LM&M May 2021

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MAY 2021 VOLUME 49 NUMBER 2
Business Continuity Planning
The magazine of the interNational Association of Lighting Management Companies, NALMCO®
Post Pandemic
26 16 4 LM&M | May 2021 25 NALMCO® MEMBERSHIP RESOURCES & UPDATES 05 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE 06 EVENT INFORMATION 06 WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES 08 CERTIFICATION RECOGNITIONS 09 NEW MEMBERS LIGHTING MANAGEMENT FUTURE TRENDS & BUSINESS 10 NALMCO SPONSORS MAINTENANCE STUDY By Craig DiLouie, CLCP, LC 12 BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE PANDEMIC By Bob Mellinger, CEO, Attainium Corp. PROJECT SPOTLIGHT CASE STUDY 25 NALMCO MEMBERS PARTNER ON ICE ARENA LIGHTING PROJECT IN MINNESOTA 25 FSG PROVIDES PROACTIVE DISINFECTION SOLUTIONS FOR FULLERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT IN CALIFORNIA 26 UVC MOBILE DISINFECTION UNITS KEEP CONESTOGA VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT OPEN ADVERTISING INDEX Acuity, 15 iR-TEC, Inside Front Cover Overdrive Lighting, 23 Saylite, Back Cover MAY 2021 VOLUME 49 NUMBER 2 SPECIAL SECTION 16 NALMCO 68TH ANNUAL CONVENTION AND TRADE SHOW

TRAIN STAFF WITH QUALIFIED CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS

NALMCO offers exams, training modules and study manuals online, removing all barriers to workforce development.

Train your workforce using NALMCO’s four certification programs developed by lighting industry experts. NALMCO’s training programs are reviewed annually to ensure programs are relevant to industry changes. Professionally narrated training modules, electronic manuals and online exams assure that training is easy to access and fit into any busy schedule.

NALMCO training programs:

1. Offer cost-effective resources to train your staff.

2. Are convenient. Study manuals, training modules and exams are offered online.

3. Increase efficiency and reduce liability. Trained technicians are effective and have fewer accidents.

4. Provide credibility. Stand out as a leader and acknowledge your achievements in the industry.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATIONS

CALT

CERTIFIED APPRENTICE LIGHTING TECHNICIANTM

Basic lighting terminology and lighting management operations. Prerequisite to the Certified Senior Lighting Technician (CSLT).

CSLT

CERTIFIED

SENIOR LIGHTING TECHNICIANTM

Experienced technicians reinforce the principles of basic and advanced lighting and lighting management operations. The Certified Apprentice Lighting Technician (CALT) is a prerequisite

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATIONS

CLCP

CERTIFIED LIGHTING CONTROLS PROFESSIONAL®

Assures that experienced professionals are highly educated about lighting controls based on curriculum designed by the Lighting Controls Association.

CERTIFIED LIGHTING MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT®

Lighting management professionals who have demonstrated superior knowledge and technical expertise in the areas of design, lighting, controls and sustainability.

*Qualifies for Certified Lighting Efficiency Professional (CLEP) reciprocal certification through partnership with Association of Energy Engineers (AEE).

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CLMC®
MEMBERSHIP RESOURCES

RECOGNITIONS CERTIFICATION

Congratulations to the following individuals for earning their professional designations between February 1–March 31, 2021.

CERTIFIED APPRENTICE LIGHTING TECHNICIAN ™ (CALT ™ )

CORPORATE ELECTRIC COMPANY LLC

Alexander Shepley, CALT Pao G. Vang, CALT CSL Ryan Ginn, CALT

LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES, INC. Landon Satterfield, CALT

LUMATECH Raymond Earl Verhoeven, CALT

STAY-LITE LIGHTING, INC. James Freebern, CALT

SUNSET LIGHTING Virginia Alvarez, CALT

YESCO ARKANSAS NORTHWEST Travis McGrew, CALT

YESCO PIEDMONT TRIAD Meagan Bray, CALT

YESCO, LLC Matthew Lucas, CALT Vince Tomanio, CALT

CERTIFIED SENIOR LIGHTING TECHNICIANS ™ (CSLT ™ )

AVAIL SERVICES Denise Dee Nichols, CSLT

CORPORATE ELECTRIC COMPANY LLC Michael Dennison, CSLT

ENERGY MANAGEMENT COLLABORATIVE Doug Meyer, CSLT Jonathon Rasch, CSLT

INDIVIDUAL Rothana Thorng, CSLT

CERTIFIED LIGHTING CONTROLS PROFESSIONAL® (CLCP ™ )

FISK ELECTRIC David Daniel York, II, CLCP

INDIVIDUAL Emily Abt, CLCP

CERTIFIED LIGHTING MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT ® (CLMC ® )

PRIORITY SOLUTIONS GROUP Kevin Matthew Foster, CLMC, CLEP

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NEW

MEMBERS

GENERAL MEMBERS

AGI

5514 Rio Vista Drive Clearwater, FL 33764 Phone: (757) 410-2374 www.agi.net

Contacts: Jennifer Conley, IES, Energy Solutions Sales Manager, jconley@agi.net

Mark Consigny, National Account Sales, Electrical Lighting & Maintenance Division, mconsigny@agi.net

Greg Crew, LC, CLEP, PMP, Director of Electrical Lighting & Maintenance Division gcrew@agi.net

Branch Location

AGI 2655 International Parkway Virginia Beach, VA 23452 (757) 410-2374

Contact: David Clower, VP of Electrical Lighting & Maintenance, dclower@agi.net

AKT3 COMPANY

9720 Capital Court Ste 108 Manassas, VA 20110 (866) 275-5782 https://www.akt3.com/

Contact: Emily Myer em@akt3.com

GENESIS LIGHTING SOLUTIONS

700 Parker Sq Flower Mound, TX 75028 (469) 322-1900 https://making-light.com/

Contact: Douglas Alan Head DOUG@making-light.com

EDUCATION PARTNER NATIONAL LIGHTING CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

3301 E. Hill, Ste. 408 Signal Hill, CA 90755 https://www.nlcaa.org/

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validate the method with field measurements, identify any relationship between age and average brightness, and gain insight regarding the incidence of exit signs no longer satisfying minimum brightness requirements.

Specific tasks to be completed by the research team include:

Literature review: The researchers will review all existing studies related to factors that make luminous signage detectable, identifiable and legible. The review will validate criteria for brightness, uniformity and contrast under critical conditions. Best practices, specification guide and related standards will be reviewed. This task will produce photometric criteria against which field measurements can be compared.

Concurrently, the researchers will interview experts to identify industry priorities and common practice for selecting, installing and maintaining exit signs. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the Fire Protection Research Foundation (FPRF) will be invited to contribute information about key issues related to the use of exit signs under emergency situations.

Field measurement procedure: The researchers will acquire several types of green and red exit signs and evaluate a range of methods to test sign brightness. These may include spot measurements at the sign using a portable luminance meter or digital imaging and also measurements at a known distance. These methods will be compared for simplicity, repeatability, accuracy, and cost. This task will produce a procedure for measuring exit signs in the field.

Field measurements: The researchers will conduct field measurements of exit signs installed in buildings in at least two locations. As much information as possible about exit sign operating age will be documented. The measurements will target about 100 to 120 signs, focusing on panel-face signs using red or green LEDs. This task will produce a large set of data with which to test the hypothesis.

Technical analysis: The researchers will estimate the number of exit signs with potentially insufficient brightness and relate that to the age of the sign. This is the ultimate test of the hypothesis that the greater proportion of older exit signs will have insufficient

brightness. If the hypothesis is confirmed, the researchers will compare expected and actual lumen depreciation. If the hypothesis is not confirmed, the researchers hope to gain an estimate of the portion of exit signs that produce insufficient brightness, regardless of age.

Present the results: The researchers will host a roundtable of relevant stakeholders, including NALMCO, to share project findings and discuss next steps. These may include: including field measurements in exit sign evaluation programs, potential changes to existing standards, and education of building owners regarding if, how, and when to evaluate exit signs. A report will be produced.

The researchers anticipate that this will be an initial study to develop a field measurement method and test the hypothesis. They expect the results will support a larger study that will include more applications and locations. The ultimate goal is to get a handle on the scope of the problem should it exist and produce actionable guidance for maintenance and replacement of exit signs.

This is a significant study in the industry, as it could result in revision of lighting maintenance practices, possibly affect future development of life/safety codes, and produce opportunities for lighting management companies.

Craig DiLouie, CLCP, LC, principal of ZING Communications, Inc., is a consultant, analyst and reporter specializing in the lighting and electrical industries, and a regular contributor to LM&M. You may contact Craig at cdilouie@zinginc.com.

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greater than we could have imagined, so we need to think bigger as we plan for the future. Scientists believe that unique risks will result from climate change as well as the frequency of pandemics as temperatures rise and lost habitats result in humans and animals living closer together and transmitting disease. Others warn that the melting permafrost could cause ancient diseases to reemerge. Air pollution also could cause viruses to become airborne and spread faster. All of this should give us a lot to think about as we begin to plan or update our plans. The recent freezing and flooding in Texas should be a lesson also, because of the consequences that affected so many people and businesses.

We now know that we should plan for extended periods out of the office if necessary, shutdowns ordered by the government, as well as the need to maintain (and obtain if necessary) additional equipment to allow people to work from home. And what about ensuring that people working from home have access to broadband and digital communication equipment. The challenge for all of us is to try to identify what additional risks could impact us in the next couple of years, how probable they are and how much of an impact they might have.

Reputation damage, litigation, and other factors increase the odds against business continuity; there is significant potential for loss of income if you are not prepared. An organization should be prepared for anything that could happen—ready to protect its employees, clients/ customers, members, and, to the greatest degree possible, its reputation and financial viability. It's entirely possible that one ruined or badly handled incident might result in extensive revenue losses and require years of rebuilding reputation and attendance.

Mitigation—The Art of Helping Prevent Disruption

Mitigation is everything you do to prevent a disruption from occurring or to minimize its impact—activities aimed at reducing vulnerability, activities performed in advance to decrease impact, loss or damage. There are any number of potential disruptions that you might be able to mitigate, And what about this pandemic you might ask? That’s a good question, since it’s unlikely we would have been able to prevent it. If we had considered in the planning stage that we might have to deal with a pandemic, we might have been able to do something to make it easier on everyone.

Now that we know that such a risk is possible and even inevitable, we need to think about how to plan for the next such crisis. For example, instead of scrambling to come up with sufficient equipment for everyone to work at home, what can we do now to prevent all that scrambling? How can we plan for virtual events and meetings? As you think about mitigation, you also need to prioritize which risks might cause the greatest disruptions and plan for those first. It’s important to keep things in perspective. Any consequence that might involve potential critical injury or loss of life must take precedence over less critical outcomes.

Where Do You Begin to Plan?

Business continuity planning is a time-consuming, ongoing process. After you have been through the tasks of identifying your risks and determining any possible mitigation steps, the steps below can help get you from no plan or outdated plan to workable plan. Wherever you are in the process, your efforts will benefit from implementing or rethinking these steps.

Identify your key business functions. You need to assess the criticality of your organization’s business processes and determine the impact and consequences of loss of service or a reduction in normal service levels. Your key business functions are those that, under no circumstances, could be subbed out to a contractor/ vendor and must remain viable to the organization to continue to function. I’m sure you already see a problem here: during this pandemic, did your key business functions change? In what way? How are they likely to remain in their current state and how does that affect your planning?

Determine your recovery time objectives. Once you have identified the key business functions, your next step should be to determine your recovery time objectives (RTO) for each function. How long can you be without each function before the situation goes critical? This will help you determine what you should concentrate on first. Again, however, how did/do your RTOs change during this pandemic? What will they be going forward?

Ensure the safety and security of your people. In any disruption or disaster situation, the safety of your employees should be your main consideration. Start by making sure you have a complete employee roster and contact information for everyone. Have a complete

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evacuation plan and practice it; every employee should be familiar with it and know what to do. What will you need in a shelter-in-place situation? As people return to the workplace, this will still hold true. But what will be unique about sheltering out of place when the office is off limits?

Protect your network, data and records. This is critical to ensuring the future viability of your firm. You have a secure network, but do you have a backup network—at some distance from your primary location—in the event your primary network is compromised? Maintaining your important records in the cloud is perhaps the best option and can make data available to employees working from home.

With what you have seen this year, you need to consider what you would add or change to strengthen your plan if a similar situation were to occur again. How will you build resilience into your organizational DNA? Is this really a good time to update your plan? Absolutely, with the knowledge of what worked, what didn’t and what wasn’t even considered, this is the best time. Act while the results are fresh, so you won’t get caught again without the strongest plan possible.

Bob Mellinger is the president and CEO of Phoenix, AZ-based Attainium Corp. For more information about the Plan-A-ware™ service, tabletop exercises, drills, and The Disaster Experience, contact Attainium Corp. at (571) 248-8200 or ContactUs@attainium.net, or visit the Attainium web site at www.attainium.net.

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68TH ANNUAL CONVENTION AND TRADE SHOW—

BREAKING TRADITIONAL BARRIERS

The year 2021 has brought a flood of ideas and creative insights to the NALMCO board of directors and program committee, and they are eager to share them with the NALMCO community as progress continues for a live, in-person Annual Convention and Trade Show in October 2021.

FIRST, NALMCO is extending the 68th Annual Convention and Trade Show by one day to include the 2021 Spring Seminar Learning Lab content. Expect the same small group atmosphere and hands-on learning with the addition of a visit to the Trade Show, lunch and networking opportunities. Plus, you have the option to stay for the entire Convention!

SECOND, the Networking Event, one of the highlights of the Convention, continues with a bit of readjustment to aid in health and safety.

ALSO, value is added with an additional networking opportunities at lunches and receptions.

FINALLY, a General Member Pod has been added to connect GM2GM for their B2B needs.

Continue reading to discover the value this year’s Annual Convention and Trade Show has in store.

Registration opens this summer and will be available online at www.NALMCO.org.

AGENDA

*The agenda is subject to change

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2021

CLMC Content Review Session

Trade Show Set-up/Exhibitor Move-In CLMC Exam

Exhibitor Welcome Cocktail Reception

MONDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2021 – Learning Labs

Breakfast with Exhibitors

Learning Lab Sessions

Lunch

NALMCO's Workforce Development Solutions, Brian Baker, CLMC, CLCP; and Kim Cagle, CLMC, CLCP

Networking Reception

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2021

8:00 AM–12:00 PM 12:00–5:00 PM 2:00–4:30 PM 6:30–8:30 PM 8:00–9:00 AM 9:00 AM–2:50 PM 11:30 AM–12:20 PM 3:00–4:00 PM 7:00–8:00 AM

8:00–8:30 AM 8:30–9:30 AM

Past President’s Breakfast Breakfast with Exhibitors

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Post-Pandemic Business Continuity, Bob Mellinger, Founder and CEO, Attainium Corp

9:45 AM–12:30 PM 12:45–1:45 PM

Networking Event with Associate Members

Annual Meeting & Awards Lunch

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GENERAL SESSIONS

Long before the pandemic hit, the lighting industry realized the importance of keeping up with fast-paced change through continuity and diversification while supporting current business and practices. It is used to shifting sand and the creativity coming out of 2020 is proof that NALMCO members are never shaken.

Tuesday and Wednesday, we will hear from an expert in business continuity as well as seasoned experts from the lighting field on ways to keep the business ball rolling as you progress into the future doing what you do best–lighting up an ever-changing world.

Tuesday, October 12

General Session: Post-Pandemic Business Continuity with Bob Mellinger

General Session: Diversify and Sustain Panel 1: UV Lighting and Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

Wednesday, October 13

General Session: Emergency Lighting with Norma Frank General Session: Diversify and Sustain Panel 2: Horticulture Lighting and Temperature Kiosks

• Networking Event

• *New* for 2021 the Networking Event will be restricted to only one General Member and one Associate Member from each company to allow for social distancing. Plan ahead to assign shifts to your company attendees.

• Fast-paced networking event designed to have each General Member speak to each Associate Member for two minutes.

• It is not designed to display products/services.

• Each General Member Company will have its own small table.

• Associate Companies will meet with the General Members, one-on-one, for two minutes. Associates need to be prepared to give their elevator speech.

• Music signals Associates to move to the next General Member table.

• Bring at least 100 additional business cards.

One-on-One Appointments

• NALMCO will provide all attendees with One-onOne appointment cards.

EXCLUSIVE VALUE-ADDED NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

The re-designed 2021 Annual Conference adds greater value to networking opportunities:

• Four Networking breakfasts in the Exhibit Hall. Free time to enjoy breakfast, visit exhibits and chat before activities begin.

• Four Networking Receptions. Fun and interactive receptions designed for casual interactions.

• Sunday evening’s reception is extended with food stations designed so you don’t have to dine out. Stay and greet everyone you’ve missed in 2020!

• Monday and Tuesday evening receptions are lighter, shorter receptions to allow you to connect before dining out.

• Wednesday evening’s reception offers a meal and time to mingle with the crowd and simply enjoy your evening together.

• Make appointments during the Sunday and Monday evening receptions, Monday and Tuesday morning breakfast and during the Networking Event.

• Too many appointments and not enough One-onOne slots? There are plenty of networking breaks, including the extra day, throughout the program for General Members to stop by Associate Member booths!

GM2GM B2B Connections

• General Members can connect in a space designated only for them.

• Allows GMs a refuge from the noise of the Trade Show so they can connect B2B with other General Members.

• Gives space to process ideas and sort through Convention and Trade Show takeaways.

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SPECIAL SECTION

DESTINATION

The 68th NALMCO Annual Convention and Trade Show is surrounded by 36 holes of championship Orlando golf and 15 acres of recreation. The Omni Resort and is located 20-minutes from Universal Studios and SeaWorld.

• 36 holes of championship golf

• 18-hole miniature golf and lighted 9-hole par 3

• Complimentary scheduled shuttle transportation provided to the Walt Disney World® Theme Parks (24-hour reservations are required).

• Pool with private cabanas, wave pool and zero-entry family pool with a 125-foot corkscrew water slide and water tower

• 850-foot lazy river with shooting water cannons, arched waterspouts and a waterfall

• Basketball court

• Multiple dining outlets

You’ll love these additional amenities for NALMCO attendees*:

• Rates are available three days prior and three days post event

• Complimentary fitness center access (for those who stay at hotel)

• 10% discount on spa services

• 10% discount on golf rates

• Complimentary wireless internet in guest rooms

• Complimentary wireless internet in meeting space

• $5.00 Self-parking discount

• No Resort fee

• Ability to cancel rooms at no penalty up to three days prior to arrival (if within 72-hours, penalties apply)

*Exclusive for booking within NALMCO’s room block.

HOTEL INFORMATION

Omni Orlando Resort at ChampionsGate

1500 Masters Boulevard ChampionsGate, Florida 33896 (407) 390-6664 www.omnihotels.com/hotels/orlando-championsgate

Room Rates and Reservations

Omni is offering a reduced rate for sleeping rooms as follows:

• Single or Double: $195+/night

• Triple: $225+/night

• Quad: $255+/night

To reserve your room online, go to https://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/ orlando-championsgate/meetings/ nalmco-2021-10082021

To reserve your room by phone, call 1 (800) 843-6664 (1-800-THE-OMNI) and refer to NALMCO.

The cut-off date to book rooms is on Friday, September 15, 2021. After September 15, the remaining rooms will go back into inventory and be sold at a higher rate.

Please make your reservations early. While the hotel will guarantee the lower room rate until September 15, 2021, this does not mean they can guarantee that rooms will be available. There are a limited number of rooms set aside at the hotel for NALMCO. Rooms are on a first-come, first-served basis.

NALMCO does not use a housing service to book sleeping rooms. If you are contacted by a company other than NALMCO to book your sleeping room, please let NALMCO know.

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SPECIAL SECTION

NALMCO MEMBERS PARTNER ON ICE ARENA LIGHTING

PROJECT IN MINNESOTA

Submitted by General Member The Retrofit Companies

Lakeville, MN Ice Arena …

https://retrofitcompanies.com/ ice-arena-lighting-wireless-controls-lakeville-mn-video/

The Retrofit Companies recently completed a project for the City of Lakeville (Minn.), upgrading ice arena lighting with new fixtures and implementing wireless controls. This project was done in collaboration with Apex, an ESCO, based in Minnesota. TRC specified Acuity’s line of Lithonia fixtures with nLight Air wireless controls, purchasing the material through Rexel Solutions. Acuity and Rexel are members of NALMCO.

This was a great project that includes performance as well as energy-savings and uses many resources to get it done for the customer. Click on the video above to learn more about this case study and hear customer feedback.

FSG PROVIDES PROACTIVE DISINFECTION SOLUTIONS FOR FULLERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT IN CALIFORNIA

Submitted by General Member Facility Solutions Group

CHALLENGE

During the summer of 2020, with another school year just a few short weeks away, the staff of the Fullerton School District in California decided that they needed to improve indoor air quality (IAQ). Having already made considerable investments in PPE for the facilities they maintained, staff members were concerned with the IAQ at a particular junior high campus that was completely enclosed. With news of the COVID-19 pandemic dominating the headlines, they knew that doing nothing was no longer an option. Knowing that parents, teachers and students were all looking for answers to the central question of how to keep schools safe during the ongoing public health crisis, the time had arrived for some kind of constructive action. FUSD staff members needed someone to help them understand their building disinfection options, and they turned to FSG.

SOLUTION

The team at FSG’s Placentia office met with members of the school district staff and explained the various technologies available to disinfect the school and administrative facilities the district maintains. For this

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PROJECT SPOTLIGHT

also spread when infected droplets land on objects and a person who touches those objects later touches their eyes, nose or mouth. The incubation period of the virus can be anywhere from one to 14 days, and the symptoms can vary from asymptomatic, mild to severe. Given the novelty of COVID-19, the entire world was working on preventing the transfer and decreasing the virus cases.

In March 2020, the United States began seeing a significant impact with an increase in cases and a promotion of business closures, school closures and limiting of social interactions. While many of the above have slowly begun to be reinstated, essentially, our ability to conduct business as usual, attend schools, restaurants, places of worship, and other public or social gatherings has been dramatically impacted. The overall goal is to ensure the safety of people and to limit the transmission of the virus.

SOLUTION

The outbreak of COVID-19 brought to the forefront a technology that has been around for close to a century, which is Ultraviolet light, particularly UVC lighting. UVC lighting has a proven history as an effective technology in fighting against surface and air-borne viruses, bacteria and pathogens. While UVC cleaning and wavelengths have been used in medical facilities, water purification sites, food processing facilities, pharmaceutical production, and wastewater treatment settings for many years, the dramatic increase in COVID-19 and the additional cleaning measures to prevent transmission has made the need for more effective cleaning measures essential.

UVC lighting is a non-corrosive, chemical-free virus inactivation process, which leaves no residue on objects. UVC lighting provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to disinfecting large spaces. UVC portable units also make the technology more accessible than ever. Essential training that demonstrates the ease of use and the required personal protective equipment (PPE) ensures that UVC lighting units can be utilized by parties outside of medical, food, and water management facilities. Also provided with the UVC lighting units are dosimeter cards that visually confirm the area has the appropriate UVC lighting dose for optimum cleaning.

APPLICATION

In early 2020, Nashville-based Accendo Lighting, sister company of Stones River Electric, launched two new

portable UVC disinfection products to help in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. In June 2020, Stones River Electric was contacted by a national electrical distributor to assist with UVC product specifications and bid documents for purchasing PPE products through 2021. The bid documents were directed to roughly 50 school districts and related facilities within the State of Pennsylvania. By August 2020, Stones River Electric received the first of two orders from Conestoga Valley School District (CVSD) for the 320W rolling mobile UVC units developed in part by Accendo Lighting.

Conestoga Valley School District is located in Lancaster County, Penn., and consists of four elementary schools, one middle school, one high school, district offices, and facility buildings. The Director of Operations for Conestoga Valley School District, Ken Johnson, purchased six 320W mobile units in 2020. Mr. Johnson explained that he bought the mobile UVC units as part of an overall strategy to disinfect the school classrooms, common areas, offices, and other large rooms, along with other disinfection measures. Using the UVC mobile units and other preventive cleaning measures, CVSD was able to document a lower percentage of cases from both the students and staff than the number of overall cases reported throughout the county and local townships.

Due to these preventative measures' success, CVSD has continuously run a five-day school week through the end of the year. The communication of UVC disinfection and all other measures' success was submitted to the students, parents, and staff through social media and written letters.

One of the keys to the success of CVSD's use of the UVC mobile unit has been the ability of facility staff to both transport and smoothly operate the units by anyone, regardless of experience level or possible language barriers. According to Mr. Johnson, the mobile units’ overall effectiveness and ease of use for his staff allow him to incorporate plans to purchase a few more mobile units later this year.

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PROJECT SPOTLIGHT
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