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NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY Board of Trustees Meeting September 18, 2018


Nashville Public Library Board of Trustees Agenda September 18, 2018 Main Library 615 Church Street Nashville, TN 37219 Board Room – 10:30 a.m. I. II.

Call to order / Roll Call Metro Ordinance Required to be announced at all Board Meetings – Chair, Keith Simmons a. “Pursuant to the provisions of § 2.68.030 of the Metropolitan Code of Laws, please take notice that decisions of the Nashville Public Library Board may be appealed to the Chancery Court of Davidson County for review under a common law writ of certiorari. Any appeal must be filed within sixty days after entry of a final decision by the Board. Any person or other entity considering an appeal should consult with an attorney to ensure that time and procedural requirements are met.”

III.

Introduce Visitors

IV.

Public Comment

V. VI. VII. VIII. IX.

Board Presentation: Bobby Braddock Board Chair Comments – Keith Simmons, Chair Approval of Minutes: July 17, 2018……………………………………..……….pgs. 1 – 10 Library Director Report a. Library Director, Kent Oliver Staff Reports a. Votes for Women Project Update, Kent Oliver……..……………………pg. 19 b. PR Campaign, Andrea Fanta/Mary Brenna Corr c. Summer Challenge Summary, Lisa Bubert

X.

Adjournment

Next Board of Trustees Meeting 12:00 noon – October 16, 2018 Richland Park Library – Meeting Room 4711 Charlotte Ave Nashville TN 37209


NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY A City with a Great Library is a Great City® LIBRARY BOARD MINUTES July 17, 2018 12:00 p.m. Inglewood Branch Library, 4312 Gallatin Pike, Nashville, TN 37216

Members Present:

Keith Simmons, Robert Oermann, Joyce Searcy, Katy Varney

Members Absent:

Sepi Khansari, Lucy Haynes, Gini Pupo-Walker

Library Staff:

Kent Oliver, Larry Price, Susan Drye, Jena Schmid, Andrea Fanta, Noel Rutherford, Lindsey Patrick, Terri Thomas, Suzanne Robinson, and Joanna Roberts

Also Present:

Carly Elliott, Metro Department of Law attorney Mark Naccarato, SEIU representative Mark Schlicher

I.

Call to Order / Roll Call Keith Simmons called the meeting to order at 12:21 p.m.

II.

Metro Ordinance required to be announced at all Board Meetings “Pursuant to the provisions of § 2.68.030 of the Metropolitan Code of Laws, please take notice that decisions of the Nashville Public Library Board may be appealed to the Chancery Court of Davidson County for review under a common law writ of certiorari. Any appeal must be filed within sixty days after entry of a final decision by the Board. Any person or other entity considering an appeal should consult with an attorney to ensure that time and procedural requirements are met.”

III.

Introduce Visitors Mark Schlicher is a local professor. He was involved in the efforts to save the William Edmonson home site and has an interest in the Edgehill area.

IV.

Approval of Minutes: June 19, 2018 Mr. Simmons noted that an amendment should be made to the minutes from the June meeting. The sentence in question, on page 33 of the July Board packet, reads, “Mr. Simmons moved for approval of Resolution 2018-06.02; Ms. Varney seconded the motion and it passed unanimously.” The sentence should be amended to read, “Ms. Searcy moved for approval of Resolution 201806.02; Mr. Oermann seconded the motion and it passed unanimously.” 1|Page


Robert Oermann moved for approval of the minutes from the June meeting as amended; the motion was seconded by Joyce Searcy and passed unanimously. V.

Library Director Report – Kent Oliver, Library Director a. Metro Finance has set a savings requirement for the library. Mr. Oliver noted several things:  NPL has been tasked with saving $812,200.00. NPL plans to meet this goal by allowing positions to remain vacant, not by laying off staff. To illustrate the enormity of this task, Ms. Drye explained that the current 32 vacancies would have to remain vacant until March 2019 in order to meet the savings goal. Mr. Oliver stated that library administration will continue to discuss how to save money. Savings cannot be achieved by altering the collections budget, because funding for the library collection comes out of the 4%, only from the operating budget. Mr. Simmons asked if each Metro department is required to save a similar amount. Ms. Drye replied that the amount varies by department.  Mr. Oermann asked if volunteers could ease the strain on staff by completing shelving or other tasks. Mr. Oliver replied that volunteers and the reassigned Madison Branch staff are currently helping to fill in the gaps. The Madison Branch reopening is tentatively slated for November 2018.  Mr. Simmons asked how maintenance has been impacted by the hiring freeze. Mr. Oliver noted that there are maintenance position vacancies and reviewed the Personnel Summary on page 41 of the Board packet.  Mr. Simmons requested more information about the process for filling vacant positions. Ms. Drye explained that the library must request permission to fill each vacant position, and this procedure has been in place since 2009 under the Karl Dean administration. The library must show that the vacancy is a critical position and that the savings goal can still be achieved if the position is filled. NPL is trying to balance filling front-line, public service positions with filling management positions.  Mr. Oliver has communicated with Metro administration regarding the increasing number of vacancies and their impact on day to day operations. Each vacancy increases the burden on staff. Mr. Oliver will continue this conversation and meet with the new Chief of Staff. More information regarding savings efforts will be shared at the next Board meeting. b. There is momentum building behind the creation of the Women’s Suffrage Room. Elaine Weiss, author of The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote, has become engaged in these efforts. The planning group met with Mr. Oliver this morning. They will present programming examples at the next Board meeting. c. On July 16, Mr. Oliver served on a panel with the National Association of Counties to discuss the role of libraries in the 2020 Census. Libraries will take a prominent role by providing meeting spaces and computers for the public to complete the form online. 2|Page


VI.

d. Mayor David Briley will be making a stop at the Main Library on July 27 to speak about the Nashville Literacy Collaborative. The Nashville Public Education Foundation will make an announcement in the children’s area at 10:00 a.m. e. Mr. Oliver will send another Doodle poll to the Board members in order to schedule an informal informational meeting about Church Street Park. f. Mr. Oliver announced that automatic renewals will be enacted at the end of July. This is a courtesy service that renews checked-out materials that do not currently have holds. Patrons will receive notification that their items have been renewed. g. The Board will not meet in August. The September meeting will take place at the Main Library at 10:30 a.m. After the meeting, members will attend the Courtyard Concert with lunch provided. h. Mr. Oliver reviewed the year-end statistical summary.  There are some very positive figures from the 2018-2019 fiscal year. Despite the Madison Branch closure and the Main Library garage renovations, circulation increased by four percent. The number of items circulated per visit has also increased. Cardholder numbers are staying steady at approximately fifty five percent. The library is making an effort to retain graduating MNPS seniors as cardholders.  Ms. Varney asked if the Limitless Libraries (LL) program has had an impact on circulation. Noel Rutherford confirmed that the program does contribute to circulation statistics. Mr. Oliver noted that LL circulation decreased this year due to the implementation of a new ILS and MNPS building staffing issues. However, the outlook for future LL circulation is positive. The new ILS has been in place for a year, and LL is adding an outreach position to serve as a liaison to MNPS staff.  Mr. Simmons pointed out that the number of children’s programs decreased. Mr. Oliver explained that the decrease is due to the Madison Branch closure, having fewer staff available to lead programs in the building and through outreach, and early voting decreasing available programming space.  Mr. Simmons commented that circulation and visits both increased during the last Nashville International Puppet Festival and asked if there were plans for another festival. Mr. Oliver replied that there are currently no plans for another festival. It costs approximately $300,000 to put on the festival, which would require major donations to the Foundation and it takes about a year to plan the event. Staff Reports a. Civil Society & Collections – Lindsey Patrick  Ms. Patrick explained that a series of events, beginning approximately six months ago, precipitated this report. First, Ms. Patrick’s team of children’s staff participated in Civil Rights and a Civil Society, a diversity education program led by Andrea Blackman. This training proved helpful when patrons informed staff that they were uncomfortable with some children’s book content. When one mother asked for books with character diversity, Children’s Librarian Greg Hall provided her with diverse book lists. Also after the training, Ms. Patrick read Philip Nel’s Was the Cat 3|Page


in the Hat Black: The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books. All of these events led Ms. Patrick to ask Mr. Oliver about the library’s responsibility in this area. Mr. Oliver paired Ms. Patrick with Noel Rutherford, and the two formed a task force. The task force is devising tools that will highlight the diversity of the collection. They are creating book lists and writing blog posts that include diverse children leading joyful lives. This task force is a credit to NPL as they confront these issues and speak about them without fear. The Board members thanked them for their efforts.

b. Read to Rise Marketing Presentation – Andrea Fanta and Terri Thomas  Andrea Fanta brought a Library of the Year mug for each Board member. San Francisco Public Library is the new award recipient.  Ms. Fanta announced that the Community Engagement and Education division has been working on Read to Rise, a reading campaign that encourages literacy skills for children from birth through age five. The planning committee is comprised of Elyse Adler, Andrea Fanta, Liz Atack and Terri Thomas. The campaign model has been established in other cities, such as Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The program’s goal is for parents and caregivers to read to children for twenty minutes a day. When children start kindergarten, they will graduate from Read to Rise and receive a certificate that also recognizes their parent or caregiver. The prizes are as follows: o 90 days - Growth Chart o 180 days - Sticker o 270 days - Mood Cup o 360 days - Free Book  Ms. Fanta explained that Read to Rise (RTR) will capitalize on the Summer Reading Challenge’s (SRC) momentum and its built-in audience by transitioning participants from a summer to a year-round reading program. The SRC ends on August 3, and RTR will launch at 10:30 a.m. on September 12 at the Edmondson Pike Branch. The kick-off event will include a Puppet Truck show of The Frog Prince. Attendees will receive a free book and have the opportunity to sign children up for My First Library Card. Mr. Oliver will introduce the campaign mascot. The naming contest for the mascot, a raccoon, will run from August 20 – September 4. Patrons will be able to suggest names either online or at a library branch.  Ms. Fanta outlined the marketing sustainability plan. The mascot will appear on social media and share tips on how to incorporate reading into daily life. Information will also be shared via a monthly newsletter, blog posts, news media, library staff, and Blueprint for Childhood Success partners such as the Nashville Public Education Foundation and MNPS.  Ms. Thomas has been a children’s librarian at NPL for sixteen years, and the last twelve years have been spent at the Green Hills Branch. Ms. Thomas plans to 4|Page


VII.

increase adult involvement in early literacy by encouraging caregivers to read to children after library story time. Mr. Oermann suggested creating a club for parents in order to build a sense of community amongst the adults. Ms. Fanta noted that there is a virtual sense of community on NPL’s social media. Ms. Thomas observed that adults tend to socialize before and after story time at the Green Hills Branch. Ms. Varney recommended providing adult reading lists near story time rooms. Ms. Rutherford noted that there is a table of books for adults positioned at the entrance of the Green Hills Branch children’s area. Outreach at community events, churches and clinics will help bring awareness to the campaign. Nashville Public Library, Book’em and Imagination Library are the Nashville agencies dedicated to improving early literacy skills. Ms. Varney suggested partnering with the Adventure Science Center, Mr. Oermann suggested Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, and Ms. Searcy recommended Nashville Children’s Theatre.

New Business a. Amendment to Fee Schedule Resolution – Susan Drye Ms. Drye noted that the Fees and Charges Policy lacks the current private event space fees. Mr. Oermann moved to adopt resolution 2018-07.01 with the addition of private event space fees; the motion was seconded by Ms. Varney and passed unanimously.

Nashville Public Library Board July 17, 2018 Resolution Title: Fees and Charges Policy History/Background/Discussion: The Fines, Fees and Charges Policy (formerly F1.1) was last reviewed and revised by the Board on July 1, 2009. Policy F1.1 states the Library Board sets all library fines, fees and charges (see below): Establishment of Fines, Fees and Charges The Library Board will set all library fines, fees and charges (F2.1 and F2.2). All assessments to the public will be made in accordance with the above or the most recent revisions as approved by the Library Board. This policy included F2.1 Amounts Charged Overdue Fines (last updated July 1, 2009) and F2.2 Amounts Charged Fees and Charges (last updated September 28, 2009). When reviewing this part of the policy, F2.1 and F2.2 included the amounts the Library would charge and procedures to implement those charges.

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In an effort to separate the fines, fees and charges set by the Library Board and the procedures to implement those charges, on October 20, 2015 the Library Board approved a Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule. However, this schedule was never put into policy form. On February 21, 2017 the FY 2018 Budget Enhancement Resolution was adopted which included eliminating overdue fines and the non-resident fee for library users outside of Davidson County (for tangible materials, e- content is a $10.00 fee). With the Board’s approval of the Budget Enhancement Resolution, the Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule should have been updated to reflect these changes, including having the schedule put into policy form. To date, revising the Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule and solidifying that schedule into policy form have not been completed. Additionally, in the same chord as eliminating overdue fines and non-resident fees, Nashville Public Library also wishes to eliminate the $1.00 non-refundable Lost Card Fee found in the previous Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule. In FY2017-2018 only $70.00 was collected in nonrefundable Lost Card Fees. Library Cards currently cost Nashville Public library $0.35 each. The Library wishes to revise the Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule into the Fees and Charges Policy with Overdue Fines, Non-Resident Library Card Fee (for tangible materials) and Lost Card Fee eliminated which would put this schedule into policy form. Recommendation: The Board approves the proposed Fees and Charges Policy Draftor(s): Susan Drye, Assistant Director for Administrative Services Person(s) Responsible for Implementation: Felicia Wilson, Susan Drye

RESOLUTION 2018-07.01 Fees and Charges Policy WHEREAS, Nashville Public Library seeks to update and revise the library’s Comprehensive Fines and Fees Schedule which will eliminate the Overdue Fines and the Non-Resident Card Fee (for tangible materials) and Library Card Replacement Fee from this schedule and put into policy form as the Fees and Charges Policy and WHEREAS, a Fees and Charges Policy is a fluid document, needing constant refreshing to keep it accurate as well as relevant, and WHEREAS, a review and revisions of the Fees and Charges Policy will be ongoing, and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED by the Nashville Public Library Board of Trustees to adopt the Fees and Charges Policy and that library’s policy and procedures be revised to reflect this.

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Nashville Public Library Departmental Policies

Fees and Charges Policy

Policy Information Approved Date: Effective Date: Keywords:

[Date] July 17, 2018 Fees, Charges

Policy

Establishment of Fines, Fees and Charges The Library Board will set all library fines, fees and charges. All assessments to the public will be made in accordance with the above or the most recent revisions as approved by the Library Board. Collection and Deposit of Fees and Charges The Library’s Finance and Purchasing Office is responsible for formulating and implementing procedures for the collection and deposit of fees and charges (US currency only). Procedures will be provided to all staff responsible for collecting these revenues. Finance and Purchasing Staff will periodically audit branches and divisions to ensure compliance with these procedures. Nashville Public Library Comprehensive Fee and Charges Schedule Materials & Card Fees Item

Charge

Lost pieces of AV materials

$1.00/item + cost of item

Out-of-County Card Fee for e-content

$10.00/account

Collection agency fees

$10.00/account

Default Price List for Replacement Items (when there is no listed price) Collection

ADULT

Format

Charge

Fiction Non-Fiction

$ $

27.47 25.38

Trade Paperback Fiction Trade Paperback Non-Fiction Paperback Mass Market

$ $ $

15.64 20.40 8.30

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YOUNG ADULT

JUVENILE

A/V MATERIALS

Book Club-in-a-Bag Laminated Sheet

$

2.50

Hardback Fiction Hardback Non-Fiction Trade Paperback Fiction Paperback Non-Fiction

$ $ $ $

15.33 25.38 9.95 11.00

Paperback Mass Market (includes series)

$

5.99

Easy (Picture Books) Fiction Hardback (includes hardback readers & series) Non-Fiction Hardback

$ $ $

18.97 17.63 27.04

Fiction Paperback (includes paperback readers & series) Paperback Non-Fiction Board Book

$ $ $

7.90 8.45 6.95

DVD (per disc)

$

22.99

Music CD (per disc)

$

15.65

Audiobook on CD

$

54.75

Playaway

$

53.00

Photocopies and Printouts Service

Charge

Black & white photocopy

$0.10/page

Color photocopy (from Financial-Fees & Charges document)  Library reimburses $0.50 if federal, state or local government agency document

$1.00/page

Microfilm/Microfiche readers

$0.25/page

Black & white computer printout

$0.15/page

Color computer printout  Library reimburses $0.50 if federal, state or local government agency document

$1.00/page

Special Collections and Archives Service

Charge

Archival Certification for legal use of records other than marriages

Duplication Fees

Image Reproduction Fees

$2.00 Photocopies (black/white) Printing from microfilm readers CD duplication Copy of a Marriage Record (Archives site & document) Certified Copy of a Marriage Record (Financial-Fees & Charges procedure Duplication of any record to a CD 8 X 10 11 X 14

$.10/page $.25/page $5.00 each $5.00 $10.00 $5.00/scan $15.00/image $25.00/image

8|Page


0-5,000 5,001-10,000 10,001-25,000 25,001 or more copies Circulation of 49,999 or less Publication in serials, magazines, Circulation of 50,000 to 99,999 newspapers Circulation of 100,000 and over Publication in audio, video or Under 500 copies electronic medium Over 500 copies Broadcast on PBS or non-commercial outlet Motion picture or TV broadcast Commercial broadcast or motion picture Museum or other non-profit display Display in commercial offices, stores and restaurants Advertising and Commercial Use Book jackets, end papers, magazine covers, CD covers Advertising 0-1,000 copies 1,001-2,000 Usage of other novelty items 2,001-3,000 3,001-4,000 4,001-5,000 Commercial and For-profit web pages Publication via the Internet Non-profit web pages The Library reserves the right to charge more based on size of reproduction. Publication in books, guides, brochures

$10.00 $30.00 $75.00 $100.00 $10.00 $25.00 $100.00 $25.00 $150.00 $50.00 $150.00 $25.00 $25.00 $100.00 $150.00 $40.00 $60.00 $80.00 $100.00 $120.00 $100.00 $25.00

Conference Center Business Rates

Nonprofit Rates

Room Auditorium

   Conference Room 1A or 1B

 

Conference Room 1 (Large)

         

Standard A/V equipment + surround sound, projection screen, and stage 230 fixed theater seats Refreshments must be served and consumed outside the Auditorium $650 per 4-hour block

Standard A/V equipment + projection screen 350 maximum capacity for standing reception 200 for theater-style setup 80 for seated meal setup 50 for classroom setup $475 per 4-hour block Standard A/V equipment + projection screen 500 maximum capacity for standing reception 300 for theater-style setup 200 for seated meal setup 115 for classroom setup $650 per 4-hour block

  

          

Standard A/V equipment + surround sound, projection screen, and stage 230 fixed theater seats Refreshments must be served and consumed outside the Auditorium $500 per 4-hour block

Standard A/V equipment + projection screen 350 maximum capacity for standing reception 200 seats, theater-style setup 80 for seated meal setup 50 for classroom setup $300 per 4-hour block Standard A/V equipment + projection screen 500 maximum capacity for standing reception 300 for theater-style setup 200 for seated meal setup 115 for classroom setup $500 per 4-hour block

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Conference Rooms 2 or 3 (Small)

  

VIII.

Standard A/V equipment Tables are set in a hollow square to accommodate 20 people $35 per hour block

  

Standard A/V equipment Tables are set in a hollow square to accommodate 20 people $25 per hour block

Adjournment The meeting adjourned at 1:38 p.m.

Next Board Meeting – 10:30 a.m., September 18, 2018 Main Library 615 Church Street Nashville TN 37219

Respectfully submitted by Joanna Roberts

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library Cardholders as % of Population Served

Cardholders as % of Population Served

56.4%

July 2018 New Cards: 3,464 Active Cardholders: 383,254

August 2018 New Cards: 3,566 Active Cardholders: 389,772

Public Computer Usage July 2018 / 2017 47,194 / 54,406

Public Computer Usage August 2018 / 2017 45,525 / 57,635

Wireless Usage July 2018 / 2017 141,915 / 49,145

Wireless Usage August 2018 / 2017 150,626 / 129,498

Database Sessions July 2018 / 2017 13,039 / 5,903

Database Sessions August 2018 / 2017 24,577 / 48,265

Volunteer Services Number of Volunteers Volunteer Hours Volunteer Services Number of Volunteers Volunteer Hours

Jul-18 219 2010.00 Aug-18 232 2160.00

Jul-17 231 2011.00 Aug-17 204 1755.25

% Change 2018-2017 -5.19% -0.05% % Change 2017-2016 13.73% 23.06%

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

CIRCULATION TREND FY1819

FY1718

FY1617

650,000 600,000 550,000 500,000

450,000 400,000 350,000 300,000

JU L A U G

SE P

OC T N OV DE C

JA N

FE B MA R A PR MAY JU N

CIRCULATION COMPARISON PHYSICAL VS EMEDIA Physical

eMedia

34%

30%

66%

70%

J UL-18

J UL-17

CIRCULATION COMPARISON PHYSICAL VS EMEDIA Physical

eMedia

31%

31%

69%

69%

AUG -18

AUG -17

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library Circulation Bellevue Bordeaux Donelson East Edgehill Edmondson Pike Goodlettsville Green Hills Hadley Park Equal Access Hermitage Inglewood Looby Madison Main North Old Hickory Pruitt Richland Park Southeast Thompson Lane Watkins Park eMedia Talking Library NPL Total

Circulation Bellevue Bordeaux Donelson East Edgehill Edmondson Pike Goodlettsville Green Hills Hadley Park Equal Access Hermitage Inglewood Looby Madison Main North Old Hickory Pruitt Richland Park Southeast Thompson Lane Watkins Park eMedia Talking Library NPL Total

Jul-18 Circulation 43,950 7,354 9,875 6,861 3,441 40,418 19,528 53,079 1,955 281 33,908 13,041 3,687 16 56,774 3,042 4,837 1,530 12,972 21,749 9,324 1,368 179,222 2 528,214

Month Jul-18 Jul-17 % of Total Circulation 8.32% 40,257 1.39% 6,561 1.87% 10,611 1.30% 6,472 0.65% 3,596 7.65% 40,082 3.70% 17,454 10.05% 54,369 0.37% 2,265 0.05% 323 6.42% 31,757 2.47% 10,560 0.70% 2,355 0.00% 13,972 10.75% 59,093 0.58% 3,213 0.92% 4,136 0.29% 1,453 2.46% 12,913 4.12% 21,333 1.77% 8,665 0.26% 1,325 33.93% 152,264 0.000% 3 505,032

% Change 2018-2017 9.17% 12.09% -6.94% 6.01% -4.31% 0.84% 11.88% -2.37% -13.69% -13.00% 6.77% 23.49% 56.56% -99.89% -3.92% -5.32% 16.95% 5.30% 0.46% 1.95% 7.61% 3.25% 17.70% -33.33% 4.59%

Jul-18 Year-to-Date 43,950 7,354 9,875 6,861 3,441 40,418 19,528 53,079 1,955 281 33,908 13,041 3,687 16 56,774 3,042 4,837 1,530 12,972 21,749 9,324 1,368 179,222 2 528,214

Fiscal Year-to-Date Jul-17 Year-to-Date 40,257 6,561 10,611 6,472 3,596 40,082 17,454 54,369 2,265 323 31,757 10,560 2,355 13,972 59,093 3,213 4,136 1,453 12,913 21,333 8,665 1,325 152,264 3 505,032

% Change 2018-2017 9.17% 12.09% -6.94% 6.01% -4.31% 0.84% 11.88% -2.37% -13.69% -13.00% 6.77% 23.49% 56.56% -99.89% -3.92% -5.32% 16.95% 5.30% 0.46% 1.95% 7.61% 3.25% 17.70% -33.33% 4.59%

Aug-18 Circulation 50,132 8,799 12,693 8,193 4,507 43,373 23,806 60,896 2,665 520 40,707 16,501 4,542 39 67,505 3,790 6,233 2,233 16,635 25,748 11,440 1,857 181,950 7 594,771

Month Aug-18 Aug-17 % of Total Circulation 8.43% 39,043 1.48% 6,306 2.13% 10,560 1.38% 6,241 0.76% 3,536 7.29% 37,130 4.00% 16,842 10.24% 48,868 0.45% 2,139 0.09% 442 6.84% 31,543 2.77% 10,494 0.76% 2,397 0.01% 14,250 11.35% 57,433 0.64% 3,306 1.05% 4,500 0.38% 1,669 2.80% 12,576 4.33% 20,506 1.92% 8,707 0.31% 1,513 30.59% 153,929 0.00% 2 493,932

% Change 2018-2017 28.40% 39.53% 20.20% 31.28% 27.46% 16.81% 41.35% 24.61% 24.59% 17.65% 29.05% 57.24% 89.49% -99.73% 17.54% 14.64% 38.51% 33.79% 32.28% 25.56% 31.39% 22.74% 18.20% 250.00% 20.42%

Aug-18 Year-to-Date 94,082 16,153 22,568 15,054 7,948 83,791 43,334 113,975 4,620 801 74,615 29,542 8,229 55 124,279 6,832 11,070 3,763 29,607 47,497 20,764 3,225 361,172 9 1,122,985

Fiscal Year-to-Date Aug-17 Year-to-Date 79,300 12,867 21,171 12,713 7,132 77,212 34,296 103,237 4,404 765 63,300 21,054 4,752 28,222 116,526 6,519 8,636 3,122 25,489 41,839 17,372 2,838 306,193 5 998,964

% Change 2018-2017 18.64% 25.54% 6.60% 18.41% 11.44% 8.52% 26.35% 10.40% 4.90% 4.71% 17.88% 40.32% 73.17% -99.81% 6.65% 4.80% 28.18% 20.53% 16.16% 13.52% 19.53% 13.64% 17.96% 80.00% 12.41%

LIMITLESS LIBRARIES TERMINAL ACTIVITY TREND FY1819

FY1718

18000 16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NO V

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

AP R

MAY

JUNE

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

PROGRAM TREND FY1819

FY1718

FY1617

1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

JU L A U G SE P

OC T N OV DE C

JA N

FE B MA R A PR MAY JU N E

PROGRAMS BY AGE GROUP Adult Programs

Teen Programs

Children's Programs

675

548

188

298

433

390

J UL-18

J UL-17

PROGRAMS BY AGE GROUP Adult Programs

Teen Programs

Children's Programs

440 438 187

318

421

427

AUG -18

AUG -17

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

PROGRAMS - LIBRARY VS OUTREACH Library

Outreach

16%

17%

84%

83%

J UL-18

J UL-17

PROGRAMS - LIBRARY VS OUTREACH Library

Outreach

17%

14%

83%

86%

AUG -18

AUG -17

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE TREND FY1819

FY1718

FY1617

50000 45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000

JU L A U G SE P

OC T N OV DE C

JA N

FE B MA R A PR MAY JU N E

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE BY AGE GROUP Adult Attendance

22,033

Teen Attendance

Children's Attendance

24,188

1,773 4,483

2,640 4,349

J UL-18

J UL-17

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE BY AGE GROUP Adult Attendance

Teen Attendance

Children's Attendance

24,188 15,022 2,751 5,084

2,640 4,349

AUG -18

AUG -17

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

PROGRAMS - LIBRARY VS OUTREACH Library

Outreach

16%

17%

84%

83%

J UL-18

J UL-17

PROGRAM ATTENDANCE - LIBRARY VS OUTREACH Library

Outreach

21%

19%

79%

81%

AUG -18

AUG -17

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Statistical Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library VISITS TREND FY1819

FY1718

FY1617

450000 400000 350000

300000 250000 200000 150000

JU L

Visits Bellevue Bordeaux Donelson East Edgehill Edmondson Pike Goodlettsville Green Hills Hadley Park Hermitage Inglewood Looby Madison Main North Old Hickory Pruitt Richland Park Southeast Thompson Lane Watkins Park NPL Total

Visits Bellevue Bordeaux Donelson East Edgehill Edmondson Pike Goodlettsville Green Hills Hadley Park Hermitage Inglewood Looby Madison Main North Old Hickory Pruitt Richland Park Southeast Thompson Lane Watkins Park NPL Total

AUG

SE P

OC T

N OV

DE C

JA N

FE B

MA R

A PR

MAY

JU N

Jul-18 Visits 26,654 10,430 13,666 13,039 4,581 27,682 10,088 28,293 3,205 27,431 19,454 4,966 0 41,616 7,725 3,267 6,205 11,982 27,324 17,733 2,841 308,182

Jul-17 Visits 21,198 9,238 12,305 11,584 5,497 19,955 9,168 20,631 3,349 18,079 13,284 4,618 19,084 58,258 7,090 2,592 6,784 20,011 16,256 16,637 2,813 298,431

% Change 2018-2017 25.74% 12.90% 11.06% 12.56% -16.66% 38.72% 10.03% 37.14% -4.30% 51.73% 46.45% 7.54% -100.00% -28.57% 8.96% 26.04% -8.53% -40.12% 68.09% 6.59% 1.00% 3.27%

Jul-18 Circ / Visit 1.65 0.71 0.72 0.53 0.75 1.46 1.94 1.88 0.61 1.24 0.67 0.74 N/A 1.37 0.39 1.48 0.25 1.08 0.80 0.53 0.48 1.13

Jul-17 Circ / Visit 1.90 0.71 0.86 0.56 0.65 2.01 1.90 2.64 0.68 1.76 0.79 0.51 0.73 1.02 0.45 1.60 0.21 0.65 1.31 0.52 0.47 1.18

% Change 2018-2017 -13.17% -0.72% -16.20% -5.82% 14.82% -27.31% 1.68% -28.81% -9.81% -29.63% -15.67% 45.59% N/A 34.43% -13.10% -7.21% 15.13% 67.77% -39.35% 0.95% 2.23% -4.20%

Aug-18 Visits 30,744 9,711 13,895 9,388 3,772 40,550 10,745 23,498 1,849 19,097 20,069 4,148 0 43,965 4,962 3,228 5,796 12,064 21,142 18,282 3,079 299,984

Aug-17 Visits 25,671 11,803 13,912 16,450 4,792 19,437 9,754 22,261 3,206 17,945 15,125 5,080 17,355 58,099 5,651 2,655 6,944 22,807 18,547 18,365 4,654 320,513

% Change 2018-2017 19.76% -17.72% -0.12% -42.93% -21.29% 108.62% 10.16% 5.56% -42.33% 6.42% 32.69% -18.35% -100.00% -24.33% -12.19% 21.58% -16.53% -47.10% 13.99% -0.45% -33.84% -6.41%

Aug-18 Circ / Visit 1.63 0.91 0.91 0.87 1.19 1.07 2.22 2.59 1.44 2.13 0.82 1.09 N/A 1.55 0.76 1.93 0.39 1.38 1.22 0.63 0.60 1.38

Aug-17 Circ / Visit 1.52 0.53 0.76 0.38 0.74 1.91 1.73 2.20 0.67 1.76 0.69 0.47 0.82 1.00 0.59 1.69 0.24 0.55 1.11 0.47 0.33 1.06

% Change 2018-2017 7.21% 69.59% 20.35% 130.03% 61.93% -44.01% 28.31% 18.05% 116.03% 21.27% 18.51% 132.06% N/A 55.32% 30.56% 13.92% 60.29% 150.07% 10.15% 31.99% 85.52% 29.72%

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Staff Reports – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library Votes for Women ProjectThe Legacy of the 19th Amendment Nashville Public Library Board Meeting September 18, 2018 Location. In its May 15, 2018, meeting, the Board approved the exploration of constructing a Room, similar to the Civil Rights Room, which tells the story of Nashville’s role in granting women the right to vote. The proposed location of the Room is the current Banner Room and adjacent space, located in the Nashville Room at the opposite end from the Civil Rights Room. The writers’ rooms will be relocated within the Main Library. The Banner collection will be moved to a more vibrant space in the microfilm room. Mission and Objectives. The following mission and objectives for the Room are proposed. To provide a permanent space that tells the pivotal and dramatic story of Nashville’s role in granting women the right to vote with the passage of the 19 th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and to provide a space to explore the core themes surrounding women’s roles, democracy and power. This Mission is accomplished in three major ways:  A permanent exhibit which is self-guided and serves as a destination place for visitors.  Programming focused on civic engagement and women’s roles.  Collection and assembly of information that pertains to the involvement of Nashville and beyond in this movement and of books, women’s stories, including oral histories, and other documents and records with a focus on women’s contributions.

Permanent Exhibit. This space will be dedicated to engaging communities in conversations about current issues of equality, women’s role in society, democracy and the right to vote. The elements and design of the space will convey Nashville’s complicated history and will have a centerpiece, much like the replica of the lunch counter in the Civil Rights Room. When one considers the place and space, it is particularly meaningful that the Room overlooks where the fight for the vote was waged at the Hermitage Hotel and the State Capitol. Programs. Programming will build upon the library’s current outstanding programs presented in conjunction with the Special Collections Division. Programs will involve the core themes of American and Tennessee history—race, class, money, gender, states’ rights, power and democracy—all which came into play in Nashville. An important focus will be the role of women in our society, particularly Nashville, and the importance of the right to vote. Exploring these themes will utilize multiple methods of engagement: public programs centered in both historical truths and social commentary; and author and scholar-led events that are steeped in counter narratives and critical dialogue. Management and planning will be coordinated by the Special Collections Division that will involve library programmers, curriculum designers, artists, and educators to design connecting content for K-12, higher education and community groups. Collections. In carrying out the objectives of the exhibit and programming, the library will immediately begin its collection development phase of the project. An extensive book list of current and former writers will be considered for circulation throughout the system as well. Materials already available in the library will be compiled and organized with the new materials and incorporated in the Room. Additionally, the library will collect women’s stories, similar to other library projects, for such stories are often not told, collected or given appropriate recognition. This space will allow more people to have much more input into how to create and tell women’s histories.

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Financial Overview – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library Metro Government of Nashville Monthly Budget Accountability Report As of August 2018 Public Library GSD-General - Operating PY Budget PY Actuals PY% Prior Year Thru Thru Thru Prior YTD Budget Current Mo. Current Mo. Current Mo. Variance

Current Annual Budget

CY Budget Actuals YTD % Thru Current Mo. Thru Thru YTD Current Mo. Actuals Current Mo. Current Mo. Variance

Variance Explanation

EXPENSES: Salaries:

Regular Pay

Overtime

All Other Salary Codes

Total Salaries

13,974,200

2,329,033

2,257,814

96.9%

35,300

5,883

8,414

143.0%

1,257,300

209,550

316,941

15,266,800

2,544,466

2,583,169

Fringes

5,510,400

918,400

1,061,559

Other Expenses: Utilities Professional & Purchased Services

1,643,100 2,526,400

273,850 421,067

163,688 36,948

71,219 14,537,600

2,422,933

-2,531

35,300

5,883

151.2% -107,391

1,257,300

209,550

2,638,366

101.5%

-38,703 15,830,200

115.6% -143,159

59.8% 8.8%

110,162 384,119

1,043,113

4,853

1,991,749

82.2% 431,184

11,314

192.3%

-5,431

104,724

298,019

142.2%

-88,469

1,152,690

2,301,082

5,638,100

939,683

467,459

932,747

1,643,100 3,044,000

273,850 507,333

158,097 585,440

184,515 619,087

87.2% 337,284

99.3%

Fringe is at 99.3% thru AUG due to higher overall fringe costs. LIB does not have 6,936 much control over fringe costs.

67.4% 89,335 122.0% -111,754 Travel is currently under budget for the year. However, monthly parking passes for Main employees are the biggest expense and we anticipate being over at 1,760 the end of the FY in this line item. 73,551 LIB is at -64.4% of budget thru AUG. The lower amount here is the result of a prepayment on the reimbursement from MNPS for the new ILS system. LIB will 135,097 monitor closely. Internal Service Fees have not been 2 posted. 172,409 Library is under budget (86.4%) for FY19 YTD. NPL will monitor ALL expenditures closely as the fiscal year progresses to ensure we are on budget by year end as well as providing the requested savings if 704,620 possible.

Travel, Tuition & Dues Communications

62,700 598,400

10,450 99,733

9,001 -41,355

86.1% -41.5%

1,449 141,088

115,200 593,400

19,200 98,900

12,227 16,838

17,440 25,349

90.8% 25.6%

Repairs & Maintenance Services

493,100

82,183

67,115

81.7%

15,068

493,100

82,183

34,624

-52,914

-64.4%

1,785,900 2,196,400

297,650 366,067

288,592 160,588

97.0% 43.9%

9,058 205,479

1,830,600 1,853,000

305,100 308,833

143,688 77,852

305,098 136,424

100.0% 44.2%

30,083,200

5,013,866

4,329,305

86.3%

684,561 31,040,700

5,173,448

2,648,915

4,468,828

86.4%

407,000

67,833

68,478

101.0%

-645

189,200

31,533

20,336

37,914

120.2%

-6,381

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 407,000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 67,833

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 68,478

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 101.0%

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -645

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 189,200

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 31,533

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20,336

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37,914

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 120.2%

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -6,381

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 407,000

0 67,833

0 68,478

0.0% 101.0%

0 -645

0 189,200

0 31,533

0 20,336

0 37,914

0.0% 120.2%

0 -6,381

Internal Service Fees All Other Expenses

TOTAL EXPENSES PROGRAM REVENUE: Charges, Commissions & Fees Other Governments & Agencies Federal Direct Fed Through State Pass-Through Fed Through Other Pass-Through State Direct Other Government & Agencies Subtotal Other Governments & Agencies Other Program Revenue TOTAL PROGRAM REVENUE NON-PROGRAM REVENUE: Property Taxes Local Option Sales Tax Other Tax, Licences & Permits Fines, Forfeits & Penalties Compensation from Property Miscellaneous Revenue - Donation TOTAL NON-PROGRAM REVENUE Transfers From Other Funds & Units TOTAL REVENUE AND TRANSFERS SUMMARY OF POSITIONS: Total Authorized Positions - Oper Fd Total Filled Positions Total Vacant Positions

LIB is at 82.2% thru AUG. Vacancies are being held per a Metro wide hiring freeze. NPL is filling critical positions when allowed. However, NPL will keep an eye on expenditures. LIB is over budget at 192.3% thru AUG. With staffing levels, OT is necessary at times to fulfill NPL needs especially with Maintenance and Security issues. LIB is 142.2% thru AUG. This is not unusual for this time of year after summer vacations. NPL will keep an eye on this category and make budget adjustments for FY19 to cover more of these costs next fiscal year. LIB is at 87.2% of total budgeted salaries thru AUG. With only critical vacancies being filled, OT and vacation leave, currently NPL is on budget. However, NPL will monitor expenditures closely throughout the FY.

397 358 39

SUMMARY OF VARIANCE:

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Personnel Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library

New Hires & Resignations July & August New Hires N/A July & August Resignations Name

Classification

Pruitt, Randall Rhodes, Danielle Pryor, Randall NeSmith, Taja Colter, Ellen Rieckhoff, Jaime Terfinko, Emma Queen, Jennifer Muhsin, Aven Johnson, Kelsey Faulkner, Leah Hamilton, Sabrina

Bldg Maint Supv Library Page Security Guard Circ. Asst. 1 Librarian 2 Librarian 1 Circ. Asst. 2 Librarian 1 Circ. Asst. 2 Library Page Library Page Circ. Asst. 2

Resignation Date 7/6/2018 7/6/2018 7/6/2018 7/20/2018 7/20/2018 7/25/2018 7/27/2018 8/10/2018 8/15/2018 8/18/2018 8/21/2018 8/24/2018

Location Maintenance (retire) Circulation-Main Security Hadley Park Bordeaux (retire) Goodlettsville Bellevue Edmondson Pk Edmondson Pk Donelson TOTAL Richland Park

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Personnel Summary – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library NPL Vacancies as of 8/31/2018 = Approved to fill by OMB = Requesting permission to fill from OMB = Vacancies that have not yet been requested to fill

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Division / Branch OP & MAIN-MN OP & MAIN-MN BORDX GRN HILLS HADLEY HERM RICH PK BELLEVUE ED PIKE GOOD GRN HILLS RICH PK TECH SVCS DONELS ED PIKE ED PIKE GOOD SE BORDX OLD HICK REF SE OLD HICK BORDX SE DONELS GRN HILLS HADLEY INGLE MADISON REF REF THOMP BORDX HR IMP PUBLIC REL PUBLIC REL REF SECURITY

Title BLDG MAINT MECH - Main BLDG MAINT SUPT - Main CIRCULATION ASST 1 CIRCULATION ASST 1 CIRCULATION ASST 1 CIRCULATION ASST 1 CIRCULATION ASST 1 CIRCULATION ASST 2 CIRCULATION ASST 2 CIRCULATION ASST 2 CIRCULATION ASST 2 CIRCULATION ASST 2 INFO SYSTEMS APP TECH 1 LIBRARIAN 1 LIBRARIAN 1 LIBRARIAN 1 LIBRARIAN 1 LIBRARIAN 1 LIBRARIAN 2 LIBRARY ASSOC 1 LIBRARY ASSOC 1 LIBRARY ASSOC 1 LIBRARY MGR 1 LIBRARY MGR 3 LIBRARY MGR 3 LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE LIBRARY PAGE - to BX PROGRAM SPEC 2 PUBLIC INFO REP PUBLIC INFO REP LIBRARY ASSOC 1 SECURITY GUARD

Grade TG08 TS13 ST04 ST04 ST04 ST04 ST04 ST05 ST05 ST05 ST05 ST05 OR01 ST09 ST09 ST09 ST09 ST09 ST10 ST06 ST06 ST06 OR05 OR07 OR07 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST02 ST08 ST10 ST10 ST06 ST06

Name FPS FTE VACANT (K CALLIS) F 1.00 VACANT (B PRUITT) - upgrd F 1.00 VACANT (S JONES) - moved pos to BX from HP F 1.00 VACANT (J MCFARLAND JR) F 1.00 VACANT (T NESMITH) F 1.00 VACANT (V LUCAS) F 1.00 VACANT (S WILLIAMS) F 1.00 VACANT (E TERFINKO) F 1.00 VACANT (A MUHSIN) P 0.49 VACANT (S WALLACE) F 1.00 VACANT (M TERFINKO) F 1.00 VACANT (HAMILTON, SABRINA) F 1.00 VACANT (D SLOAN) F 1.00 VACANT (K SHAW) F 1.00 VACANT (A BURKHEAD) F 1.00 VACANT (J QUEEN) F 1.00 VACANT (RIECKHOFF, JAMIE - 7/20) F 1.00 VACANT (R DOOM) F 1.00 VACANT (E COLTER) F 1.00 VACANT (C JACKSON) F 1.00 VACANT (D LARSON) P 0.50 VACANT (E LOVELL) F 1.00 VACANT (L EMERSON) F 1.00 VACANT (F ADEBOLA-WILSON) F 1.00 VACANT (S RODRIGUEZ) F 1.00 VACANT (JOHNSON, KELSEY H) P 0.49 VACANT (C SONGER) P 0.49 VACANT (T NESMITH) P 0.49 VACANT (R O'DENEAL) P 0.49 VANCANT (C MARTIN) P 0.49 VACANT (D RHODES) P 0.49 VACANT (T DILL) P 0.49 VACANT (G MASOOD) P 0.49 VACANT(Q BAKER) P 0.49 VACANT (K HEAD) F 1.00 VACANT (C CONKLIN) - pos dwngrded to Prog. FSpec 2 1.00 VACANT (K KIRKPATRICK) - pos upgrd F 1.00 VACANT (T WATERS II) F 1.00 VACANT (S PRYOR) F 1.00

Date Vacant 6/29/2018 7/6/2018 10/16/2017 4/9/2018 7/10/2018 3/29/2018 6/7/2018 7/27/2018 8/15/2018 5/3/2018 5/18/2018 8/24/2018 2/28/2018 3/26/2018 1/15/2018 8/10/2018 7/20/2018 1/15/2018 7/22/2018 8/1/2017 6/22/2018 5/19/2018 6/22/2018 9/8/2017 6/29/2018 8/19/2018 5/7/2018 11/20/2017 5/12/2017 5/7/2018 7/6/2018 4/13/2018 3/24/2018 6/28/2018 3/12/2018 2/2/2018 2/27/2018 1/19/2018 7/6/2018

NOTE: Metro has instituted a hard hiring freeze as of 1/31/2018. Any position that may become vacant after that date will have to go through the hiring freeze process and will be considered on a case by case basis and if urgency and critical to department operations. We have been notified this hard hiring freeze will continue into FY19.

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Brief Area Updates – September 18, 2018 Nashville Public Library ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES REPORT Safety/Security: July 2018  

  

1 after hours events covered by security this month. Safety and Security Manager Mark Crowder conducted 7 annual Safety and Security training classes for staff at Main and branches. 14 classes are scheduled for August. These classes cover OSHA required topics such as fire extinguisher use, right to know law (chemicals that employees may come in contact with) blood borne pathogens, active shooter and open discussion about employee concerns or questions. Animal Pro returned on July 31 and August 2 to spray the courtyard for birds again. They have 2 more sprayings scheduled for the week of August 6. Listed below are the total number of incident reports for the month of July and the amount for each category. Most incidents remained about the same and suspensions remained about the same as in June.

Total 40 down from 45 in June, including: Ambulance Alarm Theft Arrest

2 3 1 1

Injury/Accident Mental Issue Illness

1 1 1

Number of suspensions by conduct violation numbers: #1 — 0 #3 —1 #5 — 3 #6 — 1 #8— 8 #11 —2 #12 — 0 #14 — 0

#15 — 5 #16 — 4 #17 — 18 #18 — 2 #19 — 12 #20 — 2 #21 – 1 #22 – 2 #23 – 1

Suspensions for June: # of patrons 0 0 0 8 1 7 0

# of days suspended 1 5 7 30 60 90 180 23 | P a g e


19 Safety/Security: August 2018  

365

2 after hours events covered by security this month. Safety and Security Manager Mark Crowder conducted 16 annual Safety and Security training classes for staff at Main and branches. This class goes cover OSHA required topics such as fire extinguisher use, right to know law (chemicals that employees may come in contact with) blood borne pathogens, active shooter and open discussion about employee concerns or questions. Mark Crowder also conducted one safety class for all of the teen librarians from all locations to discuss their needs and responsibility in handling teen situations.

Total 51 up from 40 in July, including: Ambulance Alarm Theft Arrest

5 3 4 3

Injury/Accident 1 Suspicious Activity 1 Vehicle Damage 1 (Patron Clifford Douglas rear window on his vehicle was broken when our grounds crew hit a rock with their mower.) Number of suspensions by conduct violation numbers: #1 — 0 #3 —1 #5 — 9 #6 — 1 #8 — 9 #11 — 0 #12 — 1 #14 — 0

#15 — 4 #16 — 1 #17 — 18 #18 — 0 #19 — 10 #20 — 4 #21 – 1 #22 – 0 #23 – 0

Suspensions for June: # of patrons 0 0 1 9 1 10 1 17

# of days suspended 1 5 7 30 60 90 120 365

Delivery: July 2018 Main: 24 | P a g e


   

NPL received 665 incoming UPS packages and sent 66 packages out UPS GROUND. There were 62 overnight packages received from FedEx, DHL, etc. NPL received 102 inserts of mail from the United States Post Office and we sent 76 inserts of mail to Metro Mail for postage. There were 26 special deliveries from Ikon, Supply Room, Advance Supply, Firefly, etc.

Branches: For the month of July Delivery moved 5,807 hold bins (185,824 items), 6,053 non-hold bins (193,696 items), 546 A/V bins (17,472 items) and 1,291 Circulation bins (41,312 items). This gives Delivery a grand total of 13,697 bins moved, a total item count of 438,304 with an average of 623 bins and 19,922 items moved per day. NPL sent 120 boxes to Pratt for recycling. NPL sent 8 skids of books to BWB Daily completion Percentages: Holds 21 of 21 days for 100% Facilities Maintenance: July 2018 Work Orders: • 206 Opened during the month • 136 completed • 70 Active 67% completion rate Completed:  Replaced sign at Thompson Lane and Edgehill.  Pressure washed Richland Park.  Erosion blanket was put out at Goodlettsville. A rock was added to rain garden at Goodlettsville to control concentrated flow issue.  Donelson volunteers helped with landscape.  Old Hickory’s flower bed was weeded.  Replaced flexible coupling in the boiler pump.  Did scheduled maintenance with branch air handlers at Pruitt, Inglewood, Donelson, Hermitage, Green Hills, and Edmondson Pike.

Facilities Maintenance: August 2018 Projects: Edgehill had a broken tree branch trimmed and haul off. Repairs and evening maintenance on equipment was performed. Clean EHP ac units. Replaced fan in AC unit at Lakewood. Replaced water heater at Donelson. Replaced water spigot and repair leaking unions. Goodlettsville’s irrigation line was repaired. Green Hills had a water valve for the fountain replaced. Pads were added for the Lakewood dumpster. Goodlettsville also had an AC unit 25 | P a g e


installed in custodial room. Donelson, Edgehill, Edmonson Pike, Richland Park, Hadley Park, and East had their windows cleaned. Carpets were cleaned at Green Hills, Old Hickory, Edgehill, and Thompson Lane. We had deep tile cleaning completed at Bordeaux, Hermitage, Green Hills, and Edmondson Pike. Bordeaux, Green Hills, Hermitage, and Edmondson Pike had early voting take place. TAMIS: 426 work orders submitted for August.  337 completed  89 remain active. 80% Completion Rate. BRANCH SERVICES REPORT Demographic Research Internship Elizabeth Yarbrough, a Geology major at Western Washington University, was the Demographic Research Intern for Branch Services this summer. Her data analysis and communication skills were a perfect fit for this internship. Under the supervision of Joanna Roberts, Ms. Yarbrough compiled census data, created a statistical dashboard of FY2017-2018 library data, and graphed branch meeting room usage. Her main project was to create an infographic for each branch library. These infographics convey library usage statistics such as new card registrations, program attendance, terminal activity, meeting room usage, and PC usage. Her work will be a major asset to the development of the next revision to the Facilities Master Plan. Branch Library Voting Locations This year seems to be a constant cycle of elections in the regional branches. We finished the latest round of Vice Mayoral runoff election. Bellevue and Green Hills were the busiest locations with slightly over 36% of all early votes cast. Total early vote counts for all location was only 15,515. For 2018, branches have lost access to their primary meeting rooms for more than 60 service days. This has had a huge impact on branch programming, resulting in fewer programs and lower attendance. On the other hand, it has increased traffic into our branches and has allowed staff to introduce many voters to services about which they were unaware.

COLLECTIONS AND TECHNOLOGY SERVICES REPORT Collections & Technology Services  As a member of the PLA Leadership Development Committee created and submitted a proposal for ALA Annual 2019 titled “Leading beyond the buzzwords: Authentic

26 | P a g e


     

Leadership and why it matters”. Chaired monthly LLAMA LOM PAM committee meetings. Worked with staff to restructure the Patron Purchase Requests using PIKA. Worked with staff on the implementation of Auto Renewals. Attended meetings involving MNPS, Limitless Libraries and NPL to discuss various issues including the data received from Infinite Campus (IC), the new patron loader and student library cards. Toured Ingram facilities and met with Ingram staff. Held biweekly group meetings with staff to discuss ongoing projects. Held biweekly meetings with individual staff to discuss ongoing projects.

Web Services  Conducted Bedework Training for 8 staff. Generated assignments, set up new accounts, graded homework, added to the live submitter list. Announced Winter 2018 additions.  Added additional site links to Book Clubs web page to increase visibility.  Launched new podcast, “Just Listen”, created feeds to RSS, Apple Podcasts and Stitcher. Added our new changes into codebase.  Generated the Back-of-Book event listings for Fall Unbound issue from Bedework events calendar.  Created new Genealogy page based on our database cards layout.  Training: Completed PHP Basics training course on treehouse. Completed several JavaScript modules on freecodecamp.  Tested Bedework 3.12 upgrade on our test server. Ready to update from current version at end of September.  Troubleshooting database access for public library staff and Limitless Libraries.  Sat for Acquia Certified Drupal Site Builder Exam.  Drafted documentation for our LastPass Enterprise installation.  Worked on moving EZProxy production and live servers to SSL.  Drupal Training.  Set up Google Tag Manager account for NPL.  Created a draft Podcast Guide. The guide covers how to start a new podcast series and how to add new podcast episodes to the website.  Created a custom site in READsquared for the Read to Rise program.  Created QA testing on the Nashville Helps site and worked with staff to define user roles for developer. We outlined specific permissions for three user roles: admin, agency rep and client.  NPL Site: Updated Suggest a Purchase info on website.  Salon updates: Create graphics for Salon listings. Published Salon listings to Bedework and Salon website.  NPL Site: Created new web graphics for Book Clubs page and related icons.  Adult Literacy: Updated Adult Literacy content. Created new Adult Educator of the Year page.  Bedework: Reviewed and approved events in Bedework Calendar approval queue every two weeks.

27 | P a g e


 

Limitless Libraries: Added Publish Content Drupal module to the Limitless Libraries site. Module allowed me to set more granular permissions so non-admin staff could add / edit / schedule content for publication. Met with staff to discuss updates to the Be Well page. We have a few outstanding items, but we implemented several requests immediately. We updated the page with new photos, updated the intro text, and swapped out sponsors. We still need to add a block with recommended databases and move the blog swim up on the page. We're working on how to lay out the new content on the page (in Photoshop) before making the changes in code. Met with staff about updates to the Talking Library page, adding a streaming widget, and adding an online application. Content changes will happen in the early fall. We will investigate what is necessary for an online application before committing to the project or a timeline. Creating a page for Mobile Printing and updating relevant sections of the NPL website (locations page, amenities list).

Shared Systems  Auto renewals service was successfully launched.  Patron “Suggest-a-Purchase” change of platform, improved service.  Worked with Limitless Libraries on their back-to-school contests (most circulation by individual at a school and as a percentage of the circulation from the school as a whole).  Beginning to test the Carl.X upgrade software (version 9.6) which will have many improvements for NPL and MNPS staff.  Working with Infinite Campus to improve the student and staff patron extract NPL receives from schools.  Devised a plan to remove students who are no longer with MNPS from the system using new patron loader/updater program (coded in-house).  Set up a new library branch (Independence Academy).  Set up a new library branch (MNPS Virtual School).  Updated MNPS/Limitless cataloging specifications.  Worked with TLC to allow easier back and forth between KidsPAC and the shared catalog. Elementary schools Pre-K through 2nd graders use KidsPAC and do not get Limitless Libraries delivery, while 3rd and 4th graders use the regular catalog and receive Limitless Library deliveries. Links were added between both catalogs.  Held weekly code jam sessions to develop solutions for PIKA and Carl.X issues. Materials Management/Collection Development  Materials Management staff completed the selection, cataloging and roll-out of the new Vox Talking Book Collection at 10 library locations.  Noel Rutherford arranged and completed an Ingram facilities tour followed by a meeting with Ingram staff. Limitless Libraries staff also participated in the tour.  Noel Rutherford arranged circulation/front desk training for Eman Azer and Jessica Martin. They will be assisting Green Hills (Jessica) and Southeast (Eman) one day a week.  Noel Rutherford spoke with Edmonton Public Library regarding collection assessment and floating analysis at their request. 28 | P a g e


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Collection Development Selectors begin using PIKA for Patron Material Requests. There has been a monthly increase in the number of patron requests from approximately 315 to well over 1000. Noel Rutherford is coordinating the visit by Spartanburg Public Library, set for Sept 26th & 27th. Their visit will focus on Collection HQ and Limitless Libraries. Materials Management is working on FY19 Periodical renewal. Revising several materials management forms dealing with missing or damaged pieces. Creation of a small ODC for Madison Branch Library. FY19 Materials Budget Report (waiting on roll-forward amount from Finance).

Technology  Mobile Print has been installed at 8 locations (Main and 7 library branches). The app will officially launch on September 20th.  Technology staff are currently evaluating a Mobile Device Management solution for NPL owned mobile devices including iPads used for Carl.X, training and outreach. This allows Technology to more efficiently manage, maintain and inventory these devices.  Technology staff are working with Metro ITS on NPL’s migration to Windows 10. This will involve more than 1,000 computers. This includes testing apps, security policies, data migration, etc.  Technology staff are currently scheduling 15 server replacements for end of life servers currently installed at various branch locations.  New Patron Incident Report has been developed and is currently being tested by NPL Security staff and modified as needed.

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATION REPORT Outputs/Outcomes

Studio

NPL Monthly Board Highlights Wishing Limitless NAZA Chair Digital Inclusion

BBTL

Be Well

Adult Literacy

Production Serv Total

TOTAL # OF PROGRAMS

87

39

4

15

238

39

19

422

TOTAL # IN ATTENDANCE

663

754

406

125

3418

476

NA

5842

11 8 3

33 2 31

17

23 5 18

23 3 NA

67 32 57

TOTAL # OF PARTNERS SERVED Branches Other Partners

Stephanie and Elyse met with Dr. Felder, et al to provide LL update; also met with Mary Laurens Minich regarding Charter Schools

NEW OR ENHANCED PARTNERSHIP HIGHLIGHTS

New service provided

Discontinued or completed services

5

Partnering with MNPS STEM teacher at Oliver Training for Junior League Middle Membership Woodland Hills outreach put on hold as facility transfers to private ownership

Working with Memphis Public Library Prod. Services Dept. exploring future collaboration opportunities Now able to record phone interviews at broadcast quality

Just kicked off New Senior Tech Academy at Edgefield Manor (MDHA) Completed series of leadership book clubs for agencies

TRAINING / PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT / CONFERENCES

Training provided Trained 10 MNPS Provided 12 trainings to teachers on 3D printing 10 partners

Training received Other presentations or participation relating to conferences

MNPS School Librarian PD Day; 2 Parent Nights at Moss Elementary; 1 teacheer training at Ida B. Wells

consumer health information overview training for attendees of adult services meeting

Stephanie and Emily were interviewed by Library Journal for a "Limitless Libraries 2.0" article.

$140,000 awarded to Be Well by NIH/NLM All of Us program, ending April 2020. MLA blog quoted Elizabeth and her experience at their conference and NPL health literacy goals

Liz trained as co-chiar of Blueprint for Early Childhood Success working group

AWARDS / SPECIAL ACCLAIM/PUBLICITY

Press received, articles published

BBTL's work with GROW mentioned in Journal of the American Medical Association

Book club for Martha O Bryan Center and YWCA; IAC meeting on Be Well resources CNM mentoring workshop; Design thinking Caffy Hour; FSG webinar on building leadership capacity in CI; Alignment workshop on journey mapping to better understand user experience

2 new techs trained to record and edit recordings in the new production studio

MAIN REPORT 

The Library Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program celebrated its 40th anniversary on August 16th! We will be hosting a celebration reception at Main on September 28th during the International Week of the Deaf. The Talking Library Listener conducted its annual survey. Here are a few highlights: o 567 surveys were mailed to listeners. 114 were returned completed (20%) o 52% of the listeners now have internet access (10% increase over last year) o 92% of the respondents use the Bi-Monthly Program Guide; 4 people would like the guide available in Braille. o 72% of the respondents report having “Good” radio reception; 22% “Great/Clear” reception.

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 

August 7th marked the start of the 2018/19 school year. The Teen Center has once again become a popular after-school destination for students from all over the city. With the start of the school year the Teen Center is now serving meals from 3-4PM. The meals are provided at no charge to the library or to the students thanks to a partnership with New Beginnings International Church. G.T.I. (Woodland Hills) is transitioning from a state run facility to a private operation. Library involvement with G.T.I. is on hold during the transition. We hope to continue working with the students there in the future. Several staff members from Main hosted an amazing successful booth at Hypericon this summer. At the convention, NPL held a Star Trek trivia game as well as an air guitar contest. The Public Technology department has purchased a new Virtual Reality system that they will soon start using in library programs. The Children’s Department hosted a Peach Boy party this summer during the showings of Wishing Chair’s Momotaro. Members from the Japanese and Japanese-American community volunteered their time and services to help us celebrate and learn more about Japanese culture. A new mural adorns the wall of the parking garage outside the library. The grant-funded project was completed by a local artist working with young adults. They created a Nashville community quilt on the wall.

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS REPORT Results from two Marketing & Communications (MarComm) summer campaigns: No. 1: Wrapping Up NPL’s Library of the Year celebration campaign Web Marketing  1,975 views of Library of the Year-related web pages

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Social Media Marketing and Advertising*  195,555 FB users reached with 61,212 engagements  1,055 NEW TW followers  1,263 NEW IG followers  40,202 IG engagements  Of the thousands of people who saw our paid Library of the Year ads, 552 clicked to visit our get-a-card page Email Marketing  (4) emails throughout campaign o Received by 96,000-plus subscribers each time o Average open rate = 15,668 o Total number of embedded link clicks = 1,124 Events Marketing  MarComm hosted “Reading for a Reason,” a community reading marathon at the Main Library that ran for 12 hours straight o ~100 participants - including Library Board member Katy Varney and Library Foundation board member David Fox  MarComm hosted a celebration for NPL employees and supporters when Mayor Megan Barry declared “NPL Day” o ~300 participants No. 2: Summer Challenge “Reading Rockstars” campaign Web Marketing  158,567 views on NPL’s homepage  1,044,865 page views of the Summer Challenge site built/maintained by NPL’s Web Services team o 19,265 users conducted 48,773 sessions  1,572 of these sessions came from social media referrals Social Media Marketing and Advertising*  28,613 FB users reached  61,897 TW impressions  47,600 IG users reached (plus more reached with IG stories)  Of the thousands of people who saw our paid Summer Challenge ads, 415 clicked to visit our get-a-card page or the Summer Challenge website Email Marketing  5 targeted-audience emails to 14,007 people o 12,888 opens o 1,492 embedded link clicks  3 articles in NPL’s newsletter o Received by 171,300+ subscribers each time 32 | P a g e


o Average open rate = 29,628 o 3,446 embedded link clicks Events Marketing J.T. Moore Middle School achieved the highest participation in this year’s Summer Challenge among all Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS). Mayor David Briley will soon visit J.T. Moore to choose a Student Mayor for a Day to honor the school’s achievement. *Social media numbers include content from NPL’s main FB, TW, and IG profiles only; they do not reflect larger reach/engagements that resulted from content posted to/shared by branch library FB profiles or supporting/partner organizations’ profiles.

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September 2018 NPL Board Packet  
September 2018 NPL Board Packet  
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