NatCon22 Solutions Guide

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SOLUTIONS GUIDE

TheNationalCouncil.org/NatCon22SolutionsGuide


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Table of Contents NatCon22 Sponsors..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................2 innovaTel.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4 Helping Communities Thrive Together.......................................................................................................................................................................................................5 Netsmart.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................6 Investing in Your Middle Management........................................................................................................................................................................................................7 Alkermes.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7 NatCon22 Exhibitors............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................8 Making Mental Health a Priority at Work...................................................................................................................................................................................................9 CCBHC Success Center................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 National Council Consulting Tip....................................................................................................................................................................................................................11 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services..........................................................................................................................................................................................11 MHRRG Negley.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................12 Turning Around a Stressful Day.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................13 MTM...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................14 Mental Wellbeing: A Youth Perspective....................................................................................................................................................................................................15 Relias...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................16 Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions........................................................................................................................................................................17 Takeda........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................17 National Council Partners ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................18 Addressing Youth Substance Use.................................................................................................................................................................................................................19 Fairfax & Falls Church Community Services Board..............................................................................................................................................................................19 Humana....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................20 Getting Ready for 988 Implementation....................................................................................................................................................................................................21 Social Justice Leadership Academy Workbook.....................................................................................................................................................................................21 CARF International.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................22 Establishing Peer Support Services for Overdose Response....................................................................................................................................... 23 FinPay........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................23 Hill Day 2022.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................24 Getting Trained in Mental Health First Aid.............................................................................................................................................................................................25 Lundbeck.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................26 Getting Candid......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................27 Truth Initiative.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................28 Charting a Path toward Integrated Care...................................................................................................................................................................................................29 Mask Use in Residential Treatment Programs.......................................................................................................................................................................................30 National Council Consulting Team..............................................................................................................................................................................................................31 Save the Date – NatCon23.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................32

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Helping Communities THRIVE TOGETHER When it comes to helping communities thrive, knowing where to start can be difficult. That’s especially true when it comes to connecting individuals in historically underserved communities to care. We can help through our Interest Groups initiative, a National Council members-only benefit. Our Interest Groups are digital communities that help you learn and grow alongside likeminded peers. As a participant, you can share your experiences with others, pose questions, raise your voice for important issues and stay informed regarding social trends. And that’s not all:

Discover the latest best practices in prevention, treatment and recovery. Hear from the best minds in health care and the National Council’s own thought leaders. Troubleshoot your unique challenges with health care colleagues. Attend webinars and online discussions about current issues and social trends. Access original content, share files and download peerprovided resources.

By joining an Interest Group, you will get to examine – and help advance – new interventions for select populations; specifically, individuals who identify as LGBTQ+; older adults; individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD); and children, young adults and families. What’s more, we just launched two new Interest Groups: Rural Health and Substance Use! Hear from peers who’ve “been there, done that,” when it comes to service delivery in rural communities, as well as health care professionals who are advancing substance use treatment. If you’re a National Council member, fill out an interest form and indicate which group(s) you’d like to join. Then, we will share relevant learning opportunities and new resources to help you get the most out of your learning journey. Have questions about our Interest Groups? Contact us!

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designed for providers by providers Visit us at BOOTH 313


INVESTING IN YOUR MIDDLE MANAGEMENT Eager to strengthen your management team? The best way to develop your management-level staff is through our Middle Management Academy (MMA), the only program of its kind designed to develop future health care leaders into strong links in the management chain. Our virtual training uses in-depth assessments in a small group setting to help staff develop the skills to utilize their individual strengths in the workplace, motivate and manage employees, apply the right leadership styles in everyday situations and solve real-world challenges. It’s never too early to start planning for what’s next! With MMA, you can bring a customized training to your organization and get your managers on the right track. Invest in your middle management staff today – learn how the National Council can bring MMA to your agency.

Thank you for visiting Booth 113. For more information about Alkermes and our portfolio of commercially available products, please visit www.alkermes.com. ALKERMES® is a registered trademark of Alkermes, Inc. ©2022 Alkermes, Inc. All rights reserved. UNB-003382

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NATCON22 EXHIBITORS 501(c) Services

338

Accreditation Commission for Health Care

342

Accreditation Guru, Inc.

1007

Community Data Roundtable 1229

Informd

708

Owl

324

Compass Health Network

1001

innovaTel Telepsychiatry

703

Oxehealth

243

Concert Health

204

Inovalon

325

Patagonia Health

107

Connections Health Solutions 1127

Inperium, Inc.

ContinuumCloud

403

InSync Healthcare Solutions

Core Solutions Inc.

1143

InteliChart

1002

1025

Coviu

807

Aegis Sciences Corporation

1100

Culinary Services Group

1004

IPC -Integrated Psychiatric Consultants

1225

Aigilx Health

1107

Deerfield Solutions, LLC

105

Accumedic

705

AdvancedMD

1017

AdvantEdge Healthcare Solutions

Iris Telehealth

1226 437

624

Alkermes

113

designRoom

213

Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. 937, 903, 1116

American Bedding MFG, Inc

101

DrFirst

216

Kipu Health

931 314

Amwell

1114

eClinicalWorks

928

LearnWell

Array Behavioral Care

813

Eleos Health

808

MARCON CONSULTING

1202

ASD.ai

906

EnSoftek Inc./DrCloudEHR

914

McKinsey Health Institute

1228

Axiom Powered by Health Information Management Systems Beacon Health Options Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy

306 1137 227

Behavioral Health RCM Solutions, LLC

201

Behavioral Health Response

930

Benchmark Human Services

706

Brady United/End Family Fire Butler Human Services Furniture

119 1112

Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board

1048

FDA Center for Tobacco Products

1200

FinPay

927

Fitango Health

1231

Five Element Analytics LLC

907

Fivebase, LLC

304

Genoa Telepsychiatry

109

Genoa Healthcare GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

McLean Hospital

949

MediSked

103

Meditab Software

241

Mental Health Risk Retention Group/Negley Associates 100 Millin Associates

Sage Intacct

302

SageSurfer

1013

Sally Spencer-Thomas LLC

1208

Secure Telehealth Inc.

330

Sevita

827

Sheppard Pratt

1224

Social Current

912

Stella

1216

Stepped Care Solutions

126

Strategic Education, Inc. | Capella University

219

MyAdvisor, A Division of Three Wire Systems

203

Terrapin Pharmacy Medherent

1109

316

NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

1102

Nationwide

707

Netsmart

313

NextGen Healthcare

425 1103

326

214

925

Heritage CARES

217

Nonstop Administration and Insurance Services, Inc.

CHESS Health

337

Humana Healthy Horizons

Chestnut Ridge Foam Inc.

340

Humannovations

1208

iCentrix Analytics

205

1106

Impact Suite

1119

CIT International

122

INB Medical

215

Cloud 9 Telehealth

128

INCITE Consulting Solutions 200

Cohen Veterans Network

212

InfoMC Inc.

Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters

803

307

HENKA LLC

Cerner

Relias

905

1015

CCNY, Inc.

1129

TAO Connect

NextStep Solutions

CARF International

R1 Learning

300

806

225

437

Motivo

Healthcare Financing of America

Care2, LLC

Qualifacts

837

1131

825

229

Streamline Healthcare Solutions

Guardian Pharmacy Services

Cantata Health Solutions

ProtoCall Services

1230

1117

831

1227

Molina Healthcare

GUARD1 by TimeKeeping Systems, Inc.

CannonDesign

231

Primary Care Development Corporation

904

237

951

ObservSMART

1125

Ochsner Health

1050

The Echo Group

725

The Joint Commission

815

The Meyers Group

1101

Thrive Peer Recovery Services 130 Topaz Systems Inc. Total Brain Triad

318 1005 202

Trust Risk Management Services

1204

Odyssey

207

Unemployment Services Trust - UST

829

Opeeka

218

US WorldMeds

1104

Optum

0

Vanguard Research Group

312

Orexo

328

Winbrook

206

Otto Trading Inc.

336

Zero Suicide Institute

926


MAKING MENTAL HEALTH A PRIORITY at Work Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, we recognize that things will never go back to exactly the way they were. We must find a “new normal” and create new practices that prioritize mental and physical wellbeing both in and out of the workplace. A Recovery Village survey of 2,000 U.S. workers found that 74% experienced mental health symptoms, such as anxiety or depression, in January 2021. Less than six months later, in May 2021, the rate had increased to 87%. It’s critical for employers to make mental wellbeing a priority and provide employees with the tools and resources they need to support one another and take care of their own mental health and wellbeing. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) at Work is a training that can help create a mentally healthy workplace where individuals feel valued, supported and respected. “SMP [Standard Motor Products, Inc.] offered Mental Health First Aid at Work training on February 13, 2020, and the timing was fortuitous. The workshop built a foundation for ongoing, critical mental health conversations in response to COVID-19,” said Nikki Reynolds, SMP’s wellness director. “Perhaps more than ever, it is imperative to communicate clearly about the virus, associated stress and fear, the importance of self-care and knowing when to seek professional support.” MHFA at Work teaches employees to identify, understand and respond to signs and symptoms of a mental health or substance use challenge. Employees learn how to provide initial support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use concern, including how to help them connect to appropriate employee resources if needed. Employees also learn how to manage stress and take care of their own mental health with key self-care strategies. As your workplace navigates the changes brought on by COVID-19, make mental health a priority with MHFA at Work. Like Reynolds was for her SMP workforce, you can #BeTheDifference for your employees. For more information, www.MHFA.org or email MHFAatWork@TheNationalCouncil.org.

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CCBHC SUCCESS CENTER

The CCBHC model is bringing sustainable financing to the safety net—and rapidly expanding throughout the nation.

Get Started in Your State

The National Council CCBHC team is here to help!

Advice on state options for CCBHC implementation Lessons learned from other states and clinics that have gone through the CCBHC transition

Implementation “roadmap”

Training for current and prospective CCBHCs

Connect with the SAMHSA CCBHC-E National Training and Technical Assistance Center, a support hub for current grantees

Guidance on this year’s open grant opportunities for CCBHC implementation

Data, informational materials, and more

Visit the CCBHC Success Center for more information Email us at: CCBHC@TheNationalCouncil.org


CONSULTING & TRAINING PATH TO RECOVERY Assessing recovery capital – the sum of the internal and external strengths and supports – available to a person to help initiate and sustain long-term recovery from addiction should be assessed by all mental health and substance use treatment providers. Offering resources to improve recovery capital will help individuals move into and sustain long-term recovery efforts.

AARON WILLIAMS, MA Integrated Health Consultant,

National Council for Mental Wellbeing

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TURNING AROUND A STRESSFUL DAY It’s impossible to avoid stress. Whether it’s impending deadlines at work or school, a long to-do list or an argument with a loved one, everyone experiences stress from time to time. What makes the difference is how you handle the stress. Not sure how to turn around a stressful day? Here are some tips:

Find healthy ways to cope:

Reflect on your day:

Practice gratitude:

Avoid using substances like alcohol or other drugs to manage stress. Instead, try activities that can improve your physical and mental wellbeing, like working out, spending time with loved ones or journaling.

Before you go to sleep, think about your day and reflect on what went wrong. Was there a way to prevent it? Could you have reacted differently? According to Harvard Business Review, by reflecting on your day and setting clear expectations, you can learn how to better handle stressful circumstances if you face them again.

Research has shown that consciously practicing gratitude can reduce feelings of stress and anxiety. Remind yourself of everything you’re thankful for instead of focusing on everything that went wrong. Writing them down or saying them out loud can help.

Change your routine: A change of scenery can help shift your focus onto something else. Rather than preoccupying your mind with the source of your stress, taking a walk, hiking or just putting yourself in a different location can help you think of something else and relax.

Focus on self-care: Your mental health should be your top priority, so be kind to yourself! According to Mental Health First Aid, disconnecting from technology and focusing on things that make you happy and give you energy can help you get through a stressful day.

There may be times when you can’t fix your bad day — and that’s OK, too. The most important thing is that you take care of your mental and physical health any way you can.

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Make 2022 the Year of Staff Retention

2021 was the year of the Great Resignation. Are you going to continue doing the same things you’ve always done? Or are you ready to reimagine your systems to better support your consumers and your staff? MTM has helped over 1,000 other organizations since 1995 and we can help you too. Data Analytics with SPQM

Leadership Training

Same Day Access

Customer Services Reviews

Just in Time Prescriber Scheduling

Data Mapping for EHR Development

Cost Finding and Net Revenue Analysis

Revenue Cycle Management

IT Analysis and Readiness Report

Centralized Scheduling and No Show/Engagement Management

Medical Code Usage and Documentation Appropriateness Review

DLA-20 Outcome Measurement

Let’s work together to make 2022 the year of staff retention! mtmservices.org

MTMServices

mtm_services


MENTAL WELLBEING: A Youth Perspective As concerns for the mental wellbeing of young adults grow, our youth-oriented program, CONNECTED, seeks to better understand the lived experience of youth and partner with them to improve access to mental health supports. We spoke with Kiki, a 20-year-old CONNECTED youth influencer, about the program and her mental wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How did you hear about CONNECTED? “I heard about CONNECTED from a mentor and family friend. She said I should join because she knows I’m passionate about mental health. To become part of the National Council program, I joined M.A.D. – H.O.P.E., an organization that was applying to be a part of CONNECTED. M.A.D. – H.O.P.E. is a collaborative, local program that’s focused on youth suicide prevention. After joining M.A.D. – H.O.P.E., five individuals, including me, were selected to participate in the CONNECTED initiative.”

What does joining CONNECTED mean to you? “Being a part of CONNECTED has helped me take a step closer to my professional goal of becoming a counselor one day. The program has taught me a lot about mental health, like the different signs that may indicate someone is dealing with depression or anxiety, coping mechanisms for mental health problems and much more. CONNECTED has also played a large role in spreading mental health awareness in my local community.”

How have you been managing your mental wellbeing these days? “At the start of the pandemic, my mental health was OK. Things slowly started to change, though. I was living with my grandparents, and it quickly became a very negative environment. Because I wasn’t able to go out, I fell back into my depression. Luckily, I had my mom and dog to help me get through those times. When I was finally able to see people again, I noticed an improvement in my mental health. I also picked up photography as a hobby and spent a lot of time taking photos at my grandmother’s place. My family, photography, reading and journaling were all very important in my journey toward better mental wellbeing during the pandemic.”

What resources do you or your peers need right now? “I would like to have better quality mental health services. When I was dealing with depression during the pandemic, I didn’t reach out to mental health professionals because I’ve had negative experiences in the past. Because of that, I find it hard to trust mental health professionals. I also wish it were easier to find and access a counselor or therapist. Sometimes young adults like me may not have a car or the insurance to afford visits. A low-income option for mental health services would be amazing!”

What can parents and educators do to better support the mental wellbeing of youth? “Reach out to the youth in their lives. Asking someone how they’re doing and checking in with them is incredibly powerful. Parents and educators should also ask young adults, ‘Who is a trusted adult in your life, and why?’ Adults should have more conversations with youth about gaining trust with adults and be more supportive of their needs. My parents have helped me through my hardest times and every young adult deserves to have someone in their life they can go to for help.” NatCon22 | TheNationalCouncil.org

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Relias offers proven solutions to help staff optimize their performance with effective training and insights so they can achieve the best outcomes for their clients S TA F F T R A I N I N G Give your staff the training tools they need to provide person-centered, trauma-informed, and culturally-competent care to those you serve.

COMPLIANCE TRACKING Get access to data that can improve access to care, services, and appropriate state reporting.

REPORTING Manage and track all staff requirements, from training to certifications to non-training requirements.

LEARN MORE

relias.com


The Center of Excellence for Integrated Health Solutions is committed to advancing the implementation of highquality treatment for individuals with co-occurring physical and mental health conditions, including substance use disorders. Our team of experts in organizational readiness, integrated care models, workforce and clinical practice, health and wellness, and financing and sustainability are ready to partner with you to create a customized approach to advance integrated care and health outcomes.

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Thank You

to our National Council Partners platinum

silver

bronze


ADDRESSING YOUTH SUBSTANCE USE

Today’s youth are facing insurmountable odds – from the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their mental wellbeing to lingering stigma, limited access to care and an increasing reliance on substance use. What can we do to set them up for success? We explored that question and more during our “Wellbeing Wednesdays” virtual learning event in September, which featured a roundtable of health care experts. Our panel touched on a variety of topics, including warning signs to look for in youth and capacity issues for care delivery. Watch our “Wellbeing Wednesdays” episode to learn more about the intersection of teen mental health and substance use challenges, and check out our other virtual learning opportunities – from podcasts to our “National Council Conversation” series with our president and CEO, Chuck Ingoglia.

WE’RE HIRING! SIGN-ON BONUSES for new hires of $2,000 (FT) or $1,000 (PT) in nursing positions, behavioral health specialists (II), developmental disability specialists (II)/support coordinators, and behavioral health senior clinicians Fairfax County is a dynamic and diverse community spanning over 400 square miles, with 1.2 million residents. Since 1969, the Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board (CSB) has served individuals of all ages with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, and/or developmental disabilities.

Meaningful Work. Rewarding Careers. Excellent Benefits!

Stop by our booth #1048! For a full list of opportunities available at the CSB, visit: https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/community-services-board/careers

@FairfaxCSB www.fairfaxcounty.gov/csb Fairfax County, VA Publication | April 2022

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Humana Healthy Horizons™ is proud to be a sponsor for NatCon22 We focus on whole-person care addressing physical, social and mental well-being to promote recovery and resiliency.

Humana Healthy Horizons is a Medicaid Product offered by affiliates of Humana Inc.


Getting Ready for

988 IMPLEMENTATION In July, 988 – the new national three-digit crisis hotline – will go live, providing easy access to mental health and substance use crisis support for all Americans. With this date fast approaching, we’ve complied some resources to help you stay informed and prepare for the launch:

SAMHSA’s 988 webpage: Access information about implementation, partner toolkits, data on the mental health crisis in America, funding and more. 988 state legislation tracker: Check if your state has passed (or has pending) 988 legislation. Contact your elected officials: Send a message to Congress urging them to invest in our nation’s crisis care system through the 988 Implementation Act.

988 messaging framework: A how-to guide to assist your ongoing and future communications with state agencies, crisis centers, policymakers and more. CCBHCs and crisis response systems: Learn what role Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHC) play in the crisis system, including their standardized crisis care capabilities and how you can help support the expansion of CCBHCs.

Keep your learning journey going – view additional resources to learn how 988 will impact our crisis system infrastructure and why we must bolster our systems to meet the upcoming demand.

Social Justice Leadership Academy Workbook The Social Justice Leadership Academy (SJLA) Workbook is a digital learning guide containing 90+ pages of educational background and self-guided exercises about social justice inequities and their impact on mental wellbeing. Lessons are designed to help health care professionals increase their social justice awareness and form action plans for change on both personal and organizational levels. To learn more about SJLA offerings and purchase the SJLA Workbook, visit our website. NatCon22 | TheNationalCouncil.org 21


About CARF: n Accredits programs/services internationally n Reviews business and program/service processes n Guides person-centered practices n Establishes quality performance improvement systems n Hosts training and education on standards Benefits of CARF accreditation: n Service excellence n Business improvement n Funding access n Competitive differentiation n Risk management n Positive visibility n Accountability n Peer networking Since 1966, the CARF seal has been the hallmark of quality in person-centered services. CARF is a leading independent, nonprofit accreditor of health and human services. CARF is internationally recognized for its consultative external peer-review process and evolving field-driven standards.

Scan the QR code or go to www.carf.org/Programs/BH for full program descriptions.

To learn more about CARF and how accreditation can help your organization contact us today!

www.carf.org

888-281-6531

bh@carf.org


ESTABLISHING PEER SUPPORT SERVICES FOR OVERDOSE RESPONSE Overdose deaths in the U.S. have increased at an alarming rate since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, with more than 100,000 deaths reported during the 12-month period ending in April 2021. Despite the rising rates of overdose, substance use-related harms are preventable. Peer support services (PSS) are a valuable component of overdose response programs to help link individuals at risk of overdose to evidence-based treatment and services. Local and state health departments are well-suited to integrate PSS into their overdose response and linkageto-care initiatives, but unique planning and implementation considerations must be addressed. To help public health practitioners implement and enhance PSS, the National Council for Mental Wellbeing, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developed “Establishing Peer Support Services for Overdose Response: A Toolkit for Health Departments,” a technical assistance tool informed by real-world experience. This toolkit provides information, resources, tools, actionable steps and examples informed by the latest research, subject matter experts and experiences from diverse settings across the country. For more information and tools on planning and implementing linkage-to-care efforts for people at risk of overdose, see “Overdose Response and Linkage to Care: A Roadmap for Health Departments.”

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Getting Trained in MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID We’ve all heard of CPR. Because of it, many of us know what to do if someone is having trouble breathing. But do you know what to do if someone around you is having a panic attack or suicidal thoughts?

That’s what Mental Health First Aid is for. Similar to traditional first aid and CPR, MHFA helps you assist someone experiencing a mental health or substance use crisis until professional treatment is obtained or the crisis is resolved. You learn how to recognize warning signs of a mental health or substance use challenge, provide help in both crisis and non-crisis situations and understand where to turn for additional assistance. You can also take a course that’s specific to the people you know and work with. MHFA offers tailored courses that meet the needs of specific populations, including adults, youth, public safety, fire/EMS, veterans and the workplace. Our newest training, teen Mental Health First Aid (tMHFA) teaches teens in grades 10-12 (or ages 15-18) how to take care of their own mental wellbeing and support their friends and peers in need. Courses are available virtually as well as in-person.

Mental health problems are common. MHFA participants learn about concerns that affect nearly everyone in some way, shape or form — depression and mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance use challenges, trauma, eating disorders, suicidal thoughts and behaviors and more. Every year, one in five American adults is affected by a mental health challenge — mental health challenges are more common than heart disease, lung disease and cancer combined! This means it’s very likely you or someone around you will experience a mental health or substance use challenge. And you can help with MHFA.

You learn an action plan. When you take a MHFA course, you learn not only how to recognize warning signs of a mental health crisis, but how to respond with the MHFA Plan. Sometimes professional and other support services are not available in a crisis. When that happens, First Aiders can assist the person in an effective and safe way to get appropriate help and support. A ssess for risk of suicide or harm. L isten nonjudgmentally. G ive reassurance and information. E ncourage appropriate professional help. E ncourage self-help and other support strategies.

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You learn to prioritize and protect your own mental wellbeing. If you’re not taking care of your body and mind, you won’t be the best version of yourself, especially when others need you. MHFA helps First Aiders understand what self-care is and the various forms it can take. The curriculum demonstrates how self-care is important to resilience and recovery, and then helps First Aiders develop their own self-care action plans to navigate traumas and stressors.

You can “Be the Difference”! In the U.S., someone dies by suicide every 12.3 minutes. And for every suicide, 25 more people attempt it. Every day, 140 people in the U.S. die of a drug overdose, 91 specifically because of opioids. Mental health and substance use challenges are taking lives every day, making it more important than ever that everyone is trained to help with MHFA. With the right information and skills, you can respond to someone who is struggling and help them get the support they need. As a trained First Aider, you can respond in a way that can make a difference. If you are already trained, thank you. If you are not, please visit MHFA.org to find a MHFA course near you and #BeTheDifference for everyone who needs you.


Getting Candid: Framing the Conversation Around Youth Substance Use Prevention The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented disruption to the routines of youth across the United States. With support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Council created a comprehensive message guide and toolkit to equip youth-serving providers and organizations with tools and resources to engage youth in prevention conversations, intervene early, and provide youth-centered resources for support. Effective early identification and intervention on youth substance use decreases the likelihood of future development of substance use disorders, and consequences related to the use of alcohol and other drugs.

TARGET SUBSTANCES

MESSAGING THEMES THAT RESONATED MOST WITH YOUTH FOCUSED ON:

Alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs

The future

TARGET AUDIENCE

Risk of addiction

Youth-serving providers and organizations who work with youth ages 12-18

Relationships

Activities

Self-affirmation

TARGET MESSAGING Prevention and early intervention

YOUTH'S PREFERRED WAY TO COMMUNICATE

PROVIDER’S PERCEPTION RE: MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO REACH YOUTH

Face-to-face or in-person

45%

Face-to-face or in-person

78%

Text

29%

Text

44%

Email

27%

Social media

33%

TheNationalCouncil.org/Getting-Candid

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Colliding Crises: Youth Mental Health and Nicotine Use Many young people turn to nicotine to alleviate stress, anxiety, and depression, but it may be making them feel worse Two health crises among youth — a mental health crisis and a vaping epidemic — pose increasing threats to a generation of young people. They are also linked in ways many may not realize, according to a body of peer-reviewed studies. Both crises have intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even before the pandemic, 70% of young people said anxiety and depression were a major problem among peers in their community, according to a Pew Research Center report.2 Since then, the problem has gotten worse, as the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in youth has doubled compared to before the pandemic.9 Alongside this mental health crisis, youth e-cigarette use — driven by products that quickly deliver highly-addictive nicotine — has remained at epidemic levels, with one in five high school students vaping in 2020, according to the National Youth Tobacco Survey. In the time since that survey, national e-cigarette sales have risen to record highs and the risks of vaping have become more apparent, as evidence shows it can harm lung health and may put users at greater risk of contracting COVID-19.17 While it is well known that nicotine harms developing brains, including by making young people more susceptible to addiction,1,6 lesser known are the worrying connections between nicotine and mental health. Though nicotine has not been found to directly cause mental health conditions and more research is needed, numerous peer-reviewed studies reveal troubling links, including clearly established research that shows nicotine can worsen symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Learn moreCOLLIDING – visit www.truthinitiative.org today! CRISES

September 2021

While it is well known that nicotine harms developing brains, including by making young people more susceptible to addiction, lesser known are the worrying connections between nicotine and mental health.


Charting a Path toward

INTEGRATED CARE

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent fight for racial justice have both highlighted and exacerbated existing gaps and inequities in our criminal justice and health care systems. Recently, the assistant secretary for health released the results of SAMHSA’s National Household Survey of Drug Use and Health, the most comprehensive household survey of substance use, substance use disorders (SUD), mental health and the receipt of treatment services in the U.S. Findings indicate significant reductions across several drug classifications (opioid use, in particular) and improvements in use of Medication-assisted Treatment (MAT). However, the survey also indicates that despite these improvements, 19.3 million adults who met criteria for an SUD were not receiving care. In recent weeks, the CDC released preliminary data from 2019 on the number of drug overdose deaths in the U.S. While the number of overdose deaths declined in 2017 and 2018, the preliminary findings from 2019 indicate a significant increase in the number of overdose deaths to an estimated 71,999. Opioid- and stimulant-involved overdoses are the primary drivers of this increase. In addition to these existing challenges, the pandemic brought on increased demand for SUD services and myriad other challenges in delivering care. SUD service providers are scrambling to meet the demand for services, and many are looking for tools and innovative solutions to expand access to SUD services. Providers are asking important questions like: How do I serve my patients and community in a more wholistic way? How do I remove barriers to access? Integrated care is a provider-level solution that helps expand access to substance use services, especially addiction treatment medications and recovery support services. Full implementation of integrated care policies and principles can provide the foundation for expanded access and improved care for people with SUDs. The National Council has long fostered the principles of integrated care through its public education and training programs. That continues through its support of Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics (CCBHCs), which have greatly expanded their substance use services by hiring staff, offering medications and expanding service options. While the road to greater access to evidence-based substance use services can be long and winding, integrated care can offer a straighter path forward. If you are interested in expanding access and improving care for people with SUDs, or any other integrated care need, please contact one of our integrated health consultants today!

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Mask Use in Residential Treatment Programs Looking for recommendations for mask use in residential treatment programs? In late March, the National Council’s medical director, Joe Parks, MD, conferred with the infection control experts of our affiliate member, The Joint Commission, who advised following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) guidance for nursing homes (part of the CDC’s current guidance for health care facilities), since current CDC guidance specific to substance use disorder or mental illness treatment residential centers does not exist. It states: Residents who are up-to-date with all recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses in Nursing Homes in Areas of Low to Moderate Transmission: Nursing homes are health care settings, but they also serve as a home for long-stay residents and quality of life should be balanced with risks for transmission. In light of this, consideration could be given to allowing residents who are up-to-date with all recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses to not use source control when in communal areas of the facility; however, residents at increased risk of severe disease should still consider continuing to practice physical distancing and use of source control. CDC guidance for health care facilities varies by the rate of COVID-19 transmission in the county where the facility is located. The CDC’s COVID Data Tracker will help determine if your organization is in an area of low to moderate transmission. Please note: The CDC is still recommending that staff wear masks even in low or moderate transmission areas. Here’s an additional resource from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for more information.


CONSULTANTS

Renee Boak, MPH

Jeff Capobianco, PhD, LLP

Elizabeth Guroff, MA, LCMFT

Consultant

Integrated Health Senior Consultant

Director, Trauma-informed, Resilience-oriented Care

Joan Kenerson King, RN, MSN

Jane King, PsyD, LP

Laura Leone, DSW, MSSW, LMSW

Integrated Health Senior Consultant

Senior Consultant

Integrated Health Consultant

Pam Pietruszewski, MA

Amelia Roeschlein, DSW, MA, LMFT

Aaron Williams, MA

Integrated Health Consultant

Consultant, Trauma-informed, Resilience-oriented Care

Senior Director, Training and TA for Substance Use

Visit our website to learn about the National Council’s Consulting and Training Services.

Have questions? CONTACT US. NatCon22 | TheNationalCouncil.org

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S AV E T H E DAT E

NATCON 23 M AY 1 - 3 , 2 0 2 3 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA