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Research in Education and Arts Practice @ NAFA: Research in Retrospect 2014 to 2019

REAP Series Issue 1


R .E. A . P. at

Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts

REAP Series REAP is an acronym for Research in Education and Arts Practice Editor

Rebecca Kan

Project Manager

Jonathan Chng

Student Assistant

Ong Kai Wei

Designer and Illustrator

Nandy Rhea

This is published under the auspice of Pedagogy and Research Unit, Office of Academic Affairs, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. Editorial correspondence can be addressed to: Pedagogy and Research Unit 80 Bencoolen Street Singapore 189655 pr@nafa.edu.sg Issue 1: First Published August 2020 Š Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner.


Research in Education and Arts Practice @ NAFA: Research in Retrospect 2014 to 2019

REAP Series Issue 1


Foreword We are delighted to bring you the first issue of Research in Education and Arts Practice. REAP@NAFA aims to profile a creative medley of research-informed practices at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. Research at NAFA is informed by practice that underpins pedagogy, student experience, curriculum and artistic practices. In the first edition of this series, we explore how NAFA seeds a culture of research through professional development, to advance research-informed practices in teaching and learning. Prior to July 2018, the faculty development programmes were designed to grow an appetite for research. These programmes covered a range of topics relating to our curriculum, assessment and pedagogies for higher arts education. Since the inception of the Pedagogy and Research Unit (PRU) in 2018, faculty development programmes in research have sharpened their focus to target individual colleagues who are interested to deepen insights into research techniques, art-based research practices and the scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education.

Brought to you by Pedagogy and Research Unit

Another focal point in this issue is the collective research output by NAFA colleagues from 2014 to 2019. The creative enterprise of individual faculty members have reaped a harvest of contributions to Singapore’s voice in the arts, including commissioned essays for local productions, thinking strategies in interdisciplinary projects, studies on employability, investigations prior to art and music making, and critical inquiries on digital modalities. The new REAP series is another contribution to knowledge and documentation of research practices at NAFA. It provides an opportunity for artisteducators to learn more about research at our academy, which seeks to push the boundaries of artistic knowledge and creation through research inquiry and design.


Contents

1

About NAFA Vision, Mission and Core Values pg 1 Pedagogy and Research Unit pg 1

2

Our Processes

4

Our Professional Capability Faculty Development in Research pg 22 Research Planning and Methods pg 25 Creative Research Methods

pg 32 Gallery pg 40

Institutional Processes to Support Research pg 2 Research Evaluation Panel pg 2 Approved Ethics Applications in 2018-2019 pg 4

3

Our People Outputs at a Glance pg 5 A Review of Research from 2014 to 2019 pg 6

5

Our Highlights Teaching Workshops over a Decade: 2009 to 2018 pg 43 Gallery pg 53


Chapter 1: About NAFA

Vision A leading arts institution enriching lives and communities through education and practice

Mission Inspire learning and growth through the arts.

Core Values Passion, Care and achieving Excellence through the NAFA spirit of Creativity, Exploration and Resilience

1

Pedagogy and Research Unit The Pedagogy and Research Unit of the Office of Academic Affairs spearheads research on artistic practices and scholarship in teaching and learning. We conduct research for new knowledge and insights to deepen our understanding of art and design at higher education. In order to do this, the unit designs processes to support research activities, builds the capability of colleagues in research and pedagogical competence, and stimulates conversations through both formal and informal learning platforms.


Chapter 2: Our Processes Institutional processes to support research pg 2 Research Evaluation Panel pg 2

Institutional Processes to Support Research The research ethics policy and procedure, spell out the statement of research integrity for NAFA researchers to adhere to, in order to ensure that research activities are conducted ethically. In addition, the entire research ethics application process is also communicated via infographic for easy understanding at a glance.

Approved Ethics Applications in 2018-2019 pg 4

Research Evaluation Panel The Research Evaluation Panel (REP) consists of at least 3 members: The Chairperson (Vice President, Academic), relevant Dean of School (or appointed member), Vice Dean (Pedagogy and Research), Secretariat (non-voting member). The REP is set up when there is a new application for ethical approval, and may also serve as an investigation panel to make decisions pertaining to research misconduct and compliance, should any arise.

2


3


Approved Ethics Applications in 2018-2019 A total of 18 research ethics applications were received and approved.

Analysing the Quality and Use of Learning Management Systems (LMS) in Higher Education

Dr Rebecca Kan (Vice Dean, Pedagogy and Research Unit), A/Prof Joyce Koh (University of Otago)

Self-Regulated Learning in Music Performance and Instrumental Practice

Dr Rebecca Kan (Vice Dean, Pedagogy and Research Unit), Dr Leong Wei Shin (National Institute of Education)

Narratives on Creative Processes in Music Making

Dr Ernest Lim (Vice-Dean, School of Music)Dr Rose Martin (University of Auckland)

Exploring Collaborative Inquiry through 5E Instructional Model in Higher Music Studies

Dr Rebecca Kan (Vice Dean, Pedagogy and Research Unit), A/Prof Joyce Koh (University of Otago)

The use of Sounds and Music to motivate learning

Janielyn Kong (Lecturer, Design & Media)

Understanding Design & Media Students’ Identity through Character-based Gamification

Anm Pek (Lecturer, Design & Media)

Building Students’ self-efficacy in Creating Meaningful, Relevant and Relatable Content for Visual Narrative

Peh Mei Lian (Programme Leader, Design & Media)

Experiential-Learning – E.P.I.C.

James Sin (Senior Lecturer, Design & Media)

Drawing Fundamentals

Dr Lim Poh Teck (Senior Lecturer, Design & Media)

Watch and Think: Incorporating Project Zero’s Thinking Routines in Video-based Learning of Sewing Skills

Georgette Yu (Research Associate, Pedagogy and Research Unit), Eliza Lim (Senior Tutor, Fashion Studies)

Quarter Scale Pattern Making Technique

Chew Han Lim (Programme Leader, Fashion Studies)

Develop Design Ideas Through Observation and Reflection

Benz Tan (Lecturer, Fashion Studies)

Creating an Effective Experiential Based Learning Pedagogy For Theory/History Module

Joey Soh (Lecturer, Fine Art)

Does Planar Analysis Improve the Accuracy of Proportion in Student’s Drawing?

Raymond Yap (Lecturer, Fine Art)

Cultivating Design Thinking dispositions

Tanny Wong (Programme Leader, 3D Design)

Mentoring in a Higher Education Arts Institution

Marienne Yang (Vice Dean, School of Art & Design)

Information Literacy in Music: Increasing Its Relevance and Effectiveness for Music Students in Higher Education through Active Learning

Mingshanwang (Senior Executive Officer, Library)

Journaling as Self-reflection

Ethel Chong (Senior Lecturer, Arts Management)


Chapter 3: Our People Authored or Edited Books and Chapters of Books pg 6 Journal Publications pg 8 Publications, including Gazettes, Zines and Editorials pg 9

Conference Posters or Presentations and Proceedings pg 12 Seminars, Talks and Presentations pg 17

Other Non-Published Papers (Dissertations, Report, Discussion or Working Papers) pg 12

Outputs at a Glance

Ethel Chong

5

Journaling a


A Review of Research from 2014 to 2019

Authored or Edited Books and Chapters of Books Authors:

elf-reflection

Burridge, S. Cariño, C. Chong, E. K. M.

Goh, S. K. Lee, R. Tan, E. A. L.

Tan, B. T. Tariao, F. C. Yu, W. J.

Burridge, S. & Cariño, C. (Eds.) (2017). Evolving synergies: Celebrating dance in Singapore (1st ed.). Routledge. https://www.routledge.com/Evolving-Synergies-Celebrating-Dance-in-Singapore/ Burridge-Carino/p/book/9780815369431 Cariño, C. (2015). Contemporaneous, contemporisation, contemporary expressions in dance. In R. Lee (Ed.), Arts hats in Renaissance city: Reflections & aspirations of four generations of art personalities (pp. 238-246). World Scientific. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814630788_0025 Cariño, C. (2015). The possibility of Asian mind-body practices in tertiary education. In Mohd Anis Md Nor Mohd Anis Md Nor. (Ed.), Perspectives on dance education. University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. Cariño, C. (2017). Creating contemporary Asian dance in tertiary dance education: Research-based choreography at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. In G. Barton & M. Baguley (Eds.), The Palgrave handbook of global arts education (pp. 259-273). Palgrave Macmillan. https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9781137555847 Cariño, C. (2017). The evolving cultural ecology through dance. In S. Burridge, & C. Cariño (Eds.), Evolving synergies: Celebrating dance in Singapore (pp. 1-16). Routledge. Cariño, C. (2019). Teaching contemporary choreography: A research and inquiry-based approach. In P. Costes-Onishi (Ed.), Artistic thinking in the schools: Toward innovative arts /in/ Education research for future-ready learners (pp.107-122). Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-138993-1_6 6


Chong, E. K. M., & Tan, E. A. L. (2014). ‘The story of a nation’s first choir: First fifty years’. This song of mine: The SYC ensemble singers celebrates 50 years. The Singapore Youth Choir Limited. Singapore. 8-49. Goh, S. K., & Tan, B. T. (2017). To Live, to dance, to be: Two decades of Singapore Dance Theatre and Beyond. In S. Burridge, & C. Cariño (Eds.), Evolving synergies: Celebrating dance in Singapore (p. 48). Routledge. Lee, R. (Ed.) (2015). Arts hats in Renaissance city: Reflections & aspirations of four generations of art personalities. World Scientific. Tan, B. T. (2015). Mind the gap: Mapping the other. National Library, Singapore. https://www.nlb.gov.sg/biblio/201684170 Tan, B. T. (2016). The transformation of Chinese visual arts in Nanyang. In C. L. Pang (Ed.), 50 years of the Chinese community in Singapore. World Scientific, Singapore. Tan, E. A. L. (2015). Music education in Singapore. In R. Lee (Ed.), Arts hats in Renaissance city: Reflections & aspirations of four generations of art personalities. World Scientific, Singapore. Tariao, F. C. (2017). ASEAN para games 2015: Dancing for inclusivity. In S. Burridge & C. S. Nielsen (Eds.), Dance access and inclusion: Perspectives on dance, young people and change (pp. 104–106). Taylor and Francis. Yu, W. J. (2014). Misunderstanding of the nature of performing arts & dispositioning of the feature of conservatoire education: Reflections on the

phenomenon of "post-XX theatre performance". In L. B. Liu (Ed.). Drama school showcase under the clothing of contemporary approach to Classics: The contemporary performance of Classical drama in theatre education (pp. 93–132). 8th Asian Theatre Education Centre (ATEC) International Forum. China Theatre Press, Beijing. Yu, W. J. (2015). The successful fruition of artistic idea of Richard Wagner’s musik drama: A tentative exploration of the aesthetic significance of the stage experimentation of the Chinese ‘model plays’ of the 20th century. In B. X. Cai (Ed.), Tradition & modernity: Paper collection of 2015 international Chinese Opera Academic Symposium, ᷞ䶝᳌䉮ᶡ濣2015“䆬⚌▻攃ネ㖰⨤㗭䛒 婦ᷘ熏婸㑅斄). Culture & Arts Publishing, Beijing, China. 7


Yu, W. J. (2019, July). Chapter 7 - Metamorphosis: “Modernity” on stage – The formation of the Chinese spoken drama in Singapore (1913 – 1937). Modernization of Asian Theatres: Process and Tradition. Springer / RAWAT. (2011). New Asian imaginations: (Re)searching the Arts in Southeast Asia. Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, Singapore. https://www.creativenz.govt.nz/news/new-asian-imaginations-re-searching-the-artsin-southeast-asia-19-21-sept-singapore

Journal Publications Authors:

Cariño, C. Kan, R. Yu, W. J.

Carino, C. (2018). Perspective. In T. Goh (Ed.), Singapore at Tanzmesse 2018. https://issuu.com/saltshakerarts/docs/singapore_at_tanzmesse_2018

Kan, R. (2015). Technology integration in Singapore’s higher music education: From insurance to assurance. Time of Art Education. Collection of Theses and Materials of III International Scientific and Practical Conference, 3–12. [Republished in Art Education: History, Theory, Technology. Collection of Scientific Works, 97–107.]

Yu, W. J. (2018). 乌⎇濊⨕㨡倒◄濕乌暳᳻⹉濣佣㑗≀熏∕㚭Ჾ㝤濤‣㝤熐∌媫 ⊮媋䕂僜⊮⿝㚑⅙ (The beauty and power of the Mandarin drama speech presentation in Toy Factory’s production of “A dream under the south bough: The beginning”).㑮⅞☟⸑ᶡ儸㗭䛒䤴ᷘ (Contemporary Arts Research Society Singapore), 1.

Yu, W. J. (2019, August). Ჾ㜊ᵊ㟃᳸⎨僪"⾃䋄屡ㄾ㑷᳸ネ濣ᶌ熍ネ℥⻥熎 ᳌熍℥◸⻥熎䕂䶑⋆䗉∌㒍ネ㖰䕂儸㗭䄷⸿ Research on the Inheritance and Development of Chinese Opera: Collection of Papers of 2017 Singapore Chinese Opera International Symposium ネ㖰ᷞㄽ᳌⊏⬓䛒䤴濣㑮⅞☟熅熃熄熊 ⴲ䆬⚌▻攃ネ㖰⨤㗭䛒婦ᷘ婸㑅斄 Shanghai University Press ᳈㰵⟥⨤₸䄆䟼  8


Publications, including Gazettes, Zines and Editorials Authors:

Abdullahsani, A. Chua, P. L. Chua, W.

Xin, X. C. Lim P. T. Shen, K.

Tan, W. Yabuka, N. Yang, M.

Yu, W. J.

Abdullahsani, A. (2018). Gulliver [Exhibition catalogue]. In B. Starr, & M. Pocock (Eds.), Two houses: Politics and histories in the contemporary art collections of John Chia and Yeap Lam Yang (p. 52). Institute of Contemporary Arts, Singapore. https://www.lasalle.edu.sg/sites/default/files/2019-01/2018_two_houses.pdf Abdullahsani, A. (2018). Ocho o ocho [Exhibition catalogue]. In B. Starr, & M. Pocock (Eds.), Two houses: Politics and histories in the contemporary art collections of John Chia and Yeap Lam Yang (p. 100). Institute of Contemporary Arts, Singapore. https://www.lasalle.edu.sg/sites/default/files/2019-01/2018_two_houses.pdf

Abdullahsani, A. (2018). Untitled 2014-2015-02 [Exhibition catalogue]. In B. Starr, & M. Pocock (Eds.), Two Houses: Politics and histories in the contemporary art collections of John Chia and Yeap Lam Yang (p. 96). Institute of Contemporary Arts, Singapore. https://www.lasalle.edu.sg/sites/default/files/2019-01/2018_two_houses.pdf Chua, P. L. (Ed.) (2014, June 30). Tuas Literature, (4). https://zhoucanshuzhuo.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/⟥➩㑅儸䧪▙㗝₸䄆ᵄ/ Chua, P. L. (Ed.) (2015, April 25). Tuas Literature, (5). https://zhoucanshuzhuo.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/%E3%80%8A%E5%A4%A7%E5% A3%AB%E6%96%87%E8%89%BA%E3%80%8B%E7%AC%AC%E4%BA%94%E6%9C% 9F-2/

Chua, P. L. (Ed.) (2015, August 22). Tuas Literature, (6). https://zhoucanshuzhuo.wordpress.com/2015/08/22/ƺ⟥➩㑅儸ƻ䧪熉㗝ⲯ䶍₸䄆 9


Chua, P. L. (2015). The artistic aesthetics of Oh Chai Hoo (p. 22-31). Firstfruits Publications, Singapore. Chua, P. L. (2017, August 16). Da wu da wu ⟥於⟥⽝ . In Lian He Zao Bao Newsletter. https://www.zaobao.com.sg/news/fukan/mini-columns/story20170816-787489 Chua, P. L. (2018, March 16). Chuang wai you zhi hong er ya 䥕⟔㗇⊨䵠仱 洌  In Lian He Zao Bao Newsletter. https://www.zaobao.com.sg/news/fukan/literary-writings/story20180501-855193 Chua, P. L. (2018, September 13). Fu shan tu 㰬⬯▼). In Lian He Zao Bao Newsletter (p. 10). https://www.zaobao.com.sg/news/fukan/literary-writings/story20180913-890773 Chua, P. L. (2018). Duan de shi shi zhang de 䚫䕂媕㓭搽䕂  Journal of May Poetry, 43, 32-33. Singapore May Poetry Society. Chua, P. L. (2018). Shi yi ⟯⺄  Hui yi: Shi kong de sui dao ▜⺄濣㒴䤸䕂敥弑  Singapore Chinese Literature, 89, 170-171. http://www.singaporewriters.org.sg/xinhua89.pdf Chua, P. L. (2018). Night is pouring like splashed ink. In SG Poems (pp. 57-58). Ethos Books, Singapore. Chua, P. L. (2018, March 22). Zuo Yong 濑Ḛẏ濒. In Lian He Zao Bao. Chua, P. L. (2019, Jan 8) Qin Nan She 䋲敼僋 . In Lian He Zao Bao. Chua, P. L. (2019, May 15). Yan Se Fu Yun 儱儰㰬ᵏ濒. In Lian He Zao Bao. Chua, P. L. (2019, May 16). Shi Er Shou 媕ᵊ桔濒. In Lian He Zao Bao. Chua, P. L. (2019, June 18). Huo Xin Zi Ye 濑創周ᴉ⟚濒. In Lian He Zao Bao. Chua, P. L. (2018, August 3). Seeing the world through the eyes of a child, drawing the universe with the strokes of a brush 䦣䗺䗉⟧᳉濕⺩䧒⁗⟥∁ . Preface l for “Untamed Heart, Chinese paintings by Quek See Ling”ƺ悌䏝䕂 ⺁濣徫媕䉰㫲❦䏹斄ƻ 10


Chua, W., Xin, X. C., & Mitsuyasu, Y. (Eds.). (2017). The machinist. Singapore. Lim P. T. (2016). Nanyang art research projects: Research on Nanyang style project 1. Office of Contemporary Art, Thailand and Tian Jin Academy of Fine Arts, China. Lim, P. T. (2014). Nanyang art & Nanyang artist & Singapore art II. Federation of Arts Societies, Singapore. Lim, P. T. (2015). Nanyang art research projects: Nanyang arts reviews, 3 & 4. Singapore. Lim, P. T. (2015). Research of Nanyang style projects. Beijing and Tianjing, China. Lim, P. T. (2015). Review of Ho Ho Ying Arts. In Nanyang Arts, 42. NAFA, Singapore. Shen, K. (2017). Ellipsis Journal, Issue D. Ellipsis Journal, London-Singapore. Tan, B. T. (2019, 14 August). #peripheries: Revitalising Krabi. Thailand Biennale 2018. In https://culture360.asef.org/magazine/peripheries-revitalising-krabi-thailandbiennale-2018/ Tan, W. (2014). Twilight bilingual for 6767 exhibition in NAFA media. Lian He Zao Bao. Yabuka, N. (2017, 19 July). The craft of the machinists. Review of W. Chua, X. C. Xin, & Y. Mitsuyasu (Eds.), The machinist. In Indesign Newsletter. https://www.indesignlive.sg/happenings/the-craft-of-the-machinists Yang, M. (2017). When the children cry. Annual Art Journal, (6). LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2014, October 11). The truthfulness becomes false when the false pretends to be true [Theatre review]. In Lian He Zao Bao Newsletter, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2015). A magnificent landscape on the Chinese-speaking stage in the Lion-city: The consistent efforts to stage the world children literature classics by Arts Theatre of Singapore 䆬⚌∌媫ネ℥僜⊮Ჾ弑䶘᳻䕂枌㔭 䵽濣㑮⅞☟儸㗭℥◸㋪㷒᳔䐊´䦣㑅⨤⋋匕䕂᳋ゆⅨ⅙<XDQ濑㵎 . Chinese Cultural Bimonthly Magazine, 4. Singapore Federation of Chinese Clan Associations, Singapore. http://artstheatre.com.sg/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/unnamed-file-3.pdf 11


Yu, W. J. (2017). A shining pearl in the treasure house of Mandarin-speaking children play of the Lion City: Reflections on the production of fairy tale play of the little white rabbit staged by arts theatre of Singapore 濑䆬⚌∌媫´䦣 ℥⩛ⵑᳫ䕂撨ᵬ䊋䊞濣墀㑮⅞☟´䦣儸㗭℥◸㷒₸䦣媛℥ǀ⫍䔻‒ǁⷓ⊏䕂⻛仁濒 Arts Theatre of Singapore, Singapore. http://artstheatre.com.sg/ch//wp-content/uploads/2018/06/unnamed-file.pdf

Other Non-Published Papers (Dissertations, Report, Discussion or Working Papers) Authors:

Hayes, L. F. Leong, G. Tan, B. T.

Hayes, L. F. (2018). Out of the play(box): An investigation into strategies for writing and devising (M.A. dissertation). University of Birmingham. https://etheses.bham.ac.uk//id/eprint/9014/1/Hayes19MAbyRes.pdf Leong, G. (2014). An investigation of sustainable operational traits of building-based puppetry theatre [MA dissertation]. University of London: Royal Holloway. Tan, B. T. (2017). Research on Southeast Asian curating and museology [Unpublished doctoral dissertation]. University of the Arts London.

Conference Posters or Presentations and Proceedings Authors:

Cariño, C. Ching, L. Chua, P. L.

Flach, J. Hayes, L. F. Kan, R.

Koh, J. B. T. Ong, N. Soo, J.

Tan, B. T.

Tariao, F.

Tan, E. A. L. and Shahanum

Yu, W. J.

Cariño, C. (2014, December 6-7). Bharatanatyam at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts: Emulation, rejection and negotiation of Western constructs [Paper Presentation]. International Conference on Bharatanatyam in Singapore, Singapore. https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/52239606/international-conference-onbharatanatyam-in-singapore-2014-conference-booklet 12


Cariño, C. (2014). Creating contemporary Asian dance through researchbased choreography [Paper presentation]. World Alliance for Arts Education Summit, Brisbane, Australia. Cariño, C. (2014). The possibility of Asian mind-body practices in tertiary education [Paper presentation]. International Conference on Dance Education 2014 (ICONDE 2014), Cultural Centre University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur; National Department for Culture and Arts, Ministry of Tourism and Culture (Malaysia); and Faculty of Music and Performing Arts, Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia. Cariño, C. (2015). Expressing cultural heritage through contemporary dance: The Singapore predicament [Paper presentation]. Asia-Pacific Dance Bridge: Connectivity through Dance, Singapore. Cariño, C. (2016). Expressing cultural heritage through contemporary dance: Case studies of four choreographers in Singapore. Choreography: Legacy, transmissions and transformation [Paper presentation]. 3rd Singapore Heritage Science Conference, National Heritage Board, Singapore. Cariño, C. (2016, July 21-24). Shaping change through contemporary dance: A case study of one Singaporean choreographer [Paper presentation]. Dance Routes – Danced Roots: Connecting the Local and the Global. World Dance Alliance, Seoul, Korea. https://ausdance.org.au/?ACT=73&file=2292

Cariño, C. (2018, October 13-14). A wilderness that no longer exists. Conflict and convergence: Bharatanatyam culture in contemporary Asia [Paper presentation]. NUS Centre for the Arts and Bhaskar’s Arts Academy, Singapore. https://cfa.nus.edu.sg/whats-on/conflict-and-convergence-bharatanatyam-incontemporary-asia-2018/ Ching, L. (2018, March 24). Nurturing musical talents - Baroque performance practices [Paper presentation]. Royal Musical Association's Study Day on Baroque Music. SEA Chapter, Singapore. https://www.rma.ac.uk/2018/02/02/southeast-asia-chapter-study-day-on-baroquemusic/ Chua, P. L. (2017). Reflection on human condition in mechanical society: An investigation of Ming Wong’s installation (2017) entitled ‘The bamboo spaceship’ [Paper presentation]. Buddhist and Pali College "Reflection" Symposium, Singapore. 13


Flach, J. (2018). Recent developments in the band movement in S. E. Asia [Paper Presentation]. Band Directors Association (Singapore) Conference, Bangkok. Hayes, L. F. (2015). What are the tensions and possibilities that arise in using Lecoq’s pedagogy for movement training for actors in an open culture in Singapore? [Paper presentation]. 8th International Drama in Education Research Institute (IDIERI), ‘Open Culture in the Asian Century’, National Institute of Education-Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Hayes, L. F. (2016, June 20). 'Please don’t write stage directions, I have an imagination of my own.’ The journey from page to stage [Paper presentation]. Everywhere and Nowhere: An Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Symposium on Imagined Spaces, University of Nottingham, Nottingham. https://lspimaginedspaces.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/symposium-programme-2016. pdf Hayes, L. F. (2018, July 9-13). The play(box): Play-writing through play, objects, and the body [Paper presentation]. International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR), Belgrade, Serbia. https://www.iftr.org/media/3397/iftr-world-congress-belgrade-2018-program.pdf Kan, R. (2014). iPedagogies: Managing change and making transformations [Paper presentation]. Art Education and Digital Technologies: Virtual World Conference. Kan, R. (2016, September 24). Exploring practices of performance through a 5E instructional model [Paper presentation]. InAEA 2nd Biannual Virtual Conference. https://inaea.org/2016/09/07/inaea-2nd-biannual-virtual-conference-conference-program/

Kan, R., & Tan, C. K. (2017, May 31–June 2). Baroque as catalyst for artistic collectives: Turning problems to promises [Paper presentation]. NIE Re-Designing Pedagogy International Conference, National Institute of Education - Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://www.nie.edu.sg/about-us/news- events/events/event-detail/redesigningpedagogy-international-conference-2017 Kan, R. (2018). Employability impact: The need for developing higher order thinking amongst tertiary students [Paper presentation]. Panelist at EduTech Asia Conference, Singapore. 14


Kan, R., & Koh, J. H. L. (2018). Making space for meaningful e-learning: Through the lenses of the Arts in NAFA [Paper presentation]. International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI), Singapore. Kan, R., & Koh, J. H. L. (2019, July 2-5). Preparing students for learning with next-generation digital learning environments (NGDLEs). Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) Conference 2019, Auckland, New Zealand. https://www.herdsa2019.auckland.ac.nz/ Koh, J. B. T. (2018). Musicalising a scientific theory [Paper Presentation]. 5th Social Sciences, Arts and Media International Conference (SSAMIC), Bangkok. Ong, N. (2015). Current situations and future prospects of the piano education in Singapore [Paper presentation]. 1st Asia International Piano Pedagogy Seminar - Ehwa Womans University, Seoul, Korea. Soo, J. (2016). Featuring art vocational colleges. Plenary session and round table meeting of the heads of China-ASEAN art schools [Paper presentation]. 11th China-ASEAN Cultural Forum. Tan, B. T. (2019, November). TIME WILL TELL / another-mountain-man x stanley wong / 40 years of work 㘩敹䙫奲娣⎯ᷧⱘạ;溫䂚⟠⛂⌨⹛≜ ὃ [Paper presentation]. Commissioned retrospective research article for 40th anniversary publication another-mountain-man, Hong Kong Heritage Museum. Tan, E. A. L. and Shahanum (2015). SG50 new compositions [Paper presentation]. Princess Galyani Vadhana Institute of Music, Bangkok, Thailand. Tariao, F. (2015). Constructing the architecture of posture [Paper presentation]. Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference Asia, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Singapore. Tariao, F. (2016). 8th ASEAN paragames: Dancing for inclusivity [Paper presentation]. World Dance Alliance: Celebrating Connection Local and Global Integration Through Dance, South Korea. Tariao, F. (2016). Centering: Conditioning and training [Paper presentation]. Southern Vermont Dance Festival, Southern Vermont. Tariao, F. (2016). Dance as Art and Science [Paper presentation]. Southern Vermont Dance Festival, Southern Vermont.  15


Yu, W. J. (2014, July 4-8). The fruition of nation-building – Social performance on and off stage: A case study of Singapore [Paper presentation]. Performance Studies International Conference (Psi20). Shanghai Theatre Academy I Performance Studies International Board, Shanghai, China. https://www.psi-web.org/past-events/case-study-5/ Yu, W. J. (2014). Modernity on stage: The formation of the Chinese-spoken theatre in Singapore (1913–1937) [Paper presentation]. International Conference on Modernization of Asian Theatre. Asian Theatre Research Group and Institute of Theatre Studies, Osaka University of Japan, Osaka. Yu, W. J. (2014). The one-table and two-chairs stage device in Chinese opera performance [Paper presentation]. Academic Symposium of 1st International Chinese Opera Festival. Singapore Traditional Arts Centre, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2015). The successful fruition of artistic idea of Richard Wagner’s musik drama: A tentative exploration of the aesthetic significance of the stage experimentation of the Chinese ‘model plays’ of the 20th century 䓍㠣 亚犐柚ḷㇶ≎犑剡㜖䏭ペ䙫ㇷ⊆人㙝Ɲ犈犆᷽云Ḕ⛤犐㠞㝦ㇶ犑刅⏗⮅橳䙫併⭍ヶḰ [Paper presentation]. International Chinese Opera Symposium Singapore 2015. Traditional Arts Centre Singapore, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2016). The acceptance of Stanislavsky acting system with the Chinese-speaking drama on Singapore stage: The exploration and experimentation by I-Lien drama society, Singapore 犒㖖❍ⰣἺ䳢犓✏䋕➵ ⌵寔ㇶ≎刅⏗ᷱ䙫䡕䪲 [Paper presentation]. Academic Symposium of the 60th Anniversary of I-Lien Drama Society. Cited in Programme Magazine of Paradise - Human World-Feelings. I-Len Drama Society, Oct, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2017). Construction and contribution: The unique role played by Arts Theatre of Singapore in the regional and global Belt-and-Road project ( 㐔⻡ḃ⌾ẁ✗⌡⌵寔ㇶ≎⅘⏳Ἲ䙫⹦旻刅⏗Ɲ㖗⊇❈剡㜖≎✡✏Ḕ⛤ḃ䛆犐ᷧ⸍ᷧ 巖犑㕮⋽ẋ㴨⏯ὃḔ䙫㡌⤛⠈ὦ⑤ [Paper presentation]. Academic Summit of China-ASEAN Theatre Week 2017 (receiving the Award of Excellent Paper), Nanning Municipal People’s Government Department of Culture of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China, Nanning, China. Yu, W. J. (2017). Inheritance and development: The unique artistic creation of the three-approaches in Chinese opera playmaking in Singapore 从㉦ ᷵⎸ⰼƝ䋕➵刅⏗ᷱ⌵㖶ㇶ㛙∂ὃ犐ᷰ⹝ḥ犑䙫䋓䉠∂怇 [Paper presentation]. Pear Garden Century - International Chinese Opera Academic Summit 2017 National Institute of Education-Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Chinese Opera Institute (COI) Singapore and Nanyang Studies Society, Singapore. 16


Yu, W. J. (2017). Singapore’s theatre’s participation in Belt-and-Road scheme [Paper presentation]. Academic Summit of the 5th ASEAN-China Theatre Festival, Beijing. Yu, W. J. (2018, June). The knowledge management & knowledge generation process with the history & theory modules in today’s higher education: A case study of the module series of theatre appreciation taught at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, Singapore [Paper presentation]. GRD 7th International Conference on Teaching, Education and Learning, at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2019, July 8 – 12). Theatre modernity towards contemporary performance fruition drawing on the cultural richness of its own: Stage experimentation along with nation-building & urbanization process in the multi-cultural state of Singapore [Paper presentation]. FIRT 2019 Annual Conference, Shanghai Theatre Academy, China. Yu, W. J., & Zhang, J. (2019). The practice of the “Extra-daily” “Presence” of the unified vocal and physical expression of Singapore’s Chinese-language spoken-drama as part of the artistic gesture of Southeast Asia: Performance on stage and training in studio [Paper Presentation]. Southeast Asian Arts Forum 2019, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts.

Seminars, Talks and Presentations Authors: Cariño, C. Chen, J. H. A Chua, P. L.

Flach, J.

Kan, R. Goh, Z. T. C. Lim, E. Tan, A. Ho, H. M.

Tan, T. C.

Lim, P. T.

Tan, B. T.

Tariao, F.

Koh, J. B. T. ObjectifsFilmsSg. Tan, E. A. L.

Yap, R.

Leong, G.

Yu, W. J.

Soh, J.

Tan, N. K.

Cariño, C., & Tariao, F. (2017). An essential understanding of safe dance practice. Singapore [Workshop]. Dance Safety Workshop in collaboration with NAFA Centre for Lifelong Education, MOE and NAC. Cariño, C. (2014). Free [Interview]. Work in process, The Ngee Ann Kongsi Library Institutional Repository, Singapore. http://drlib.lasalle.edu.sg/312/ Cariño, C. (2015). Holistic dance education. Insider series: Dance education [Talk]. Library @ Esplanade, Singapore. Cariño, C. (2016). KA: Knowledge possesses the soul of Man [Interview]. Work in process, The Ngee Ann Kongsi Library Institutional Repository, Singapore. http://drlib.lasalle.edu.sg/378/ 17


Chen, J. H. A. (2019). Classical voice teaching in Southeast Asia - A roundtable discussion [Presentation]. Teaching and Artistry: Voice Pedagogy Conference 2019, YST Orchestra Hall, Yong Siew Toh Conservatory, Singapore. Chua, P. L. (2018). Negotiations beyond borders [Talk]. Singapore Writers Festival 2018 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The World(s) We Live Inâ&#x20AC;?, Singapore. Flach, J. (2018). Developments of wind orchestra scene in Southeast Asia [Keynote presentation]. SEAMEX (Southeast Asia Music Education Exchange) Symposium, Bangkok. Flach, J. (2018). Techniques to rehearse a wind orchestra [Talk]. Singapore Band Clinic 2018, Singapore. http://bdas.org.sg/2018/07/singapore-band-clinic-2018/ Flach, J. C. (2019). Music as a mirror [Presentation]. Southeast Asian Arts Forum 2019, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. Goh, Z. T. C. (2019). A session on ethnicity and education Irama Belia: Rekindling traditional musical rudiments [Presentation]. Southeast Asian Arts Forum 2019, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. Ho, H. M. (2016). Appreciating art photography [Talk]. Singapore International Photography Festival, Singapore. Ho, H. M. (2016). Pursuing contemporary photography - Approaches to photography [Talk]. Singapore Young Photographer Award Fringe Event, Singapore. Ho, H. M. (2016). Weaving narratives [Talk]. Singapore Young Photographer Award Community Outreach, Singapore. Ho, H. M., Kan, R., Lim, E., & Tan, A. (2015). Cultivating thought-fullness through a multi-disciplinary approach in the arts [Presentation]. NIE Redesigning Pedagogy International Conference, National Institute of Education-Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Kan, R. (2014). Bach's St John's Passion [Pre-Concert Talk for Singapore Symphony Orchestra]. Esplanade, Singapore. Kan, R. (2016). Sinfonie caracteristic: Haydn's Hen and Beethoven's Pastoral [Pre-Concert Talk for Singapore Symphony Orchestra]. Victoria Concert Hall, Singapore. 18


Kan, R. (2017). Learning to listen - Music appreciation [Talk]. Singapore University of Social Sciences and SSG Lifelong Learning Festival, Singapore. Kan, R. (2018). Contextualising ICT-enabled learning experiences in the Arts [Presentation]. International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement. Kan, R., & Tan, T. C. (2017). Baroque as catalyst for artistic collectives: Turning problems to promises [Presentation]. NIE Re-Designing Pedagogy International Conference. National Institute of Education - Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Koh, J. B. T. (2016). Interdisciplinary and creative becoming in the work, sounding body [Presentation]. Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts. University of Brighton, Brighton. Koh, J. B. T. (2017). Sensing sound [Presentation]. Symposium organised by Center for Research in Electro-Acoustic Music and Audio, Seoul, Korea. Koh, J. B. T. (2017). NAFA’s academy-wide project using Angkor Wat as creative stimulus: Promoting SEA arts and interdisciplinary inquiry [Presentation]. China ASEAN Cultural Forum, Nanning, China. Koh, J. B. T. (2018). Musicalising a scientific theory [Presentation]. International Conference on Social Sciences, Arts and Media Social sciences, arts and media (SSAMIC) , Bangkok. Koh, J. B. T. (2019). Were we here? – A theatre of music [Presentation]. International Composers’ Week, Seoul National University. Leong, G. (2014). Panel discussion: Revisiting censorship and live arts in Singapore [Presentation]. Asian Performing Arts Forum, SEA Arts Fest, and CCLAP Panel, London. https://www.theonlinecitizen.com/2014/11/06/our-need-to-protect-the-arts-fromcensorship Leong, G. (2015, October 8). Panel contributing titled: Aesthetics, narrative and practicality [Presentation]. Interventions that Matter: Blackboard Academic Adoption Day Teaching and Learning Conference, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, Singapore. Leong, G. (2019). Building intrinsic motivation through compassion, collaboration and contribution: The role of interdisciplinary project (Puppetry) in the arts education [Presentation]. Southeast Asian Arts Forum 2019, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. 19


Lim, P. T. (2014). The interpretation of Nanyang style III [Public talk]. Post Nanyang at Beijing Arts Studio, Beijing. Lim, P. T. (2014). NAFA creative art talks - Creative & you [Talk]. Singapore. ObjectifsFilmsSG. (2015, June 16). Image makers: Ho Hui May [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCWHfaKhVG4 Soh, J. (2016). A fertile land for the taking: Conquest and appropriation of Southeast Asia during the Age of Colonial Capitalism [Talk]. The Single Screen, NTU Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore. Soh, J. (2016). Solving grand challenges [Talk]. Expression Gallery @ ArtScience Museum, General Assembly Singapore. Tan, B. T. (2014). Iconology of greatness and glamour. Ways of knowing: Asian & Middle Eastern women in photographs [Presentation]. Symposium. Middle Eastern Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore. Tan, B. T. (2016). Sensibility in art from UOB art collection on commission from UOB [Exhibition and Talk]. Singapore: UOB. Tan, E. A. L. (2017). Bartok and Tan Dun [Pre-Concert Talk for Singapore Symphony Orchestra]. Esplanade, Singapore. https://www.esplanade.com/events/2017/tan-dun-farewell-my-concubine Tan, N. K. (2014). DesignSingapore - Strategy & competition [Talk]. 'Circle of Life' Taiwan International Student Design Competition, Taiwan. https://www.ico-d.org/connect/events/events/732.php Tariao, F. (2015). Two 2 tango: A pas des deux with technology. Singapore Nee Ann Polytechnic. Blackboard Teaching & Learning Conference Asia. Yap, R. (2018). ‘Disruptive innovation In the Art and Design education’, ‘21st century Art & Design education’, and ‘Nurturing passion with purpose’ [Presentation]. QS Totally Art Summit, Singapore and Silpakorn University, Thailand. Yu, W. J. (2017). On the nature and feature of one-table &two-chairs’ staging device: The seamless fusion of the dramatics and theatricality as the cultural aesthetic essence embodied in the Chinese opera performance conventions [Presentation]. International Chinese Opera Symposium Singapore. 20


Yu, W. J. (2017, September). Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in beltand-road scheme [Presentation]. Academic Summit of the 5th ASEAN-China Theatre Festival, Beijing. Yu, W. J. (2018). Access to the richness of the cultural diversities of the region: Exploring SEA content from within the taught modules [Presentation]. SEA Art Series, NAFA Office of Academic Affairs. Yu, W. J. (2018). The knowledge management & knowledge generation process with the history & theory modules in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s higher education: A case study of the module series of theatre appreciation taught at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, Singapore [Presentation]. GRD 7th International Conference on Teaching, Education and Learning, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Yu, W. J. (2019). The practice of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extra-dailyâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Presenceâ&#x20AC;? of the unified vocal and physical expression of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese-language spokendrama as part of the artistic gesture of Southeast Asia: Performance on stage and training in studio [Presentation]. Southeast Asian Arts Forum 2019, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts. Yu, W. J. (2019, May 16-18). Physical training of the actor-training curriculum in the context of the Chinese-language theatre [Presentation]. ATEC Annual Conference 2019, Central Academy of Drama, Beijing, China. Yu, W. J. (2019, July 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12). Theatre modernity towards contemporary performance fruition drawing on the cultural richness of its own: Stage experimentation along with nation-building & urbanization process in the multi-cultural state of Singapore [Presentation]. FIRT 2019 Annual Conference, Shanghai Theatre Academy, China.

Yu, W. J. (2019, November). The pioneering cultural interweaving performance in Singapore: Bharathanatyam staging of Cantonese opera production of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Butterfly loversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in 1958 at Victoria Theatre Ć&#x2039;ä&#x2039;&#x2022;â&#x17E;ľĺ&#x2C6;&#x2026;â?&#x2014;᡹á¸&#x192;ă&#x2013; ă&#x2021;śâ&#x2030;&#x17D;ă&#x2022;Žâ&#x2039;˝áş&#x2039;ă´¨ä&#x2122;Ťâ&#x2C6;&#x201E;⌲â°&#x201E;原Ć?ç&#x160;&#x2021;ç&#x160;?ç&#x160;&#x2039;ç&#x160;&#x17D;âš&#x203A;â?&#x2014;âş?⨭䟞⤠ĺ&#x2C6;&#x2026;â&#x2030;&#x17D;⯠â&#x152;ľă&#x2013;śă&#x2021;śă&#x203A;&#x2122;ä˛&#x2039;â&#x2030;&#x17D;ç&#x160;?㥨âą&#x2DC;áź&#x2013;᡾äĽ&#x201E;ĺ&#x2039;&#x2DC; â?&#x2014;ç&#x160;&#x2018;ä&#x2122;Ťä§˘ăŁ´Ć&#x152; [Presentation]. Cultural Interweaving Process between Oriental Classical Theatrical Varieties, 2019 Singapore Chinese Opera International Symposium (áł&#x161;ă&#x2018;ˇâ&#x160;˘â&#x20AC;śă&#x192;?â&#x201E;Ľä&#x2022;&#x201A;áľ?ăł&#x2022;áł&#x152;â&#x160;&#x2013;âˇ&#x20AC;ç&#x2020;&#x2026;ç&#x2020;&#x192;ç&#x2020;&#x201E;ç&#x2020;&#x152;â´˛ä&#x2020;Źâ&#x161;&#x152;â&#x2013;ťć&#x201D;&#x192;ă&#x192;?ă&#x2013;°ä&#x203A;&#x2019;劌áˇ&#x2DC; , Singapore.

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Chapter 4: Our Professional Capability Faculty Development in Research pg 22

Circles of Practice: Creative Research Methods pg 32

Research Planning and Methods pg 25

Gallery pg 40

Faculty Development in Research

Pedagogical Practice Sharing: Designing a Research-Led Curriculum 27 January 2016, 3.30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm, B4-18E

Intonations on curriculum design and delivery were presented at the first pedagogical practice sharing in 2016. Dr Caren Carino (Vice-Dean, Dance) was invited to share research-led methodologies and processes that she used to re-design Dance curriculum. Performance in creation was identified as one of the principal areas of concentration in the new Dance curriculum. While Western dances genres, such as Ballet and Contemporary Dance, would still be core components of the curriculum, more Asian practices, such as yoga and Balinese movements, had been progressively included since 2007. Further to this, modules in contextual studies, such as Dance History of Asia and Research Methods, centred around contemporary Asian choreographers.

By way of research-led praxis in the curriculum, Dr Carino used case studies to illustrate how various dance research methods, such as observation and description, long interviews, literature reviews and contextual essays, were introduced to the curriculum. A typical process would involve lectures and discussions with the student, conducting research practice lessons, guiding the student choreographer to identify a topic relating to their Asian experiences before recommending relevant research methods to the student.

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Pedagogical Practice Sharing: Design Thinking in Education 18 April 2017, 4-6pm, B4-18E

Wong Yew Leong provided colleagues with an understanding of design thinking and its potentials in education. Yew Leong engaged participants in a conversation about how design thinking would impact respective areas of specialisations, and explored how a design-based pedagogy might contribute to teaching and learning in their disciplines.

Define (understand needs, personas, motivations and pointof-views), Ideate (generate and evaluate ideas) and Test (build, test, iterate).

Participants learned about the stages involved in Design Thinking from an educational perspective, namely Interpretation, Imagination and Implementation. In each stage, there would be different activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Inquire (analyse problem), Fig. 1

Pedagogical Practice Sharing: Action Research on Student Feedback in the Classroom 22 September 2017, 4-5.30pm, Interval@Library

Georgette Yu (Fashion Studies) facilitated a pedagogical sharing session on the merits of using action research to evaluate the effectiveness of student-centred feedback. Participants learned about her researchled teaching experience to evaluate the feedback that was given to her class of 23 Fashion Studies Year 1 students. Her sound methodology, detailed process and conclusive findings point towards the importance of teacher reflexivity in the ways we teach, the ways we interact and communicate with our students, and how we should allow students to initiate questions, articulate their problems and listen without reacting.

Georgette went on to explain how student-centred feedback is a process-oriented teaching that cultivates students in metacognition, giving students an opportunity to develop their own creative problem-solving skills as we aim for technical perfection.

Fig. 2 23


Acquiring Knowledge, Developing Empathy, and Shaping Values through Creation and Performance 2 May 2018, 12-1.30pm, B4-18E

Together with NIE Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (CTL) Academic Group, lecturer Wong Yew Leong (NIE) and Grace Leong (NAFA) jointly conducted a research analysis on the inter-disciplinary WWII project, to examine the potential of design methods in enhancing learning in performance art and history.

Fig.3

Pedagogical Praxis Sharing: Self-Regulated Learning in the Arts 30 August 2019, 4-5.30pm, B4-18E

The role of feedback in self-regulated learning (SRL) is gaining increasing attention from educational researchers, advocating that formative feedback in particular, has the potential to facilitate self-regulated learning. In light of this, the Pedagogy and Research Unit collaborated with Dr Leong Wei Shin (Assistant Dean, Teacher Education and Student Life, National Institute of Education-National Technological University) from August 2018 to July 2019 to investigate approaches of self-regulated learning in music practice.

to improve self-directed learning and assessment practices among faculty. This sharing reported on the key findings from this project and opened the space for discussion on how approaches of self-regulated learning can lead students to higher levels of artistic achievements.

This research points to the need for student professional musicians to re-visit how approaches of self-regulated learning will affect instrumental and ensemble practice and performance. The project itself arose from conversations with students from School of Music, and a natural desire

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Research Planning and Methods

Research Supervision for Dissertations 8 April 2015, 4.30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm, Interval@Library, Campus 1

Professor Kenneth Hamilton (Dean, International) from Cardiff University spent the afternoon of 8 April with colleagues involved in research supervision of dissertations. Arising from the definition of an undergraduate dissertation as a research synthesis, with thought-provoking commentary, Professor Hamilton gave comprehensive advice about how to choose a topic to compliment the capability of each individual student, the importance of a structural timeline towards completion. He suggested alternative (shorter, but more productive) schedules to supervise and mentor the student towards effective accomplishments.

Professor Hamilton resonated with these issues. Drawing from his 20year experience in various Universities and Conservatories in the UK and US, he made some recommendations: Peer assessment of formative work, and shared specimens of good and poor practices (with mark sheets and comments) were valued as good practice. Organised (group) seminars for research methodologies were viewed as effective and productive platforms to develop skills in research.

Colleagues from Fashion, Design & Media, Fine Art and Music shared their experiences, and raised common concerns relating to supervising students with moderate abilities.

Arts Education Research Seminar 17 February 2016, 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm, B4-18E, Campus 1

Dr Leong Wei Shin from Curriculum, Teaching Learning (CTL) at NIE and Dr Pamela Onishi (Research Scientist, Convenor, Arts & Music Research Task Force) facilitated a session to seed interest in cross-tertiary institution education-based research collaboration.

25

The session was facilitated by way of a conversation, dwelling on the rationale behind educational research in the arts, types of research (questions) that


art practitioners can engage in, methods of research, and opportunities for collaborative research across tertiary institutions.

the seminar raises attention on improving teaching and learning at higher education level

Participants also learned about the recent endeavours at the Office of Educational Research (NIE) in arts education research, and arts in education research. These included publications on intervention studies, pedagogical approaches, professional development, ICT integration and arts integration/arts infused curricular. The session drew to a close with a discussion on tertiary research funding possibilities, and more details about the MOE Tertiary Education Research Fund.

there is a presently perceived blind spot with regards research at NAFA and La Salle, in collaboration with IHLs

it will be good to document years of artistic practice and experience

this is a potential space to develop, since NAFA generates student outcomes that feed directly into the creative industries.

These are some of the documented conversations to share perspectives of participants at this seminar:

Strategies for Success in Research Grant Writing: Conception, Collaboration and Crafting 30 March 2016, 12–2pm, Interval@Library, Campus 1

The art of crafting and writing good proposals had emanated from conversations at the Arts Research Seminar with NIE in February 2016. Visiting Professor Kenneth Hamilton (Dean, College of the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and Head of the School of Music, Cardiff University) and Dr Monika Hennemann (Director, Department of German, Cardiff University) were invited to provide an informal workshop to explore a range of strategies for conceiving and composing successful collaborative research grant proposals.

Colleagues received practical tips in crafting proposals from the pair who have extensive experience in both traditional and practice-led arts research.

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NVIVO Training Workshop 26 June 2018, 9am-5pm, B5-16

NVivo is a software package designed to assist in the management and analysis of qualitative data. This one-day intensive workshop gave 7 colleagues a hands-on introduction to provide a broad overview of its key functions and processes. Participants also learned how to jump-start the

analytical process by reading, coding and reflecting data; as well as exploring data using lexical queries, coding queries and visualisations.

Getting Started with NVivo 12 Pro 28 September 2018, 9am-5pm, B5-16

At the second run of the NVivo training workshop, participants learnt about the features of NVivo, a software package designed to assist in the management and analysis of qualitative data. The oneday intensive workshop gave a hands-on introduction to provide a broad overview of its key functions and processes.

of data, as well as helping to explore data using lexical queries, coding queries and visualizations.

The workshop taught participants how to jump-start the analytical process by reading, coding and reflecting various kinds Fig. 4

The Right Word in the Right Place 4 January 2019, 2-5pm, B4-18A

Felix Cheong facilitated a 3-hour workshop on 4 January for colleagues and degree students who were interested to learn more about how to polish their drafts, write clear topic sentences and make logical links between paragraphs. During the session, participants learned useful tips and techniques on how to proofread their essay

27

for errors and write connecting words to make the logic of their argument flow better. Additionally, Felix also touched on the topic of how to have proper citations in writing.


Conversazione: Charting the Way for Researching the Arts 26 September 2018, 2-4pm, B4-18

Conversazione was held on 26 September 2018, inviting targeted representatives from the three Schools to contribute views and feedback on research practices, with the objective of distilling an identity for the artistic and academic research in NAFA. During this session, Rebecca shared the progress of various research work groups, and moving forward, how the Pedagogy and Research Unit will help to support research plans and engagement with the schools on key research thrusts. During the session, each School was asked to discuss among themselves and select three possible research topics, as well as to describe the impact, gaps and end product that each research idea would entail. This is a summary of the key research thrusts identified by the representative schools:

Creative Processes of Practitioners (SOM) To examine the creative engagement of practitioners in their processes of music collaboration. New Industries (SOAD) To explore the potential to initiate collaboration between different disciplines due to the many changes that the design industry was undergoing, especially in terms of automation. This research could help to potentially shape new emerging industries. The first project with SOM has commenced. SOAD and SOAMDT Deans are working with their teams on finalising the research thrusts for their respective schools.

New Directions for Dance and Theatre (SOAMDT) To explore the new breed of Dance and Theatre students and the difference between them and choreographers and playwrights from the past.

Fig. 5

Conversazione: Research Integrity 28 November 2018, 4-6pm, B4-18E

This conversation facilitated by Dr Rebecca Kan (Vice Dean, Pedagogy and Research) was intended for colleagues involved

in research, as well as to provide an update on recent developments of ethical 28


approvals at NAFA, such as the procedure to prepare an application for human ethics review. Rebecca also explained the composition and function of the Research Work Group (RWG) and Research Evaluation Panel (REP) in the application process.

attend both local and overseas conferences. The participants were also given an opportunity to share about their research interests.

During the session, participants shared the challenges they faced in getting approval to

Conversazione: Honesty, Accountability, Fairness, and Good Stewardship 4 June 2019, B4-18A

In this conversation on Ethical Thinking, Jacinta Freeman (Programme Leader, Academic) presented her knowledge from an online course on Ethics in Social Science Research, with reference to the third and fourth chapters of Helen Kara’s book, Creative Methods in Social Sciences Research. The motif was that ethics underlie everything we do in research. We cannot do research for the sake of research, but we need to consider the ethical implications of what we do. Jacinta also introduced us to the ‘CERD’ ethical framework, which consists of four components as benchmarks for research ethics appraisal. This includes: Consequential ethical thinking – Will your research be worthwhile? What are the positive and negative consequences? Ecological ethical thinking – How can you be responsible to your participants? Relational ethical thinking – How do you respect your participants? Are you doing insider or outsider research and what is

29

your role? Who are your gatekeepers? Deontological ethical thinking – Do you still want to undertake the research, knowing its intellectual and emotional demands? What are the limitations? How do you ensure self-reflexivity throughout the course of your research? Jacinta ended her sharing by saying that our research scope may change during the course of our fieldwork, and therefore consents and permissions will need to be reviewed. We also have to consider the ethical procedure for closing the field study, to account for our participants and give them closure.


Contemporary Ethnography: Practices, Ethics, Challenges and Concerns 19 November 2019, 10-11.30am, B4-18E

“Ethnography should not still be what it used to be, we can use the frame of how ethnography used to be but at the same time adapt it to the changing needs in today’s reality.” (Rose Martin) In November 2019, Dr Rose Martin from University of Auckland visited NAFA to continue the collaboration research project on Narratives of Creative Processes with School of Music. In addition, she also facilitated a workshop on the notion of ethnography, its contemporary theories and practices, various ethnographic methods and examples of ethnographic studies within the creative arts. The method of ethnography enables a researcher to relay credible, rigorous and authentic stories that relive the experience beyond what other methodological approaches can do. Lecturers took turns to share their personal experiences on how they saw ethnography as part of their practice or research. Dr Rose encouraged lecturers to broaden their perspectives into the political, social and economic surroundings of their subjects of interest. By looking at the full spectrum of the world that subjects are living in, the people that surround them, thinking about what they would have said, thought, felt, or done, we can draw inferences on the subjects through such data. Dr Rose then introduced a variety of ethnographic data found today, including digital ethnography, embodied ethnography, and accidental ethnography.

The session included an open discussion among the lecturers of some ethical concerns and contentions they might have in research. To which, some lecturers brought up how they faced difficulties such as participants feeling uncomfortable with sharing how they truly feel due to the accountability they hold to whatever they say and participants dropping out halfway through the research process. Some of the solutions suggested included having the researcher start off by having a friendly chat with the participant so that the participant feels more comfortable and safer on sharing his thoughts. Dr Rose encouraged a selection of participants who were more passionate about the research interests, as what they would have to offer are much more valuable.

Fig. 6 30


Research Ethics 6 December 2019, 11am, B4-18E

Organised for the Research Ethics Panel, Ms Shubhra Roy from University of Canberra shed light into the importance of ethics in academic research. Adhering to ethical standards promote the values that are essential to collaborative work, such as trust, accountability, mutual respect, and fairness. Good examples of ethical norms in research include guidelines for authorship, copyright and patenting policies, data sharing policies, and confidentiality agreements. All these are designed to protect intellectual property interests while encouraging collaboration. A research project that has sound integrity is also more likely to receive funding. In the event that public funds are used for a project, having policies on research misconduct, conflicts of interest and protection of human subjects ensure that researchers can be held accountable to the public. An interesting point that was raised was that although most societies use laws to enforce widely accepted moral standards, ethics and law are not the same. An action may be legal but unethical or vice versa. Ethical norms tend to be broader and more informal than laws. Having an ethical review is important to ensure all research is conducted in a structured way and the review process is fair and equitable for all. In such reviews, the basic themes for the panel to look out for are:

31

Risk (harm, discomfort, inconvenience)

Participants (characteristics, recruitment, relationships, respect)

Benefit (personal, social, economic, educational)

Consent (informed, withdrawal rights)

Data (confidentiality, storage, disposal)

Research merit (rationale, methodology, interventions)


Circles of Practice: Creative Research Methods In order to foster collaborative learning and discussions on research, a circle of practice convened to look into burning research questions and issues on artistic and educational practices. Since November 2018, a circle of practice was convened to look into burning research questions and issues on artistic and educational practices. Dr Helen Kara’s authority on Creative Research Methods was used as the catalyst for discussion since the book covered innovative contemporary research methods to answer complex questions through creative approaches. From January to November 2019, there were nine sessions to introduce creative research, methods, research ethics, creative thinking, writing, publications, researchers’ toolbox in reflexivity, data gathering and analysing.

Session I: Creative Research Methods in the Social Sciences. Introducing Creative Research 28 November 2018; 28 January 2019, 4.30-6pm, B4-18E Grace Leong (Programme Leader, Office of Academic Affairs)

A conversation with colleagues about creative research practices was convened in November 2018, to take into account collegial research interests. In January 2019, a new circle of artistic practice was formalised for artist-practitioner-educators to study creative research methods.

methods research, and transformative research frameworks. Grace Leong also provided the participants with a deeper insight into the topic of ‘creativity’, as defined by Helen Kara.

The first session covered the relationship between the research question, methodology, methods, and philosophy, which are components of a research design. The methodological framework, with its underpinning philosophy, influences how the researcher works with participants, and the position they take in the study.

One of the highlights of the session was an extended discussion about the relationship between uncertainty and creativity.

Participants learned about the four main types of research, namely art-based research, research using technology, mixed

Fig 7 32


Participants shared their experiences of uncertainty in the classroom and art making, and to think about how levels of uncertainty lead to a deep engagement of learning in the arts.

Session II: Creative Research Methods in Practice I 18 February 2019, 4.30-6pm, B4-18E Georgette Yu (Research Associate, Pedagogy and Research Unit),

Colleagues took part in a discussion of Creative Research Methods in Practice I and shared their individual interpretations of how the processes involved in making art can be surprisingly similar to the processes involved in doing research (Kara, 2015, p. 15). Participants were introduced to artsbased research and ‘dancing’ data in other forms beyond quantitative methods. It is the emotional connections to research projects that differentiate arts-based research from traditional methods. Georgette illustrated her points through her project De LINE AT e d, an art-based research study in 2017, which examined the creative process through art-making project of a 3D linkograph. She showed how she personally gained new insight and learning by looking and analyzing data from multiple perspectives as teacher, researcher, and educator. As this form of research was communicated differently, i.e. provocatively or emotionally, there were challenges in maintaining validity, objectivity, and being ethical.

Questions arose: How rigorous could the data be, when a lot of emotion is being used? How credible is the research? How would we engage students in the research process, and assess them as participants in such research? How much of the participants’ identity is revealed that is ambiguous and even politically sensitive? “Creative process … is a process of giving equal opportunity to students. A space where the students can explore, the time when students exist, the support that students can trust and be vulnerable, accepting what is uncertain, making a leap of faith.” Georgette Yu (February 2019)

Fig 8 33


Session III: Creative Research Methods and Ethics 27 March 2019, 4.30-6pm, B4-18E Joey Soh (Fine Art Programme, School of Art and Design)

In the third session, Joey Soh (Lecturer, Fine Art) explored the concept of autoethnography through her experiences working with the artist collective “Artist Caravan”. Using her previous work as examples, Joey explored the method of autoethnography with the Artist Caravan’s three fundamental principles of engaging the Self, Others and Environment. Like autoethnography, the art collective aims to investigate the identity and role of the artist by engaging and collaborating with the community by creating art. The focus is on the process and reflecting on the process. The discussion emerges from individual’s inquiry in relation to its surroundings and people. She describes the process as becoming “hyperaware” and how one can connect instinctively with

objects and the environment. Yet, the relational nature of the artmaking process that is site-specific creates a rhizomatic situation that has “multiple, non-hierarchical entry and exit points in data representation and interpretation”.

Fig 9

Session IV: Creative Thinking I - Creative Research Methods and Ethics 15 April 2019, 5.30-7pm, B4-18E Professor Kenneth Hamilton (Dean, International, Cardiff University)

Facilitated by Professor Kenneth Hamilton and Dr Monika Hennemann from Cardiff University, the April instalment of the series opened with a broad discussion about issues in the third chapter of Helen Kara’s Creative Research Methods, who promotes the need for ethical considerations to permeate the whole of the research process.

This topic of research ethics was particularly relevant, as NAFA had recently established its research ethics policy and procedure. This presented an opportunity for NAFA to take the lead in research ethics in the arts education circle. 34


Faculty members from different disciplines shared their views on ethical procedures, such as the importance of having measures in place to safeguard unacknowledged borrowing, and the importance of informed consent in research projects. The discussion highlighted that students sometimes did not fully understand what they were undertaking when signing the Informed Consent Forms, and how this perhaps could be communicated better to them.

about it; and just blow with it.” In closing, it was mentioned that the National Arts Council has taken a fresh direction and focus on research in the 2018-2022 plans. Thus, it would benefit NAFA if more colleagues could take up research projects to explore ways of improving teaching and learning.

The couple left us thinking about how research is now changing a language, and how the new language changes the behaviour of people. On an empowering note, Kenneth talked about how easy it was to unlock funding opportunities and yet not compromise artistic practice, if you “don’t fight the role

Fig 10

Session V: Creative Thinking I 1 August 2019, 4.30-6pm, B4-18E Dr Yu Weijie (Theatre Programme, School of Arts Management, Dance and Theatre)

In this Circle of Practice session, Dr Yu Weijie (Theatre Programme) facilitated a three-part discussion on Chapter Four of Helen Kara’s book, Creative Research Method in the Social Sciences: A Practical Guide. This chapter, titled Creative Thinking, focused on the use of creative thinking in research practice. After sharing his key takeaways from the chapter, Dr Yu followed up with a sharing of his research journey, as well as a discussion on how group thinking is carried out “in the clothing of” creative thinking. 35

In the first part of the session (“Creative Thinking”), Dr Yu shared that creative thinking has been widely used since the 1990s, including in creative research, which in his opinion is considered artsbased research. The second part of the session (“My Journey”) was a sharing of Dr Yu’s


research experiences – how he integrated his personal research interests with not only the interests of NAFA’s Theatre Arts education, but also with how he brought relevance of his research to conference themes. In the final part of the session (“Group Thinking under the Clothing of Creative Thinking”), Dr Yu shared a few misused concepts that create a false notion of creative thinking. These are “Intercultural Theatre”, “Multi-disciplinary Theatre” and “Multi-disciplinary Opera” (since Theatre and Opera are already multi-disciplinary in nature), “Post-dramatic Theatre” (which Dr Yu argues that if it is the case, could also be called “non-dramatic theatre”). Dr Yu also suggested that the terms “Hybridisation”, “Melting-pot” and “Fusion” are displaced or outdated, and Southeast Asian

culture should not be misused with Chinese culture. He also cautioned the misinterpretations of quotations, citing one by Peter Brook from The Empty Space – when one person walking [sic] across an empty space in front of the audience, theatre happens. In closing, Rebecca shared the importance of ensuring that publications from NAFA meet external research standards. Therefore, while internal bulletins are initiated to create opportunities for research writing, we need to be cognizant about the external view on such writings, and build capability towards research excellence expected of tertiary institutions.

Session VI: Creative Thinking II 20 September, 1pm, B4-18E Georgette Yu (Research Associate, Pedagogy and Research Unit)

The seventh Creative Research Methods session focused on the importance of thinking creatively and the strategies one can use to implement creative thinking in doing research. The session was broken down into four different sections: 1.

What is Creative Thinking?

2. Why Creative Thinking? 3. How is Creative Thinking applied to the research process? 4. How to foster creative thinking into the research process? In this session, Creative Thinking was

associated to ways of thinking in relation to fast thinking, convergent and divergent thinking, “empathetic imagination” (Galvin and Todres, 2012) and “negative capability” (Romanyshyn, 2013). When conducting research, creative thinking allows for ethical decision making and questioning of assumptions and biases. Georgette Yu (Research Associate, Pedagogy and Research Unit) iterated 36


Kara’s point that creative thinking is integral in the research process. It is applied by way of questioning, reading, writing, and thinking. Ways to foster creative thinking when conducting research include cross-disciplinary, artbased research and imagination. Research is not only of rational knowledge but also somatic knowledge. It is a holistic process of seeing and accepting that problems can have more than one solution.

Likewise, research involves a process of reading actively and imagination is necessary to write and understand human experiences. Finally, it is important to have reflexivity to acknowledge one’s role in the research journey. For this chapter, Helen Kara concludes that research is a “creative activity which requires creative thinking”.

Session VII: Data Gathering 25 October 2019, 1-2.30pm, B4-18E Chiew Sien Kuan and Joey Soh (Fine Art Programme, School of Art and Design)

Joey Soh and Chiew Sien Kuan (Fine Art) led the seventh session on Data Collection on 25 October 2019. Joey started the session by introducing the meaning of data collection and data construction and their respective benefits. In a traditional data collection process, the relationship between researchers and participants is very much hierarchical - with researchers at the top, and interraters/moderators and participants at the bottom of the hierarchy. On the other hand, data construction is a much more multi-dimensional method of encapsulating human experience, which encourages progressive engagement between researchers and participants. Andrew Robinson approached his research using ‘progressive engagement’. The result showed a 100% retention rate in participation, as participants enjoyed the involvement. 37

Joey suggested a few methods that could be used for data construction, including focus groups, diary method, photo-elicitation, drawing, mapping, shadowing, vignettes, and methods-writing. She also shared three case studies which made use of some of the above methods for data-construction, and a podcast NRP Hidden Brain, Episode “You 2.0: Rebel with a Cause”, where creativity emerges out of uncertainties of/ from creative research methods. Chiew shared a sketchbook done by one of the Year 2 Fine Arts students. The process of getting their students to journal their artworks, elicits various information that


would not have otherwise been known. “everything could be used as data. Even things that were not necessarily thought as data. It is a matter of where we put ourselves and how we made use of such data.” (Joey Soh) Fig 11 Session VIII: Data Analysis 27 November 2019, 1.30-3pm, B4-18E Ethel Chong (Arts Management Programme, School of Arts Management, Dance and Theatre) Jacinta Freeman (Design and Media Programme, School of Art and Design)

In the eighth research circle session on Ethical Thinking, Jacinta Freeman and Ethel Chong presented a summary of the sixth chapter of Helen Kara’s book, Creative Methods in Social Sciences Research, titled Analysing Data. According to the author, “there are many ways to analyse primary and secondary data”. (p. 119) But in spite of the laborious and repetitive process, “there is still plenty of scope for creativity in data analysis.” (p. 119) It is also important to note that a common failing of research reports and journal articles is the lack of clarity when it comes to explaining the process of analysing data, which is “helpful in the next stages of the research process: writing, presentation, dissemination and implementation.” The nine different ways in which data analysis can be done consist of: 1. Quantitative Analysis - the analysis of numbers 2. Qualitative Analysis- analysis of narratives, conversations or metaphors

3. Secondary Data - analysis of data gathered for other purposes 4. Documentary Data analysing documents using textual or discourse analysis 5. Talks - conversation and discourse analysis 6. Visual Techniques 7. Videos 8. Mixed Methods using quantitative and qualitative analysis 9. Art-based data analysis Of the different methods mentioned, Ethel and Jacinta shared how they made use of conversational analysis to teach their students how to analyse a movie. For example, they would analyse the character’s pauses, fillers, 38


intonation, volume of speech and so on, to determine how information is played up or down, and how “the tables are turned”. Ethel and Jacinta also noted that the list is not exhaustive and there are many other methods of analysis that can be used on a single type of data. For example, another way to analyse “talks” is the use of rhetorical analysis. Rhetorical analysis gives us further insight by looking at the persona behind the information. They also provided the pros and cons of each method of analysis. Quantitative analysis allows little room for creativity, unless one is able to come up with a new algorithm.

However, this will require considerable expertise in more than one field. When used together with qualitative analysis, both methods can help to ensure that the data is credible by supporting one another. However, the limitation of such a method is that it is resourceintensive and time-consuming. “There is no one form of analysis, but using a combination of methods gives us more depth into the topic.” (Jacinta Freeman)

Session IX: Writing for Research 5 December 2019, 1-2.30pm, B4-18E Professor Kenneth Hamilton (Dean, International, Cardiff University)

“Writing is the one art form with which all researchers must engage. Traditional research writing is ‘depersonalised and alienating’ and some academics write in such a ‘dense and convoluted’ style that their ideas are hard to grasp.” (Helen Kara) Facilitated by Professor Kenneth Hamilton (Dean, Cardiff University), this session challenged colleagues to see beyond our roles as artists, and to consider ourselves as writers. Kenneth shared a few points to consider when writing for research: 1. Simplicity 2. Clarity 3. Rhythm Simplicity requires one to minimise the amount of technical language used. One should write in a simple manner but not (in a) simplistic and naïve way. Clarity means that one should be able to identify why the idea or research is interesting or original 39

in not more than three sentences. As a musician, Dr Kenneth felt that writing needs rhythm - just like music. “The writing has to have an inner rhythm that propels the reader forward. We all know how painful it can be to read a mechanical instruction manual.Pamphlets like that are classic examples of writing without rhythm.” (Murakami, 2011). Professor Hamilton also shared some personal tips that helped improve his writing and how he makes time for it. He advised to keep polishing the first draft until it flows. With regards to time management, he keeps timings before 10am protected, and tries to complete work that requires thinking during that time, such as writing or learning new music.


Gallery Chapter 4

Fig 1: Pedagogical Practice Sharing: Design Thinking in Education

Fig 2: Pedagogical Practice Sharing: Action Research on Student Feedback in the Classroom

Fig 3: Acquiring Knowledge, Developing Empathy, and Shaping Values through Creation and Performance

40


Gallery Chapter 4

Fig 4: Getting Started with NVivo 12 Pro

Fig 5: Conversazione: Charting the W

Fig 7: Session 1 with Grace Leong

Fig 8: Session 2 with Georgette Yu

Fig 10: Session 4 with Professor Kenneth Hamilton

Fig 11: Session 7 with Chiew Sien Kua

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Way for Researching the Arts

Fig 6: Contemporary Ethnography: Practices, Ethics, Challenges and Concerns

Fig 9: Session 3 with Joey Soh and Chiew Sien Kuan

an

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Chapter 5: Our Highlights Teaching Workshops over a Decade: 2009 to 2018 pg 43 Gallery pg 53

Teaching Workshops over a Decade: 2009 to 2018 The Teaching Workshop was an annual event organised by NAFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic staff for all educators involved in the arts within and outside of NAFA. The objective of the annual workshops was to explore curriculum design and delivery that promote deep and engaged learning in our learning spaces. Originally initiated by then NAFA Vice-President Dr Tang Seung Mun, the Teaching Workshop was officially taken over in 2011 by OAA (Office of Academic Affairs), organised and managed by Teaching & Learning Committee.

From 2009 to 2018, these workshops have enabled collaboration among educators and art practitioners, inspiring a continuum of learning that celebrates change and openness in pedagogical practices. The Teaching Workshops provided an opportunity for NAFA colleagues to watch and learn every year from both internal facilitators and invited external speakers via anecdotes and narratives on various themes.

2009

2010

The Art of Teaching

The ABC of Teaching & Learning

43

2011 The A to F of Assessing

2012

2013

Be H.O.T: Higher Order Thinkers

Motivating and Engaging Students to Achieve Outcomes


The compendium of topics from 2009 to 2018 on curriculum, teaching, learning and assessments lays the groundwork for research leadership in the next decade.

TEACHING WORKSHOP 2009 The Art of Teaching 10 September 2009, 3–6pm The inaugural edition covered a range of educational experiences to bridge, understand and share issues for improving the teaching and learning environment at NAFA.

Team: Tan Chwee Seng (Chair), Chiew Sien Kuan, Desmond Chin, Debra de Cotta, Rebecca Kan, Grace Leong, Martha Lim

A debate on whether lecturers should be hanging out with students to show care was facilitated by S. Chandrasekaran (FA), with Choo Thiam Siew (President, NAFA) and Liew Chin Choy (Vice-President, Administration) and the audience as jury. Themes: • • • • • •

Art of Teaching Sheer determination Be enthusiastic Be patient Show you care Know NAFA students

2014

2015

Distilling Research in the Arts: Paradigms – Practices – Processes

The Missing Curriculum: Design for Change, Deliver for Impact

Fig. 1

2016 Leadership in the Arts

2017

2018

Cultivating the Spirit of Entrepreneurship

Industry-based Learning: The Future of Learning

44


TEACHING WORKSHOP 2010 The ABC of Teaching & Learning 15 September 2010, 2–6pm The second edition explored new ideas in various pedagogies to enhance teaching and learning at NAFA. Topics included flexible and independent learning through e-learning affordances, perspectives of cross-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary collaboration, views about the role of lecturers and students in the Integrated Studio Project, and motivation-centred learning in block-teaching.

Fig. 2

Themes: • • • • •

E-Learning X-disciplinary Learning Learning Integrated Studio Project Block teaching

Team: Tan Chwee Seng (Chair), Chiew Sien Kuan, Desmond Chin, Debra de Cotta, Rebecca Kan, Grace Leong, Peh Mei Lian, Pek Siok Ee, Jerry Soo, Tan Choong Kheng, Tan Ngeup Khun, Dr Tang Seung Mun

TEACHING WORKSHOP 2011 The A to F of Assessing 7 October 2011, 3–6pm The third edition was designed to raise and discuss various issues concerning modes and modalities in assessment practices. One of the highlights was the opportunity for lecturers to reflect and share their views on the effectiveness of online assessments, in comparison with traditional modes of assessing students’ learning. Themes: •

Building Assessment Frameworks for the Visual Arts

Creating Assessment Rubrics in the Performing Arts

Accountability and Clarity in Assessment Feedback

Dealing with Online Assessment

Evaluating Group Projects

• Future Approaches in Assessing Students 45

Team: Jerry Soo (Chair), Chiew Sien Kuan, Desmond Chin, Debra de Cotta, Rebecca Kan, Erica Lai, Grace Leong, Martha Lim, Peh Mei Lian, Pek Siok Ee, Tan Chwee Seng, Tan Ngeup Khun, Celia Wong, Marienne Yang, Crystal Yong

Fig. 3


TEACHING WORKSHOP 2012 Be H.O.T: Higher Order Thinkers 12 July 2012, 2–5pm The fourth edition dwelled on higher-order thinking. This workshop featured a keynote presentation by Daniel K on the relationship between artistic practice and critical thinking, and an open conference on idea mapping and generation through proliferation and reformulation. Emphasis on collaboration was placed in such a way that the participants were engaged in dynamic discourse among themselves, with each lecturer leveraging on group dynamics to unearth new assumptions, derive new ideas, or to arrive at what was hitherto hidden and unknown.

Team: Grace Leong (Chair), Chiew Sien Kuan, Desmond Chin, Debra de Cotta, Matthew Foo, Rebecca Kan, Erica Lai, Peh Mei Lian, Jerry Soo, Tan Choong Kheng, Gillian Tan, Tan Chwee Seng, Tan Ngeup Khun, Marienne Yang, Crystal Yong

Themes: •

Critical thinking

Idea mapping and generation Fig. 4

TEACHING WORKSHOP 2013 Motivating and Engaging Students to Achieve Outcomes 1 March 2013, 2–6pm The fifth edition was a gathering of creative minds regionally and globally to demystify central tenets of teaching and learning the Arts. It was dissolved from different perspectives through keynotes, demonstrations, interactive workshops and a webinar. The keynote and parallel sessions provided a practical lens into central tenets of student engagement and qualities of intrinsic motivation: viz. academic challenge, employment-focussed learning, enriching classroom experiences, supportive learning environments, instructor-learner interactions, and active e- and m-learning strategies.

Themes: •

Don’t Impose. Expose!

Engaging Students in Performance: Creating Confidence with Positive Feedback Techniques Engaging Students in Visual Dimensions: Express to Impress

Repackaging Education – How Do

46


We Re-Present a Seriously Old Product? •

Understanding Learning Difficulties

Students as Digital Navigators: Role of Mobile Technologies and Digital Literacies in Creative Education

Fig. 5

Team: Rebecca Kan (Chair), Caren Carino, Chew Han Lim, Chiew Sien Kuan, Gary Goh, Desmond Ho, Lim Tee Heong, Carol Sim, Tan Choong Kheng, Tan Yee Noh, Marienne Yang, Yu Wei Jie

TEACHING WORKSHOP 2014 Distilling Research in the Arts: Paradigms – Practices – Processes 2 and 3 April 2014, 9am–5pm The sixth edition focused on paradigms, practices and processes about research in the Arts. Invited speakers covered topics on the workshop as a studio art practice, shifting structures in creative contemporary arts education and research, benchmarking research in the Arts practice, research in advertising and arts education. The programme included presentations, round-table discussions, and workshops, giving participants an opportunity to meet and network with fellow colleagues in the arts, and to keep abreast with developments at the Academy.

Supervising research

Publishing your research

Team: Rebecca Kan (Chair), Caren Carino, Chew Han Lim, Chiew Sien Kuan, Jonathan Chng, Gary Goh, Desmond Ho, Lim Tee Heong, Carol Sim, Tan Choong Kheng, Tan Yee Noh, Marienne Yang, Yu Wei Jie

Themes: •

Research-informed teaching

Research methods for Arts education

Practice-based research

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Fig. 6


48


TEACHING WORKSHOP 2015 The Missing Curriculum: Design for Change, Deliver for Impact 26 February 2015, 9am–5.30pm The seventh edition covered divergent studentcentred approaches to promote deep and meaningful engagements in teaching and learning of the arts. One of the highlights was a forum with the Deans, which discussed the weaknesses of our curriculum in addressing the needs of the industry, suggestions to fine-tune the music curriculum from an industry practitioner’s perspective, the overlaps and gaps in the curriculum of Arts Management, Dance and Theatre, and the development of technical competency. Themes: •

Effective experience and learning systems for the 21st century student

Relational aesthetics and audience participation for dialogue about art

Interdisciplinary approach to learning

Making the invisible visible: Visible Thinking

Blended Learning: debunking myths

Technologysupported, studentcentred learning

Motivating and training young people through dance

Art, Pedagogy and knowledge in a contemporary world

Team: Ernest Lim (Chair), Casey Boo, Chiew Sien Kuan, Jonathan Chng, Gary Goh, Desmond Ho, Ho Hui May, Rebecca Kan, Grace Leong, Lim Tee Heong, Jerry Soo, Tan Choong Kheng, Gillian Tan, Tan Yee Noh,Tan Chwee Seng ,Marienne Yang

Teaching Workshop 2016 Leadership in the Arts 25 February 2016, 9am–5pm The eighth edition focussed on concepts of leadership in the arts. The first half of the programme featured directors from Thought Collective, DECK, Select Centre and The Press Room. The second segment involved 5 groups of students from 3 Schools. Together, they presented opinions on types of leadership, the future of leadership, as well as field investigations with those whom they had identified as leaders in the arts. The final segment of the workshop on “Curriculum Leadership in the Arts” 49

involved participants in three break-out discussion groups, to share their views on the following questions: •

How can NAFA approach the redesign of an arts curriculum through fresh lenses?


What do we understand by a “student-centric, robust, aspirational, focussed, differentiated” curriculum?

What fresh insights or new imaginations can we generate, for NAFA to “lead” the way in “running the course”?

Themes: •

Emotional Context of Leadership

Courage to Lead

Defining Leadership in the Arts

Curriculum Leadership in the Arts

Making a Leader

An Inquiry of Leading in Times of Change

Team: Ho Hui May (Chair), Chiew Sien Kuan, Desmond Chin, Yix Guo Yi Xian, Desmond Ho and the EdTech Unit, Winson Ho, Grace Leong, Lim Tee Heong, Rebecca Kan, Deva Raj, Jeffrey Tan, Christabel Teng, David Tan, Winnie Tan

Fig. 7

TEACHING WORKSHOP 2017 Cultivating the Spirit of Entrepreneurship 20 February 2017, 9am–5pm The ninth edition focussed on entrepreneurship. The first half of the programme featured a panel discussion with arts and cultural industry experts. The second segment involved 4 student group presentations using the ‘5Ws1H’ method to articulate how entrepreneurship can be linked to their learning at NAFA. They also relayed some ideas and examples of how entrepreneurship is taught or learnt at other tertiary institutions.

Team: Jeffery Tan (Chair), Casey Boo, Chng Keng Beng, Ethel Chong, Debra de Cotta, Russell Lee, Lim Tee Heong, Andrew Mowatt

Themes: •

Entrepreneurship Relevance, Relations and Reflections

Entrepreneurial Journey in the Arts

Alumnus Advice on Entrepreneurship

Sandbox as Inspiring Enterprise

How to Begin Enterprise

Integrating Entrepreneurship in the Curriculum

Fig. 8

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TEACHING WORKSHOP 2018 Industry-based Learning: The Future of Learning 26 February 2018, 9am–6pm The tenth edition focussed on industry-based learning to prepare students for a world that is increasingly challenging. The workshop sparked rich conversation on integrating learning between the school and industry, revealing insights on the best practices to nurture the future generation of art and design practitioners, as well as the possible actions for this meaningful learning platform. The session included a student presentation on their internship experience, and how IBL has helped them prepare for the real world. There was also a studentstaff workshop to explore ways to assist students meet their learning outcomes in IBL. This session enabled lecturers to formulate ways for students to pick up beneficial skills and knowledge related to IBL.

Themes: •

The meaning of Industry-based Learning (IBL) in the Arts

Framework to build collaborative relationships with industry partners

Student experiences in industry collaborations

Challenges faced during the process

Assessment criteria / expectations from Industry

NAFA Internships with industry partners

Team: Christabel Teng (Chair), Debra de Cotta, Neil Han, Jian Yao, David Koh, Nicholas Loh, Tan Ngeup Khun, Veronica Yew, David Zeitner, Zheng Xing External Speakers: Asmah Alias (National Heritage Board), Christy Chung (Ngee Ann Polytechnic), Sheridan Newman (Soul Signature)

51

Fig. 9


Teaching Workshops over a Decade: The Learning Festival In August 2019, an installation was organized along the On-Air Gallery to commemorate the Teaching Workshops over a Decade as part of the Learning Festival. This exhibition displayed the themed posters from every individual Teaching Workshop in the series as well as a short write-up to provide viewers with a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;walkthrough memorylaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

Fig. 10

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Gallery Chapter 5

Fig 1: The Art of Teaching

Fig 2: The ABC of Teaching & Learnin

Fig 4: Be H.O.T: Higher Order Thinkers

Fig 5: Motivating and Engaging Stu

Fig 7: Leadership in the Arts

Fig 8: Cultivating the Spirit of Entrep

53


ng

Fig 3: The A to F of Assessing

dents to Achieve Outcomes

Fig 6: Distilling Research in the Arts: Paradigms â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Practices â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Processes

preneurship

Fig 9: The Future of Learning

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REAP Issue 1 Pedagogy and Research Unit Office of Academic Affairs Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts 55

Profile for nafa

Research in Education and Arts Practice (REAP@NAFA) Issue 1 - Research in Retrospect 2014-2019  

Research in Education and Arts Practice (REAP@NAFA) Issue 1 - Research in Retrospect 2014-2019  

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