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THIS PORTFOLIO CONTAINS THE DESIGN WORK OF NANA KOMORIYA.


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OUT THE WINDOW

PEACE PAVILION

CULTURAL CENTER

Fall 2018 Arch 100C Rudabeh Pakravan UC Berkeley

Spring 2019 Arch 100D Mark Anderson UC Berkeley

Spring 2019 Arch 100D Mark Anderson UC Berkeley

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Pages 16 - 25

Pages 26 - 29


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GOOD FOOD

DOUBLE NEGATIVE

CONSTRUCTION

Spring 2018 Arch 100B Eleanor Pries UC Berkeley

Fall 2017 Arch 100A Jason Campbell UC Berkeley

Spring 2018 Arch 160 Dana Buntrock UC Berkeley

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Pages 36 - 45

Pages 46 - 49

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01 OUT THE WINDOW CREATING A RELEVANT MODEL FOR A DENSE AND LEGIBLE CITY Fall 2018 | Arch 100C | Rudabeh Pakravan In designing a large scale housing project in Oakland, California, the window is explored as a catalyst that can generate new relationships between urban form, boundary, public space, flexibility, density, and legibility. On the one hand, the window frames the interior experience and its relativity to the city, “the inside out”. On the other, the window generates legibility for the urban form, “the outside in”. In this study, I developed an interest in exploring the window as a subtraction or erasure that allows for pockets of nature and privacy to be experienced in the midst of density. This project is developed through a four step sequence: 01 Domestic vs Urban: Exploring Boundary and Legibility 02 Through the Lens: Site Readings and Literature 03 The Elevation is the Generator: A Precedent Study 04 Spatial Construct: Out the Window “Certain features – open space, vegetation, sense of motion on the paths, visual contrasts – seem to be of particular importance to the cityscape.” — Kevin Lynch, Image of the City This project was selected for the CED Circus 2019, Student Exhibition 2019 & Student Archive 2019

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SITE PLAN

The site is at the intersection of Broadway Ave and West Grand Ave in Oakland. A wet wall, an infrastructural element found in existing urban conditions, is used as a continuous organizational device for the units across the site. The circulation is always along the wet wall axis which sets up a rhythm of movement. By having the wet wall house the bathrooms and kitchens, it maximizes the opportunity for windows and erasures to happen at the corners. 6


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The units are arranged across the site in clusters of three units (a studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom) with one shared common space on the ground floor. The shared space can be used as anything from an extra bedroom, an office, to an Airbnb that could generate extra income for the residents of the three units. The interior spaces are flexible, and units can be combined and separated with the sliding doors. This model proposes a new way of living that offers residents flexibility and control over the space that they live in.

SEPARATE UNITS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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SHARED SPACE + TWO BEDROOM

ONE BEDROOM + TWO BEDROOM

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

STUDIO + TWO BEDROOM

ROOF PLAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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Elevation oblique illustrating the relationship between the exterior facade and the interior plan. 10


Collage renders using photographs of physical models visualizing the outside in, elevated open spaces, and the inside out. 11


EXPLORING BOUNDARY AND LEGIBILITY This project began with two collages that manipulate the site context as an initial exploration of the relationship between domesticity and urbanism. This reading of the city was then followed by a close study of the Moriyama House by Sanaa. I found interest in how the volumes of the Moriyama House create in-between spaces for nature and privacy that feel remote from its immediate urban context. I wanted to explore this idea further by stacking and rotating volumes to create interstitial open spaces on different levels that integrate with the urban form. Through study models, a parti wall that connects the spaces together was realized. The parti wall became of particular interest to me because of the conversations of urbanism that it generated.

Elevation of the Moriyama House / SANAA

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Floor Plan of the Moriyama House / SANAA


Plan: A rotation is introduced as a response to the site

Elevation: Stacking and shifting of volumes allows for interstitial spaces to exist

SPATIAL CONSTRUCT In developing the final spatial construct, a rotation was introduced as a response to the site and the parti wall was thickened to become a habitable wet wall space. The wet wall and rotation work together as a generator for spatial organization. The wet wall is shared between units and can be read to have a paradoxical relationship: it is the most private layer of domestic life yet it plays with the idea of pushing into each others spaces. A void was cut into the wet wall to offer light and to form a relationship between the individual and the sky. 13


FINAL BRISTOL MODEL at 1/2 scale with interior details of the wet wall, furniture, sliding doors, and stairs. Study model at 1/8 scale. 14


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02 PEACE PAVILION KAIRA LOORO | ARCHITECTURE FOR PEACE Spring 2019 | Arch 100D | Mark Anderson In collaboration with Shaun Lien The Peace Pavilion in SĂŠdhiou, Senegal is a curation of spaces that feel both enclosed, for a sense of shelter, and open, for peace. Like most buildings in SĂŠdhiou, the pavilion sits in its site in a casual manner, and its form is generated from several loosely intersecting geometries that create a solid and void relationship. The voids become outdoor spaces that divide the pavilion into two distinct parts that are in dialogue with one another. In some orientations, the parts seem to be distinct sculptural objects. In other views, they read as a whole through a uniform roof profile. The facade is generated by cues from the surrounding context. With various depths and angles, the louvers create a facade that is constantly revealing and concealing, allowing for the pavilion to change its qualities while the visitor is moving around it. Excavation into the landscape allows the roof to have a close relationship with the ground and create an interior slope that fully engages the human body. The slope of the ground allows a continuous exhibition surface to transition from bench to table. A field of natural columns as interior structure contrasts the exterior louvers and invites the visitor to meander through the space. This project was executed in partnership with Shaun Lien. It was a highly collaborative process and the emerging form is an expression of each of us. I especially enjoyed the initial phase of brainstorming which included many excited back and forth sketches and scribbles to express an idea to one another. We worked together through every aspect of the project from developing the concept, making drawings, to building the physical model.

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SITE PLAN & SECTION PERSPECTIVE

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CONCEPTUAL PLAN

FLOOR & REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

ROOF PLAN

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC: PAVILION ASSEMBLY

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FRONT ELEVATION / ENTRY

REAR ELEVATION / RIVER

Approaching from the front, the pavilion appears to be solid as the louvers are arranged to conceal interior spaces. The two volumes read distinctly and sculpture like. On the other side, the river facing facade has a uniform roof profile, making the two parts read as a whole. The louvers are arranged spaciously to channel views from the river. The spacing between the louvers increases where there is an entry point, creating a porous space with many entrances. This weaves interior and exterior spaces and allows for a flexible public space that can have multiple functions. 21


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PROCESS: SKETCHES AND NOTES

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Final model at 3/16 scale made with plywood and dowels.

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03 CULTURAL CENTER KRAKOW, POLAND Spring 2019 | Arch 100D | Mark Anderson Inspired by John Hejduk, this vertical structure offers a space that rethinks and reconnects modern day Krakow to its geography and history through narrative and visual connection. The structure is carefully situated to channel various views from across the city. The louvers vary in depth to frame or fragment specific views and is operable to offer a dynamic experience. Historic images, maps, and text are projected onto surfaces to curate an immersive exhibit while creating a visual connection that relates the modern city to the historic city. This study was essential in the process of developing ideas for the Kaira Looro Peace Pavilion competition.

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Site map of Krakow, Poland 28


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04 GOOD FOOD SAN FRANCISCO CENTER Spring 2018 | Arch 100B | Eleanor Pries Good Food Center is located at the intersection of Oak St and Franklin St in San Francisco and is centered around the education, research, and production of food. The building requires various programs that are public and private, from a large market hall to test farms and research labs. While synthesizing the different programs, the structure and performance of the building is rigorously studied in creating the form. I developed a study of a prismatic form that shapes the exterior envelope as well as the interior experience and spatial organization. The study focuses on how shading devices can improve the performance of a building while crafting a transcending spatial experience as a byproduct. Particular attention is given to the structure of the building so that it fits within the framework of the spatial experience.

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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MEZZANINE PLAN

SECTION C-C

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SECTION A-A

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

SECTION B-B


The envelope consists of a faceted double skin with panels that vary in material for four different degrees of transparency: glass (transparent), polycarbonate (translucent), metal mesh (perforated), and solar panels (solid). Different size panels and materials are calibrated to the suns path and are layered to create varied lighting conditions. The envelope casts shadows onto the surface of the interior prismatic volumes that house the various programs. The structure resembles a diagrid system with a deep roof structure, box truss, and vertical structures that are carefully hidden within the volumes. The horizontal beams hidden within the floor plates attach to the light steel frame structure that supports the double envelope. The hidden structure and prismatic form craft a unique spatial experience that feels light and transcending.

CONCEPTUAL FACADE DEVELOPMENT

EAST

NORTH

WEST

SOUTH

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Final model at 1/4 scale made with acrylic, copoly, mesh, and bristol. Multiple iterations of study models at 1/8 scale include relational models, idealized models, and synthetic models that test different materials and production methods including hand cutting, laser cutting, and 3D printing. 35


05 DOUBLE NEGATIVE POTRERO HILL LIBRARY Fall 2017 | Arch 100A | Jason Campbell A double negative is defined as two subtractive voids that intersect to produce a third condition. A three dimensional spatial construct of the double negative is designed by a subtractive process. For PC, a sculpture by Tony Smith, was the starting point of a rigorous recursive process. The geometries of the sculpture were duplicated and combined through careful analysis. The same geometries were used to extrude from the mass to create voids. The recursive process of the overlaying trajectories resulted in the creation of the third condition, two negatives that make a positive. There is a clear registration in the overlapping of the two voids, in which an unexpected solid is formed. In this process, complexity was pushed while carefully maintaining a balance between solid and void. This project was selected for the CED Circus 2018 & Architecture Undergraduate Publication 2017.

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SERIAL SECTIONS show the emergence of a solid, the

unexpected third condition formed by the double negative. 38


FINAL BRISTOL MODEL

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UNROLLED ANALYTICAL DIAGRAM

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The double negative was further developed into a study of the relationship between form and program in designing a contemporary library. The intent for this library was to create an internalized space that is experienced through orientation, circulation, and thresholds. A central atrium is formed by the solid and void relationship of the double negative. The void houses the circulation and sequence of the program, while the solid becomes an object of navigation and orientation. SOLID The central solid is a means for way finding. Where ever you are in the building, there is always some kind of relationship between you and the solid whether it be looking up at it, walking around it, or occupying it. An unrolled analytical diagram illustrates the relationship between the circulation and the central solid.

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LONGITUDINAL SECTIONS

VOID The library requires a set of specific programmed spaces, including a lobby, offices, reference area, computer room, community room, children’s area, young adult’s area, and reading areas. The program is carefully arranged around the central void in relation to one another. The circulation wraps around the void in a spiral motion, orchestrating the sequence from one program to another. 42

TRANSVERSE SECTIONS


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

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FINAL BRISTOL MODEL 1/4 scale 44


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06 CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL EXPLORATIONS Spring 2018 | Arch 160 | Dana Buntrock In collaboration with Mahira Aly, Leah Lock, Sahil Mohan Three projects explore the three common building materials: steel, wood, and concrete. STEEL Steel was a challenge for it is an unforgiving material. Precision and attention to detail were key in the success of this project. The intent for the design of this steel stair was to have a repetition of frames that support a set of very light and minimal treads. The stair was constructed mostly with cold connections with minimal welding used solely for the handrail. Angles and rivets were used to create clean and aesthetic connections. Each of the angles were carefully cut from cold rolled L steel to match the exact thickness of the HSS frame. The treads were crafted by sandwiching perforated metal sheet in-between two metal bars. My group members and I worked together throughout the entire process. While in the workshop, I worked mainly on the smaller steel pieces, such as cutting the angles and drilling holes for the rivets, as I am very meticulous.

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WOOD In exploring wood as a material, a planter box was constructed using 2 x 2 softwood lumber, dowels, power tools, and hand tools. The intent for the planter was to create a continuous ribbon of density with repetitive vertical and horizontal members. Three different joints were used for three different conditions: the lap joint for structural support, the tongue and groove for the transition between horizontal and vertical members, and the bridle joint for creating the troughs that the plant pots sit in. My main contributions to the project were translating and developing the concept into the physical model as well as detailing and constructing the joints.

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CONCRETE Concrete was my favorite material to work with; the process was fun and experimental. My group members and I spent some time experimenting with different formwork materials before casting a table lamp as the final product. We found that plastic formwork produces a glossy polished finish while sand can be used as formwork for creating a irregular and grainy texture that resembles the walls of a cave. These two very different form working methods were used to craft a smooth rectilinear surface on the exterior and a rough organic texture on the interior. For the final pour, my role was to laser cut and assemble the formwork and to handle the sand during the pour.

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07 TANGE ASSOCIATES INTERNSHIP Summer 2018 | Tokyo, Japan During my internship at Tange Associates, I was involved in the renovation of the Mode Gakuen, a high-rise school building, in the three locations: Tokyo (Cocoon Tower), Osaka (Spiral Tower), and Nagoya. I modeled the interior renovations and created renders to present to the client. In addition to the renovations, I was responsible for the design of new signage and common space furniture for the Tokyo Mode Gakuen. My work at Tange Associates helped develop my interest in the intersectionality of architecture and urbanism. Paul Tange’s proposition of vertical architecture in rethinking density in Tokyo prompted me to want to explore architecture’s role in shaping urban form.

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NANA KOMORIYA

Profile for Nana Komoriya

Nana Komoriya / Architecture Portfolio 2019  

BA Architecture at University of California, Berkeley

Nana Komoriya / Architecture Portfolio 2019  

BA Architecture at University of California, Berkeley

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