical problems of managing acreages and ventures. Kids activities provided. Producer scholarships for registration fees and lodging are available. Presented by Joel Salatin, a third-generation alternative farmer in Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shenandoah Valley. Registration details are available at http://blocksofsuccess.org, info 307-766-3782 or cehmke@uwyo.edu (Cole)

AUG 18

AUG 20-21

AUG 28

Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤÂ?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â?vĂ&#x160; /Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160; 5:30p, Haycreek Golf Club

1Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;/i>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}\Ă&#x160;8a, Jim Bower Arena

Â&#x2C6;viÂżĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160; i>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; iÂ?iLĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160;First 50 kids get a free beach ball. 1p, Wright Rec Center

AUG 25 Ă&#x201C;ä£äĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iVÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; +\Ă&#x160; 5:30-7p, free, Worland Community Center Complex, 1200 Culbertson, info Worland/Ten-Sleep Chamber of Commerce

- */Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;{Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;V>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;\ Wright Museum.

SEPT 4-5 -Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;}Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160;Wright Labor Day Celebration. Baseball Fields, info 307-464-6060 (Alan)

Snecdp

WEDNESDAYS

SEPT 4-5

Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â?`Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;i\Ă&#x160;11a, free, public library, 105 Wright Blvd, info 307-464-0500

7Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; /Ă&#x20AC;>`iĂ&#x160; -Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;\ Wright Labor Day Celebration. Multi-Purpose info 307-4646060 (Alan)

DAILY

iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;\Ă&#x160;open through mid-September, 10a-5p, free, 104 Ranch Dr, info 307464-1222

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Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160; viĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; /iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; -Â?ii°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;}Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ?>ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; iĂ?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;tĂ&#x160; /Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;fÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ä°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2C6;Â?>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;iiÂ&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;iÂ?Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;âiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;"½ Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;{Ă&#x17D;ÂŁÂ&#x2021; Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;v>ViLÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2030; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;

AUG 26

Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;ÂľĂ&#x2022;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;\Ă&#x160; Goshen County Fairgrounds, 7078 Fairgrounds Road (Highway 26 West), Torrington, info 307-837-0150 (Cal or Barb Dyer)

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.3


Classifieds

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ÂŁĂ&#x2021;°Ă&#x160; /,6 Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; RECREATION

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££°Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160; CONSULTING

Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;",Ă&#x160;- Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;- Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Pre-innoculated multileaf $2.90/lb; Perry $2.90/lb; Ranger $2.90/lb; Wrangler $2.90/lb; Grass seeds available. All seeds in short supply. Richard Haun, 307-856-5748. AERMOTOR WINDMILLS AND PARTS, cylinders, pipe, rod, submersible pumps, motors, control boxes, Hastings 12 ga. stock tanks, and more. Herren Bros., Box 187, Harrison, NE, phone 1-308-6682582. 7Ă&#x160; EĂ&#x160; 1- Ă&#x160; "Ă&#x160; -/" ,-] parts, service & advice. Available for most makes. Thanks. 307-754-3757. HEATMOR OUTDOOR FURNACES, heat your home with wood, coal, used oil, or pellets with a stove that is backed with Limited Lifetime Warranty. www.heatmor.com or call 307-710-6264.

Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;°Ă&#x160;",- -Ă&#x160; SELLING AMERICAN SADDLEBRED ",- -Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;All ages. Blackcrow@wyoming.com, Riverton, Wyo., 307-8570012.

.4

W R E N

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-

 Ă&#x160; * -Ă&#x160; qĂ&#x160; Handmade using Wyoming wool. $175. 307-335-8014. wyowoolworks.com.

ÂŁx°Ă&#x160; *"9 /Ă&#x160; SOUGHT

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-1,Ă&#x160; * -]Ă&#x160;  9Ă&#x160; "",-°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Bred females & Fiber males starting at $300. Champion bloodlines, stud services & customer support. Rebecca/Ten Sleep Alpacas (307) 366-2206.

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OLD GASOLINE PUMPS, GLOBES AND - -°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; Collector only. Will offer fair market value. Please call Jeff Wandler, 307-680-8647, jwandler@ lnh.net. 7 Ă&#x160; *9Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x160; ",Ă&#x160;  ,Ă&#x160; EĂ&#x160; "Ă&#x2030; GAS INTERESTS producing & nonproducing. 800-733- 8122.  *-Ă&#x160; 7 / \ 1970-2003 CJ-5s, CJ-7s, CJ-8s or Wranglers, reasonably priced, any condition, thunter@281. com, 800-316-5337.

HENS, PULLETS AND ROOSTERS FOR - Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; 1"Ă&#x160;, ° Ranch Eggs Available. 307-684-7067

7 /Ă&#x160; /"Ă&#x160; *1, - Ă&#x160;  ,-Ă&#x160; EĂ&#x160; "/ ,Ă&#x160; "Ă&#x2030;-Ă&#x160;  / , -/-° Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201.

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TOWN FOR SALE, +/-50 acres, Restaurant, lounge, 5 cabins, 2 garages, 3 bedroom trailer, Full Liquor License, Inquire at: P.O. Box 184 Leiter, WY 82837

A U G U S T

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BEGIN YOUR OWN BUSINESS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MiaBella Candles, Gifts, Beauty. Try the Best. Free weekly drawing. www. naturesbest.scent-team.com.


W YO M I N G QUA RTE R

handmadebycowboy.com C H EC K IT O UT !

ÊÊÊ£È°Ê 1  Ê-1** -Ê WATER SOFTENERS, FILTERS, CHLORINATION SYSTEMS and reverse osmosis systems. We also specialize in iron and odor problems. Water Right and Culligan parts and service. We offer rentals, rent to own, and sales for both commercial and residential. Serving all of Northeast Wyoming and Western South Dakota. Wyoming Water Solutions, 605 E. 7th Street, Gillette, WY 82716, www.wyomingwatersolutions.com, 307-682-4464 or 888367-2462.

WYOMING SENIOR CITIZENS  ",*",/ Ê qÊ You may qualify for extra help from Medicare to help pay for prescription drugs. Please call one of Wyoming Senior Citizens, State Health Insurance assistance programs to see if you qualify. RIVERTON: 1-800-856T B B U A A D Z M T P S E N U 4398, CASPER: 1-877-634-1006, CHEYENNE: 1-877-634-1005. E K A C L E N N U F C P D R C

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-",]Ê 7 ]Ê 9 ,"Ê qÊ Solar water pumps, batteries, highefficiency LP appliances and wood boilers, inverters, charge controllers, utility intertie wind units—we have it all. Serving the U.S. for 14 years. We specialize in custom system design and technical support/customer service as well as providing the best equipment in the industry. We know our products, we know our business. *Ask for information on local grants & federal incentives/tax credits. Earth Energy 406-8922505.

E A F K NW B R N G O I A O F L R D R MA K T O P T R N C G W S N B I E C D X C T A O E O MUWO Y E N H A F O L M L H NW C L C R D N O C N S E T T F F E R O A D C V S C P L T X H G E C I Y T O A K A U A E L I S I F AM L N X N N D I K S B B Q P O R K S A N DW I C H E O P V D L L N I

I Y Y H U Z

Q L MA E R C E C I D N B X Q E O N I O N R I N G S N U A T S N O C O N E I G R D G I L R

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Just Picture It

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=qcqop#opdaia6 ?]no Shery Jespersen and her husband ranch near Upton, Wyo. They are members of Powder River Energy Corporation. Shery has just joined the WREN team as a freelance writer. Read her column on page 23.

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Agribusiness Division Staff: Cindy Garretson-Weibel, Director 307.777.6589, cindy.weibel@wybusiness.org

John Henn, Livestock/Meat Marketing 307.777.2847, john.henn@wybusiness.org

Terri Barr, Marketing Information 307.777.2807, terri.barr@wybusiness.org

Scott Keith, Livestock Genetics 307.259.3274, scott.keith@wybusiness.org

Kim Porter, Farmers Market & Education 307.777.6319, kim.porter@wybusiness.org

Donn Randall, Crop & Forage 307.777.6578, donn.randall@wybusiness.org


   





   

   

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