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P H O T O S : G R E A T D A Y I N N A S H V I L L E • R E V I E W : N O R B E R T P U T N A M “ V O L .1 M U S I C L E S S O N S ” • G A L L E R Y : L I F E M E M B E R P A R T Y

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF AFM LOCAL 257 APRIL – JUNE 2018

John Prine WORKING MAN’S MUSE

APR – JUN 2018 1


2 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


CONTENTS Official Journal of the Nashville Musicians Association, AFM Local 257 | APRIL — JUNE 2018

4 6

7 8 10 12 16

ANNOUNCEMENTS Details on the next membership meeting to be held Tuesday, May 15, meeting minutes, and more. STATE OF THE LOCAL President Dave Pomeroy discusses the latest news, including finances, work dues, Nashville Symphony negotiations, and new benefits for AFM 257 members. NEW GROOVES Secretary-Treasurer Vince Santoro fills in membership on details regarding the improved stability of the Local 257 Funeral Benefit Fund.

12

LIFE MEMBER PARTY 2018

HEARD ON THE GRAPEVINE An amazing day in which decades of session players came together to celebrate Harold Bradley’s birthday at the Musicians Hall of Fame. NEWS An unexpected development on the Local 257 election, and a “Jam-aversary.” GALLERY We recognize member milestones as well as other events and honors. COVER STORY: JOHN PRINE Warren Denney talks to the iconic artist about his writing process and his first record in 13 years, Tree of Forgiveness.

22 REVIEWS Legendary producer and bassist Norbert

Putnam has written a fascinating book on the music business, and we hope it really is just “Vol. 1” as he says — because it definitely left us wanting more.

16

28 SYMPHONY NOTES Laura Ross looks back on the

1988 symphony shutdown in the second of two columns on the historic event.

JOHN PRINE

29 JAZZ & BLUES A roundup of shows and other happenings in the jazz and blues community.

30 FINAL NOTES We bid farewell to John Ray “Curly”

Seckler, Mike Leech, Stu Basore, Dave Hall, Mike “Cookie” Jones, George McCormick, Jack Calhoun, and Mac Byrd.

33 MEMBER STATUS 34 DO NOT WORK FOR LIST COVER PHOTO: DANNY CLINCH

22

REVIEW: NORBERT PUTNAM APR – JUN 2018 3


ANNOUNCEMENTS

OFFICIAL QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE NASHVILLE MUSICIANS ASSOCIATION AFM LOCAL 257

PUBLISHER EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR ASSISTANT EDITOR CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

ART DIRECTION WEB ADMINISTRATOR AD SALES

LOCAL 257 OFFICERS PRESIDENT SECRETARY-TREASURER EXECUTIVE BOARD

HEARING BOARD

TRUSTEES

Dave Pomeroy Vince Santoro Kathy Osborne Leslie Barr Austin Bealmear Warren Denney Roy Montana Kathy Osborne Dave Pomeroy Vince Santoro Steve Tveit Laura Ross Rick Diamond Mickey Dobo Tripp Dockerson Lisa Dunn Donn Jones Dave Pomeroy Laura Ross Vince Santoro Lisa Dunn Design Kathy Osborne Leslie Barr 615-244-9514

Dave Pomeroy Vince Santoro Jimmy Capps Jonathan Yudkin Laura Ross Tom Wild Mark Johnson Beth Gottlieb Andre Reiss Michele Voan Capps Tiger Fitzhugh Teresa Hargrove Kent Goodson Dave Moody Kathy Shepard John Terrence Bruce Radek Biff Watson

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS

Steve Tveit

NASHVILLE SYMPHONY STEWARD

Laura Ross

OFFICE MANAGER ELECTRONIC MEDIA SERVICES DIRECTOR ASSISTANT DATA ENTRY RECORDING DEPT. ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, LIVE/TOURING DEPT. AND PENSION ADMINISTRATOR MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR/RECEPTION MPTF COORDINATOR/RECEPTION

Anita Winstead Steve Tveit Teri Barnett Christina Mitchell Paige Conners Leslie Barr Laura Birdwell Sarah Bertolino

@ 2018 Nashville Musicians Association P.O. Box 120399, Nashville TN 37212 All rights reserved. nashvillemusicians.org

4 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

NEXT GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING TUESDAY, MAY 15 The next Local 257 General Membership meeting will be Tuesday, May 15. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. and the meeting will start promptly at 2 p.m. There are no bylaw amendments on the agenda, but there will be president and secretary-treasurer reports, and discussion of other important issues. Please make plans to attend and take part in the business of your union.

Nashville Musicians Association AFM Local 257, AFL-CIO Minutes of the Executive Board Meeting Dec. 14, 2017 PRESENT: Vince Santoro(VS), Dave Pomeroy(DP), Tom Wild(TW), Laura Ross(LR), Jimmy

Capps(JC), Jonathan Yudkin(JY), Chuck Bradley(CB). ABSENT: Beth Gottlieb(BG), Mark Johnson(MJ), Andre Reiss(AR).

President Pomeroy called the meeting to order at 8:47 a.m. MINUTES: Minutes from Oct. 26, 2017 were distributed.

MSC to approve as amended. CB, LR. PRESIDENT’S REPORT: The following issues were discussed:

1. Opryland Hotel has no live players under AFM contract at Christmas. 2. General Jackson’s contractor refuses to pay payroll taxes. 3 Streaming agreements are to be discussed and approved with IEB. 4 Charging a rehearsal hall maintenance fee will be discussed at next membership meeting. TREASURER’S REPORT: Santoro distributed financial reports and fund balances. He

reported the following: 1. Don Kennedy installed a skylight replacing the old model that had reached and surpassed its life expectancy. 2. We are currently midway through the install of HVAC in the rehearsal hall. The new system should be operational Dec. 18. MSC to approve Sec-Treasurer report. JY, TW. MSC to approve salaries for 2018. JY, CB. MSC to accept new member applications. JC, LR. MSC to approve $500 support of Grammy Awards advertisement. DP, JY. Motion to adjourn. TW, LR. Meeting adjourned at 9:50 a.m.

DO WE HAVE YOUR CURRENT

EMAIL ADDRESS?

Local 257 sends important advisories to members by email, including updates on our annual NAMM pass giveaway, and invitations to Local 257 events. Don't be left out of the loop! Notify the front desk of any changes to your contact information, including phone number, address and beneficiary. Call 615-244-9514 to make sure we have your correct information, or email kathyo@afm257.org


ANNOUNCEMENTS

IF

you performed as a guest musician on the Nashville Network’s Music City Tonight, hosted by Crook and Chase, recorded between October 1993 and October 1995, we may have some money for you. We reached an out of court settlement with Jim Owens Entertainment (JOE) for the unauthorized airing of Music City Tonight episodes on the Luken TV network. Of the 500+ shows that were recorded for TNN, 359 of the episodes were aired on Luken, some multiple times during the time period covered by the lawsuit, which was U S IC M 11/2/12 to 2/20/2017. •

NA

S H V IL L E N E T

WO

The house band (and subs) are being compensated on a pro-rated basis for the shows on which they played. If you were a guest musician, please contact us with information as to who you played with on Music City Tonight and approximately when, and we will look into the database to see if we can find you. “We are not talking about a lot of money here, but it is the principle that matters, which is why we spent more than four years and a considerable amount of money and resources getting Owens to take responsibility for his actions. This notice will expire in 60 days, so please contact us as soon as possible,” Local 257 President Dave Pomeroy said. If you played on one or more of these shows and have not yet informed the recording department at Local 257, please send an email to steve@afm257.org with all pertinent details. 

Monday, May 28, 2018 Memorial Day

Wednesday, July 4, 2018 Independence Day

SAVE A TREE! CI T Y T O

NI G

H T

RK

HOLIDAY CLOSINGS

Sign up for the electronic version of the Nashville Musician by sending an email to kathyo@afm257.org

Don't forget to like us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Search for Nashville Musicians Association

RECORDING AT HOME? Check out the new "How to use the AFM Single Song Overdub Scale” instructional video on the Nashville Musicians Association YouTube channel!

TNM

APR – JUN 2018 5


STATE OF THE LOCAL

BY DAVE POMEROY

“Together, we have power for positive change that is much stronger than we have as individuals.”

T

he past few months have been very interesting to say the least. The executive board election fiasco came out of the blue in early March, when members began calling to let us know their ballots, postmarked in December, were being returned as “undeliverable.” We immediately contacted the post office and began the investigation and resolution process. It quickly became obvious that the Acklen Post Office had inadvertently kept about 40 percent of the ballots received before the deadline, and the election committee took action to invalidate the December election. The U.S. Postal Service is paying all the bills for the new re-election. By the time you read this, we will have elected and installed a “new” executive board. Thanks to the Local 257 Election Committee and everyone who remained calm during this unprecedented situation.

Moving forward

We have made a lot of progress in many areas, and our 2017 year-end numbers reflect that as well. As Vince details in his column, the changes that we made to the Funeral Benefit Fund are turning that decadeslong cash drain issue into something that is now sustainable in the long term. Long ago, it was started with each member contributing a dollar when a fellow member passed, and it is still the most generous funeral benefit in the entire AFM. Hats off to Vince for his hard work on this and every aspect of our bottom line, including the long-needed new skylight and state of the art HVAC system in our rehearsal hall, which will finally solve our chronic moisture issues in that space.

Shared responsibility

As Vince also mentions, a small percentage of members not paying their work dues in a timely fashion has become the difference between losing money or breaking even at the end of the year. The vast majority of our members pay as they go, in other words, when they pick up a check or get it in the mail, they pay their work dues in full. We never charge you work dues until you get paid. What we charge varies from 3 to 4.4 percent, depending on the type of contract. In my nearly 10 years as president, we have only convened the hearing board a few times, but that may have to change. Going forward, we will be bringing those people who owe large amounts of overdue work dues up on charges with the hearing board. This is not my preference, but it is important that ALL members keep up their end of the responsibility equation. Everyone here in the office is committed to getting you paid, and your work dues are what keep the lights on and allow us to pursue anything you make us aware of. If something is lingering too long at any stage of the process, asking about it is more than OK. If we don’t know about a particular problem, it’s a lot harder to solve it. 6 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

Studio tracks onstage

The new “payment for use of studio tracks onstage” clause in the SRLA contract that we negotiate with the major labels is bringing in significant new money. We developed and brought this concept to our last negotiations. The labels agreed to a reasonable price for use of tracks on a per show basis, with a discount for paying in advance. In the vast majority of these cases, management, not the label, pay these bills, but if there is an issue, it ultimately goes to the label. The new contract took effect in July. However, since then, we have had a couple of situations where players are being put in an awkward position with producers or artists who don’t understand the rules have changed. Now, regardless of who plays on the record, if the tracks are used onstage, they need to be paid for their intellectual property. This is a very affordable and fair solution to a longstanding problem. If your tracks are being used in this way, come talk to us and we will help you get what you deserve without throwing you under the bus.

Nashville Symphony negotiations

I recently attended one of the Nashville Symphony’s “Violins of Hope” concerts, featuring members of the NSO playing instruments that had been played in — and rescued from — the concentration camps of World War II. It was an incredibly uplifting experience, and the NSO rose to the occasion beautifully. The world premiere of Jonathan Leshnoff’s Symphony No. 4, “Hechalos,” which was written for these instruments, was recorded for an upcoming release on Naxos. The NSO has never sounded better, and as we begin our negotiations for a new contract, we will be doing all we can to get to the best possible financial package. There is still a significant gap between the world-class reputation of the Nashville Symphony’s musicians and their pay, relative to similar orchestras. The NSO’s financial problems from the stock market crash of 2008 hit everyone hard, and the musicians took a collective hit in the spirit of shared sacrifice. The ship has now been righted, and it is time for the musicians who hung in there through the tough times to be rewarded for their patience, perseverance, and fine musicianship.

Member benefits

We recognize that membership is a value equation and we want you to be able to take advantage of as many money-saving benefits as possible. Check our website for the long list of discounts we have with a variety of different companies. Our new AFM 257 exclusive health care plan has been a boon to many of our members and has brought in many new members. The nationwide network aspect of this Blue Cross Blue Shield plan makes it especially good for traveling musicians. In addition to our Premier Parking discount at McKendree Garage for downtown musicians, by the time you read this we will have announced a new AFM 257 member discount with Lyft, which has offered $10,000 over three months in discounts for musicians who work downtown in this new experimental program. This is all part of our quest to promote respect for musicians. There is only one Music City, and only one organization looking out for professional musicians. We are here at a unique time in Nashville, where we can show the world that you don’t have to rip off musicians to make a living in the music industry. Together, we have power for positive change that is much stronger than we have as individuals. TNM


NEW GROOVES

L

ocal 257 has been in existence since 1902 and we’ve survived and flourished this long by being able to roll with the changes. Changes in the market, changes in our membership numbers, ch-ch-ch-ch, changes Since I’ve been here as secretary-treasurer things have been no different. Our membership made a huge change in the Funeral Benefit Fund (FBF) that was painful to members all across the age spectrum. But it takes guts to accept when change must occur, and I applaud you all for voicing your thoughts and helping reach a fair resolution. Between 2015 and 2017 the local reformed the fund, its structure, and tiers of member vestment. The turnout for the Aug. 22, 2016 membership meeting for proposal of the changes was great, but I do still hear from some members who may or may not know what happened, is happening, right on through to what WILL happen with the fund. Following is a table showing the new tiers. Members who joined before July 1, 2015 have their benefit calculated following these tiers:

Years 0-4 ...............$500.00 5-9 ............. $1000.00 10-14 .......... $1500.00 15-19 ..........$2500.00 20-49 .........$4000.00 50 –up........$5000.00 Members who joined after July 1, 2015 use these tiers: Years 0-4.........Vesting period 5-9................ $500.00 10-14............$1000.00 15-19 ...........$1500.00 20-up.......... $2000.00 I think now would be a good time to take a snapshot of where we stand, how the fund is doing and answer some questions that may be of interest. Question: Is the fund trending toward our stated goal of being self-sufficient? Answer: Yes. It is healthier because our outlay in a given year is completely covered by the FBF assessment. You might say, “Shouldn’t that have always been the case?” Well, yeah, but remember all the changes I said the local had seen over the years? We used to have some 4000 members and that has gone down over time. Some really good news on that front is that since we began our membership drive in December 2017, we’ve added more than 120 new members. Welcome to the AFM Local 257 fold, folks! By the way, each and every one of those new members is like a Vitamin B-12 shot for the Funeral Benefit Fund.

BY VINCE SANTORO

“It takes guts to accept when change must occur, and I applaud you all for voicing your thoughts and helping reach a fair resolution.” Question: Is the fund assessment portion of our annual dues going to keep going up? Answer: No, unless we have an extraordinary number of member deaths in a year. Our average number is around 28. To give you some perspective: In 2015 we paid out $256,000 to 32 beneficiaries. In 2016, as the changes we made in 2015 began to take effect, we paid 21 beneficiaries $156,000. In 2017, the outlay was $127,000 for 27 beneficiaries. At this rate, we can expect a levelling off of the assessment part of the annual dues. If 2018 sees less than 30 members pass away we should actually be able to cut annual dues and still offer new members a funeral benefit double what any other local offers. I never thought I’d be able to say that. The wild card is — and always will be — the number of members we lose. You could say that the health of the Funeral Benefit Fund depends on the health of its membership. So, eat well, exercise, and keep those sixteenth notes coming. Now that the Funeral Benefit has been stabilized and doesn’t show up on the year-end ledger as a negative number, I should point out that the only financial elephant left in the room, aside from non-member service fees, is members’ work dues. Work dues paid by members in 2017 was $47,858 less than in 2016 and that is a serious problem. The financial spreadsheet for 2017 can be viewed on page 26. You can see for yourself how a small percentage of members not taking care of business affects our bottom line. Certainly, there are members who have real problems that may preclude their ability to stay up to date. This office is sympathetic to any member’s adverse situation but this has gotten out of hand, in my opinion. If you are one of those who has financial restraints, it doesn’t absolve you from your responsibility to make good on your duty to this organization. That’s why we ask you to set up a payment plan with us to bring your dues amounts down with the goal of zero owed. Please don’t come in here to pick up a check and pay nothing on your balance if you have one. It’s not a joke to say the local’s future depends on the personal ethics of each member. We are not the electric company. We are your peers, and when you think of it, sticking it to “the man” does not apply here. Let’s all pull our own weight and help give AFM Local 257 a fighting chance to stay relevant. TNM APR – JUN 2018 7


HEARD ON THE GRAPEVINE

A GREAT DAY IN NASHVILLE — JANUARY 2, 2018 A Great Day In Nashville: The Musicians Hall of Fame was the scene for the first in a series of photos of Nashville studio musicians, in the spirit of the famous “Great Day in Harlem” photograph of New York City jazz musicians. Jan. 2, 2018 was also Harold Bradley’s 90th birthday and a perfect time to gather together several generations of Nashville Cats for this picture. 1st row: Jerry Kennedy, Ray Edenton, Harold Bradley, Bob Moore, Pat Flynn | 2rd row: Jimmie Lee Sloas, Dan Huff, Elliot Huff, Kenny Malone, Norbert Putnam, Billy Sanford, D. Bergen White, David Briggs, Mike Brignardello, B. James Lowry, Tony Harrell | 3rd row: Glen Duncan, Gary Prim, Steve Gibson, Eddie Bayers, Dave Pomeroy | 4th row: Pat Bergeson, Sam Bush, Shane Keister, Scotty Sanders, David Hungate, Paul Leim, Steve Hinson, Matt Rollings, Duncan Mullins, Dennis Crouch, Bruce Bouton, Jim Hoke, Alison Prestwood, Chris McDonald, Kirk “Jelly Roll” Johnson, Andrea Zonn | 5th row: Gordon Kennedy, Jerry Kroon, Rob Hajacos, David Hoffner, Andre Reiss, Tony Migliore, Fred Newell, Pete Abbott, Chris Leuzinger, Greg Morrow, Denis Solee, Byron House, Aubrey Haynie, Michael Rhodes, Bobby Ogdin, Jonathan Yudkin, Bob Mater, Troy Lancaster, Jim “Moose” Brown, Jay Vern, Joe Spivey

8 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

Aubrey Haynie, Matt Rollings, Joe Spivey

(L-R) Harold Bradley, Kenny Malone, Fred Newell, Ray Edenton


HEARD ON THE GRAPEVINE

1.

4. 1. Andre Reiss and Denis Solee 2. Norbert Putnam and Steve Hinson 3. Jerry Kennedy 4. B. James Lowry, Bruce Bouton, 2.

5.

Rob Hajacos, David Hungate, Chris Leuzinger, Jim”Moose” Brown 5. Sam Bush chats with Harold Bradley 6. Andrea Zonn, Kirk “Jelly Roll” Johnson, and Pat Bergeson TNM

3. 6.

APR – JUN 2018 9


NEWS

Post office errors force new Local 257 election

B

ecause of gross delivery errors by the U.S. Postal Service, ballots were mailed out again in March, and recast by the membership, to elect the new Local 257 Executive Board. Fortunately, all other candidates including president and secretary-treasurer, plus hearing board and delegates, were unopposed and won by acclamation. The mistakes of the post office did not come to light until three months after the election was held. Monday, March 12, Local 257 began to get a number of phone calls and emails from members about ballots from the November 2017 election that had been sent in well before the deadline of Dec. 11, 2017, but were returned from the Nashville post office Acklen branch, where the official election post office box had been opened on Nov. 17, 2017.

— Dec. 11, 2017, in this case. This procedure was followed as usual, and 161 ballots were given to election officials by postal employees. The box was left open to receive late-arriving ballots, as is usually done. (These ballots cannot be counted, but they must be marked “void” and kept, along with the counted ballots, in a sealed box at the local.) Acklen postal employees produced 59 late-arriving ballots, and the election P.O. box was closed Jan. 19. At that point in time the “missing ballots” still were not in the P.O. box, so their existence was still unknown. After a box is closed, post office procedure is to return mail addressed to that box to the sender. Therefore, we concluded that sometime in the second week of March, the missing container of correctly returned ballots was discovered by a postal employee, and because the box was now closed, those ballots were returned to the sender. The one race that was run in the November election for the executive board had resulted in numbers that were very close between some of the candidates, necessitating that a new election be held. On March 13 Pomeroy filed a complaint and asked for reimbursement from the post office. Monday, April 2, we were informed that the post office would indeed pay the local $2600 in compensation for the funds spent “This has been a real ordeal, but we’re on the original election. This allowed the local to “rehappy that we were able to recoup run” the election without a monetary the expense of running the election loss. A special election box was opened again — this time at the from the post office.” airport, not the problematic Acklen At first it seemed that there were only branch — and ballots were sent out March 26. They were rea handful of returned ballots, but it soon turned to the local before Apr. 13 and counted, after this issue became clear that dozens of members of The Nashville Musician had gone to press. By the time this had been affected. The Local 257 Election magazine is published, we will have the results of the re-cast Committee was quickly informed of the ballots, and will know who will sit on the new Local 257 Execuproblem, and along with President Dave tive Board. Complete results will be printed in the third quarter Pomeroy, Secretary-Treasurer Vince Sanissue of The Nashville Musician. toro, and Local 257 staff, began to inves “This has been a real ordeal, but we’re happy that we were tigate. After several discussions with post able to recoup the expense of running the election from the office officials, it was discovered that at post office. We will revisit the mail-in ballots protocol at the least 130 ballots were mishandled by post next general membership meeting, and see if there is a desire office employees, and although they made from membership to make any sort of change in election proit from their varying points of origin to the cedures before the next election,” Pomeroy said. Acklen branch, they were never delivered into the special election post office box Local 257 had opened at that branch. Bylaws require that ballots be picked up at 4 p.m. on the day they are to be counted

10 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


NEWS THE REVAMPED LOCAL 257 MUSICIAN-SONGWRITER JAM recently passed its one-year milestone, and is going strong. Organizer John Mattick does the heavy lifting for the event, which offers players an opportunity to strengthen their chartreading skills, and songwriters the chance to hear their creations come to life. Songwriters can send Mattick tunes, which he charts and copies for the group. He also acts as

session leader, guiding the attendees through the process of working up the songs. Scott Metko, David Abdo and Lee Worden are also on hand to offer assistance. “The jam is well-planned and executed, and we appreciate John and everyone who helps out. Thanks to all the writers and players who come out and make it a fun and educational event for all,” said Dave Pomeroy, AFM Local 257 president. TNM

APR – JUN 2018 11


LIFE MEMBER party GALLERY

T his year’s life member party took place on Mardi Gras, a

happy coincidence that resulted in plenty of beads, masks, and

Mardi Gras-themed petit fours to go with the dinner and the fellowship.

JAY PATTEN, PAT MCINERNEY, and TONI SEHULSTER catch up on

the latest.

12 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


GALLERY

1.

2.

3. 1. JAY PATTEN, CHRIS LEUZINGER and MIKE SEVERS

5.

hang out in the Mardi Gras spirit. 2. BILLY LINNEMAN catches up with TERI BARNETT. 3. “Come on in My Kitchen” with BERGEN WHITE, DAVID BRIGGS, REGGIE YOUNG, DEBBIE LONDIN, BRUCE DEES, JIM HORN, STEPHANIE HORN, JENNY YOUNG, JOHNNY DUKE and BOBBI DUKE, SAM BUSH, and SEAN LONDIN. 4. SEAN LONDIN and BEN SCHULTZ converse; WALTER KING in the background. 5. JOHN WADE and another guest chat at the party. 6. JON WEAVER

4. continued on page 14

6.

APR – JUN 2018 13


GALLERY continued from page 13

1.

5. 1. AMY PARKER, V.P. for

Marketing and Development for Special Olympics Tennessee, stopped by to pick up a donated guitar signed by Kathy Mattea, Rodney Crowell, Luke Bryan, and Vince Gill. 2. DAVE COE savoring his new 6.

25-year pin. 3. Drummer HARRY WILKINSON is fired up

2.

and ready to celebrate life membership with Local 257. 4. New 25-year pin member — guitarist TONY OBROHTA. 5. Life member WALTER KING 7.

receives his pin from Dave Pomeroy. 6. Brand new life member BECKY HOBBS enjoying spring and

3.

her new pin. 7. Guitarist BEN SCHULTZ shows

off his life member pin. 8. JIMMY SANDEFUR is mighty

proud of receiving his life member pin. 8.

4. 14 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


PROGRAMS AT THE HALL SUPPORTING OUTLAWS & ARMADILLOS: COUNTRY’S ROARING ’70s EXHIBIT OPENS MAY 25 May 26: Panel: Home with the Armadillo with Jim Franklin, Mike Tolleson, Gary P. Nunn, and Eddie Wilson May 27: Musician Spotlight: Bobby Earl Smith June 2: Panel: Hillbilly Central with Marshall Chapman, Kinky Friedman, and Kyle Lehning June 16: Nashville Cats: Salute to Harmonica Player Mickey Raphael UPCOMING SIGNATURE SERIES PROGRAMS April 14: Nashville Cats: Salute to Accordion Player Joey Miskulin April 21: Songwriter Session: Don Schlitz July 1: Audio Engineering Society Lifetime Achievement Awards

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS

Downtown Nashville • #PressPlayRecord • @CountryMusicHOF CountryMusicHallofFame.org/Calendar SUPPORTED BY Family Programs are funded in part by The Bonnaroo Works Fund of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee; Epiphone; Fender; Gibson Foundation; Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission; Nashville Parent; National Endowment for the Arts; and Tennessee Arts Commission. Technology Partners: Cisco; NewTek; Personal Computer Systems, Inc.; and Promethean.

APR – JUN 2018 15


16 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN 16 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


WORKING

mans Muse BY WARREN DENNEY

The world should be thankful it has John Prine. As scenes from Shakespeare’s King Lear and The

Comedy of Errors play out in the

daily news, Prine walks around with the answers in his head, proven by his words though he would tell you he doesn’t really know why.

JOHNPRINE APR – JUN 2018 17


continued from page 17

For the record, Prine earned his first Grammy for the 1991 album The Missing Years, and a second for Fair and Square from 2005. He joined the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2003, the same year he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Americana Music Association. And, in a fit of logic and contrition, the Grammy Hall of Fame inducted his 1971 self-titled debut album, which gave listeners “Sam Stone,” “Paradise,” and “Angel from Montgomery” among its 13 gems, in 2014. He accepted the PEN New England’s Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence Award in 2016, and at the age of 70, Prine was named Artist of the Year by the Americana Music Association last year. His new release Tree of Forgiveness, produced by Dave Cobb and recorded at [RCA] Studio A in Nashville, confirms the everlasting strength of the thinking lyric. Prine is a survivor, an amalgamation of omen, joker, and pool shark — a storyteller with few equals.

to walk about the street. He never says too much, or too little, and cuts straight to the heart of being human. This is the man who sang “There’s a hole in daddy’s arm where all the money goes.” Tree of Forgiveness holds 10 songs worth the wait, his first record of new material in 13 years, and it is a love letter to living, loving, and dying, possessed both of the highest folly and heavy truth-telling. To point are tracks like “Egg and Daughter Nite, Lincoln, Nebraska 1967 (Crazy Bone)” and the stark and relevant “Caravan of Fools.” There is the sense of a man making peace with many things on Tree of Forgiveness, but one readily knows Prine made peace with the world by 1971 — if not sooner. The sweetness of “I Have Met My Love Today” and “Boundless Love,” or the equally sweet transience of “When I Get To Heaven,” has the simple power to lead one’s cynical sense of humanity to a serene, uplifting place. There is always a forgiveness inside the lyric — and a rhythm. “There is,” he said. “There’s a rhythm “My mom liked Jesse Stuart books. He was a Kentucky writer, in words for me. Words have always kind of come easy to me. I was a tough student, and and she turned me on to him. They have a thread that runs it was hard for me to catch on at school. I couldn’t sit there and listen to the teacher who straight through. That’s something I’ve kept in mind in all didn’t have something to say. And, usually, if you gave me an assignment where I didn’t my writing — I always think that there’s a thread running have to crack a book, where I had to approach the thing from pure imagination, I could nail it. through my writing that is a constant.” I could tell a story, I could do all that.” “Both my mother and father were pretty good storytellers,” Prine Prine was drawn to writers, in particular John Steinbeck. Naturally. said during a recent interview, anticipating the release and a year of Bob Dylan once described Prine’s songs to the Huffington Post as “pure touring. Now, at 71, his career spans five decades. “My mom had a Proustian existentialism. Midwestern mindtrips to the ‘nth’ degree.” great sense of humor, and so did my dad, in their own way. Our fam “I read a lot more when I was younger than I do now,” Prine said. ily — we were a real strongly-made family — was one that stayed “I read most of Steinbeck when I was a teenager. I was really drawn together. We knew all of our uncles and aunts. to his stuff, I think initially through the movies. I saw the movie Grapes “We had a family reunion in Kentucky once a year, and you’d of Wrath. I was just wanting to read everything that this guy wrote. get to hear your aunts’ stories. My mom had eight sisters and three “My mom liked [poet and novelist] Jesse Stuart books. He was brothers and they were like a living history book. They’d tell us stories a Kentucky writer, and she turned me on to him. They have a thread about our great-grandfather, who we never knew. They would just that runs straight through. That’s something I’ve kept in mind in all bring the whole thing to life for us. It just ended up right in my lap, so, my writing — I always think that there’s a thread running through my I didn’t have to look far for it.” writing that is a constant.” There are few songwriters whose phrases — and phrasing — In crafting Tree of Forgiveness, Prine checked into the Omni honail the unnamed emotions that rise in the chest, or push people tel in Nashville with 10 boxes of unfinished lyrics and four guitars. The songs are new, though some had remained unfinished for decades. Many songs are shared works with others, co-written with Pat McLaughlin, Dan Auerbach, Roger Cook, Keith Sykes, and fittingly, with Phil Spector on the long dormant “God Only Knows.” “Yeah, it doesn’t look that easy after 40 years, Prine said, laughing. “My wife, Fiona, who’s managing me now, and my son, Jody [Whelan], who runs Oh Boy Records, both said, ‘Okay, you’re booked into the Omni for a week — after that you’re going into the studio every day, pop. You better have good songs ready.’ “So, I just started writing because I had to. I just follow the muse. Wherever it takes me, and whatever subject I write about — it’s not usually a conscious decision on my part, unless I’m co-writing. But I never have a discussion with myself when I’m writing. At the end of the song I sing it, and sometimes I’ll go, ‘How am I going to explain this one? Where did this come from? I always have several songs like that — like ‘Jesus, the Missing Years,’ and ‘Sabu Visits the Twin Cities Alone.’ When I finished those songs, I thought, man, I don’t know if I 18 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


Unadorned truth, melancholy, and humor are three independent bedrocks of his catalog, often merging in a magical sense. They also happen to be bedrocks of quintessential country and folk songs, which can swing from the suicidal to slapstick translations of living. He relates to those songs because he grew up listening to them all. They are in his DNA. “My dad and mom were both huge country fans,” Prine said. “And, my dad in particular would sit in the kitchen at night and drink quarts of beer. He said it tasted more like draft beer. He would drink Heileman’s Old Style Lager, and we listened to WJKG in Chicago, which was a big country station. We’d listen to that all the time, and on the weekends we’d get the Opry, and my dad would figure out a way to set radio up on its side, propping the window up, facAlways aloof, Prine is humbled by his place in the world the ing the south. We liked country music a lot. I grew up listening to the best of pop, and rock & roll, too. I was turning 14, and “Only in retrospect can I talk about some of my stuff in the past, all of a sudden, here was Elvis and Jerry Lee Lewis, and all this stuff. It like having some importance now,” he said. “But, I never think about that was like a gift from God. presently. Like I say, I’m not sure where these really good songs come “I loved rock & roll, but I loved country. And, when I decided to from, so I try to serve the song. The song is my master, in other words. pick up the guitar, my older brother Dave was there with folk music. That’s what I’m doing. I’m just the guy that wrote it down, you know?” He was self-taught — fiddle player, banjo player — he taught down It is a sentiment shared by many of the greatest songwriters, and at the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago. So, Dave had a lot Prine channels the other world naturally. of folklore that he introduced me to, and I just wanted to learn how to “My main guitar is my ‘68 Martin D-28,” he said. “I wrote just play the guitar. If somebody would’ve shown me a couple of Chuck about 90 percent of everything over the years on that one guitar. I’ve Berry licks, I would’ve had a rock & roll band. But, instead I was still got my Harlan Howard birthday bash sticker on that guitar. Whenlearning Carter Family stuff, and that was my introduction to playing ever I’m standing on stage, I look down at my guitar that’s where I see music. That’s how I became a folk musician, because that’s the style it. Harlan’s Birthday Bash.” want to sing these for anybody right away. “I mean, some of them come from some really odd places. When I’m writing on my own, I try not to follow any particular sort of way of doing things. If something interests me, I’ll follow that and see why it interests me.” Prine’s importance to the American songwriting canon cannot be exaggerated. From the moment Kris Kristofferson famously “discovered” him in Chicago’s Quiet Knight pub, and his subsequent 1971 self-titled release on Atlantic, he has been essential to the authentic conversation. He is at once a folk singer, blue-collar country railbird, and rock & roller — a potent combination that has kept him a step ahead of convention and reinforced his mongrel appeal.

continued on page 20

APR – JUN 2018 19


continued from page 19

of guitar I learned. Something that’s good, though, is going to stick around regardless of labels and everything.” Of course, this was the era — the 1950s and 1960s — in which many country songs would roll over into the pop charts, and vice versa. Hard-working cities like Chicago and Detroit had large country music followings, attracting big acts. “My dad and mom would take me to shows in Chicago — there’d be 15 country acts,” he said. “You’d see Johnny Cash, George Jones and Tammy Wynette, all on the same bill. Faron Young. I mean, the list would just be mind-boggling of what you got to see in one show.” Prine understands the relationship between hard-working musicians and other hard-working Americans. The relationship was alive inside his own family. “It [the work ethic] was very strong, and we had a lot of relatives that followed us up,” he said. “They would come live with us for a while and try to get jobs in the factories. And if they couldn’t find anything in Chicago, they’d go on up to the auto factories in Detroit.

“When I Get to Heaven” “My dad was a big union guy. Steelworkers union. He raised me and my three brothers to be pro-union — no matter what line of work we went into. From the 1930s, he was there when they organized and he was there when they all got fired, and they’d hit the lines with other scab workers — everything, you know?” That understanding led to the work that placed him in prounion clubs like the Fifth Peg and the Earl of Old Town in Chicago which would provide his ultimate breakthrough. He was an amateur, singing one night a week and delivering mail during the day. He was a member of the postal union, but eventually believed he could make a go of his “second job” and joined the musicians’ union there. Film critic Roger Ebert, by sheer luck, caught Prine one night in 1970 at the Fifth Peg and gave the young singer his first review — in the Chicago Sun-Times. His songs were being heard. Ultimately, he would find Nashville, where he has lived now for 38 years. Prine joined the Nashville Musicians Association, AFM Local 257 in 1983 and is now a life member. “I came down here from Chicago in early ‘73, just for a weekend to visit,” he said. “I ran into Lee Clayton. He wrote some of the early country outlaw songs — “Ladies Love Outlaws,” songs like that. He’s always been kind of an outlaw himself, and he sent me directly over to the back door at the Opry. It was a Friday night, and he knocked on the door and they let us in. I was standing there, at the backstage of the Opry, at the old Ryman, with about two-and-a-half feet at most from the brick wall to the back of the curtain. That was where everybody stood, and I was standing in between — five minutes after I get to Nashville — I’m standing in between Ernest Tubb, Roy Acuff, and Bill Monroe. I got to stand there because there was no place else to stand. You had to be shoulder to shoulder. All of a sudden somebody said, ‘Hey, here comes Dolly!’ And Dolly Parton came through. All the men had to suck their guts in to let her through.” “That was the first night I was here, and they took me out to Hank Cochran’s houseboat about three o’clock in the morning. This was the way I hit Nashville. It just opened up. My producer from New York

came down, and I recorded at Quad. So, after I did that I was kind of sold on Nashville. I also cut three albums in the ‘70s over in Memphis. I just liked being in Tennessee, period. And I ran into Jack Clement around 1977, and we worked on a record together for a while. We didn’t get one, but we had a good time chasing it.” Prine has chased it all along. And, of course, he doesn’t shy away from the truth, still delivering hard punches today as evidenced in Tree of Forgiveness — a writer who likes to stand close to the fire. “I was thinking I really like the last song, “When I Get to Heaven,” he said, negotiating with mortality and amusement. “It’s so together in a really odd sort of way. I had the chorus to the song about getting my favorite cocktail, and I haven’t been able to smoke in about 20 years because of cancer. It’s one of my favorite things. I still look at people longingly when I see them, after dinner, light up that first cigarette. I even go stand next to somebody when I see them outside a restaurant firing up, just so I can smell that smoke. “And I thought, here’s a guy that so wants to smoke a cigarette … where in the heck could I see that. The only place that I would be able to do that is heaven. So I thought I had to write a song about heaven in order to justify the chorus. It’s a real backwards way of approaching the whole thing. Actually, I’m thinking about mortality and all that — oh, hell no! I just backed into this parking space.” TNM

“Oh, hell no! I just backed into this parking space”

20 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN


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REVIEWS

In his unpretentious way, Putnam spins fascinating tales that pull the covers off the creative process of making records, the interpersonal dynamics between musicians, artists and labels, and the politics of the record business.

NORBERT PUTNAM MUSIC LESSONS, VOL. 1 THIMBLETON HOUSE MEDIA

22 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

NORBERT PUTNAM is certainly one of the most interesting and successful musician-turned-producers in the history of Music City. His new autobiographical book, Music Lessons, Vol. 1, is an intriguing series of short stories outlining a fascinating journey that led from Muscle Shoals, Ala., to Nashville, Tenn., and far beyond. The format is roughly chronological, and the 34 “lessons” each tell a tale of a man who started playing his dad’s upright bass in Elvis-inspired bands as a teenager and wound up playing on more than 170 Elvis recordings. His wideranging career includes opening for the Beatles on the band’s first U.S. concert in Washington, D.C., playing sessions with everyone from Tommy Roe to Ray Stevens, Al Hirt, Neon Philharmonic, and Henry Mancini, and producing hit records for artists including Joan Baez, Dan Fogelberg, and Jimmy Buffett. After all his success, “Putt,” as Elvis liked to call him, doesn’t take himself too seriously and is not afraid to point out his own missteps. He doesn’t water anything down, either, as he details his musical adventures, dating back to the beginning of the Muscle Shoals phenomenon. He played on the first hit to come out of Shoals, Arthur Alexander’s “You Better Move On,” an incredibly influential record produced by Rick Hall, later covered by the Beatles and countless other artists. Putnam’s path led him to Nashville in 1965 where he joined Local 257, and his prowess as a bassist quickly led to his playing on records with great artists such as Tony Joe White, J.J. Cale, Mickey Newbury, and many more. He was also a member of the groundbreaking session player supergroup Area Code 615, which included Wayne Moss, Mac Gayden, Buddy Spicher, and Charlie McCoy.

His relationships with fellow session icons such as Jerry Carrigan, David Briggs, Chip Young and Harold Bradley are detailed with humorous anecdotes and musical insights. His first producing gig, with Joan Baez, came on five minutes’ notice when an intoxicated Kris Kristofferson bailed at the last moment and handed over the job to Putnam, who had been hired as bassist for the sessions. The end result was the most successful Joan Baez album ever, Blessed Are… “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” became the biggest hit single Baez ever had, complete with a choir of songwriters, outlaws, and hangers-on. That initial success as a producer led to a major career shift, as Putnam became Clive Davis’ folk-rock producer of choice. He went on to produce memorable records with Dan Fogelberg, and made an album at George Harrison’s house with the group Splinter, bringing a young Steve Gibson along for the ride. He tells a hilarious tale of producing the Grateful Dead spin-off New Riders of the Purple Sage, and how an extremely large hotel bar bill was paid with perfect timing. The evolution of his relationship with Jimmy Buffett is worthy of its own book, and is a highlight along with a plethora of intriguing behind-the-scenes Elvis stories. In his unpretentious way, Putnam spins fascinating tales that pull the covers off the creative process of making records, the interpersonal dynamics between musicians, artists and labels, and the politics of the record business. His love for making music is palpable throughout the book, and his sense of humor and uncanny recollections of events from long ago make for very compelling reading. A projected “Vol. 2” is apparently in the works, and no doubt the next set of music lessons will be just as fascinating. TNM — Roy Montana


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SYMPHONY NOTES

BY LAURA ROSS

THIS IS PART TWO OF A TWO-PART STORY ON THE SHUTDOWN OF 1988.

In the last issue, I revisited the lead-up to the 30th anniversary of the NSO shutdown that began on Feb. 6, 1988. The orchestra had negotiated a back-loaded contract, following a seven-week strike in 1985, that increased the size of the orchestra to 70 full-time core musicians (with a total complement of 86 musicians). In part, due to the financial crisis in 1987, the board suspended all fundraising in October 1987 and, unwilling to honor that contract, voted to shut down operations, citing a $400,000 deficit. The musicians began organizing concerts, beginning with a repeat of the final Classical Series concert, followed by a Pops concert the next week.

S

ome of our performance partners – Humanities Outreach in Tennessee and the Nashville Opera – generously engaged musicians to perform as the months passed. Performances were held in local churches, at Belmont University, in Franklin, and at Cheekwood. First violinist Brian Groner took on conducting responsibilities and Kenneth Schermerhorn also conducted the orchestra on several occasions. We had wonderful friends who donated their time, talents, names and celebrity to support our cause: Connie Lincoln helped with our public relations campaign, and former NSO members W.O. Smith and Edgar Meyer, country stars Lynn Anderson and John Anderson, Belmont’s Dean of Music Jerry Warren, composer/arranger Bill Purcell, and others, recorded Public Service Announcements (PSAs). Johnny Cash and Mae Axton both held press conferences — Cash offered to perform with the orchestra in the future (he did when the orchestra returned to work), and Axton presented gifts and financial support to the musicians from friends who had heard about our situation. Weeks passed without activity, and from time to time a board representative would reach out to the musicians’ representatives to discuss a new contract that would put us back to work, but all without result. That May, Dennis Botorff resigned as NSA board chairman to head up Sovran Bank. It wasn’t until the Nashville Symphony Association filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection four months later on June 16, 1988, that any real bargaining occurred. However, during that time, additional damage had been done; by laying off 86 musicians and their entire staff (minus acting Executive Director Tim Ambrose), the board had doubled the NSO’s debt because they had never paid unemployment insurance as a reimbursing employer. 24 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

Dewayne Pigg and Johnny Cash at his press conference at the House of Cash Mae Axton presents a gift to Dewayne Pigg, orchestra committee chair.

The aftermath

On July 29, following court-mandated bargaining, the NSA board approved a new twoyear extension agreement. The musicians ratified the agreement on Aug. 10 that put them back to work — tentatively — by early November. The previous agreement expired on Aug. 31, 1988. The shutdown was a time of great strife and vulnerability. Some fortunate musicians were hired to play with other orchestras, while others found other work that kept them busy and feeling useful. But musicians were also dealing with a great deal of fear about whether Nashville would have a symphony orchestra in the future. Fear can be a great divider and the musicians were not immune as the weeks turned into months without resolution on the horizon. Musicians also began leaving the orchestra, having won auditions or shifted to teaching. By 1990, every single principal string player had left the orchestra, as well as many of its other titled strings. We also said goodbye to our second trumpet, the only wind or brass position to become vacant. The size of the orchestra was reduced over time from 86 to 73 total musicians, with three levels of contracts — core, long, and special — the core was reduced from 70 to 58 musicians (it could have dropped to 55, but never quite fell that low.) The orchestra you see onstage today, despite additional unwarranted concessions

in 2013, is the result of numerous challenges we faced over the decades of rebuilding. For example, due to an insufficient pool of available subs and extras for the repertoire being scheduled, the string sections were finally expanded to pre-1990 levels. It took 18 years to recover the length of our season of 43 weeks that was reduced to 35 weeks in 1988. The year we opened the Schermerhorn Symphony Center, we expanded the season to 44 weeks with five vacation weeks, and, with the exception of principal keyboard, every member of the orchestra has a full-time contract.

Coda

It’s an unfortunate fact that orchestras across the country have been damaged for decades by the thoughtless actions of their boards and managers who chose to “slash and burn” their organizations rather than look for solutions that would serve the entire institution. Our enterprises are about maintaining the quality and integrity of the orchestra; you cannot cut costs by taking a “corporate” approach. Union steward Mike Karr and the NSPA Orchestra Committee of Dewayne Pigg (chair), Randy Ford, Sarah Fogel, Joann Cruthirds and Paul Tobias, were our de facto negotiating team during this entire period. Paul Tobias is the only current member of the NSO today. Every one of them deserves our thanks for stepping up during TNM a difficult period in all our lives.


JAZZ & BLUES BEAT

It’s

time again for summer festivals. As we note every year, there is not as much jazz and blues among the area performances as there used to be. Whatever fits in the “roots” category seems to be the main entree on the menus this season. Here’s what we found for the jazz and blues lovers —though you may have to drive a bit for some of the choices.

Single festival events

For those who like their jazz with rhythm and blues or “smooth” groove, the 3rd Annual Music City Jazz Festival takes place May 24-26 at Public Square Park in downtown Nashville. Featured artists include Boney James, Rachelle Ferrell, Peabo Bryson, Hiroshima, and others routinely heard on radio stations like WFSK 88.1 Jazzy 88. There will be food, areas for kids and more. To get details, go to www.musiccityjazzfest.com or call 205-705-3131. For something more on the blues and rootsy side, try Brier Hill Farm’s 2nd annual Arts and Music Festival located beside Highway 242 between Ethridge, Tenn., and the Laurel Hill Wildlife Management Area. Bring chairs and coolers for the music. There will be craft vendors, and the lake, creek, and pecan orchard areas are available for camping, walking, or picnics. Details at www.brierhillfarm.com or www.eventbrite.com. For a full-tilt boogie into American culture, pack the kids and head to Chattanooga, Tenn., June 8-16 for the annual Riverbend Music Festival. Five hundred thousand people will hit the downtown streets to enjoy music and food with scenic river views in the background. More than 100 bands play five stages during the eight days — with one day dedicated completely to jazz and blues. Birthplace of blues legend Bessie Smith, the city’s musical past will be celebrated during the Bessie Smith Strut Night on historic M.L. King Boulevard. A grand fireworks display ends the week. Find out more by emailing info@ riverbendfestival.com. The 18th Annual Jefferson Street Jazz & Blues Festival June 15-16 will celebrate the vitality of the Jefferson Street community through its arts, music and food culture. Produced by the Jefferson Street United Merchants Partnership (JUMP), festivities start with a SoBro Block Party at Fifth Avenue and Demonbreun Street Friday and conclude with a Saturday full of local and national jazz and blues artists. There will be food and retail vendors from the north Nashville community. Artists should be announced by the time this issue hits the street. Go to www.nashvillejazzandbluesfest.com.

BY AUSTIN BEALMEAR

A picturesque drive to Blue Ridge, Ga., will get you to the Blue Ridge Mountains Wine & Jazz Festival June 16 from 1-10 p.m. (EDT). This event is billed as an annual concert of jazz music aimed at keeping this uniquely American music form vibrant through its public, corporate, private and charitable Riverbend Music Festival partnerships. The day will celebrate the musical, enological (science of wine and wine making), visual and culinary arts, and will help raise money for student programs in jazz music and education. Visit www. blueridgewineandjazz.com.

Weekly at the wineries

Several local vineyards still include some jazz and blues in their summerlong wine on the lawn weekends. At the Arrington Vineyards in Arrington, Tenn., Music in the Vines starts in April and runs through October. Enjoy both Bluegrass in the Barn and Jazz in the Courtyard from 4-8 p.m. on Saturdays and 2-6 p.m. Sundays. For the weekly lineup of free music and other info, go to www.arringtonvineyards.com. In Clarksville, Tenn., the Beachaven Winery offers a variety of music under the banner Jazz on the Lawn every other Saturday at 6:30 p.m., starting May 12. Performing artists should be listed soon at www.beachavewinery. com. In Hampshire, Tenn. (between Columbia and Hohenwald), the Amber Falls Winery includes some jazz and blues in its Music on the Ridge series, most Saturdays and Sundays. Dates, artists, times and other info at www.amberfallswinery.com.

Summer concerts of interest

The Schermerhorn Symphony Center gets down this summer by recognizing a couple of legends. “A Tribute to Ray Charles” June 15 at 8 p.m. features vocalist Ellis Hall and the Nashville Symphony performing a solid night of Charles classics. The real deal arrives July 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the form of guitar legend Buddy Guy and his band. Now in his 80s, Guy continues to amaze with his electrifying musicianship and soulful voice. All details available at www. nashvillesymphony.org or call 615-687-6400. See you out there. TNM APR – JUN 2018 25


FINANCIALS NASHVILLE MUSICIANS ASSOCIATION | REVENUES & EXPENSES | YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2017 FUNERAL REGULAR SPECIAL BENEFIT ER FUND FUND FUND FUND TOTAL REVENUES LOCAL DUES 422781 422781 INITIATION FEES 3800 3800 ERF CONTRIBUTIONS 21406 21406 FUNERAL BENEFIT CONTRIBUTIONS 150994 150994 FEDERATION INITIATION FEES 1300 1300 WORK DUES 541965 541965 FINES & REINSTATEMENT FEES 4195 4195 INTEREST EARNED 425 33 4416 12 4886 UNAPPLIED MEMBERS’ ESCROW -1556 -1556 CASH OVER & SHORT 51 1 52 CANDY & SNACK SALES 61 61 SERVICE CHARGES 41609 41609 LATE FEE - SERVICE CHARGES 5881 5881 CREDIT CARD USAGE FEE 4818 4818 SUPPLIES SOLD 545 545 ADVERTISING SALES 9690 9690 DISCOUNTS RECEIVED 33 33 OTHER 100 102 202 ARTISTS & OTHERS 383166 383166 AFM - EP FUND 2455 2455 AFM HEALTH & WELFARE 8919 8919 SERVICE CHARGE 4877 4877 MUSICIANS’ PAYROLL TAXES 11217 11217 CONVENIENCE FEE 2480 2480 CARTAGE 1380 1380 RESIGNATION CLEARANCE FEES 250 250 CAPITAL GAINS 16586 16586 TRANSFER FROM SPECIAL FUND 19202 19202 TOTAL REVENUES

SUMMER NAMM JUNE 28-30, 2018 MUSIC CITY CENTER NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

1057630

412150

171996

1663194

EXPENSES SALARIES & PAYROLL TAXES 469155 469155 OFFICER’S EXPENSES 17047 17047 OFFICE EXPENSES 159815 250 160065 OTHER EXPENSES 39386 39386 BUILDING & EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 54505 54505 PER CAPITA TAX 132615 132615 DEPRECIATION 23366 23366 FEDERATION INITIATION FEES 1625 1625 AFM-EP FUND 53875 53875 AFM WORK DUES 146762 146762 COMMISSIONS 1157 1157 ADVERTISING 759 759 ARTISTS & OTHERS 323646 323646 AFM - EP FUND EXPENSE 2669 2669 SERVICE CHARGE 4064 4064 MUSICIANS PAYROLL TAXES 11220 11220 BANK CHARGES & FEES 17575 15 15 17605 BENEFITS 127000 28900 155900 REFUNDS 319 319 ERF CONTRIBUTIONS 6175 6175 CANDY & SNACK PURCHASES 111 111 PROFESSIONAL FEES 47745 3500 51245 ELECTION EXPENSES 1597 TRANSFER TO REGULAR FUND 19202 19202 TOTAL EXPENSES OPERATING PROFIT (LOSS)

1125844

408561

130500

29165

1692473

(68214)

3589

41496

(7747)

(29279)

THESE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN AUDITED OR REVIEWED, AND NO CPA EXPRESSES AN OPINION OR A CONCLUSION NOR PROVIDES ANY ASSURANCE ON THEM.

26 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

21418


FINANCIALS NASHVILLE MUSICIANS ASSOCIATION STATEMENT OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES | DECEMBER 31, 2017 FUNERAL REGULAR SPECIAL BENEFIT EMERGENCY FUND FUND FUND RELIEF FUND TOTAL ASSETS: CASH & CHECKING ACCOUNTS 242425 175901 4837 23561 446723.6 INVESTMENTS 10691 0 128638 0 139329 TOTALS

253116

175901

133475

23561

586052.6

DUE TO/FROM FUNDS 371413 1641 373054 PROPERTY & EQUIPMENT LAND 125000 125000 BUILDING 509792 509792 BUILDING RENOVATION 416842 416842 FURNISHINGS & EQUIPMENT 405180 405180 LESS: ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION -960425 -960425 TOTAL PROPERTY & EQUIPMENT

496389

0

0

0

496389

TOTAL 749505 175901 504888 25202 1455496 LIABILITIES ESCROW AND ADVANCE PAYMENTS 16889 164683 8000 0 189572 DUE TO FUNDS 373054 0 0 0 373054 PAYROLL TAXES WITHHELD 749 0 0 0 749 TOTAL LIABILITIES

390692

164683

FUND BALANCES

358813

11218

8000

TOTAL

749505 175901 504888 25202 1455496

496888

25202

AFM LOCAL 257 HOLIDAY CLOSINGS Monday, May 28, 2018 Memorial Day Wednesday, July 4, 2018 Independence Day

563375 892121

THESE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN AUDITED OR REVIEWED, AND NO CPA EXPRESSES AN OPINION OR A CONCLUSION NOR PROVIDES ANY ASSURANCE ON THEM.

LOCAL 257 MEMBERS: Please check to see that your

FUNERAL FUND BENEFICIARY is listed correctly, and up to date. We can't stress the importance of this enough.

YOUR LOVED ONES ARE COUNTING ON YOU. Take a moment and ask the front desk to verify your funeral benefit beneficiary information. Please also check to see that we have your correct email address. APR – JUN 2018 27


FINAL NOTES

John Ray “Curly” Seckler Dec. 25, 1919 — Dec. 27, 2017

F

irst-generation bluegrass musician John Ray “Curly” Seckler, 98, died Dec. 27, 2017. He was one of the last living members of Flatt and Scruggs’ Foggy Mountain Boys. It’s generally agreed that Seckler’s solid mandolin chop, driving rhythm guitar, and impeccable tenor harmonies with Flatt were an essential part of the Flatt and Scruggs sound. But before the legendary duo even formed a band, he played with a host of other players of the era, including artists like Charlie Monroe, Jim and Jesse McReynolds, and many others. Born Dec. 25, 1919 near China Grove in Rowan County, N.C., Seckler was the fourth of eight children born to Calvin and Carrie Sechler — he later changed the spelling to avoid mispronunciation. At the age of 15 he first joined the Yodeling Rangers along with his brothers Marvin, George and Duard — and in his early performing years he worked with many other bluegrass pioneers as well. After his long run with Flatt and Scruggs (1949-1962) which included countless touring dates and over 130 recordings with the group, Seckler played for many years in Nashville Grass with Flatt. Before Flatt died in 1979, he asked Seckler to keep the band 28 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

going, and he did until his retirement from touring in 1994. Band members at various times included Marty Stuart, Kenny Ingram, Johnny Warren, Bob Rodgers, Charlie Nixon, Blake Williams, Pete Corum, Willis Spears, Paul Warren, Tater Tate, and Jack Hicks. Seckler continued to make appearances at festivals and concerts into his 90s. He also released several solo records, worked with David Grisman and the Steep Canyon Rangers, and many other artists. Marty Stuart commented on his old bandmate’s passing: “In losing Curly, our country music family has lost one of its greatest and most notable statesmen. Personally, I lost one of my truest heroes and one of my dearest friends. I loved him. God bless Old Seck.” Seckler was inducted into the IBMA Hall of Fame in 2004, the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame in 2010, and the Bill Monroe Bluegrass Hall of Fame in 2011. He stopped performing after serious health issues in 2014, but was a guest of honor in November 2014 at a private concert in Hendersonville, Tenn., given by the Earls of Leicester — a Flatt and Scruggs tribute band. A book about Seckler’s amazing life

was published in 2011. Foggy Mountain Troubadour: The Life and Music of Curly Seckler, by Penny Parsons, reveals that in addition to his accessibility to fans, Seckler was known as an honorable, caring person, well-loved by peers and fans alike. A fascinating storyteller who enjoyed sharing reminiscences about the road, he was also known as was a loving husband and parent, and a loyal and generous friend. Seckler, a man of great faith, was a member of Holiday Heights Baptist Church. Fiddle player Johnny Warren, whose father Paul Warren was also a fiddler and a member of the Foggy Mountain Boys, talked about Seckler: “Curly Seckler is best known for his tenor singing with Lester Flatt. That sound was — and remains — second to none. My earliest memories of him began when I was a little boy tagging along with my dad to TV show and WSM radio tapings.  He would always go out of his way to speak to me and offer me a piece of Dentyne chewing gum. That doesn’t sound like much, but means a lot to a little kid.  Much later on after Tater Tate left the Nashville Grass, I took on the job as fiddle player and traveled with him for several years.  You get to know a man and his character when you’re with him that extensively.  Seck was a kind, Christian man and always treated everyone equally. Years later after my dad — Paul Warren — and Curly’s wife, Mabel, passed away, he and my mother got married after a long courtship.  I was very happy to see that happen because I knew he was a good man.  I truly miss him.” Seckler was preceded in death by his parents; five sisters, Myrtle Barnhardt, Ethel Jackson, Claire Sloop, Mary Freeze, and Ruth Speck; four brothers, Roy, Marvin, George and Duard; and one granddaughter. Survivors include his wife of 19 years, Eloise Warren Seckler; two brothers, Floyd and Hugh Sechler; two sons, Ray and Monnie Sechler, two stepsons, Gary and Johnny Warren; one stepdaughter, Debbie Frazier; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; and special friend Penny Parsons. Funeral services were held Jan. 1, 2018 at Spring Hill Funeral Home in Nashville. Burial followed at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens in Goodlettsville. Condolences may be made online at www.springhillfh.com


FINAL NOTES

Michael Anthony Leech Sept. 26, 1941 — Dec. 12, 2017

Session great and Memphis Boys bassist Mike Leech, 76, died Dec. 12, 2017. In addition to bass, he also played guitar and harmonica, produced, and arranged strings and horns. He recorded with more than 200 artists, and his work can be heard on many hits, including Elvis Presley’s “Suspicious Minds,” “Sweet Caroline,” by Neil Diamond, Willie Nelson’s “Always on My Mind,” and “Drift Away,” by Dobie Gray — for which he received platinum records. Michael Anthony Leech was born Sept. 26, 1941, in Memphis, Tenn. He graduated from Catholic High School for Boys and Memphis State University, where he performed in the Memphis State University ensemble The Mighty Sound of the South band. His session career began at Royal Studio in Memphis, and his rise to fame was with the 827 Thomas Street Band (Memphis Boys) — a sought-after group of recording musicians who were the house band at American Sound Studio in 1967-72. During that period he performed on 122 Top-10 pop records, and worked with Presley, B.J. Thomas, Dionne Warwick, The Box Tops, and Dusty Springfield, among others. After his move to Nashville in 1972 he quickly became a member of the A-Team, another hot group of session players who recorded a multitude of records for a variety of artists. Over the next several decades Leech played on hundreds of hits, including records for more than a dozen members of the Country Music Hall of Fame including Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Jerry Reed, Bobby Bare, Waylon Jennings and Ferlin Husky. Leech also played sessions for numerous R&B and jazz artists like Esther Phillips, King Curtis, Bobby Womack, Herbie Mann, Earl Klugh, and Al Hirt. He was well-known in the rock & roll world as well, playing on records for Eric Clapton, Roy Orbison, Delbert McClinton, Jerry Lee Lewis, Tom Jones, Johnny Rivers, Dr. Hook, Carl Perkins, John Prine and Al Kooper. He became a member of the Musicians Hall of Fame along with the Memphis Boys in 2007 — the inaugural year of the organization. Fellow Memphis Boy member Reggie Young commented on Leech’s passing: “Mike Leech was 76 years old when he passed. I played for his high school prom which was held at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis. We went back a long way and played on many hit records together. He was a wonderful musician and great friend. He will be missed. May God bless him.” Leech was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas Joseph and Norma Leech; one brother, Thomas Leech, Jr., and one sister, Mildred Key. Survivors include his daughters Shelly Wood and Melanie Paquette; one sister, Anne Jones, three grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service was held Jan. 20 at The Cumberland in Nashville. Donations can be made to St. Patrick School, 175 St. Patrick Street, McEwen, TN 37101. Please notate donation “In memory of Michael Leech.”

“I played for Mike Leech at his high school prom which was held at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis. We went back a long way and played on many hit records together. He was a wonderful musician and great friend. He will be missed. May God bless him.” – Reggie Young

Stuart H. “Stu” Basore May 3, 1937 — Feb. 5, 2018 Steel guitarist and dobro player Stuart H. “Stu” Basore, 80, died Feb. 5, 2018. He became a 50-year life member of the Nashville Musicians Association in 2014, and joined the local in February 1964. He was born May 3, 1937 to Floyd Campbell and Grace Eleanor Ulrich Basore at Fort Monroe, Va. His father was an officer in the Air Force — and Basore considered himself a “military brat” who traveled throughout the United States and France while growing up. His family settled in Aurora, Colo., which Basore called home. At the age of 11 he began to play the steel guitar, and was basically self-taught, although he also studied at the Honolulu Conservatory of Music in Denver, Colo. He served in the Air Force from 1956-1960. Basore’s musical career spanned many decades, and included work with Tex Ritter, Kitty Wells, Johnny Wright, George Hamilton IV, Connie Smith, and Marie Osmond. He performed on a plethora of TV and radio shows such as The Porter Wagoner Show, Grand Ole Opry, Waking Crew and the Afternoon Show. He played on hundreds of sessions, including “I Will Always Love You” and “Jolene” for Dolly Parton. He also played on commercial jingles and movie soundtracks for C.W. Coop, W.W. & The Dixie Dance Kings, and Robert Altman’s critically acclaimed film Nashville. He recorded the song “Jammin’ with Jimmy” in the Grammy-winning animated short film For the Birds. Basore did not limit his talents to the country genre; he recorded with Louis Armstrong, and developed a huge following with Ween fans after perfoming with the alternative rock band. Basore had a number of hobbies, including fishing, and golfing — he achieved two holes-in-one — and loved spending time with friends and family. He received the ROPE (Reunion of Professional Entertainers) Lifetime Achievement Award in Country Music in 2005. His close friend Rusty Russell talked about Basore: “Stu was kind, funny, too smart for his own good, and always, always, made anyone he played with sound just a little better. His steel sound was as heart-tugging as anyone’s, and he could keep it country, or bend your ear with sophisticated harmonic excursions that sent you running for the practice room. The biggest legends of steel guitar’s golden era considered him a peer; if he’s not on your short list of those — he should be. Stu’s was a life well-lived. He raised continued on page 30 APR – JUN 2018 29


FINAL NOTES a wonderful family, had many friends and admirers, and made lasting contributions to the art and profession he loved.” In addition to his parents, Basore was preceded in death by his sister, Ruth Wilson; and two brothers, Floyd L. and Terry K. Basore. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Marsha Gray Basore; two daughters, Kelly B. Milam and Rebecca Michelle Martin; one granddaughter; and many nieces and nephews. A celebration of life was held Feb. 10 at Spring Hill Memorial Funeral Home and Cemetery, with burial following. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to either the Emergency Relief Fund for American Federation of Musicians, AFM Local 257, P.O. Box 120399, Nashville, TN, 37212 or Alive Hospice, 1718 Patterson St., Nashville, TN, 37203

Mike Wayne “Cookie” Jones Aug. 30, 1952 — Feb. 8, 2018

continued from page 29

Jones came to Nashville in 1970, honed his chops, and got a gig touring with a Nashville band. After work with Lois Johnson and Charlie Louvin, he joined Mandrell’s band in 1975. Over his two-plus decades with the artist, he played in her touring band as well as on many albums. He also appeared on multiple awards shows, as well as TV shows Hee Haw, That Nashville Music, and Pop Goes the Country among others. “Mike ‘Cookie Monster’ Jones became the steel guitar player in my band, the Do-Rites in 1974 and worked until I retired in 1997. He was the best musician and friend to me and all the members of the Do-Rites. Everyone loved him,” Mandrell said. Jones was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include his wife Claudette; two sisters, Darla Schnabel and Carla Murphy; three nephews, two nieces, and several cousins. Memorial gatherings were held Feb. 11 and 12 at Cole & Garrett Funeral Home in Goodlettsville. The family welcomes memorial contributions to Alive Hospice or the Freedom Farm of Hendersonville.

David Charles “Dave” Hall June 1, 1941 — Jan. 19, 2018

Local 257 life member Mike Wayne “Cookie” Jones, 65, died Feb. 8, 2018. He played steel guitar for Barbara Mandrell for 23 years. He was also a dobro player and bassist, and joined the Nashville Musicians Association in October 1972. He was born in Quincy, Ill., Aug. 30, 1952 to Kenneth W. and Thora Werner Jones. He said in a 2003 interview that the steel guitar was his parents’ favorite instrument and that when he was seven they encouraged him to learn to play. “I’ve been beating on that thing ever since,” Jones said. He got his own instrument when he was in the sixth grade. “It was a Fender 400, had four pedals and eight strings,” Jones said. 30 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

Bassist David Charles “Dave” Hall, 76, died Jan. 19, 2018. His lengthy career in the music business included touring with George Jones as well as other artists; he was also a songwriter, artist, and publishing executive. He was a life member of the Nashville Musicians Association who joined the local in September 1970. Hall was born June 1, 1941 to Staley and Mary Basham Hall. He was an Air Force veteran who served as a medic. His career as a professional musician started in 1965 when he began playing for Jones. He went

on to also work with Kitty Wells, Connie Smith, Red White and Bluegrass, The Kendalls, Faron Young, Stu Phillips, The Whites, and Doug Stone. Young once called Hall the “Frank Sinatra of country music” because Hall’s tenor blended well with Young’s voice. Hall had a stint as an RCA recording artist, during which he cut a single, a cover of the Beatles’ “We Can Work It Out.” He went on to join some friends and form the band Foxfire, which had a hit single “Fell into Love,” and was awarded Cashbox New Singles Vocal Group of the Year in 1979. He began working with publishers Raindance Music and Ballpoint Music, and in 1980 was a cowriter with Russ Allison and Dallas Cody on the Conway Twitty No. 1 hit “I Am the Dreamer (You Are the Dream).” Over the last decade Hall worked for Horipro Entertainment as an executive advisor. Phil O’Donnell, his friend and associate, commented on his passing: “To me he was one of about four people I have been blessed with to call a true friend in my life; that I could count on for a 3:00 a.m. phone call for help, or just an ear to hear me out. He was always there to listen. He was one of the most humble, gentle, men I have ever met. He was one honest good man. He was a Christian man who did not have to tell you he was a Christian — it was obvious just by watching the way he lived his life that he loved the Lord. He was a mentor to many of us who came here to run after this crazy music. I will forever miss our breakfast talks and his advice.” Hall was preceded in death by his parents and his wife, Peggy Hall. Survivors include one daughter, Leslie Barr; two brothers, Woody and Ron Hall; one sister, Narvona Langley; two grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Graveside services were conducted Jan. 27 at Mt. Juliet Memorial Gardens with Phil O’Donnell and Butch Baker officiating. Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 840692, Dallas, TX 75284-0692.

George Washington McCormick June 16, 1933 — Feb. 5, 2018

Life member George Washington McCormick, 84, died Feb. 5, 2018. He played guitar and bass, and was also a vocalist; he joined Local 257 in June 1953. Over his career he performed as a solo artist, and also played with many country music greats including Jim Reeves, Dolly Parton and


FINAL NOTES

Grandpa Jones during his 47 years on the Grand Ole Opry. He was born June 16, 1933, in Smith County, Tenn., to the late Jesse Joseph and Della Lee Burton McCormick, and moved to Nashville when he was 14 to play music and work at WLAC radio. McCormick found a spot with Big Jeff Bess’ Radio Playboys, which eventually led to the start of his Grand Ole Opry career in 1951 with Martha Carson. McCormick became a solo artist with MGM in 1953, and recorded several singles, including “Fifty-Fifty Honky Tonkin’.” In 1954 he met guitarist and singer Earl Aycock, and the two started performing as a duo with a country-crossed-with-rock & roll sound. They eventually signed to Mercury, but in 1957 McCormick went solo again with another MGM project. After work with The Louvin Brothers, he became a regular on the Porter Wagoner Show in 1963, and stayed with the show for two decades. He retired from the Opry in 1998. McCormick attended Smith Springs Baptist Church and Nolensville Baptist Church, and also Silver Point Baptist Church. He was known as one of a kind who enjoyed telling stories and laughing at jokes with his

family and many friends. Acclaimed instrumentalist Buck Trent commented on his long association with McCormick. “We were friends for a long time, and we worked together for a long time. He could sing any part, and played the finest rhythm guitar. We are all going to miss George, we had a lot of fun together,” Trent said. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by three brothers, David, Joe and Billy McCormick; one sister Betty Talley; one step-daughter, Anita Zemencuk; and one granddaughter. Survivors include his wife of 33 years, Betty Norrod McCormick; four daughters, Teresa McCormick, Trilene McCormick, Mindi McCormick, and Anita Stewart; one step-daughter, Helen Smith; one brother, Charles McCormick; eight grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Feb. 9 at the Baxter Chapel of Hooper-Huddleston & Horner Funeral Home with interment following in Crest Lawn Cemetery. Rev. Tony Crow officiated.

moved to Florida in 1942. The twins began performing at the age of 11, and were discovered by Shot Jackson. Afterwards they went to Nashville and recorded their first record, Goin’ to the Dogs, which was produced by Jackson and Pete Drake. Other albums followed through the ‘60s and ‘70s, and the twins — with their pure country sound, unique lyrics, and quirky album covers, still retain a cult following. Calhoun and his brother also started a tour bus company — the now 40-year-old Entertainment Coaches of America — which builds buses and leases to top acts, among them Willie Nelson. Calhoun had a passion for golf as well as music; he was known as a very generous person, and for his great love of family, friends, and his dogs. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by one son, Jackie Calhoun;

John C. “Jack” Calhoun Sept. 17, 1939 — Nov. 17, 2017

Life member John C. “Jack” Calhoun, 78, died Nov. 17, 2017. He was a guitarist and vocalist who joined Local 257 in May 1966, and recorded with his twin brother Jerry as The Calhoun Twins. The duo released several albums and performed in the U.S. and internationally, as well as on the Grand Ole Opry and at shows in Branson, Mo. He was born Sept. 17, 1939 in Ann Arbor, Mich., to John and Mariam Calhoun, and

continued on page 32

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FINAL NOTES continued from page 31

and one brother, Jay Calhoun. Survivors include one daughter, Robin Stewart, one son, Caleb Calhoun, mother of the children Karen Calhoun; three grandchildren, and companion Beverly Peterson. A celebration of life memorial service was held Nov. 21, 2017 at the First Baptist Church in Kissimmee, Fla., with the Rev. Dr. Ed Carney officiating. Memorial contributions may be made in Calhoun’s name to Osceola County Animal Control, 3910 Old Canoe Creek Road, St. Cloud, FL, 34772.

Mack E. Byrd Feb. 23, 1930 — Feb. 4, 2018

Nashville Musicians Association life member Mack E. Byrd, 87, died Feb. 4, 2018. Born Feb. 23, 1930, he played bass and guitar, and was also a vocalist. Byrd joined Local 257 in July 1968. Survivors include his wife, Diane. Arrangements were provided by the Neptune Society. TNM

IN MEMORIAM

The officers, staff and members of Local 257 extend our deepest sympathies to the families and friends of our members who have recently passed away. You are in our thoughts, hearts and prayers. Name

Born

Joined

Died

Life Member

Stuart H Basore

05/03/1937

02/25/1964

02/05/2018

Y

Mack E Byrd

02/23/1930

07/24/1968

02/04/2018

Y

John L Green, Sr

11/16/1936

06/06/1961

02/20/2018

Y

David Charles Hall

06/01/1941

09/22/1970

01/19/2018

Y

Ronald L Huff

03/16/1938

02/27/1975

03/18/2018

Y

Mike Wayne Jones

08/30/1952

10/13/1972

02/08/2018

Y

George W McCormick

06/16/1933

06/02/1953

02/05/2018

Y

Ronnie Victor Prophet

12/26/1937

08/06/1969

03/02/2018

Y

MEMBER STATUS NEW MEMBERS Kathy Smith Anderson CLA TAM KA@AndersonDesignStudio.com Cell (615)-479-1300

Jeffrey L Hale (Jeff Hale) PIA mlwtm4511@comcast.net Cell (615)-587-7494

Sandra L Bealmear VOC sandyfitness@comcast.net

Chris Michael Haughey BAS chaughley@gmail.com

Robert Crowell (Robbie Crowell) BAS KEY DRM SAX ocrobbie@gmail.com Cell (773)-510-7493

Brian William Hinchliffe (Brian Hinchcliffe) FB BAS GTR bhinchliffe@gmail.com Cell (615)-582-8755

Devin Dawson Durrett VOC GTR

Samuel James Hoisington GTR BAS TBN samhoisington@yahoo.com Cell (413)-834-0424

Keven Eknes GTR PIA keveneknes@gmail.com Cell (646)-258-2228 Joshua O Gray GTR VOC

32 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

Beau James Hudson GTR MDN beau@cartervintage.com Cell (615)-945-3081

Josh Hunt DRM PRC joshua.hnt@gmail.com Cell (270)-847-3466 Chris J. Hunter GTR hunter133@mac.com Cell (931)-619-4834 Benjamin P Jordan BAS PRO DRM PRG bjordanproduction@gmail.com Cell (615)-414-4374 Alexandra Kline GTR akline85@gmail.com Cell (415)-497-3713 Jared Richmond Kneale DRM Kyle Damon Knoth (Kyle Knoth) GTR BAS VOC crowdingalice@aol.com Cell (765)-427-4209


MEMBER STATUS Carl Brandon Lay (Brandon Lay) GTR brandonlaymusic@gmail.com Cell (731)-394-2665 Dean M Marold BAS GTR deanmarold@gmail.com Cell (720)-201-6210 Rachel McCann KEY VOC Ryan Isidore Michaels (Haley & Michaels) GTR VOC PIA ryan@haleyandmichaels.com Cell (615)-715-4449 Austin Louis Moore (Austin Moore) austin.moore79@gmail.com David Nels Nelson DRM PRC BAS PIA GTR Cell (615)-440-0658 Michael Hunter Ochs PIA GTR Cell (615)-485-7172 Robin Leigh Palmer VOC robin@smacksongs.com Cell (615)-504-5199 Stephen Lewis Pennington VOC prokidusa@mac.com Marcus Petruska DRM VOC marcuspetruska@yahoo.com Leif Shires TPT PIA leftcoastjazz@gmail.com Cell (804)-244-1086 Les Singer BJO GTR le81677@aol.com Cell (615)-598-6863 Duane Allen Smith DRM PRC dasdrums@me.com Cell (502)-541-9317 William L Smithson VOC williamsmithson@gmail.com Cell (615)-585-8444 Aaron F Tatum KEY FLT HRM AHP aftatum@yahoo.com REINSTATED Jerry Bob Abbott Timothy Wayne Akers Roland Jabari Barber Nathan Barlowe Lloyd F Barry, Jr Kelly Back Edward L Bell Sayre Joan Berman Justin Bertoldie

Olivia Bey Eric Bikales Emelyne Marie Bingham Larry L Borden Bruce C Bouton Jimmy Bowen Charles L. Bradley Alison Hilary Brown Michael David Bub Samuel Edward Buchanan Nicholas M Buda Kathy Burkly Dennis J Burnside Robert Lewis Burns Bentley T Caldwell Claude R Carmichael Elton Christopher Charles Benjamin T Clark Patrick Cullen Coil Ernie L Collins Joeie Dale Canaday, Jr James Alexander Cook Thomas Michael Cordell Mark A Corradetti Dennis G Crouch Dana Eugene Cupp, Jr John Shelby Deaderick Gerald Bruce Dees Richard Deroberts Eric Joseph Dinenna Carl Everett Dunlap Phillip Brian Eads Leslie M Fagan Darin Lee Favorite Mike Feagan Clayton Mitchell Feibusch David J Flint Shannon Otis Forrest Jason M Gantt Juan M Garcia Larry Gatlin John Gavin Teddy W Gentry Kenneth Guy Gist, Jr Gilles Alelard Godard Arnold Samuel Gottlieb Mark Kevin Grantt Robin Guidicy Dean Hall Anthony R Harrell Michael L Hartgrove Tracy Matthew Heaston Kathryn Lynn Hendricks Trey Hensley Richard Conoley Herring Daniel Glen Hochhalter Michael Bernard Hodge Warner E Hodges Gary W Hooker Mark E Howard Lonnie Joe Howell Bobby G Huff Jedd Michael Hughes David Huntsinger Ben Joseph Isaacs Don B Jackson Charles H Jones Joseph Daniel Justice, III Laur Joamets Thomas Johannes Jutz Andrew J Keenan Thomas C Keifer Shane Keister Steve D Keller Donald W Kerce, Jr Douglas J Kershaw James B Kimball Paul S Kim Tom Kirk

Randy Alan Kohrs Jennifer D Kummer Jim Lance Mary Helen Law Bernie M Leadon Virginia Lee Levine Jimin Lim William Eugene Linneman, Sr Deanna R. Little Clifford Edward Long Jonathan Alan Long Gary Lee Lunn Jeffrey A Marino Andy May James Emmanuel Mayer Delbert McClinton Eric Reid McClure Richard Vance McDonald Christopher M McHugh Jerry A McPherson Garrett Keith McReynolds Manuel D Medina Mark Andrew Miller Clay B Mills Bobby Howard Minner, Jr Dan Mitchell Michael Derek Mixon Cameron Jaymes Montgomery Carlton Laymond Moody Anthony J Morra Daniel R Needham Chris E Nelsen Keith David Nicholas Randy Owen Lynn Owsley Sean G Paddock Russ Pahl John Mark Painter Michael Todd Parks Dolly Parton Eric R Paul Andrew Powell Peebles Karen J Pendley-Kuykendall John Harold Pennell Stu Phillips Peter Michaelson Pisarczyk Philip Chandler Towns William Burt Poe, Jr Betty G Polk Hyram Lee Posey Kevin M Post Daniel P Pratt Joel Philip Reist Jeannie C Riley Clifford E Robertson Trevor J. Rosen Rivers Rutherford, II Tripper Ryder Michael Uri Samis David P Sartor Justin Lance Schipper William Whitfield Sellers Tim Ray Sergent Andrew Charles Sheridan Herb Shucher David A Smith Keith E Smith Andrew Michael Sovine Maya Kai Stone Johnathan Elmo Szetela Garry W Tallent Gary Wayne Talley Daniel Keyes Tashian Mary Curtis Taylor Downs B Thompson Ed Toth Guthrie Trapp Jonathan Marc Trebing Ted Tretiak

John Henry Trinko Robby O Turner Christopher Tyrrell Matthew Utterback George Larry Wallace William James Wallace Bruce Watkins N Leon Watson, Jr Jason Brent Webb Scott B Weckerly Margaret L Werner Garry West Kirk W Whalum William Monroe White, III Dan Edward Williams Lynn Williams Mark Wesley Winchester Rex Allen Wiseman Earl Jeff Wisor Michael Adam Wolofsky Xiao-Fan Zhang Mary Lynne Zirkle EXPELLED Kevin J Adams Carl Richard Albrecht Kurt Michael Allison Max T Barnes Douglas Belote Alyssa B. Bonagura Thomas M Britt Adam Browder Darrell Royce Brown Eugene A Bush, Jr Carly Campbell Joe Allen Carrell Richard B Carter Michael David Catone Ron Chancey Paul W Chrisman Jonathan David Coleman Bradley Thomas Connolley Steven Louis Cook Amber L Crowning Perry Danos Jared F Decker William Moody Denton, III Gray Devio Steven R Diamond Marty Ray Dillingham Roger Dale Eaton Brian Robert Eckert Marcus Edward Finnie Patrick H Flynn Jamie Christian Follese Sean Patrick Fuller Mac D Gayden Edward Earl Gidcumb Oscar Charles Gnaedig Nicholas Gold Eddie Gossien Michael Gray Brian Lee Green Edward Jorden Gross Erik B Halbig Joshua Alan Hallock John C Hamm Jeff Hanna Larry Thomas Harden Robert Harsen Warren George Hartman Donald Francis Harvey Billy Hawn Tara Haye Amos Jacob Heller W S Holland Mark Lucas Holman Stephen Kent Hornbeak Leigh Houison

Noah Joseph Hungate James E Hurst Charles L Jacobs John B Jarvis Dina M Johnson Dirk Johnson James David Jones, III Edwin Hamilton Josey John P Kearns Jay Daniel Kimbro Craig Dwayne Koons Karen Ann Krieger Patrick S Lassiter James Philip Lassiter Jason Allen Lauver Earl L Lett Bobby J Lewis Jeffrey Allan Lockerman Isai Daniel Lugo Steve Anthony Mandile Roderick D McGaha Charles Lynn Mead Jamel Franklin Mitchell Joe Murphy Emily Rose Nelson Mark E Nesler Christopher Aaron Powell Charles W Rainey Heather R Risser Danny Roberts Steve Romero Laura Ann Ross Robert M Rutherford Gary Sadker Rex Paul Schnelle Michael Harrison Seal Christian Kraus Sedelmyer Gene Sisk Darran G Smith Ken E Smith Lindsey Allison Smith-Trostle Wayne Dee Southards Jeffrey Michael Spirko George Geoffrey Sprung Donna Kay Stallings Adam Carter Steffey Steven David Stern Ruby Rachel Stewart Alan Stoker Jeremy Stover Donald Thompson Mark F Thompson George Tidwell Samuel C Tritico Jesse Tucker Rozlyn Marie Turner Joel David Wallace Kevin A Ward Clayton Hale White James Marshall White Lawson Wayne White, Jr Erich William Wigdahl James Edward Williams Jake Willemain Kevin Brent Williams Micah Wilshire Andy Witherington Brian James Wooten Scotty Lamar Wray William Harrison Yount TNM

APR—JUN 2018 33


DO NOT WORK FOR The “Do Not Work For” list exists to warn our members, other musicians and the general public about employers who, according to our records, owe players money and/or pension, have failed to sign the appropriate AFM signatory documents required to make the appropriate pension contribution, or are soliciting union members to do nonunion work. When you work without protection of an AFM contract, you are being denied all of your intellectual property rights, as well as pension and health care contributions. Every nonunion session you do harms your AFM Pension. TOP OFFENDERS LIST RecordingMusicians.com - Alan and Cathy Umstead are soliciting nonunion recording work through this website and elsewhere. Do not work for them under any circumstances without an AFM contract. Steve Schnur, worldwide music executive for the videogame company Electronic Arts, is commissioning and recording non-union sessions in Nashville for his company’s hugely successful franchises. EA declared $4.3 billion in net revenue in fiscal year 2015 and despite many promises made, he still refuses to work under AFM contracts or negotiate in good faith. We will continue to work towards resolution. These are employers who owe musicians large amounts of money and have thus far refused to fulfill their contractual obligations to Local 257 musicians. Positive Movement/Tommy Sims (multiple unpaid contracts from 2007) Terry K. Johnson/ 1720 Entertainment (unpaid contracts/unauthorized sales - Jamie O’Neal project) Beautiful Monkey/JAB Country/Josh Gracin Eric Legg & Tracey Legg (multiple unpaid contracts) Ed Sampson & Patrick Sampson (multiple unpaid contracts) Ray Vega/Casa Vega Quarterback/G Force/Doug Anderson Rust Records/Ken Cooper (unpaid contracts and pension) Revelator/Gregg Brown (multiple bounced checks/unpaid contracts) HonkyTone Records – Debbie Randle (multiple unpaid contracts/pension) UNPAID CONTRACTS AND PENSION Casa Vega/Ray Vega Knight Brothers/Harold, Dean, Danny & Curtis Knight RLS Records-Nashville/Ronald Stone Region One Records RichDor Music/Keith Brown River County Band/SVC Entertainment (unpaid demo conversion/pension) Robbins Nashville

Next General Membership Meeting Tuesday, May 15, 2018 2 p.m. 34 THE NASHVILLE MUSICIAN

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UNPAID PENSION ONLY Comsource Media/Tommy Holland Conchita Leeflang/Chris Sevier Ricky D. Cook FJH Enterprises First Tribe Media Matthew Flinchum dba Resilient Jimmy Fohn Music Rebecca Frederick Goofy Footed Gospocentric Tony Graham Jeffrey Green/Cahernzcole House Randy Hatchett Highland Music Publishing In Light Records/Rick Lloyd Little Red Hen Records/Arjana Olson Maverick Management Group Mike Ward Music (pension/demo signature) Joseph McClelland Joe Meyers Missionary Music Jason Morales (pension/demo signature) O Street Mansion OTB Publishing (pension/demo signature) Tebey Ottoh Ride N High Records Ronnie Palmer Barry Preston Smith Jason Sturgeon Music AFM NON-SIGNATORY PHONO LIST We do not have signatory paperwork from the following employers — pension may have been paid in some cases, but cannot be credited to the proper musicians without a signatory agreement in place. If you can provide us with current contact info for these people, we will make sure you get your proper pension contribution for your work. 604 Records Heaven Productions Stonebridge Station Entertainment The Collective TNM


APR – JUN 2018 35


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Profile for AFM Local 257

The Nashville Musician — April - June 2018  

The official quarterly publication of the Nashville Musicians Association, AFM Local 257. This edition features John Prine, Norbert Putnam,...

The Nashville Musician — April - June 2018  

The official quarterly publication of the Nashville Musicians Association, AFM Local 257. This edition features John Prine, Norbert Putnam,...

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