Page 1


Method to Our Madness – Notes from your Editors 1. The tribute pages are alphabetized by nickname. In other words, how we know each other – As the memory dims, last names, married names fade – but our nicknames and the names we gave each other stay cemented in our memories. This is why most of your pages use your maiden name – unless you specifically put your married name into your header. 2. You are looking at your pages with the minimum of edits. We formatted superficially but the contents were left largely alone. So if dates, names and spelling (some grammar?) need editing we thought that was a style thing. This can be worked on later. We noticed a persistent problem with tenses. Pages would begin in the past tense and then gradually the present tense would take over. This we know is a mindset. Although some of our mothers are gone, they are still with us and the memory is as if they walk and talk with us still. So we did not alter that. 3. It was a matter of cost – we just couldn’t afford to print these books in color. Oh how we wanted to. Oh how we tried. In the end we would have had to sell our first-borns (thankfully some of us didn’t have any!) 4. But we fully intend to digitally make the original color copies available. To everyone - either on Picasa or some other free and public web service. Please be patient. It will be available soon. 5. Finally, this is “a draft,” a first submission – a promise of what can be a jaw– droppingly significant addition to our sapphire (45th) homecoming commemorative programme in 2014. 6. Here in the pages that follow, we are “daughters first” again. Here and for always we are so grateful to our Mothers. CJY, PLP, CGH, GAC, LGC


WE ONLY HAVE ONE MOTHER

We only have one Mother – birth, adoptive, step, or figurative. We, Class ’69 Theresians, give honor to our Mother with this tribute of a Tea Party and the presentation and dedication of a collective manuscript of testimonials (tentatively entitled “MY NANAY BOOK”) written by us about each of our own Mother. It is never too late to recognize our Mother at any time. As they say, it should have been done “yesterday” - while they are still on Planet Earth to hear us or read our words of thanksgiving, admiration and love for them. And any day is the perfect day for giving Mother her tribute’s worth for a lifelong testimony of love for us. Mother nurtured us - body, soul, spirit - through our growing years of elementary and high school days in St. Theresa’s College - and even if we were not very obedient daughters, her advice and guidance has sustained us from sweet sixteen to sensible sixty. Today we are sweet sixteen again and our Mother is in her early 30’s or 40’s. She’s packing our sandwiches into our schoolbags, checking that our homework is okay, braiding our hair, powdering our backs, seeing us off to school, ”helping” us with or sewing projects, coaching us in reading, guiding our hands in penmanship, signing our report cards, and seeing that we’re going to school in a good mood and a full stomach. Our Mother, be She present in life or in spirit is the woman we place on a pedestal of honor, thanksgiving and love. We only have one Mother, and She is a treasure as much as She treasured us. We love our Mother forever and we give thanks to God for who She is. Our bucket list continues…

MA. ASUNCION “NANCY” TANCINCO REYES-LUMEN January 20th, 2013


ANG TANGI KONG YAMAN Ang tangi kong yaman Na pang habang buhay Ay pagmamahal ng aking ina na walang katulad Ang kanyang paglingap At mga pagdamay Walang kapantay kahit saan Kay sarap mabuhay Sa piling ni Nanay Pag nasawi ka Ay mayroon pa ring napaglalambingan Kanyang mga payo At mga pangaral Alaala ko habang buhay

-

These lyrics come from a song by Conching Rosal. We are grateful that Athens aka Goddess aka Diosa remembered Marilou Unson gave them to her some time ago. The NanayBook went out without a dedication page. Seems like it was waiting for this perfect expression.


Agnette and Ebony Peralta’s Mom – Carmen Prospero dePerio Peralta

Mameng, Lola Mommy, Lola Menchie, Mama, Mommy is CARMEN PROSPERO dePERIO PERALTA, our 86 year old mother who was widowed in 1976 at age 49 by our father Atty. Isauro Corpus Peralta. Mama lost her mother at an early age and was taken care of by her married but childless aunt Tia Ineng since her eldest sister Nene already was busy helping earn a living and taking care of the rest of the siblings. Moreover, her father had remarried a widow with several kids, too. Mama had to do housework in her aunt's home while studying in elementary school in her hometown of Castillejos, Zambales. In high school, she and her cousins boarded with a family because the high school was not near the center of town where the de Perio clan had their homes. Her high school education was interrupted by the Japanese invasion of the country, because the family had to evacuate to the mountainous area of Castillejos. After the war, she finished her high school studies and came to Manila to take up the Associate Degree in Elementary Education at the Philippine Normal College. Her studies were funded by our grandfather and by Mama's older sister Liling who was then already working in Manila. Mama taught in Castillejos, Zambales, but after she and our Daddy got married, they moved to Manila. From being a lawyer in the Department of Labor (DOL), our father rose through the ranks to become a (DOL) Regional Director. As an RD, he was assigned to different parts of the country. Mama did not work in the school system anymore because she would be mother and father on weekdays during the period when our Daddy would be assigned outside Manila. They produced six children (4 girls and 2 boys) and Mama had to take care of us plus her backyard pigs and chickens, and home garden (with help from our kasambahay). As the home economist, Mama had to juggle the salary of our Dad, augmented by financial help from Auntie Liling who had moved to the USA, some profits from Mama's rice fields, her food-


Agnette and Ebony Peralta’s Mom – Carmen Prospero dePerio Peralta generating projects, and plastic bag-related home project. We also did not have to buy rice because this was supplied from her rice fields and Daddy's family's rice fields. Moreover, thanks to various scholarships awarded to us and our siblings, we were all able to go to elementary and high school studies at St. Theresa's College (for all the girls) and Lourdes School (for all the boys), and for college studies at UP ( five of us) and Ateneo (one of us). One of Mama's economical tricks was that of feeding us dinner after school, instead of merienda. However, we could take midnight snack if we had to stay up late studying. We also often had eggs as a viand. In April 1976 our father passed away. By then, we (Agnette and Yvonne) were already working. During our growing up years, we also shared our apartment with cousins from the province who would live with us in Manila for their college studies. This is one reason why we are very close to our cousins. Mama had a triple heart bypass in 1992 and a knee replacement surgery in 2010. She was also able to visit our youngest sister Donna STCQCHS ´82 in the USA in 1992. Mama now lives in Olongapo, with Cheryll, Cyrus (there on weekdays) and now 90 year old Auntie Liling who is being taken care of by a midwife. Fast Forward... Mama is now what we can call a Lady of Leisure. We have all become successful: Yvonne - a food scientist, son David is the 2007 Chemistry Board Topnotcher Agnette - a Medical Physicist and is a Director of the Department of Health Center for Device Regulation, Radiation Health, and Research of the Food and Drug Administration. Cyrus - an Orthopedic Surgeon practicing in Zambales. He is married to an anesthesiologist and has two sons going to medical school Cheryll - STCQCHS '74 is an Internist Cardiologist in Zambales Dod - President and Global Director of IBM Systems married to an accountant and has 4 sons - one has graduated, another in medical school and the 2 youngest in grade school Donna - STCQCHS '83 used to work at the Silicon Valley but is now a special education teacher in Fremont, CA . She is married to an engineer. Her daughter is in college and has a son in grade school We love you Mama, Mommy, Lola Carmen! TO GOD BE THE GLORY!


Angela Aida W. Halili-Jao’s Mom – Remedios Jovita Musngi Warren-Halili My mother, Remedios Jovita Musgni Warren-Halili, fondly called Mommy Titang, turning 86 years old by February 15, 2013, is such a wonderful, gorgeous lady who has reared myself and my six siblings (Dr. Rosario Halili-Calimag, Lourdes HaliliPerfecto, Miguel Jose Halili III, Leoncio Mariano Halili, Bernadette Juanita Halili and Rachel Asuncion Halili-Tuazon) to become God-fearing, law-abiding, family-oriented, resilient individuals.

Remedios
Jovita
Musgni
 Warren‐Halili
(in
her
younger
 years)


She managed to find time for all of us and my deceased father, the former Quezon City Assistant Fiscal Miguel Halili Jr., despite her then hectic Literature and English teaching job at the Far Eastern University Boys High School in Morayta, Manila. When she retired from teaching, she helped in managing the Tofemi Realty Corporation, which celebrated its golden anniversary two years ago. By the way, Mommy Titang is also a Theresian, having studied at St. Theresa’s College, Manila and so are my four other sisters.

It was from my mother that I learned the values of love, marriage, family life and relationships. She instilled in me the values of hard work, integrity, commitment and dedication to my chosen field of endeavor and to never forget the underserved. I even followed her footsteps and I’m also teaching at the UP Manila College of Medicine. Currently, despite her post-stroke left-sided body weakness and recent cataract surgeries of the right and left eyes, she still takes active part in planning our menu for the day. She continues to read pocket books, to pray daily the novena to St. Bridget and to teach Spanish to my daughter, Bernadette. Three years ago, she voluntarily tutored her caregiver’s assistant who graduated with honors from a public night high school. She now also enjoys the company of my son’s two year old daughter, Erin Bianca Ong Jao and now, especially with her improved visual acuity following her bilateral cataract surgeries, watching HBO movies and the games of the Azkals, Pacquiao and even Donaire. 



 
 Mommy
 Titang
 during
 her
 85th
 birthday
 celebration
 at
 Elizabeth
 Hotel,
 Cebu
 City
 seated
 beside
 Odette
H.
Perfecto.

Standing
from
 left
 to
 right:
 Dr.
 Nina
 Halili‐Jao,
 Berna
H.
Jao,
Abigail
Halili,
Kenneth
 Halili,
 Karen
 Halili,
 Kyle
 Halili
 and
 Dr.
Mario
H.
Elloso.



Angela Aida W. Halili-Jao’s Mom – Remedios Jovita Musngi Warren-Halili 


During
the
Ong‐Jao
wedding
January
5,
2010:
Front
Row:
(First
row)
Remedios
Warren‐Halili,
Keisha
 Halili
and
Kevin
Halili;
(second
row,
from
left)
Emily
Jao‐Lopez,
Editha
Abesamis,
Bernadette
Halili
Jao,
 Dr.
Ednalyn
Ong‐Jao,
Dr.
Bernard
Halili
Jao,
the
author
and
Mark
Herrera;
(third
row)
Irma
Halili,
Dennis
 Halili
Agbayani,
Marie
Diana
Halili‐Gonzales;
(fourth
row,
from
left)
Pete
Halili,
Dr.
Junjun
Halili
Perfecto,
 Morris
Halili
and
Architect
Marvin
Gonzales).
 
 
 


From
Left:
Angeles
Warren‐Abes,
Mommy
Titang,
Dr.
Nina
Halili‐Jao
(April

2010)



Angela Aida W. Halili-Jao’s Mom – Remedios Jovita Musngi Warren-Halili

Ground
Breaking
Ceremonies
of
Tofemi
Realty
Corp.
and
Trighem
Corporation
in
Baguio
City
 May
21,
2011
(Mommy
Titang
seated
at
center
wheelchair)



 
 


Mommy
Titang
seated
beside
Odette
Halili‐Perfecto
during
her
great
granddaughter’s
second
 birthday
celebration
(Erin
Bianca
Ong
Jao)
last
September
2012.



Angie de Leon Izhar’s Mom Angelina “Helen” Francisco de Leon

To the best of my recollection: Mommy was a lawyer who finished law school from UP and worked as the Legal Assistant of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court at that time. She was an active member of the WILOCI. Mommy was such a kind, gentle and caring woman to all of her six children, until she got sick of cancer. I’m sure that if not for her illness, she would like to be remembered this way. Mommy always told my oldest sister Vicky who in turn imparted to us, the fact that no matter how much we disliked any of our Daddy’s ways (because he was so strict hehe), never to forget that Daddy is a very good father. I indeed realized this after she passed away and I became a parent myself. Mommy said I was her only child whom she personally attended to as a toddler as opposed to having a nanny to do that for me, till later, hence maybe why I have such a strong bond with her. She also always referred to me as her “black beauty”, yet I know I wasn’t a beauty, black or whatever . I love her so and miss her to this day, 39 years after her death, such that the first time in my life I ever asked The Lord for a miracle was when she was dying of her cancer and I was still so young, in university. I love you Ma.


Aleli Raymundo’s Mom – Araceli Santayana Matriano-Raymundo

Araceli
Santayana
Matriano‐Raymundo
 Born
January
29,
1928
 Pharmacy
graduate,
University
of
Santo
Tomas



 
 Mom
devoted
her
life
raising
8
children.


 
 Strong‐willed
and
resolute,
mom
moved
heaven
and
high
waters
to
send
all
8
to
the
very
best
 colleges
in
Manila.


 
 Thank
you,
Mom.

I
will
not
be
where
I
am
today
if
it
were
not
for
you.


 
 Aleli
 

 



Athens Castaneda’s Mom - Maria Consolacion Guiam Castañeda 


My Mom with 4 generations - ako, my niece and my grandniece (my nephew's daughter). 



 When Mama turned 95 on 26 November 2012, I took her to the early evening Mass at our parish to thank God for the blessings bestowed on her. Before the Mass ended, Mama was asked by the priest to come forward to the altar to receive a special prayer followed by the sprinkling of holy water. As I ushered Mama back to the pew, another parishioner came forward to ask the priest to bless her mother who turned 100 the same day. Natalo si Mama by 5 years!!! 
 Quite a number of people, who were at Mass, came forward, greeted and congratulated Mama as well as the 100 year old lady. One of the parishioners asked Mama what her secret was for her longevity. Without batting an eyelash, she quipped "Mababait ang mga anak!" 
 I have 2 older brothers: the first was born 8 years ahead of me and the second one was already 5 years old before I came along. Afraid that she won't have a daughter, Mama prayed to St. Anne. Lo and behold, I said hello to my parents before they celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary. So may this be a warning to future mothers: beware of what you ask from Jesus' Grandmother! 
 Mama was a public school teacher but retired from the Central Bank of the Philippines. So Saturdays were always her marketing days and by Sunday, our refrigerator was filled to the brim with food cooked the Kapangpangan way. She learned to cook not from my grandmother but from her Tiya, my grandmother's sister-in-law. But, alas, her knack for good cooking did not pass on to me. Since she can no longer cook, our kitchen is in someone else's restaurant. I am sure that my fondness for clothes and style comes straight from her. As a child when she dressed me up, everything had to match from the ribbon or barrette on my hair to the color of my bobby socks!!! She has always been a prayer warrior. She spends her days praying the rosary and her various novenas. When she's not praying, she sleeps and somewhere in between she watches television. She is now a woman of leisure. It is surely well-deserved. She was a loving daughter to a woman who was widowed at 24 and never re-married. She was Ating Mary to her 2 younger brothers and a devoted wife for 42 years. She also doted on her grandchildren and great grandchildren until she was in her late 80s. Then a s now she asks, "What's for dinner?"


Belle Licud Sabares’s Mom - Francisca Marieta Campos Licud Like
 all
 other
 mothers,
 my
 Mother
 always
 reassured
 me
 that
 to
 her,
 
 I
 was
 the
 most
 beautiful
 and
 most
 loved
 youngest
 daughter
 in
 the
 whole
 world.
 Now
 it
 is
 my
 turn
 to
 tell
 the
 world
 that
 to
 me,
 my
 Mother
 is
 the
 most
 beautiful
 and
 most
 loved
 mother
 in
 the
 whole
 world.
 
 She
 was
 my
 strength
 and
 inspiration
 throughout
 all
 the
 challenges
 in
 life.
 My
 constant
 prayer
 for
 her
 was
 that
 she
 will
 live
 forever.
 
 However,
 my
 prayers
 were
 not
 answered
when
she
passed
away
on
August
13,
 2006
 at
 the
 age
 of
 91,
 while
 I
 was
 enroute
 to
 the
Philippines
from
Canada
to
visit
her.

 
 Mama
 was
 an
 Elementary
 school
 teacher
 who
 was
 educated
 under
 the
 American
 Thomasite
 Teachers
 in
 the
 year
 1934.
 
 She
 graduated
 as
 “Salutatorian”
 being
 a
 woman
 instead
 of
 “Valedictorian”
which
at
that
time
was
awarded
 to
 a
 male
 co‐graduate.
 
 
 Being
 a
 survivor
 of
 Thomasite
 students
 at
 age
 87,
 she
 was
 presented
 at
 the
 100th
 year
 Thomasite
 Centennial
 
 Celebration
 
 held
 
 at
 the
 Escaler
 Hall,
 
 Ateneo
 de
 Manila
 University
 on
 August
 Bel Licud Sabares with dear Mama, Francisca 25,
 2001.
 There
 she
 delivered
 a
 narrative
 Marieta Licud taken during her visit to Canada Sept presentation
 and
 was
 honoured
 by
 the
 1996 President
 of
 the
 Association
 of
 Thomasite
 Descendants
 and
 Students,
 Commodore
 Joselito
 Aseniero.
 
 Mama
 acknowledges
 acquiring
 from
 her
 Thomasite
 mentors,
 the
 knowledge,
 education
and
virtues
such
as:
love
of
God,
love
of
country,
love
of
fellowmen,
fairness,
justice,
freedom
 of
speech,
discipline,
enthusiasm,
perseverance,
determination,
hard
work,
integrity
and
honesty.


She
 is
proud
to
say
that
she
has
in
turn
instilled
these
values
and
virtues
to
us,
her
children
as
well
as
to
her
 grandchildren
and
great
grandchildren.


 
 Mama
also
served
as
a
past
President
and
Historian
of
the
Ladies
Auxiliary
of
the
US
Navy
Fleet
Reserve
 Association
being
married
to
my
father,
Agustin
Licud,
a
retired
US
Navy.

 
 In
 May
 2006,
 three
 months
 before
 my
 mother
 passed
 away
 at
 the
 age
 of
 91,
 she
 wrote
 an
 Ode
 to
 Mother
entitled
“Life
with
Mother
“(see
attached
in
her
own
handwriting).

My
mother
would
like
to
be
 remembered
the
way
she
expressed
it
in
this
writing.

 
 She
wrote
letters
to
me
in
Canada
almost
every
week
filled
with
inspiration,
good
and
happy
thoughts
 and
 loving
 messages
 with
 a
 constant
 reminder
 to
 always
 look
 up
 to
 God
 for
 Divine
 Providence
 and
 protection.

 
 At
 her
 death
 bed,
 she
 managed
 to
 scribble
 notes
 and
 messages
 to
 all
 her
 children
 and
 grandchildren
 who
were
then
by
her
bedside.


I
do
miss
my
Mama.

No
one
else
can
replace
my
dear
Mother.

God
 bless
her
soul.

 
 



Belle Licud Sabares’s Mom - Francisca Marieta Campos Licud




















 



Belle Licud Sabares’s Mom - Francisca Marieta Campos Licud


 



Belle Licud Sabares’s Mom - Francisca Marieta Campos Licud


 



Elizabeth Basa’s Mom – Francisca Ravara Basa

Francisca Hebron Ravara (Mommy's maiden name); Francisca Ravara Basa (married name) My mother started as a typical housewife until my father died when I was 9 yrs. old. She then thought of pursuing her career as a registered nurse to help with the family expenses. She was hardworking, strong- willed, & a fighter when confronted with life's challenges. In 1975, she was called to work in a hospital in Chicago, then Los Angeles. Mind you, she was 60 yrs. old already. Because she was either busy working while she was in the Philippines, then abroad from 1975 to 1996, I do not have lots of memories of her. But during all those years she always remembered us on birthdays & other special occasions. She made sure that distance was not a hindrance and we could always feel her love. If it were not for old age, my mom would not have stopped working. Unfortunately, age caught up w/ her & she decided to come home & spend the remaining years of her life w/ me & my family. Perhaps, she did this to make up for lost time. Since she died in 2005, we feel her physical absence but thoughts of her, her warm gestures of sincere love & kindness ( big or small) still linger in our hearts. I love my mom so much that up to this day, I feel the loss. I will always remember some of her favorite lines:


Elizabeth Basa’s Mom – Francisca Ravara Basa •

Never keep up with the Joneses.

In anything you do, always put your best foot forward.

If you want to buy something & you can't afford it unless you use your credit card, then don't buy it at all.


Bread Escueta's MomJosefina - Josefina DelgadoEscueta Escueta Bread Escueta’s MomDelgado 



 JOSEFINA DELGADO ESCUETA My
 mom,
 known
 to
 all
 our
 relatives
 and
 friends
 as
 Pining,
 was
 born
 in
 Bulacan,
 Bulacan
 to
 Ambrosio
Delgado
and
Juana
Ycasiano
on
March
27,
1908.
 My mom, known to all our relatives and friends as Pining, was born in Bulacan, Bulacan to 
 Ambrosio Delgado and Juana Ycasiano on March 27, 1908. Mama
 went
 to
 Assumption
 Convent
 and
 St.
 Scholastica
 for
 her
 elementary
 and
 high
 school.

 She
taught
Home
Economics
after
graduating
at
the
University
of
Santo
Tomas
until
retirement
 Mama went to Assumption Convent and St Scholastica for her elementary and High School. age,
which
was
the
year
we
graduated
from
college.
 She taught Home Economics after Graduating at the University of Santo Tomas until retirement 
 age, which was the year we graduated from college. Starting
from
the
kids
in
our
neighborhood
to
all
barkadas
from
school
of
my
brothers
(4)
and
 sisters
(4),
she
is
known
for
her
pancakes,
upside
down
cake,
sans
rival
and
her
chocolate
cake.

 Starting from the kids in our neighborhood to all barkadas from school of my brothers (4) and She
just
made
sure
my
groupmates
and
I
always
had
merienda.
 sisters (4), she is known for her pancakes, upside down cake, sans-rival and her chocolate cake. 
 She just made sure my groupmates and I always had merienda. Looking
back,
it
was
her
way
of
enticing
the
barkadas
to
hang
out
at
our
home.

To
date,
our
 family
encourages
friends
of
our
kids
to
hang
out
at
our
homes
for
obvious
reasons
but
serving
 Looking back, it was her way of enticing the barkadas to hang out at our home. To date, our only
delivered
pizza.
 family encouraged friends of our kids to hang out at our homes for obvious reasons but serving 
 only delivered Pizza. It
goes
without
saying
that
she
was
a
dedicated
and
loving
wife,
mother
to
9
children,
and
Lola
 to
 37
 +
 1
 grandchildren.
 
 The
 +
 is
 my
 menopause
 baby
 Zoe
 whom
 she
 never
 got
 to
 see
 and
 It goes without saying that she was a dedicated and loving wife, mother to 9 children, and Lola enjoy.


 to 37 +1 grandchildren. The+ is my menopause baby Zoe whom she never got to see and enjoy. 
 Every month she would refer to her birthday and anniversary list and buys all the cards to send Every
month
she
would
refer
to
her
birthday
and
anniversary
list
and
buy
all
the
cards
to
send
 to her children and grandchildren. We have missed her and her birthday cards for the past 23 to
her
children
and
grandchildren.

We
have
missed
her
and
her
birthday
cards
for
the
past
23
 years and continue to miss her. years
and
continue
to
miss
her.
 



Bread Escueta's Mom - Josefina Delgado Escueta Following is one of her favorite recipes:

Bread Escueta’s Mom- Josefina Delgado Escueta

Following
is
one
of
her
favorite
recipes:
 


UBSON ll""VI.

Sponge Coke BJ.SIC INGR.iilli.;.i;NrS:

6 eggs 1 C. flour 1 C. sugor

1/4 tsp. salt 1 tsp. OO.king p:rw..l<:J r 4 tbsp. wat0r or juice

Sift flour once, measur~, t~an sift with baking pow ~ur or juice Prepar;a 2 boHls. In a larg..:r one place the! eggyolks c:n:l to the colcr~d. Ba~t th~ whitds until stiff but not Jry. To th0 beaten eggyolk aJJ 1/2 c. sug~r anJ th~ othJr half to th3 white. J.JJ the flour altcrnc.h:ly with thlil wa"Wr to th-> yolk nri.xtuN then fold this into th0 eggwhit~ miXtur~. Bake in 2 lay~r greas~J pans dustad with flour. Bake in JIPderate oven for 25 minutes at a t~mp.:!rature of J)O deg. F. Raise to 350 de~;. F. to brown. Onmold on a cake rack anJ,cool. Vi.R:U.TIONS:

Sponge

BUTTr;R ICING:

Cak~

with

Butter I£Y!g

1 C. butter l .C. sugc. r

3/4 1

C. milk (chilled) vanilla

tsp~

Cream the buttdr, aJ.J su[ar gradually and beat until fluffy • .hdd the milk gradually; baating well after .each addition. Continue adding the milk until the sugar granules disappear and the whole runout of milk's consumed. When the mixtuN is fine an<l snvoth, spraad on the cooled -cake. lESSON XXVII.

Vi.R.IATIONS: UpsiJe-down Cake Sruoo ingre;tients as Sponge ·Cake, plus: SIIlc."lll can sliced pineapple J/4 C. brown sugar 1/J C. butter or margarine M!lraschino ch~rries i f dasire1 1

On thd baking pan place the butter anJ brcwn sugar; melt .over slew fire. R~~ve then arra.Ilf.e the cut pineaPPle slices in attractive patter aocenteJ by the maraschino cherri~s. Ovar this pour the »ponge cake batter.· Bake in mo-ierate oven for Jl) minutes. The sponge cake when 1one loosen the ~dges and ~urn cvar a round plrte showing off the pineappla base. ~~Cake

Same ingredients and procedura as 1 small cn.n sliced peaches 1 big can Nestle r·s cream

Spvnp3 Cake, plus: Maraschino cherrios ·

- 35 -


Carmen "Baby" Abesames’s Mom – Patsy Torres Abesames
 


Pastora
"Patsy"
/
"Toray"
/
"Taba"
Torres
–
Abesames



 Mama
hailed
from
Gapan,
Nueva
Ecija,
the
youngest
in
a
brood
of
one
boy
and
five
girls.
Born
on
August
 7,
1927,
she
 was
 named
 after
 her
 town's
patron
saint,
Divina
Pastora.
Her
nickname
was
Toray
 which
 evolved
to
Patsy
when
she
started
working
and
in
later
years,
would
be
called
Taba
by
our
relatives
as
 she
became
pleasingly
plump
when
we,
the
children,
came.
But
they
say
she
was
a
beauty
in
her
youth,
 getting
invited
to
be
a
muse
in
town
fiestas
or
a
“sagala”
in
Flores
de
Mayo.
Graduating
with
a
degree
in
 Education,
she
didn't
pursue
teaching
since
she
got
hired
right
after
graduation
as
a
secretary
cum
typist
 in
a
government
office.
That
was
where
she
met
Papa,
a
talented
and
debonair
lawyer.
The
union
was
 blessed
with
three
children‐
me,
Boy
and
Vicky.

 
 Mama
was
very
loving
and
sweet
and
took
very
good
care
of
all
of
us.
In
fact,
she
spoiled
us
all,
but
my
 brother
got
special
treatment
for
being
the
only
boy.
Despite
its
advantages
and
disadvantages,
giving
in
 to
your
wants
was
her
way
of
showing
love.
My
daughter,
Tet,
experienced
this
generous
love
and
she
 has
fond
memories
of
her
lola,
who
took
care
of
her
until
she
went
to
pre‐school.
(‘GIVE
GENEROUSLY
 BECAUSE
 IT
 WILL
 MAKE
 THE
 PERSON
 HAPPY
 AND
 THAT
 HAPPINESS
 WILL
 RADIATE
 TO
 EVERYBODY
 AROUND’.)
 
 Mama
loved
the
good
life
and
liked
to
celebrate
occasions
such
as
birthdays,
school
affairs
(graduation
 or
 field
 day
 presentation)
 and
 anniversaries.
 She
 liked
 marking
 milestones
 with
 photos
 and
 keeping
 souvenirs.
 One
 tradition
 of
 hers
 was
 having
 our
 pictures
 taken
 at
 every
 birthday
 in
 X’OR
 Studio.
 
 We
 would
 do
 the
 same
 after
 every
 Field
 Day
 Presentation
 in
 school.
 This
 continued
 all
 throughout
 our
 elementary
years.
Sadly,
I
now
regret
not
being
able
to
carry
over
this
tradition
in
my
own
family.
(‘TAKE
 PICTURES
 SO
 THAT
 YOU
 WILL
 BE
 ABLE
 TO
 REMEMBER
 THE
 OCCASION
 AND
 HAVE
 BEAUTIFUL
 MEMORIES’.)
 Mama
 also
 commemorates
 death
 anniversaries
 of
 relatives
 where
 she
 invites
 people
 to
 her
“Padasal”,
then
serves
them
her
yummy
native
delicacies.
It
was
her
way
of
keeping
her
extended
 families
close;
a
reason
to
get
together
with
her
siblings
more
often.
 
 Mama
 was
 deeply
 religious
 and
 spiritual.
 One
 of
 my
 fondest
 memories
 of
 her
 would
 be
 seeing
 her
 in
 daily
prayer
often
with
a
Rosary.
She
and
Papa
would
attend
novenas
to
Our
Mother
of
Perpetual
Help,
 
 



Carmen "Baby" Abesames’s Mom – Patsy Torres Abesames
 St.
Jude
and
the
Black
Nazarene.
By
example,
she
taught
us
to
be
prayerful.
(‘PRAYER
WORKS
MIRACLES.
 IT
WILL
HELP
YOU
OVERCOME
ANY
PROBLEMS
IN
LIFE’.)

Going
to
the
Misa
de
Gallo
was
a
tradition
we
 imbibed
from
her.
I
remember
how
we
loved
walking
in
the
cold
for
the
dawn
masses
and
being
part
of
 the
church
choir
that
sang
traditional
Christmas
songs.
I
tried
to
continue
this
tradition
in
my
own
family
 but
somehow,
this
is
still
a
work
in
progress.
We
attend
the
anticipated
Midnight
Masses
but
we
never
 really
get
to
complete
all
the
nine
days
due
to
workload
and
varied
schedules.
 
 Mama
eventually
became
my
role
model
of
a
working
woman,
efficiently
juggling
work
with
the
duties
 of
a
loving
wife
and
mother.
Like
me,
she
learned
how
to
cook
and
bake
only
when
she
got
married.
But
 unlike
me,
she
really
practiced
cooking,
and
would
later
be
known
for
her
superb
cooking
and
appetizing
 native
delicacies
which
people
liked
to
receive
as
Christmas
gifts.
(‘LEARN
TO
DO
HOUSEWORK.
IN
THE
 FUTURE,
 WHETHER
 YOU
 HAVE
 HOUSEHOLD
 HELP
 OR
 NOT,
 YOU
 WILL
 KNOW
 HOW
 TO
 FEED
 YOUR
 FAMILY.
 IF
 YOU
 HAVE
 MAIDS,
 YOU
 WILL
 NEED
 TO
 TEACH
 THEM
 DO
 THINGS
 YOUR
 OWN
 WAY.
 THERE
 ARE
THINGS
THAT
YOU
WILL
BE
DOING
FOR
YOUR
IN‐LAWS
THAT
YOU
DO
NOT
LIKE
DOING
NOW’.)This
 mantra
would
help
me
have
a
good
relationship
with
my
in‐laws.

 
 Mama
was
fashionable
and
was
the
typical
working
girl
of
her
time.
From
her,
I
learned
to
love
makeup,
 perfume
and
stockings.
I
remember
we
would
have
a
home
facial
together
before
I
prepare
for
a
party.
 Red
 was
 her
 favourite
 color
 which
 eventually
 would
 be
 mine
 too.
 I
 just
 love
 wearing
 red
 lipstick.
 Oftentimes
 it’s
 the
 only
 makeup
 I
 wear.
 When
 my
 youngest
 son,
 Mark,
 was
 of
 pre‐school
 age,
 he
 thought
 all
 the
 while
 that
 the
 natural
 color
 of
 my
 nails
 was
 red
 because
 I
 always
 had
 red
 nail
 polish.
 (‘WEAR
RED!
IT’S
A
HAPPY
COLOR’.)But
for
all
her
seemingly
modern
ways,
she
was
really
conservative
 and
strict
when
it
came
to
our
upbringing.
She
did
not
want
me
to
go
to
a
co‐ed
school
even
though
I
 passed
the
entrance
exams
at
U.P.
and
U.S.T
(‘FOCUS
ON
YOUR
STUDIES.
A
GOOD
EDUCATION
MIGHT
 BE
YOUR
ONLY
INHERITANCE.
DO
NOT
GET
MARRIED
EARLY!’)On
hindsight,
I
am
grateful
I
continued
in
 S.T.C.
 
 Both
 my
 parents
 loved
 music
 but
 it
 was
 Mama
 who
 wanted
 me
 to
 excel
 in
 piano.
 (‘WE
 MAY
 NOT
 BE
 RICH,
BUT
AT
LEAST
WE
KNOW
HOW
TO
APPRECIATE
THE
ARTS
AND
CULTURE’.)
In
order
to
encourage
 me
 to
 regularly
 practice
playing
 the
 piano,
 she
 would
 request
 me
 to
 play
 her
 a
 piece
 before
 bedtime,
 once
a
week.
However,
I
liked
dancing
more
than
piano
playing
and
I
know
I
let
her
down
then.
Years
 later,
 I
 would
 do
 a
 self‐study
 on
 piano
 but
 would
 unfortunately
 make
 little
 progress
 because
 of
 schoolwork
and
the
STC
Chorale
practices.
 Mama
 was
 generous
 both
 with
 her
 time
 and
 resources.
 Nobody
 who
 approached
 her
 left
 empty
 handed.
There
were
times
when
I
felt
she
was
too
generous
to
a
fault.
(‘IT’S
BETTER
TO
BE
A
LENDER
 THAN
A
BORROWER’.)And
Mama
loved
taking
care
of
her
grandchildren.
I
feel
blessed
that
she
would
 make
herself
available
for
us.
When
my
kids
were
toddlers,
she
did
not
want
me
to
leave
them
with
the
 household
 help.
 Hence,
 I
 would
 bring
 the
 kids
 and
 the
 maid
 over
 to
 her
 place
 and
 pick
 them
 up
 after
 office.
 

 Mama’s
great
love
and
care
was
manifested
when
she
tenderly
took
care
of
Papa
when
he
suffered
a
 stroke,
even
if
she
herself
had
Diabetes.
She
was
selfless
all
throughout
Papa’s
long
sickness.
Eventually,
 she
 would
 pass
 away
 at
 the
 age
 of
 sixty,
 two
 years
 earlier
 than
 Papa.
 Now
 that
 I
 am
 about
 her
 age,
 I
 realize
 how
 young
 she
 was
 then
 when
 she
 left
 us.
 How
 I
 wish
 she
 were
 still
 around
 now
 to
 see
 my
 beautiful
grown‐up
family
and
feel
her
pride
at
the
achievements
I
have
made
in
my
career
and
life
in
 general.
 
 Thank
you,
Mama,
and
I
miss
you
very
much.
I
love
you
and
I
always
pray
for
you.
I
am
so
privileged
and
 proud
to
be
your
daughter.
 
 



Cecile Joaquin’s mom- Rosario Tirona Joaquin

Name of Mother: Rosario “Charing” Tirona Joaquin+ Name of Daughter: Cecile “Chelsea” Joaquin Yasay Children: Teresa “Tess” Serrao, Erlinda “Lindy” Jalbuena, Cristina “Tina” Erum, Eduardo “ED” Joaquin, Enrique Jr. “Eric” Joaquin, Cecile “Chelsea” Yasay, Rene Joaquin, Walfrido “Freddie” Joaquin, Rosario “Charo” Villegas. She was a campus beauty queen and a freshman elementary education student at the

1


Cecile Joaquin’s mom- Rosario Tirona Joaquin

FEU. He was a law student when they were cast as leading man and lady in Anton Chekhov’s “A Marriage Proposal”. When the war broke out shortly after, they decided to get married because they couldn’t bear the thought of being apart. At 18, Rosario “Charing” Tirona became the bride of Enrique “Ike” Joaquin. Fast forward to 50 years later, Daddy Ike and Mommy Charing celebrate their golden wedding anniversary during the Christmas break by taking the entire brood to Hongkong – 9 children and spouses, and 50+ grandchildren and great grandchildren. To be a part of this family is to experience true love.

This is Mommy Charing’s legacy.

She devoted all her life to rearing nine children and her grandchildren. The house in West Avenue had more than 6 bedrooms to accommodate all the children and anyone else that needed care. It was the infirmary to a grand aunt during her cancer treatment and an uncle also suffering from cancer. Another aunt underwent a bone operation. They were nursed to health by Mom. Sundays were spent with the entire Joaquin clan and Mom made sure that this tradition was carried out throughout her life. The house in West Avenue was also the place where all our friends could hang out. Mom encouraged all of us to bring our friends over on the weekends so it became the party house. She knew them all by name. She was not just our Mom who fed us, took 2


Cecile Joaquin’s mom- Rosario Tirona Joaquin care of us when we were sick, helped us with our homework, sewed our clothes, drove for us when the driver was not around, and disciplined us. She was also our friend who loved to hear our stories. Our Dad was a larger than life hero, because Mom considered him one. She was the “silent” hero, the ever-supportive wife, the “wind beneath his wings” who helped him reach great heights in his career – as an officer in the World University Service where he travelled around the world delivering speeches, as a law professor at the FEU, as Chairman of the Anti-Dummy Board appointed by President Magsaysay, as the only non-American President of the International Telephone and Telegraph (ITT Phil), as Chairman ofBusinessday Corporation, as Immigration Commissioner appointed by President Cory Aquino, as Board Vice Chairman of the FEU Hospital, as Vice Chairman of Meralco, as Chairman of the Philippine Journal Group of Companies, and the list goes on.

. When all her children had grown, she finally decided to spend time on self-development. She took cooking, flower arranging and painting lessons. This is where she discovered her talent and passion for painting. In her first exhibit, all her paintings were sold. At this time too, Dad fulfilled his promise of taking her to all the places he visited while she was having babies. We enjoyed listening to her travelogues, and sometimes even had the pleasure of travelling with them. She was also active in church activities, spearheading the construction of a new chapel in Barangay Nayong Kanluran.

3


Cecile Joaquin’s mom- Rosario Tirona Joaquin

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO MOMMY CHARING: On character – from Dad but shared by Mom to us: Protect your name and reputation at all costs by doing what is right. On keeping the marriage: Never say no to your husband, he might look for someone who will say yes. On divorce: Work on perfecting your relationship. All of us are flawed. Better to stay with the “devil” you know and work on making him your angel. On finances: With budget limitations, you can save on everything else but never scrimp on food.

4


Cecilia Katigbak’s Mom – Cecilia Castillo Katigbak A SLUMBOOK PAGE FOR MY MOM (parentheses are mine)

MAIDEN NAME: Cecilia Katigbak Castillo (yes interfamily marriages happened during her time) NICKNAME: Maestra (she was a Math teacher before she had 11 children and after that she was the teacher to all of us. She supervised all our homeworks, reviewed us for our tests and kept a file of pictures for our scrapbooks. For others though she is called Maestra because she seemed to know a lot. She was their favorite go to. Doktora (she used to prescribe medicine for Dad’s patients who complained of simple ailments like stomach ache or colds) Mother Superior (her senior citizen group call her this not only because she is the oldest in the group but because she insisted on strict Christian discipline. Vanidosa (what can I say mom has blouses, shoes and purses that I would not own in a lifetime.) DATE OF BIRTH: October 30, 1921 (all of 92 and still swinging) FAVORITE SAYING: “Eh Eh Kainaman!” (translation: either I am impressed and am happy for you or I am not impressed so come sit down and let’s talk about it. That’s how she corrected us – never self righteous, never pointed fingers but always eager to listen and help come up with a solution) 
 



Cecilia Katigbak’s Mom – Cecilia Castillo Katigbak MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT: Winner of the “All Time Favorite Person Award” (her no nonsense values coupled with a good sense of humour, deep empathy for others and down to earth perspective make her the favorite sister, the favorite aunt, the favorite in-law, the favorite woman. FAVORITE COLOR: Red (how do I know this? She made us all wear red for her 90th birthday)

SECRET TO A LONG LIFE: Have someone to pray for (she believes that the Lord will not take her life as long as she still has someone to pray for. The problem is: the Lord quickly answers her prayers) MESSAGES: Dear Mom, I know you will be disappointed with this write up because there is no drama. So I have decided to end this tribute to you with a little drama. Here it is : Thank you, mom, because you were always there to wipe away my tears so I can see the stars. I love you. Your daughter, Cecilia


 



Cecilia “Cecille” Chua Chiaco’s Mom – Marcela “Celing” Chua Chiaco

Mom Celing was a nurse by profession, graduating with the highest academic award in her Nursing class of 1942. Her innate goodness and love for others is most evident in her loving care for her husband, Dr. Manuel Chua Chiaco and her devotion to her children and extended family which continues even today at 90 years of age! Mom Celing is a gourmet! Her cooking skills are legendary. She used to feed all the classmates of her children and even today, these same girls, now all grown with families of their own still fondly remember the best meals they had at the Chua Chiaco residence! When not in the kitchen, Mom Celing loved to sew and dressed her very meticulous clients in the finest haute couture attire. Her granddaughter, Elisa, an up and coming fashionista, readily takes after her with her own passion in the art of styling and dressmaking. A devout Catholic, Mom Celing is a long-time (since 1998) friend and supporter of the Bethesda Healing Ministry which Cecille now heads.


Cecilia “Cecille” Chua Chiaco’s Mom – Marcela “Celing” Chua Chiaco

“Do everything with PERFECTION IN MIND.” Mom Celing was a perfectionist: she always admonished her children to do everything with perfection in mind. Cecille attests that because of this, she, like her mom, is also a very meticulous person and a perfectionist. Cecille credits her flourishing catering business to the exceptional cooking skills and tips she learned from her mother.


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta Date of Birth: August 24, 1928 Parents: Buenaventura Reyes Nadres, Sr. + of Candelaria, Quezon Soledad Malleta Alabastro + of Lipa, Batangas As a child: According to my grandmother, Soledad, at an early age, my mother already showed her love for music. She would sing and dance and play the piano. She would play the piano with so much passion that she would always be asked by friends and relatives to grace their family gatherings with a piano number. Although typically shy, she would never turn them down. Her Story: At age 18, she met my father, Luis Tongco Villacorta + of Baliuag, Bulacan. All I know, as narrated to me by my grandmother, the moment my father laid eyes on her, he never stopped pursuing her. At 21, they married and were blessed with six (6) children: My Kuya, Luisito(1949), myself (1951), Andy (1953), Pol (1954), Bing(1957) and, after 12 years, Bong(1969). I grew up seeing them together all the time. They were inseparable. My dad was her constant companion and driver to church, the market, the grocery, to the parlor, shopping, etc. I remember they used to have ‘barkadas’ just like us, they were also couples, six of them if I remember right. They would go up to Baguio in motorcycles (what we call now as ‘big bikes’). What amused me, now that I think about it, was the fact that my mom would have her blouse and my dad’s polo made out of the same material. I think that was cute. To this day, I can still vividly remember some of them…colors and prints. As a family, we used to go out a lot to all the beaches up north, to Baguio, Tagaytay, everywhere. I remember her saying “I never really enjoyed going to the beach because all I did was count heads.” That was funny. She made sure everybody was safe. Then, in September 1974, we were all devastated by the sudden death of my dad due to stroke. We all felt the pain and the loss…but I felt sorry for my mom as I knew she was hurt the most. It took more than a year before she realized she had to move on. It was a year of frequent visits to Loyola Memorial, a year of sudden outburst of emotions every time she would come across anything that would remind her of my dad, like the unexpected encounter with the shirt he was wearing when he was rushed to the emergency, while she was cleaning the closet. I could go on and on… By God’s grace she was able to move on until March 2007, when she lost a son, my only unmarried brother, Pol, due to cardiac arrest. Again, it was painful for her to bury her own son. I was here in the states then couldn’t go home to be with her. Her strong faith


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta in God made her accept the fact that her son is in a better place now. experience with my dad’s passing have made her stronger.

I guess her

My Mom in My Eyes: When we were little, I remember she made sure we had all the things we needed. Every Christmas, she would have our clothes custom made and new pairs of shoes for all of us. She would go to the market and fill our refrigerator with food and all kinds of fruits in season. I remember my dad always praised my mom when it came to finances. She knew how to budget and save for the rainy days, so to speak. As a teenager, she would be my confidant and adviser. Because my father was a bit strict when it came to parties, my mom would always see to it that I would be able to go once in a while providing me with brothers and cousins as chaperones just to convince my dad that it was okay for me to go. When I settled down, my dad was no longer around. My mom would always tell me that as a wife I should see to it that my husband’s needs are always met…clothes should always be clean and neatly folded or hung in the closet. Food should be served when he gets home. Although I grew up with house helpers around, she said I should learn how to cook just like she did. She said a mother’s task was not always easy and could be very demanding in terms of time and attention but with lots of love could also be very fulfilling…and she is right. She just turned 84 last August 24. She was hospitalized 2 weeks after her birthday but she's fine now and doing well. She lives in Cainta with my youngest brother's family. Just like most moms her age, she has difficulty going out on long trips or even attending family gatherings as she gets embarrassed when she frequents the restroom. My mom is typically the shy type but considering her age, she knows how to bridge the gap between her generation and that of her grandkids' that's why they simply adore her. She starts her day with her daily devotion to the Lord. She loves to play the piano and because she stays home most of the time, watching the Filipino telenovelas and listening to old time favorite songs keep her busy each day. That’s my mom…and I love her.


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta

My mom's baby picture is a rarity...I mean, how my grandma managed to preserve their pictures...I have no idea. Their house in Candelaria, Quezon was turned into a garrison during the Japanese occupation and burned to the ground.


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta


Rosario “Cherry” Nadres Villacorta Bringas’s Mom Carmen “Mameng” Alabastro Nadres Villacorta

Mama’s 84th Birthday, August 24, 2012

Taken at my Kuya Louie’s residence at Filinvest East Antipolo, Christmas 2012

Mom with her only living sibling, my Tita Lita

Her passion to play the piano


Maria Corazon “Cora” Guzman Herrera’s Mom – Elvira “Elvie” Guzman Guzman Children: Maria Lourdes “Mer” Moeharam, Maria Teresa “Terry” Alinea and Maria Corazon “Cora” Herrera. Mommy Elvie’s whole life revolved around her husband, Arnaldo Guzman, her children, her grandchildren. Her whole life was centered on her deep and unwavering devotion to God and the Virgin Mary. She had eclampsia with her first pregnancy endangering both her life and that of her baby. Hence, my parents decided to pace their pregnancies. I was 12 years younger than Terry who was 5 years younger than Mer. They indulged on each daughter as if each of us was an only child. That was the same way they pampered her grandchildren – each catered to his/her favorite dish and activity whenever they were in Biak-na-Bato. There is not a single day that I do not think of Mommy. I do miss her a lot specially when an important event/milestone happens. She had instilled values in me that I hopefullyhave been able to pass to my daughters. I am who I am now because of her. On spirituality: Your faith in God will carry you through difficult times. Offer everything to Him but you have to do your best in everything you do, He will do the rest. On family: Treasure family relationships, they are your support through life. Try to maintain regular family gatherings. On finances: Save, save, save… On Mother’s role: A Mother puts her family’s needs before hers. On education and career: Education is the best gift we can give you. All we ask is for you to try your best, work hard and we will provide you with unconditional support. On humility: One should not boast of one’s accomplishments. On love and life: Live fully and love unconditionally.


Elizabeth “Behja” Feliciano Dimla’s Mom – Mela Amorsolo Romulo-Feliciano


Elizabeth “Behja” Feliciano Dimla’s Mom – Mela Amorsolo Romulo-Feliciano How do I remember my mother? She was a housewife, a stay at home mom who’s major achievement was her thirteen (13) children and I am number six (6). She took charge of the house, made a home that brought so many good memories and molded us thirteen siblings into who we are and what we’ve become. Her daily routine started at 4 AM, preparing the day’s menu for breakfast, lunch, dinner and merienda in between; and made sure we all drink that glass of milk before bedtime. Saturday mornings were spent at a beauty salon to get her hair coiffed and nails polished, all for the Sunday visit to Church. She made sure she was presentable on her day with the Lord. A meticulous dresser, her dress, shoes and bag were always well coordinated. My mom was very strict (she got it from her German ancestry) and her words were always final. In spite of her being strict, she warmly welcomed everyone into our D.Tuazon home. Mom had the pleasure of knowing my best friends, classmates, boyfriends and everyone else that made memories with us during our growing years. Most of you would have remembered our house across STC, the many dogs that numbered more than 15 at one time, that barked in unison some times. She managed to run a huge household and the dogs efficiently. My mother instilled in us the value of family. She left a mark that made me become her when it was my turn to raise my children. And now I see my children turn into me in raising their children. The legacy continues. Thank You Mela! I know you and Daddy are always watching over us from up there. On another note, my mother was very religious and always wanted to attend the first mass on Sundays. Those days, it was at 6 AM. One liner I will never forget: “Sige pag hindi ka bumangon para magsimba, wala nang party party pag sabado.” O di wake up agad!


Elsa Ma. De Veyra Unson’s Mom - Estrella De Veyra Unson

My mom was a woman of many facets. She was not a career woman in the way that married women of today are but she made being mother and wife a full time career and vocation. She gave up her teaching job so that she could be sure that we were all being cared for properly. After looking at how things were running with the children being raised by helpers, she decided that it would be best to be a full time mom. She was supermom. My dad said that he would not have been able to build our resources if my mom was not the woman that she was. She knew how to budget…how to stretch…how to be creative so that the little she chose to work with could go a long way. Mommy always told us that she did not start off knowing how to cook…she did not even know what Patis was! House chores were not second nature to her as she was a piano major and a music teacher. I remember sitting with her watching musicals on television in the afternoons and listening to her play the piano and we would sing along to her accompaniment. Whatever nature homemaking was at the start, Mommy was a quick learner and set her mind and heart to do a great job in homemaking. I fondly recall the party dresses, suits and gowns she sewed (oh yes, even the cross stitch projects!). I remember her signature dishes as well. I know she would go all over the city in search of great buys. But that was not the end for her. Mommy even had time for regular parish work and charity work. She was at home also visiting the squatter areas and cooking for a day care that she and her friends helped put up in the parish so that the women from the slums nearby, could work. Mommy was a woman who had strong values and beliefs. 
 



Elsa Ma. De Veyra Unson’s Mom - Estrella De Veyra Unson Mommy was not like the telenovela moms. She was an uncomplaining woman. Even at her death bed, she was still concerned about daddy getting enough rest. She would not nag us to study but was strict enough to enforce the NO TV until homework is done rule. She also was a great woman who incentivized us to save. She would double the savings from allowances at Christmas time. She was at the same time soft hearted as she would help us do our cross stitch projects that I guess she must have felt were too challenging for us to do. She, like my dad…was very welcoming and hospitable. Our house was always filled with relatives from the province who visited or stayed with us while studying in Manila. Mommy and Daddy also did things together. They also had one mind and approach to things. None of us could try to get something done by just talking to her or to daddy. If it was a ticklish matter, she would say, “ask your dad.” You would know if that is a NO when both of them give you the ASK YOUR DAD, ASK YOUR MOM routine. Doing things together extended to going out with friends and to faithfully attend meetings with the Christian Family Movement and later the Ligaya ng Panginoon. She was prayerful and trusting in the Lord until the end of her life when she died peacefully knowing that she was being called home to God. Today, 28 years after she died, I still think of her fondly and thank God for the blessing she was to me – mother who brought me to life, mother who nurtured and raised me, mother who led by example and love, mother who was just plain SUPER!


 



ELY CHI CO’S MOM – TRINIDAD “TRINING” ESTEBAN CHI

Ely fondly recollects that her Mom Trining was a classic example of a wonderful stay home mom. She was the ultimate Chinese housewife and homemaker, a mother who dutifully cared for her husband and children all day long, attending to their every necessity. “My Mom Trining cooked all the meals: The vegetables were always the freshest in the market for that season. Sometimes, the ingredients for the meals were especially handcarried from China. From the airport, these vegetables were cooked straight away! We had the best Chinese meals every day,” recalls Ely smilingly as she fondly remembers all the wonderful meals her mom lovingly and diligently prepared for the family. Ely proudly boasts that her mom’s specialty was Chinese lumpia – a flavorful concoction of minced and diced vegetables all put together and rolled into a wrapper and served with different sauces and condiments. “Mom would go through the laborious ritual of slicing up all the vegetable ingredients by hand from early morning . . . and then after all the hard work of slicing, sautéing and wrapping, the hungry expectant kids would gobble everything up in seconds”, recounts Ely with a guilty smile on her own face. When not preparing meals, Ely says her Mom Trining would find time to relax in her beautiful garden which was overflowing with her collection of flowering orchids! ADVICE YOU REMEMBER MOST FROM YOUR MOTHER: “All the stuff that happens in my kitchen is a FAMILY SECRET”. Ely knows her mom treasured her cooking recipes and techniques and the admonition to keep all things that happen in the kitchen a secret was also because her mom would use a lot of imported products in her cooking.


Ma. Cristina “Gang” Aquino Chong’s Mom – Patricia “Saling” Rolison Aquino

My Mom Saling was a beautiful, genuine person gifted with a sincere love for people and the arts. But, in spite of her fun-loving, artistic and charitable ways, she was also a complex person with deep hurts, insecurities and unfulfilled dreams. In her lifetime, she didn’t graduate with honors, nor was she given any awards. In fact, Mom Saling only achieved a humble grade school education. The war years snuffed her adolescence and left her as a teenage mom. Life for her after that became laborious until she met my dad Tony when she was 21 years old. My mom’s indomitable and persevering spirit propelled her to survive and re-invent herself. She was a strict homemaker to a blended family, wanting always the best for her children. She supervised a meticulously cultivated household, was a perfect hostess and exceptional in giving theme parties. Through the years, she taught pattern-making and for a while operated a small dress shop at our Borromeo backyard. She learned how to drive at 55 and click the mouse at 65. She even collated her favorite inspirational “forwards” into a book Email Uppers for the Soul. She cross-stitched until her eyes gave up and painted with the passion of Van Gogh. Every morning like a ritual, she’d tackle the Crosswords, Cryptograms and Sudoku. At night, she’d challenge friends to a game of Scrabble! Her prayer life soared with the Bethesda Healing Ministry, her spiritual family. She embraced the opportunities to be closer to God and extended herself to those needing prayer, care and counseling. Until closely before her death, Mom Saling nurtured disadvantaged children at the Fe Del Mundo clinic who were suffering from leukemia. She never got over losing her youngest daughter, Papat, to this illness and I believe this was her way of coping. She was also Bethesda’s prime speaker on Healing of the Family Tree and did the genograms. I had a super special relationship with my mom. There were no secrets between us. I always tried to understand her in the joys and pains she shared. When Bethesda asked her to speak about herself at their LSS, she made sure to first disclose all the skeletons in her closet to me and my siblings before going public. Through her I experienced unconditional love. When I got sick with Lupus at 16 years old, she was inconsolable. In the1970s, Lupus was unheard of in the Philippines but Mom tackled finding the best doctors and treatment with unheard of ferocity and passion, it made me realize and value the depth of a mother’s love. From her I learned to be strong in my will to live, persevere and always be grateful. Mom was only 38 then but she aged 20 years thinking she would lose me too soon. She had such precious dreams for me: a better adolescence than she ever experienced, live as a happy healthy adult and hopefully develop a deep spiritual life. In my mom, I see a woman who lived her life to the fullest, ever faithful to her family and her God. I am alive today because God continues to preserve and sustain me. . . and because I have a mom who really loved me. ADVICES YOU REMEMBER MOST FROM YOUR MOTHER: “Always interest yourself in whatever interests your husband” and “When we can’t, God CAN!”


Grace Cuevas Fleta’s Mom – Segunda “Sedy” Marcelo Cuevas My mom was born July 10, 1917 in Sampaloc, Manila. As a child she was always asked to participate in the yearly santacruzan in their place because they say that she was very beautiful at her young age. At the age of 29, she got married to Benito Macasaet Cuevas from Batangas. They got married at UST Church on June 8, 1946. They were able to have 4 children and all were born in UST Hospital. They also had their 25th or silver wedding anniversary at UST Church followed by dinner at Club Filipino in June, 1971. In the year 1996 they were still able to have their 50th or golden wedding anniversary and follow by dinner at Shangrila-Edsa. UST grounds has been a very memorable place for my mom. Indeed the love life of Sedy and Itong as they are called was blessed with 3 girls (Mariza '64, Grace '69 and Portia "71 and the 4th a boy Benito Jr.. As far as I can remember my mom is not fond of going out but she goes to mass everyday. She is a domesticated housewife. She is very religious, having always time to pray and recites the rosary. Her being religious made the 4 of us like her. She always pray for our safety. Looking at the other side of my mom, she's a very gentle, generous and soft spoken person. She has her own way of pleasing each one of us. She's great in kitchen too. She cooks simple everyday food and special ones when there is an ocassion. When we were still small, she sees to it that each one of us has a birthday cake on our birthday. She always order the cakes from either Hizons or Estrella Ylagan which I believe is Estrels now. On special ocassions, she always order new dress for us girls from "Angeling" shop of Nina Valencia's aunt. Angelings was known sewing nice children party dresses and I too was able to have her sew my daughter's dresses from 1979-86. My mom has been a great help for me during my elementary and high school years because she always help me with my vocational projects that's why i always got high grades. I won't forget the Spanish veil she made for me. She was very supportive to all our needs. When she was already in her late years, she couldn't go downstairs anymore, she told me that every morning she would seat by the window and see me off for the office and in the afternoon she was seated by the window again to see that I came home safely from work. This was really a very touching gesture which I won't forget. She always include my family in her daily prayers . I really had a great time with her and I thank God for the 57 years we have been together (1949-2006). No one could ever replace her and to you mom- thank you for the love, guidance and time you have given me and my family. I love you very much and this I will always treasure for life.


Hec Forlales’s Mom – Adoracion F. Forlales My Mother, Adoracion F. Forlales, is a remarkable woman. She was born in June 1918 and will be 95 years old on her next birthday. However, it is not her age that makes her remarkable; it is her capacity to love life and to love unconditionally. Anyone who has reached her age has had their share of trials. But what differentiates one person from the other is how they respond to these trials. My mother has always met her challenges head on. Her unwavering commitment to God and her child-like trust in Him is the driving force of her life. It sounds very simple and it is in fact what keeps her strong and vibrant even in her older years. During the early years of their marriage, my mother and father only saw each other when he came home to Romblon while on furlough. He lived in the US because he was a soldier in the US army. He originally came to the US from the Philippines in 1932 and went home to marry a hometown girl. My mother has gone through the shock of my father being shot in New Guinea during WWII. And when the news arrived that my father, having just landed in North Korea, was captured and held Prisoner of War in a communist concentration camp, she had just learned that she was pregnant with me. I was 3 years old when my father was finally released. My mother, my sister and I arrived in the US in 1958 to join our father. And after a brief time together we were again separated. My father was deployed to Germany during the Berlin crisis. We returned to the Philippines in 1964 when my father retired from military service. Life went on. I studied in St Theresa’s and met all of you, my fellow Theresians. My sister and I married and had a family of our own. My mother took care of each of her grandchildren. She bore with us, her daughters, our pain, my divorce, the loss of a grandchild and the death of many more loved ones and friends. And through it all it was her prayers that kept her and her family together. About 4 years ago she moved back from the US to Romblon, our province. Since her move her health has improved. She has severe arthritis and get around in a wheelchair when she is out of the house; but she has no high blood pressure, no high cholesterol and twenty-twenty vision since she had lasik surgery. She is a social butterfly and enjoys attending all the social events in the town. She holds parties to celebrate the birthdays of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren even when we are not there. Many of these celebrations are catered affairs which she organizes. All of our birthdays are announced to the congregation during mass. There is no doubt that she lights up whenever she is in the company of relatives and friends. My mother sewed our clothes when we were young and continues to sew children’s clothes. She now sews the clothes of our helper’s children. She continues to decorate cakes for her friend’s birthdays. She is engaged in the politics of the day. She admits she did not become an American citizen even though she lived in the US for a number of years, because she did not want to lose her right to vote in the Philippines. Her house is a social gathering place where people come to discuss current topics. Last year when I had my car accident, I believe it was my mother’s prayers that saved me. Many who saw the damages of that head-on collision were surprised that I survived. And so when my mother was hospitalized for exhaustion after my accident it is not surprising. It was because she had prayed her 29 hours novena for my recovery!!


 



IRENE FLORES-REYES’S MOM – TERESA N. FLORES

A TRIBUTE FOR MOM Ever since I can remember, my mom has always been such a busy person, always on the go, caring for her large family of 8 boys and 7 girls. What struck me most during my growing up years was her ability and patience in teaching us the value of doing household chores together and helping out each other. This I value most because it has helped me a lot. When I had my own family, balancing family life and my career wasn’t such a hard task. After all, I only had 2 beautiful girls to take care for, while she had fifteen of us so what I’ve gone through was nothing compared to what she lovingly did for us. For me, she was and still is my guiding light in what I am today and I never forget to thank God for giving me such a wonderful mom.


Lena del Castillo’s Mom – Lillian Fernadez Del Castillo 


Lillian Fernandez Del Castillo was born an only child on 7-23-1013 in Jaro, Iloilo. She was married to Jose Godofredo Del Castillo and bore 8 children - Mira, Linda, Isabelita, Roberto, Greg, Carlos, Helena ( that’s me!) and Ramon. Although she was a nurse by profession, she did not get a chance to work because she married right after college and moved to Lingayen. She was very much respected in her community and loved by everyone because of her compassion: for example, the fish vendors in Lingayen would ask her to buy all their stuff so that they could go home earlier. And she would. She did this not only for one vendor but for all of them selling fish or seafood that day when she marketed. My mom is Mama Ling to all of us including her extended family and her friends. She was a disciplinarian but was gentle in handling her temper. Something I have to learn to do. She waited till you simmered down to talk to you. It was enough for her to just give you that look for you to stop whatever you are doing that is not pleasing to her. Mama Ling loved to dance which is why whenever she was asked to sing, she would opt to dance instead. She had a passion to grow cymbidiums, violets and other flowering plants and loved to donate them to those who shared her passion for them. She was a voracious reader and treasured her vast Harlequin collection! She also religiously followed her daytime USA soaps operas daily. She loved going to Vegas and was almost always a winner. She was widowed early, and never remarried because she believed Papa was the only one for her. Instead, she devoted her remaining years to her family. She was spoiled by Papa in every aspect of her life including allowing her to play mahjong everyday -- Once she got into an accident and Papa sent her roses which had to be picked up from Clark Air Base because they were shipped from the USA! Even when she suffered a stroke in 1988, leaving her right side semi functional, she never wanted the people around her to feel like she was a burden to them. She was one patient who was not "makulit” at all. She knew her medications and her medical routine, so she needed very minimal help until her last few months. Mama Ling was an active member of the Legion of Mary and was in church regularly despite her disability. She was President of the CWL of Lingayen at one time.


Leng Gomez Caine’s Mom - Paquita Villanueva Gomez MD


 “A mother is a person who seeing there are only four pieces of pie for five people, promptly announces she never did care for pie. ~Tenneva Jordan” 
 My Mom, Francisca “Paquita” Villanueva Gomez turned 93 in 2012. She was born in Angeles, Pampanga “posthumously” - in other words, she was in my lola’s womb when her father passed. My grandmother raised her and her sister by herself. Lola had a small tindahan in the palengke in Angeles City. But they lived in the household of my grandmother’s sister… so there was an uncle who was a very kind father figure and lots of women folk to make sure they behaved. Paquit always excelled in school, valedictorian in high school, Winthrop Scholar in Med school. I remember testing her by asking her the most esoteric words - and it always blew my mind that she knew their definition AND the Latin derivation! 1942 came and the war sent her away from Manila to seek safety from the Japanese Occupation. She was months away from graduating Medicine at UST. Eventually she graduated magna cum laude. She was on the fast track in her medical career – she had her own small hospital with her brother-in-law and then she met him. Colonel Francisco Mapa Gomez took her breath away (literally, he taught her how to hold her breath swimming)… They got married, and had five girls… My oldest sister Lisa died when she was 8 years old of polio (I was 5) and that left a sadness in her that time did not erase… But she was tough, and if one did not know any better, would never have guessed that this lady carried such a sorrow in her heart. She stayed home to raise us. When my youngest sister reached college, my mom started her medical practice again! Amazing. She practiced way into her 70’s and was always active in the STC family council and later in the barangay of our neighborhood. Her Wisdom Shared: 1. Be careful with words. Once you have let them leave your mouth, they cannot be taken back. They can change a relationship forever. 2.

Always try to be the best person you can be. Never be loud but subdued and refined.

3.

Be frugal. Do not spend what you do not have.


 



Leng Gomez Caine’s Mom - Paquita Villanueva Gomez MD She always stayed slim. How? She ate like a bird (except for 4 spoons of sugar in her coffee.) She sewed her own clothes and ours when we were growing up. And that was a good thing as money was usually tight. She loved to sew. More that a doctor, she wanted to be seamstress. She learned how to cook from Le Cordon Bleu but was never into food. Although her Kalamansi Merengue Pie (I attach her recipe) is legendary (it is really that all-butter crust that kills!) Now in her 90’s, she has added one more thing to her beauty regiment of soap, water and a rough towel - Retin A. And her skin is still silky and flawless. Oh, she always walked with an umbrella to keep the sun away. I am very grateful to have been blessed with such a mom!


 



Leng Gomez Caine’s Mom - Paquita Villanueva Gomez MD

Paquita’s Kalamansi Merengue Pie Recipe


 Kalamansi Merengue Pie Paintings by Erbu (commissioned by Lani Gomez Somera) 1 1/2 C flour 8 tbsp butter 1/4 tsp salt Ice water 1/4 tsp cream of tartar 4 egg whites 8 tbsp sugar 1 can condensed milk 1/2 C kalamansi juice 2 to 4 egg yolks For the Crust: Mix salt and flour. Work in cold butter with 2 knives. Stir with knives and moisten with ice water. Pat gently into a ball. Wrap and keep in ice box for 30 minutes. Roll out and line pie pan. Prick the bottom all over so it stays flat. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. For the Frosting: Whip egg whites with tartar. Beat in sugar until they hold firm peaks. For the Filling: Mix condensed milk, kalamansi and egg yolks until thick and pour into pie shell (cooled down). Top with merengue. Bake at 325 degrees for 15 minutes.


 



Ma. Lourdes “Lulu” Bangsal Gonzales’s Mom – Remedios Santiago-Bangsal

Of Mothers and Daughters

If there is one truism I can personally attest to because I have lived it in my own life -- it is the tension between mothers and daughters. Do not think that this tension caused some rift between us though; not at all. In fact, it spiced up our otherwise tumultuous interpersonal relationship in the beginning of our lives rendering it most interesting at the end of it. Remedios Santiago-Bangsal, whom I fondly called 'Mamang' was born on March 16, 1920. A true Pisces, she had difficulty taming a feisty tiger like me considering that her other daughter was a docile Libran, who was the pride of our family early on. My sweet and very feminine older sister excelled in the home arts -- cooking, baking and sewing -- home grown talents hardly ever associated with me at all. Why have I gravitated into and pursued the arts myself making it my life long career? It finally dawned on me that Mamang was an original and true Humanities aficionado. Why can I say this? She used to play our heirloom piano accompanied by Papang on his beloved violin. And how the two of them produced such beautiful music together! Thing is, we never appreciated those sessions in the early years when we had to sit through them after dinner in lieu of TV during school nights. She loved to concoct new recipes out of leftovers and present them with a lot of fanfare that eventually brought secret smiles from her brood when they began to realize the effort. She sewed our clothes from bargains she found in Divisoria due to her resourcefulness. And most of all, she loved life itself! This endearing trait of my mom is what a lot of you classmates remember about her the most. Who of you recall being entertained and fed with some home


Ma. Lourdes “Lulu” Bangsal Gonzales’s Mom – Remedios Santiago-Bangsal


 cooked goodies forever available at our house?! She was keenly sincerely interested in all my friends!!! Her influence on me is complete. We became the best of friends especially after I got married and begot two daughters of my own. We took time to travel together, went shopping seriously or just bought groceries, tried new grand restaurants on special occasions, ferried to beauty parlors on lazy days or simply drove around town. Do I miss her? Very much so. Another truism lived through -- one never realizes how wonderful a person is until he/she is gone from your life. Thank you for having been my mom. "I love you so much, Mamang."


Madge Sembrano – Mothers Three

MOTHERS

Mothers I had three, One passed away Before I was three, Two never married, Raised my sister and me. “Nanay-isms” lit our path Sayings fit for a diplomat Mottos, maxims, truisms Well-lived nay a caveat, Surely created our charism. Only a few are cited here Simply too many to cohere Some are just too common Others one needs to recon.

1. Love one another, do good to those who hate you. 2. Have faith in God. Trust in Him. Everything happens for a reason. 3. Don’t forget to pray. Always carry a rosary. 4. Count your blessings. Thank God in all things. 5. All things are passing. Look at things in the perspective of eternity. 6. Be strong no matter what situation life brings. 7. Be resilient in adversity. 8. Never become bitter, nor ill-tempered or rude. 9. Respect yourself first so others will respect you. 10. Never settle for mediocrity. 11. Stay humble despite you stature. 12. Friends give joy, but it is family who will sticks by you. 13. Be honest at all times, in your thoughts, words and deeds. Never pretend. Be yourself. 14. Be fair and just in your dealings with your fellowmen. 15. Between being kind and being right, choose to be kind. 16. Between wisdom and intelligence, choose wisdom. 17. Simplicity is beauty. 18. Health is wealth. 19. Patience is a virtue. 20. The past is dead. Tomorrow is still to come. Live in the present. Have hope. 21. Treat everyone with kindness and generosity. 22. Be at peace with yourself, with others and with God. 23. Despite success, it is only God who provides happiness and peace.


Madge Sembrano – Mothers Three 24. Serve God, your country and your fellowmen. 25. On top of all these, laughter and humor to embellish these. Character more than possessions, Fear of God than public opinon, Honor more than scorn, Integrity than duplicity. Values, principles and respectability. “Nanay-isms” infused my whole being And pervaded my whole upbringing. And so I must say, I am a product of three, Lucky were we, our mothers were three. Two are in heaven, one still lives with me. She at 90 still strong, healthy and free. I am happy, grateful and glee. All because God gave me mothers three.

--Madge Sembrano


Madge Sembrano â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mothers Three


Malen Claravall’s Mom – Dahlia Rivera-Claravall

A TRIBUTE TO A WONDERFUL PERSON As I look back, I am amazed that I was able to make it through today's performance. On February 19, 2007, I lost the dearest person in my life. It happened so quickly and left me emotionally shattered. The world was just one dreadful noise, then suddenly stone cold silence. I lost the energy to teach, the inspiration to choreograph and found myself barely able to mimic the motions of life. I was left without my mentor, my inspiration, my guide – and I felt the loss even more keenly because as she neared the end of her life, my mother had become my child. An extremely refined lady of the old school, she loved the arts, most specially the ballet. She was a great fan of all the students in the Paranaque studio. Every Saturday she was there, without fail, from 9am until sundown, watching all the young ballerinas learn their first steps and eagerly dance for her. Her appreciation of the advanced students’ grueling led to her applause at the end of each session. She never grew weary of observing their efforts.

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Malen Claravall’s Mom – Dahlia Rivera-Claravall Now the corner where she used to sit and watch is just an empty space. As I saw my students shedding tears at her wake, I could see that they felt a loss as well and I realized the impact she had on all of them. I remember my first days in ballet school as a four-year old. She and daddy would be there to support me – and support until the end they both did. However, their love for ballet did not blind them to the realities of life. They strongly encouraged me to finish my Accounting degree and take my license. Their wisdom proved prudent when I lost my husband 14 years ago and needed to support my three young children financially. The seed of my great love for dance and my need to pursue excellence, nurtured by both Dad and Mom has borne fruit. Mom, I dedicate this show to you! --- and also to all the parents who have patiently and cheerfully supported their daughters in this endeavor as they walk the path that my parents tread before them. Malen Claravall Director / Choreographer Source: Souvenir Program of Claravall School of Dance (Coppelia & Other Dances) 2007

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! !


Tess “Malong” Malolos O’Shaughnessy’s Mom – Naty Inocentes Malolos May 1916 - January 1999

My Mom was the best role model I could ever have. She was gentle but strong-willed -- a career woman who taught me, by example, that I could be whatever I wanted to be. When I was young, she left for the States to take her Masters in Psychology at the University of Oregon. Of course, I don’t remember any of this because I was around 3 years old then, but my aunts tell me that, at the airport when she came back home, I ran up to her and called her “Aunty Naty!” She more than made up for her absence though because my memories of her are very much of a hands-on Mom. Funny, I don’t remember her cooking much. What I do remember is her making sure the household ran well, and that we grew up close to my aunts, uncles and an army of cousins. When I went to the East-West Center/University of Hawaii to pursue my own graduate studies, I think she was as excited as I was. A number of times, I got phone calls at the dorm from Filipinos passing through Honolulu, carrying “CARE packages” from my parents – - filled with goodies from home. I know she wasn’t worried about my grades, but she did wonder why it was taking me a long time to write my thesis. She wanted to see my thesis proposal (‘Uhmmm, I don’t have one’). Okay, how about your thesis outline, she asked (“Huh? Am I supposed to do one of those?”). My Mom had mentored many graduate school students herself, so she jokingly questioned the quality of the university I was in since it didn’t seem to dispense appropriate thesis advice! Finally, she got herself invited to a conference in Honolulu, arrived at my dorm and said, “Alright… let’s see that thesis draft!” I didn’t have much of a draft to show her but did have reams and reams of research notes to demonstrate I wasn’t exactly just taking hula lessons in Waikiki, so she went home semi-satisfied. That was my Mom of the early years…. Many years later, I moved to Montreal where my brother had immigrated, having fled martial law in the Philippines. I fell in love and got married but for double ‘P’ reasons (procrastination + ‘paltik’ ng ulo) I decided I wanted to keep my name and not bother changing all my bank records and government paperwork to my married family name “O’Shaughnessy.” To which my Mom drolly remarked, “Tessie, di ba mga artista lang ang gumagawa niyan?!” Good thing my husband had a sense of humour! When my dad passed away in 1986, we convinced my Mom to permanently move to Canada. It was a huge move for her -- leaving all her brothers and sisters, all her colleagues and amigas in Manila, but she decided she’d stay with us. And life is funny. One week after my father died - and after eight years of marriage and no kids – I got pregnant! We said


Tess “Malong” Malolos O’Shaughnessy’s Mom – Naty Inocentes Malolos May 1916 - January 1999

this little baby is probably my dad giving my mom someone to love – and so my son Michael was born. My mom made it her life’s work to nurture him and fuss over him. Although this little baby with light brown hair looked very much like an “O’Shaughnessy,” he would fall asleep rocked to the singing of “Ating ko pong singsing!” Mommy also shared her love of reading with Michael, so much so that when he later entered Kindergarten at age five, he was already reading about space and super novas. My Mom was an amazing help to me raising Michael as well as my second son Charles. We went on walks together, played with the kids in the park, brought them to the doctor for checkups together. She taught me that spending time with the kids was the best gift I could give them. In Toronto, Mommy also became the surrogate mother for many of our close friends whose parents were back in the Philippines. They loved to visit with her, have long lunches with her and, yes, go shoe shopping! For many years, life in Canada for her was very family-centered. However, slowly, symptoms of illness began to appear. She was diagnosed with a rare Parkinson-like condition (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy) from which she suffered for 9 years. Those years were not kind to her, but her faith sustained her and us through the difficult times. Through my Mom’s prayers and quiet prodding, my brother Philip, sister Marissa, sister-inlaw Clarita, and my husband Don and I all went to Medjugorje to visit Our Lady’s apparition site. It was an experience of healing and profound conversion for all of us -- bar none. This gift of faith has been one of my Mom’s lasting gifts to us. I know classmates who tease me, saying I used to give the nuns at STC a bit of a shock asking “Sister, is God dead?” Thanks to my Mom, I don’t ask that anymore. I’ve found the answer. Praise the Lord!


Margaret “Marge” Magsalin Manuel‘s Mom – Delfina “Pinang” Foronda Magsalin


 The family picture was taken when I was four years old (standing at right side). Being a pretty mestiza, my mom loved to dress up fashionably. She also had good taste in choosing the outfits we would wear. Her secondary education was taken at St. Theresa’s College, Baguio City. Since my dad was a politician, law dean and practicing attorney, he prevailed upon her to leave her career and be a full-time housewife and mother. He allowed her though to be active in socio-civic organizations like being president of the Manila Jayceerettes, president of the Philippine Red Cross, Manila Chapter, and president of the Catholic Women’s League. Loving my dad unconditionally, she agreed to leave her nursing profession for keeps but she expressed her individuality and leadership through the organizations she joined. The saying “ Behind the success of a man is a woman” aptly applies to her. We felt that she was always behind my dad in all his aspirations. Even though she experienced many challenges in her life including being completely blind at the age of 70, she was steadfast in her devotion to God and her family. We would witness her praying four mysteries of the rosary every night namely one mystery for each child. Our diet was also being closely watched as our good health was her primary concern. In pursuing our dreams, she would always say “The early bird catches the worm” emphasizing the need for us to be hard-working and industrious and to go the extra mile, if necessary. Being a role model, mentor, coach, mother, friend and prayer warrior rolled into one, our mom molded our character and served as our inspiration. We thank God for creating a wonderful mom like her.


Marilou Unson’s Mom – Edith Tanseco Unson


 
 My
Mom,
Edith
Tanseco‐Unson,
was
born
in
Catbalogan,
Samar
86
years
ago.

She
is
a
petite
 woman
with
an
intelligent
mind,
(she
placed
7th
in
the
CPA
boards)
an
admirable
perseverance,
 fortitude
and
a
kind
heart.

She
remained
steadfast
in
her
support
of
my
father,
at
home
and
in
 business
as
well.
 
 My
 mother's
 life
 was
 a
 succession
 of
 obstacles
 and
 hurdles.
 Growing
 up
 in
 a
 big
 family,
 my
 mother
worked
very
hard
to
earn
her
living
since
her
early
years.

She
developed
an
extremely
 strong
will
and
the
ability
to
calmly
deal
with
each
difficulty
and
move
on
from
failure.
 
 My
 father
 passed
 away
 4
 years
 ago.
 She
 once
 told
 me
 that
 their
 years
 abroad
 were
 the
 best
 years
of
her
life.

It
allowed
them
to
grow
in
their
marriage,
to
have
time
to
hold
hands,
to
live
a
 life
 without
 major
 responsibilities.
 She
 still
 resides
 in
 Vancouver,
 Canada,
 a
 relatively
 healthy
 widow,
 who
 lost
 her
 sight
 shortly
 after
 my
 father
 died.
 
 
 She
 suffers
 from
 the
 dreaded
 “A”
 disease,
which
I
view
as
both
a
curse
and
a
blessing.




 
 One
of
the
greatest
privileges
and
blessings
that
God
has
afforded
me
is
learning
from
women,
 from
my
mother,
my
grandmother,
aunts,
girlfriends,
and
many
others
who
have
taught
me
life
 lessons
 I
 would
 never
 have
 grasped
 on
 my
 own.
 They
 have,
 consciously
 or
 unconsciously,
 influenced
my
decisions
so
that
I
am
who
I
am
today.


 
 But
it
was
from
my
mother
that
I
felt
most
loved.

In
fact
the
one
fault
that
she,
and
perhaps
 any
other
mother
has
is
loving
too
much.

She
was
quite
protective
and
I
sometimes
resented
 her
for
not
letting
me
make
my
own
decisions.
 
 



Marilou Unson’s Mom – Edith Tanseco Unson 
 As
I
begin
the
6th
decade
of
my
life,
I
feel
that
I
am
only
starting
to
know
myself
and
find
out
 who
I
really
am.

With
all
our
children
living
their
own
lives,
I
find
more
time
to
reflect
on
how
I
 lived
my
life
and
how
I
plan
to
live
the
short
future
ahead.

 
 The
 precious
 lessons
 from
 my
 mother
 are
 the
 luggage
 for
 me
 to
 go
 on
 my
 road
 to
 continue
 discovering
new
horizons
of
knowledge,
to
make
my
unfulfilled
dreams
become
a
reality.
I
owe
 my
strength
to
my
mother.
Her
life
experience
has
made
me
more
resilient
in
the
face
of
every
 hardship
and
every
failure.
As
a
mother
and
grandmother
myself,
I
also
realize
the
invaluable
 gift
of
life
and
true
happiness.

 
 I
 sum
 up
 my
 relationship
 with
 Mommy
 in
 the
 words
 of
 Erica
 Jong,
 an
 American
 author
 and
 educator:

 
 “My
mother
wanted
me
to
be
her
wings,
to
fly
as
she
never
quite
had
the
courage
to
do;
I
love
 her
for
that.
I
love
the
fact
that
she
wanted
to
give
birth
to
her
own
wings.”
 
 Thank
you,
Mom
for
all
you
have
given
me!
 
 



 



Ma. Luisa “Marilu” Vinuya Nagrampa’s Mom – Prudy “Mom P” Vinuya


 
 Mom
 P
 was
 an
 accountant
 and
 became
 the
 Chief
 Accountant
 of
 the
 Manila
 COD
 department
 store
when
it
first
opened.

 
 She
 was
 also
 very
 active
 with
 the
 Catholic
 Women’s
 League
 (CWL)
 and
 held
 the
 position
 of
 President
for
several
terms.
In
the
CWL,
she
spearheaded
a
project
in
Quiapo
where
the
CWL
 members
taught
the
mothers
of
the
street
children
sewing
using
the
sewing
machine.
For
this
 endeavor,
she
also
successfully
gathered
sponsors
to
donate
several
sewing
machines.
 
 Mom
 P
 loved
 to
 instill
 freedom
 of
 movement
 to
 her
 children.
 Marilu
 says
 she
 herself
 is
 lakwachera
due
to
her
mother’s
influence.

 
 Mom
P
also
loved
to
eat
good
food
and
eat
out.
Marilu
recalls
that
she
would
list
the
names
of
 the
restaurants
she
would
want
to
visit
in
a
pocket
size
notebook.
Gathering
the
family
every
 Sunday,
she
would
then
choose
the
restaurant
and
after
the
meal,
she
would
write
her
critique
 in
the
notebook.
If
the
restaurant
passed
her
mother’s
high
standards,
Marilu
recounts
that
the
 restaurant
would
surely
be
visited
again!
 
 



Marilyn Alcantara’s Mom – Soledad Azcarate Vda. de Alcantara 



 




 It
has
been
wisely
said,
"The
closest
thing
on
earth
to
God's
love
for
his
children
is
a
mother's
love
for
 hers".
This
proverb
is
so
true
for
our
mom,
Soldedad
Azcarate
Alcantara
or
"Choleng"
as
she
is
fondly
 called
by
friends
 and
 relatives.

 It
 is
 not
 only
to
her
children
that
she
has
given
her
selfless
dedication
 and
 love
 but
 first
 and
 foremost,
 to
 our
 Papa,
 Feliciano
 and
 to
 her
 numerous
 grandchildren
 and
 great‐ grandchildren.
 
 As
a
wife,
her
humble
submission
and
love
for
our
father
is
exemplary
and
these
were
well
reciprocated
 by
 our
 very
 kind
 and
 loving
 father,
 the
 prefect
 match
 for
 her.

 I
 saw
 her
 stay
 up
 late
 at
 night
 ironing
 Papa's
'barong'
and
pants
for
his
next
day's
Rotary
Meeting.

She
worked
hours
on
end
to
prepare
the
 most
 palatable
 meals
 for
 Papa
 and
 her
 children.

 The
 house
 was
 always
 tidy
 and
 clean
 as
 she
 was
 a
 stickler
for
orderliness,
sometimes
much
to
much
as
she
would
stay
up
to,
at
times,
the
wee
hours
of
the
 morning
 just
 to
 keep
 the
 house
 spick
 and
 span.

 By
 today's
 standards,
 she
 fits
 the
 description
 of
 and
 "OC"
or
Obsessive
Compulsive.

She
did
all
these
though,
to
make
sure
the
family
was
comfortable.
 
 Mama
 and
 Papa's
 relationship
 was
 most
 enviable
 as
 they
 served
 and
 loved
 each
 other
 with
 all
 their
 heart
and
being.

Not
once
did
we
ever
see
or
hear
them
fight.

Not
that
they
did
at
all
but
they
were
 just
so
discreet
about
it.
 
 Having
been
born
to
a
wealthy
Chinese‐Filipino
family,
Mama
could
have
readily
asked
for
the
best
of
 everything,
something
which,
to
some
extent,
her
eldest
sister
Amparo,
her
surrogate
mother,
provided
 her.

Having
spent
a
couple
of
years
as
an
"Interna"
at
the
Assumption
Convent,
a
school
noted
to
be
a
 



Marilyn Alcantara’s Mom – Soledad Azcarate Vda. de Alcantara favorite
 of
 aristocratic
 families
 then
 and
 now,
 she
 could
 have
 demanded
 a
 College
 education
 in
 Switzerland
or
London
as
a
lot
of
her
classmates
did.

She
however,
opted
otherwise.

As
a
dutiful
child
 of
her
Chinese
father,
she
gave
up
College
education
to
help
run
one
of
his
businesses,
a
chain
of
movie
 houses
in
San
Pablo,
Laguna
and
Lucena,
Quezon,
something
she
continued
doing
for
a
while
even
when
 married
to
our
father
who
likewise
assisted
her
in
the
business.
 
 Being
 married
 to
 my
 father
 changed
 her
 lifestyle
 dramatically
 as
 the
 latter
 came
 from
 a
 simple
 and
 frugal
family.

It
was
a
shock
for
her
mother
to
see
her
wardrobe
shrink
to
basic
essentials
‐
no
more
I‐ Miller
or
Andrew
Geller
shoes,
no
more
party
dresses
good
only
for
one
wear.
 
 Having
 been
 exposed
 to
 business
 at
 a
 very
 young
 age,
 and
 perhaps
 having
 inherited
 the
 business
 acumen
of
her
father,
Mama
was
a
strong
driving
force
behind
her
husband.
They
went
to
all
sorts
of
 businesses
 from
 candle
 making,
 repacking
 of
 beer
 procured
 from
 the
 Americans
 during
 the
 Second
 World
 War,
 baking
 Pan
 de
 Sal
 from
 camote
 flour
 when
 wheat
 flour
 was
 a
 scarcity
 during
 the
 war,
 poultry,
 cake
 decorating,
 food
 catering,
 restaurant
 business
 and
 producing
 stage
 shows
 featuring
 Dolphy,
Leopoldo
Salcedo,
Katy
dela
Cruz
and
the
likes.
 
 Without
 help
 from
 the
 parents,
 they
 managed
 to
 raise
 6
 children
 and
 support
 them
 through
 College.

 Their
 greatest
 legacy
 was
 the
 education
 they
 provided
 each
 one
 of
 us,
 their
 dream
 fulfilled
 when
 the
 fruits
of
their
labor
saw
all
their
children
turn
into
professionals.
 
 The
 start
 of
 the
 50's
 saw
 a
 big
 turn
 in
 their
 fortune
 when
 Papa,
 having
 been
 a
 dentist
 by
 profession,
 ventured
into
the
dental
laboratory
business
in
Manila.
This
meant
uprooting
the
family
and
making
the
 next
 major
 move
 to
 the
 big
 city.
 This
 also
 meant
 the
 ultimate
 sacrifice
 of
 saying
 good‐bye
 to
 being
 a
 business
 entrepreneur
 for
 Mama.

 She
 had
 a
 dream
 of
 expanding
 their
 restaurant
 business
 but
 Papa
 thought
the
children
 should
 be
given
utmost
priority
especially
that
they
 needed
all
the
guidance
 and
 attention
at
this
stage.
 
 Mama
is
a
multifaceted
woman
with
talents
ranging
from
culinary
arts,
painting,
intricate
embroidery,
 gardening,
flower
arranging
and
would
you
believe,
ballroom
dancing
during
her
younger
years
or
so
she
 claims.
A
very
sociable
person,
she
can
relate
with
anyone,
young
and
old,
rich
and
poor
alike.

She
can
 develop
 friendship
 with
 even
 the
 lowly
 "magbobote",
 Mang
 Carlos,
 the
 "mag‐iitlog",Onyang
 and
 Nick,
 the
mag‐asawang
"mag‐gugulay".
 
 Possessing
an
incredible
memory
to
the
day
she
died
at
92,
all
children
relied
on
her
to
remind
them
of
 anything
 and
 everything.

 She
 can
 remember
 details
 of
 past
 and
 present
 events,
 names
 and
 faces
 of
 people
 including
 their
 genealogy.

 Accounting
 of
 our
 house
 petty
 cash
 (by
 the
 way,
 she
 lived
 with
 my
 family
for
15
years)
is
done
to
the
last
centavo.
 
 With
perpetual
curiosity
as
to
what
was
happening
everywhere,
she
read
the
newspaper
from
cover
to
 cover
until
her
90's
and
could
discuss
with
anybody
the
latest
news,
including
the
teen‐age
idol
gossip.
 Being
a
very
efficient
telephone
operator,
she
would
lift
the
phone
at
the
first
ring,
at
least
when
she
 was
awake,
jotted
down
the
names
of
callers
and
their
messages
to
the
littlest
detail.

More
often
than
 not,
she
would
engage
them
in
conversations.

This
was
the
perfect
proof
that
being
old
does
not
mean
 waning
productivity.
 
 In
contrast
to
Papa,
Mama
was
a
stern
disciplinarian
to
her
children
and
grandchildren.

Just
one
look
at
 the
kids
was
enough
to
keep
them
in
toe.
She
possessed
a
very
strong
and
forceful
character,
not
giving
 



Marilyn Alcantara’s Mom – Soledad Azcarate Vda. de Alcantara up
 on
 anything,
 no
 matter
 how
 big
 an
 obstacle.

 Even
 in
 her
 90's
 she
 was
 very
 independent.

 When
 women
 10‐15
 years
 her
 junior
 had
 permanent
 attendants,
 she
 could
 almost
 do
 anything
 without
 assistance.
She
simply
refused
to
be
treated
like
an
invalid.
 
 Mama's
generosity
to
her
family
was
beyond
all
telling.
She'd
give
her
last
Php100
to
any
child
in
need.

 She
had
very
little
needs,
however,
one
of
her
quirks
is
collecting
junk.

Name
it
and
she
had
it
all
stored
 in
 her
 various
 cabinets
 and
 boxes.

 They
 truly
 came
 in
 handy
 when
 any
 child
 or
 grandchild
 needed
 an
 item
for
whatever
purpose.
The
amazing
thing
about
it
was
her
ability
to
remember
where
the
littlest
 item
was
stored‐‐
a
plastic
bag
wrapped
and
tied
securely
with
garter,
packed
within
a
box
and
stored
 within
a
bag
stashed
in
the
corner
of
her
cabinet.
 
 Hence,
Soledad
Azcarate
Vda.
de
Alcantara,
the
third
child
of
Tan
Chiong
Say,
a.k.a.
Pablo
Tan
Azcarate
 from
Amoy,
China
and
Feliza
Geroza
from
Bay,
Laguna,
was
granted
a
long
life
by
Our
Good
Lord
until
 the
age
of
92,
a
tremendous
grace
to
our
family
as
she
was
our
hotline
to
God,
what
with
all
the
rosaries
 and
novenas
she
offered
each
day
not
only
for
her
family
but
also
for
friends
and
almost
anybody
who
 needed
intercession.

By
the
way,
I
forgot
to
say
that
one
of
her
greatest
wish
as
a
young
girl
was
to
er
 the
nunnery.

Mama
a
nun?

 
 
 Fr
L‐R:
Henry,
Karl,
Marilyn,
Justine
&
EJ
(Timmy
not
in
photo)
 
 



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Menci Molina’s Mom – Maria del Carmen Gomez-Arnau 


Maria
 del
 Carmen
 Gómez‐Arnau,
 my
 mother,
 affectionately
 known
 as
 MariCar,
 married
 my
 father,
 Antonio
 Molina,
 in
 November
 1950,
 at
 a
 time
 when
 travel
 between
 Spain,
 her
 country,
 and
 the
 Philippines,
 took
 over
 three
 days
 by
 airplane,
 with
 numerous
 layovers.
 At
 this
 time,
 too,
 communication
 was
 uncertain,
mostly
through
letters
that
took
weeks
to
arrive,
since
 a
phone
call
was
a
very
expensive—and
unreliable—proposition.
 I
 recall
 hearing
 that
 my
 father's
 Christmas
 present
 to
 her
 that
 first
year
was
a
phone
call
to
her
father
in
Madrid.

 
 MariCar
 was
 a
 very
 courageous
 woman.
 She
 was
 the
 oldest
 of
 four
 children,
 whom
 she
 helped
 to
 raise,
 having
 survived
 the
early
death
of
their
mother
during
the
Spanish
Civil
 War.
When
she
made
the
decision
to
marry
my
father
 at
the
age
of
30,
she
not
only
adopted
his
life,
but
also
 his
 country,
 the
 Philippines.
 She
 became
 a
 Filipino
 citizen
 not
 only
 in
 paper
 but
 also
 in
 her
 heart,
 raising
 her
 five
 children
 to
 love
 and
 cherish
 the
 land
 of
 our
 birth.

 
 But
she
understood
what
it
meant
to
come
from
a
far
 off
land
and
the
emotional
sacrifice
this
entails.
As
a
 result,
she
was
particularly
welcoming—with
a
spirit
 of
true

"acogida"—to
anyone
who
was
struggling
to
 belong,
 anyone
 who
 might
 be
 far
 from
 their
 home.
 How
many
times
I
remember
her
being
on
the
phone,
 engaged
 in
 long
 conversations—mostly
 listening
 to
 someone
 in
 need
 of
 her
 attendant
 heart!
 And
 as
 demanding
as
we
were
with
our
various
needs,
she
would
go
to
each
one
of
us
whenever
we
 called
to
her.
A
funny
aspect
of
this
was
that
on
Sundays,
she
was
often
late
getting
ready
 for
 Mass—not
 because
 she
 dilly‐dallied,
 but
 because
 one
 of
 us
 was
 always
 in
 need
 of
 something,
 or
 had
 come
 to
 her
 with
 a
 question
 or
 a
 request.
 Perhaps
 that's
 one
 of
 the
 reasons
we,
her
children,
have
always
known
that
her
love
would—and
will—always
be
with
 us.

 
 My
mother's
constant
faith
sustained
her
and
 gave
 substance
 to
 any
 advice
 she
 imparted.
 In
 addition
 and
 perhaps
 more
 importantly,
 she
offered
the
example
of
a
life
of
faith
and
 ultimate
trust
in
God.
 
 
 



Menci Molina’s Mom – Maria del Carmen Gomez-Arnau I
 do
 recall
 a
 particular
 piece
 of
 advice
 she
 had
 about
 making
 decisions
 in
 life:
 "If
 you
 are
 faced
with
a
tough
decision
and
keep
wavering
back
and
forth,"
she
said,
"imagine
having
 made
 a
 choice,
 either
 way.
 And
 then,
 having
 placed
 yourself
 in
 that
 'future
 place',
 ask
 yourself
if
your
heart
is
at
peace.
If
it
is,
then
you
have
made
the
right
choice."
My
mother
 considered
 "peace
 of
 heart"
 a
 great
 value,
 and
 she
 was
 at
 peace
 with
 herself
 during
 her
 life—most
of
all
at
its
closing.
She
died
quietly
on
the
eve
of
All
Saints'
Day,
no
doubt
eager
 to
be
reunited
with
my
father
on
the
same
month
they
had
exchanged
marriage
vows
many
 years
before.
 



 


Antonio
and
Carmen
Molina,
1950



Milagros “Mila” Guerrerro Barretto’s Moms - Adela Fuentecilla Guerrero and Brigida “Iday” Barbaran Guerrero 



 
 That’s
me,
Milagros
Guerrero
Barretto,
on
the
first
row
to
the
right,
at
a
little
over
two
years
of
age,
with
 my
mom
Adela
Fuentecilla
Guerrero
in
the
coat
standing
right
behind
me.


 
 A
certified
romantic,
Mama
Adela
wrote
at
the
back
of
the
photo
the
place
and
the
date
–
Mines
View
 Park,
Baguio
City,
Feb.
16,
1954
–
indicating
that
she
chose
to
spend
Valentines
in
the
summer
capital
 with
my
dad
Conrado
(seated,
first
row)
,
her
two
kids
and
kin.
 
 Little
 did
 we
 know
 that
 she
 would
 join
 her
 Creator
 three
 and
 a
 half
 years
 later
 at
 age
 31
 after
 complications
from
giving
birth
to
my
only
brother
while
recovering
from
meningitis.

That
she
passed
 on
just
a
few
hours
before
my
sixth
birthday
made
me
the
object
of
extra
sympathy.
 
 Mama
 Adela
 valued
 Papa
 and
 us
 her
 children
 above
 all.
 A
 consistent
 topnotcher
 in
 her
 elementary
 &
 high
 school
 days,
 she
 eloped
 with
 my
 father
 and
 quit
 studying
 at
 UP
 Diliman
 to
 be
 a
 full‐time
 homemaker.
 
 She
 never
 wavered
 despite
 the
 vociferous
 objections
 at
 the
 start
 of
 her
 parents
 and
 six
 siblings.
 
 My
 fondest
 memories
 of
 her
 include
 her
 regularly
 bringing
 freshly
 made
 cold
 calamansi
 juice
 and
 sandwiches
during
morning
recess
for
my
elder
sister
Agadel
and
me
at
St.
Joseph’s
Olongapo,
with
our
 baby
sister
and
her
yaya
in
tow.

She
did
not
want
us
taking
soft
drinks
and
canteen
snacks.


 
 



Milagros “Mila” Guerrerro Barretto’s Moms - Adela Fuentecilla Guerrero and Brigida “Iday” Barbaran Guerrero 
 
 A
 lover
 of
 the
 arts,
 she
 enrolled
 Agadel
 in
 piano
 lessons
 which
 culminated
 in
 a
 recital
 complete
 with
 published
photos
in
the
newspaper.

Up
to
this
day,
Agadel
plays
the
piano
well.

Mama
Adela
taught
me
 to
 dance
 simple
 ballet
 steps
 with
 “The
 Swan”
 playing
 in
 the
 background.
 
 She
 would
 show
 us
 off
 to
 visitors
 –
 Agadel
 playing
 “The
 Swan”
 and
 I
 pirouetting
 awkwardly
 but
 with
 the
 confidence
 that
 Mama
 Adela
instilled
in
me.
 
 Her
genes
live
on
in
me
–
my
love
for
reading
and
writing
come
from
her
line
of
journalists
and
lawyers.

 And
above
all,
I
have
inherited
her
devotion
to
husband
and
offspring.
 
 Papa
remarried
in
1960.

My
stepmom,
Brigida
“Iday”
Babaran
Guerrero,
was
a
27‐year
old
elementary
 schoolteacher
who
happened
to
be
staying
in
the
same
boarding
house
as
my
dad
in
the
hinterlands
of
 Cagayan
province.

Papa,
a
civil
engineer,
was
working
on
a
road
construction
project
and
got
intrigued
 by
the
lady
boarder
who
never
left
her
room
except
to
go
to
school.

Again,
as
in
the
case
of
my
Mama
 Adela,
Papa
won
Mama
Iday’s
heart
despite
the
howl
raised
by
her
family.

What,
a
widower
with
five
 young
children,
a
stranger
in
town,
will
carry
off
the
sheltered
“bunso”!

Rumor
has
it
that
the
reason
 why
we
the
children
were
not
asked
to
attend
the
wedding
is
that
one
of
our
stepaunts
may
object
to
 the
marriage
in
church
during
the
ceremonies.
 
 Mama
Iday
proved
to
be
the
most
atypical
“madrasta”
that
she
was
always
mistaken
to
be
our
biological
 mother.

She
treated
us
in
the
same
manner
as
she
did
her
only
child
with
Papa.

And
to
this
day,
we
her
 stepchildren
remember
her
unconditional
love
and
care
for
us.

Barely
a
year
after
her
marriage,
Papa
 left
for
Singapore
to
manage
a
port
construction
project.

For
a
dozen
years
after,
he
left
us
mostly
to
 the
 care
 of
 Mama
 Iday
 as
 he
 moved
 from
 one
 country
 to
 another
 overseeing
 dredging
 and
 other
 infrastructure
projects
for
multinationals.


 
 And
so
it
came
to
pass
that
all
throughout
my
elementary
and
high
school
years,
only
Mama
Iday
was
 around
to
pin
my
medals
at
the
end
of
the
schoolyear.

Thankfully,
Papa
proudly
witnessed
my
college
 graduation
as
he
had
put
up
his
own
construction
business
in
Manila
by
then.

She
made
wise
decisions
 on
the
purchase
of
our
own
house
and
on
investing
the
funds
remitted
by
my
dad.

When
Papa
passed
 on
in
1979
after
a
lingering
illness
at
age
57,
she
continued
to
be
the
rock
that
held
our
family
together
 through
good
times
and
bad.


 
 I
will
always
be
grateful
to
the
Lord
for
bringing
her
to
my
life
–
she
who
gave
me
away
at
my
wedding,
 who
 helped
 look
 after
 me
 during
 my
 difficult
 pregnancy,
 who
 doted
 on
 our
 only
 child
 Yasha
 and
 who
 entrusted
me
with
the
administration
of
Papa’s
estate
and
her
retirement
fund.



 



Milagros “Mila” Guerrerro Barretto’s Moms - Adela Fuentecilla Guerrero and Brigida “Iday” Barbaran Guerrero 
 
 In
 the
 first
 photo
 below
 taken
 during
 our
 visit
 to
 the
 UN
 office
 of
 my
 younger
 sister
 Marge
 in
 Chiba,
 Japan
 in
 2002,
 Brigida
 “Iday”
 Babaran
 Guerrero
 is
 the
 woman
 with
 the
 sunglasses.
 
 
 And
 two
 years
 before
she
passed
on,
she
is
shown
in
the
second
photo
at
her
home
with
four
of
us
her
children
(except
 our
family
friend
on
the
extreme
left).
 



 



Mimi Chuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mom â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gloria Inocencio Chua

Growing up with 7 other sisters and 3 brothers was pretty amazing! There was a lot of sharing, laughter, and, also disagreements. As we each started our own lives, getting married, bringing up our kids- some moving abroad, including myself, there was something that always kept all of us together. These are our parents. Our Mom and Dad were always there for us. They always had a keen sense of what was going on with our lives. They always encouraged us to be the best of what we can, and as we became adults, applauded our successes and guided us with our missteps. Our mother, Gloria Inocencio Chua, was born on April 15, 1922 in Pandacan, Manila. Motherless and the eldest sister of 8 other siblings, she took it upon herself to take care of them with the help of close relatives. She grew up a real beauty and was hailed Miss Pandacan as a teenager. Just imagine being wooed by Ma Mon Luk with siopao and siomai in hand chasing after her in a caritela! We would always laugh hysterically when she would tell us this story. At 19 years old, she met my Dad, a widower with 2 sons, and fell in love. Their life together was not easy. They endured a world war together but lived harmoniously as partners bringing up a brood of an additional 9 children. As the family grew even more, our parents made Antipolo our weekend retreat, and it became our family's meeting place. Our Mom would make sure everything was in order for her children and grandchildren. These weekend retreats were indeed the highlight of our lives as young mothers and fathers, and also the grandchildrens' as well. Mom would be occupied with mahjong and pares pares with her chorum while enjoying the company of her family. I remember she would wake up early Saturday morning having a list in her mind of the weekend menu. No paper list for her! We would leave the wet market content with our bounty of fish, pork and a variety of kakanin. She drives a hard bargain for the tinderas, a trait that my sisters and I inherited to this day. These past 10 years were cruel to my Mom. I mourned for her each time I visited as I witnessed how her mind deteriorated and robbed of precious memories. But most of all, I was sorry that I couldn't thank her enough for her care and love, and tell how much I miss her. People always say you become like your mom. My sisters and I have become like her one way or another. She made us better persons, mothers and grandmothers. Her memories will not be forgotten as we, her children and grandchildren carry the torch of her unconditional love and legacy forever.


Minda Carmen Ruiz-Arceta’s Mom - Elisa Macaraeg Ruiz

Elisa M. Ruiz was my adoptive mom. She was the sister of my dad and she was childless. She waited for years to have me and I am thankful it was I whom my parents "gave away" to be legally adopted by her. Elisa was the second of 6 children and since the eldest was sickly, my mom became the decision maker, disciplinarian, administrator, plus all the other responsibilities given to the "Atchi" of the family. Her decision was final and executory; but she was caring, loving, and sympathetic to her other siblings. She graduated with honors from the Instituto de Mujeres, the first vocational school for women in the Philippines. Because of this, I learned how to use the sewing machine at an early age. The first lesson that I remember most which she imparted to me was about patience. In one of our afternoon siestas, while she was sewing a dress for me, she asked me to untangle knotted threads. So I sat down and after a few minutes I gave up and said: "this is so difficult to do". In a soft and comforting voice, she said: “Darling Girl, (this was how she called me) you have to be patient. Sit down and untangle the threads one by one and before you know, it’s done.” And true enough, after patiently pulling the threads, I got it done. So today, whenever I see a Singer sewing machine and tangled threads in my sewing box, I remember vividly my mom and me during that rainy afternoon in May. Elisa was also a teacher and a guidance counselor; graduated from the UST. She was an advocate of "spare the rod and spoil the child." Her favorite tool to spank me with was the guava twig. She only did this when I was really "bad". Bad was being disobedient. After the spank she would explain to me the reason: "I spanked you because I wanted to drive away the devil in you." Those were her exact words. I was an only child and people thought I was a spoiled brat. She single handedly raised me to be a well-balanced woman. My adoptive father, Dominador B. Ruiz, succumbed to meningitis when I was only 4 years old. 
 



Minda Carmen Ruiz-Arceta’s Mom - Elisa Macaraeg Ruiz

My mom was also funny. I remember she criticized a childhood friend saying she looked like pancakes. Pancakes? And she replied: “It’s because my friend's cheeks were chubby.” She also advised me never to wear green and yellow. Again, I was puzzled and while laughing she said it’s because I would look like a parrot. My mom read this tale/story entitled “The canal of rice” to me when i was about 6yo. It was about a rich Chinese family who lived in a village. Whenever they had their meals, they threw their leftover rice in the canal that flowed downstream. There was a poor family living downstream and every day they collected the rice that was thrown by the rich family. After many years, the poor family became rich and you guessed right... the rich one became poor. So whenever I did not eat all the rice on my plate, my mom would always say, ”hija, remember the canal of rice”... her voice was foreboding and threatening but said in a loving way. My other cousins also knew this Chinese tale and it became a favorite saying at meal times... ”the canal of rice.” She was also a good cook. My favorite breakfast that she prepared was her champorado. Instead of evaporated milk, she would pour freshly squeezed coconut milk. I also loved her prawns with annatto seeds and simmered in coconut milk. That's probably the reason I love food cooked with coconut milk. She was a fashion icon during her time. She loved to go shopping at Aguinaldo's, Berg's, Syvel's and Rustan's in Cubao. She loved those white embroidered handkerchiefs which were only available at Aguinaldo's. She would buy a dozen of these hankies, put each in an envelope with cash and distribute them to her inaanaks. She taught me to moisturize, moisturize and moisturize . I miss my mom so much. She loved me with all her heart and her mantra to me was ”Darling girl, I love you so much too much.” She peacefully succumbed to cancer on July 13, 1982 at the Heart Center. In my own little way, I would like to honor her with this Nanay-ism. 1. Always be honest. 2. Be patient all the time. Patience is a virtue. 3. Don't show a man you love him so much... ayyayay! In other words, be pakipot! 4. Moisturize, Moisturize, Moisturize


 



Minda Carmen Ruiz-Arceta’s Mom - Elisa Macaraeg Ruiz

Elisa M. Ruiz (seated), Alejandro Sison (standing) extreme left, with my biological parents, aunts, uncles and cousins


 



Minda Carmen Ruiz-Arceta’s Mom - Elisa Macaraeg Ruiz

Mom during her chemo days.

Mom Elisa’s Prawns in Coconut Milk Ingredients: 1. 1 k of prawns or medium sized shrimps 2. 1 c of coconut cream or kakang gata 3. Achuete soaked in 1/4 c water 4. Salt to taste 1. Simmer prawns in coconut milk. 2. When prawns turn pink, add achuete water 3. Cook a few minutes more. 4. Add salt to taste.


 


My Nanay Book A-M  

Tribute Book presented and distributed during the Afternoon Tea for Mom Jan 20, 2013. It is aphabeticallly arrange by first or nickname.

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