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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips Volume 2


Cover: Susan Wakefield Kinney (1842-1929), Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn., circa 1851


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips A catalog with titles or subject identification with life dates, work dating, location, dimensions, descriptions, inscriptions, biographical data, provenance, sale records, ownership, published references, and cross-references to previous catalogs for over 750 works, with additional notes as to duplicates, errors and misattributions; and a comparative survey of over 650 examples, organized by date, locale, and stylistic period.

Volume 2 – Comparative Survey

David R. Allaway Second edition – June 2020 ISBN 978-0-9987122-1-5


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Author’s Note Ammi Phillips’s given name is from the biblical Hebrew, meaning “my people.” As he devoted a half-century to traveling the Hudson and Housatonic Valleys and capturing the likenesses of his contemporaries, it seemed a fitting title for a catalog of his work.

Valley of the Housatonic, Kent, Connecticut by Jasper Francis Cropsey, 1845. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Table 1 – Portraits Signed or Recorded as by Phillips ............................................................................................... 13 Geographic Analysis ..................................................................................................................................................... 14 Table 2 – Ammi Phillips Geography by Decade .......................................................................................................... 14 Circa 1811: The Early Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. ................................................................................................ 16 Early to Mid-1810’s: The Early and “Border Limner” Periods – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified .................. 17 Early to Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Washington, Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. ................. 18 Early to Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and vicinity ............................................. 19 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – The Dorr family, Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y. .................................. 20 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Hoosick and Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. ................................ 21 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. ............................................................ 22 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. .............................................................................. 23 Mid-to-Late 1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. and unidentified .................................... 24 Mid-to-Late 1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Washington and Rensselaer Co., N.Y...................................... 25 Circa 1818-20: The Troy Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. ............................................................................................. 26 Circa 1818-20: The Troy Period – Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................................ 27 Circa 1820-21: The Troy Period – Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................................ 28 Circa 1820-21: The Troy Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified ................................................................... 30 Circa 1815-22: The Troy Period – Young People ......................................................................................................... 31 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. ....................................................................... 32 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Red Hook and Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............ 33 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Lithgow, Dutchess Co., N.Y........................................................................ 35 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Greene, Schoharie and Montgomery Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............. 36 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y. ........................................................................................... 37 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified .............................................................. 38 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y. and related Dutchess Co., N.Y. ......................... 39 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Ulster, Sullivan and Orange Co., N.Y. ......................................... 40 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Orange and Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................ 41 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. .................................................................................... 42 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange, Dutchess and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified ................... 45 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified ....................................................... 46 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Delaware and Chenango Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................... 50 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified .................................................... 51 Circa 1829-30: The Amenia Portraits – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity ................................................... 52 Circa 1830: Dutchess Co., N.Y. vicinity and unidentified .......................................................................................... 56 Circa 1830: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Greene Co., N.Y. and unidentified ................................................. 57 Circa 1832: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............................................. 58 Circa 1833: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................... 59 Early 1830’s: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Greene and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................... 60 Circa 1834: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............................................. 61


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1834-35: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ........................................ 62 Early to Mid-1830’s: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified .............................. 63 Circa 1836: The “Kent Limner” Portraits - Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn. and vicinity .............................................. 64 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............................................................ 66 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Litchfield Co., Conn and Westchester Co., N.Y. ..................................... 67 Mid-to-Late 1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Putnam Co., N.Y. and unidentified .................... 68 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ......................................... 71 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Westchester Co., N.Y. and unidentified .................................... 72 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified ...................................... 73 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Well-suited Boys ....................................................................................... 74 Late 1820’s to late 1830’s: The Children in Red Dresses ........................................................................................... 75 Late 1820’s to late 1830’s: More Children in Dresses ................................................................................................ 76 Late 1830’s: The Haxtun family, Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y. ............................................................................... 77 Early to Mid-1840’s: The Early Daguerreotype Period – Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ............... 78 Early to Mid-1840’s: The Early Daguerreotype Period – Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified ............. 80 Mid-1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified ....................................................... 81 Mid-to-Late 1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified....................................... 83 Circa 1850: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified .................................................... 85 Circa 1853: The Daguerreotype Period – The Hotchkiss family, Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn. ....................... 87 Circa 1848-53: The Litchfield Children and related portraits with Paisley shawls (shown to relative size) ......... 88 Circa 1850’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. and unidentified ................................................. 90 Circa 1857: The Late Period – West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass and unidentified ...................................... 94 Circa 1860: The Late Period – Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. vicinity and unidentified ................................. 95 Circa 1862: The Late Period – Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity ........................................................... 98 Table 3 – Chronology of Datable Portraits.................................................................................................................. 99 Addenda – Contemporary Hudson Valley Portraiture ............................................................................................. 101 Appendix A: Ammi Phillips Family and Historical Records .................................................................................... 103 Appendix B: The Rediscovery and Identification of Ammi Phillips ........................................................................ 107 Photo Credits .............................................................................................................................................................. 111 Index to Named Examples (Volume 2) ...................................................................................................................... 120


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Introduction This volume is a companion to the complete catalog of Ammi Phillips’s known work, and displays representative examples. As such, it constitutes more than a ten-fold increase over previously available references. As noted in the introduction to Volume 1, I undertook this arrangement in order to better understand the evolution of Ammi Phillips’s style, to convince myself that this large body of portraiture was indeed by a single hand, and to more accurately attribute and date individual portraits. The extant references contained too few examples to create an entirely convincing continuum of work, and in many cases were confusingly arranged. It is my hope that this analysis resolves these difficulties. I have also endeavored to include as many as possible of the evidential works, those which are signed or documented as by Phillips (see Table 1). Arrangement To arrange hundreds of portraits in roughly chronological sequence is no trivial matter. Paramount is the problem that few portraits are dated, either by inscription or by contemporary reference. I decided to reject, as scientifically prejudicial, any previous estimates as to the period or date of individual portraits. Rather, I started afresh, and let the portraits fall where they may. The obvious starting point, like a jigsaw puzzle, was to group portraits which were recognizably similar in pose and general appearance. The groupings were then arranged based on any factually-dated portraits. In many instances, portraits have also been arranged in proximity based on family relationships or specific locality. The underlying assumption is that Phillips often painted portraits of multiple family members or neighbors in a single visit. Where known pairs existed, these were used like dominoes to link the man or woman’s portrait to similar examples, sometimes with surprising results. When possible, portraits have been arranged with others having interestingly similar details. The process was highly iterative and full of problems but was eventually sorted out to my general satisfaction. There is limited ability to do this with portraits of children. Despite their notoriety, children comprise only about ten percent of Phillips’s work. The portraits of children are mostly arranged on separate pages for comparison purposes within their respective periods, some of which are nearly devoid of children’s portraits. In most instances, pairs of portraits (husbands and wives) are shown together. A small number of exceptions are made, where it would prevent a more illustrative comparison with similar portraits. In making so many arrangements of similar portraits, I am by no means attempting to assert the sameness of Phillips’s work. To the contrary, I would draw the reader’s attention to the variety of differences in facial features, both flattering and unflattering, and in details of fabric, furniture and accoutrements. After extensive contemplation, it is the uniqueness, not the sameness, which impresses. In many instances, I have placed unidentified portraits, with no factual basis as to their specific locale, on the same page with similar portraits. In these cases, no locale is intended to be implied, and I leave it to your judgement as to whether this is a useful comparison. Other than placement within time periods, I have refrained from giving estimated dates on individual portraits. Whenever present, I have included any date inscriptions on newspapers or letters held in the subjects’ hands. The titles of books or periodicals are also noted and, when available, the publication date of the book or periodical is given. I have included the date of birth (for children) or date of death of the subject where it may be relevant to dating the portrait. I have not used the descriptive title, as often used in books and sales catalogs (e.g., “Woman in Bonnet holding a Book”) as being redundant, cumbersome and often arbitrary. Instead, I have confined myself to Unidentified Man, Woman, Boy, Girl or Unidentified Child. For these unidentified subjects, the reference number (as used in Volume 1) is given in brackets. What results from all of the above is both chronological, geographical, and stylistic in its progression.

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Stylistic Progression Ammi Phillips found a steady clientele for his work from the mid-1810’s to at least the early 1860’s, even successfully battling the headwinds of Daguerreotype photography in mid-career. He clearly had a genius for capturing likenesses. Viewed as a whole, and in detail, one cannot help being struck by the individuality of the faces. From about 1820 onward, they are as distinctive as real individuals. After close acquaintance with over 600 portraits, I now react instantly and instinctively to the sight of a Phillips portrait as being either a familiar or unfamiliar face, just as one would when an actual acquaintance or stranger approaches. The first element one probably notices is that of formula. What might be initially regarded as repetition or similarity is, in fact, drawn from a repertoire. Whether Phillips carried with him a sketch book or simply drew from memory of previous works is unknown. Phillips was continually refining and reinventing his repertoire of poses, repeating a successful formula time and again, trying a new variation here, and discarding an old variation there, never to be used again. It was as if he carried with him, like a traveling conjurer, a constantly evolving portfolio of new and old tricks. The second element one notices is personalization and uniqueness of detail. No two bonnets are the same. No two pieces of lace have the identical pattern. The variety and intricacy of the fabric detail is mind-boggling. Phillips obviously took great pleasure in incorporating small details which spoke to the subject’s individuality. A held letter may indicate the subject’s name and place of residence. A publication may indicate the date, locality, and perhaps the subject’s religious affiliation or political sympathies. A ledger book, a volume of legal statutes, a large bible, a pamphlet on agriculture, a treatise on anatomy or botany, each quietly announced the subject’s profession or avocation. Books, often newly-published, spoke to the subject’s intellectual currency. For women, the message is quieter but still present. A bound poem, a monogrammed psalm book, a piece of sewing in progress, a religious guide for the afflicted, each spoke to the subject’s literacy, piety, domestic occupation or personal circumstance. The precise symbolism of various natural items such as peaches, parsley sprigs or strawberry buds may be partially lost to us, but the intent is evident. Sometimes the puns are writ large, as with the portrait of young Andrew Jackson Ten Broeck under an “Old Hickory” tree. Children are not typically overburdened with toys, whips, baskets or a multitude of pets, but are usually depicted with simplicity and some small item. The message, if any, may be subtle. There can be little doubt that the sedentary dog, which appears in so many of his portraits of children, was Phillips’s own. As a traveling companion, a means of connecting with children, and of keeping them preoccupied during tedious portrait sessions, Phillips could have found no better device. Fashions in attire come and go over the decades: From the simple women’s caps of the 1810’s, to the elaborate beribboned bonnets of the 1820’s and 1830’s, to the more restrained fashions of the 1840‘s and 1850’s. From the gentlemen’s high white stocks and ruffled jabots of the 1810‘s and 1820’s, to the briefly-fashionable black stocks and cream vests of the early 1830’s, to the black vests and bow ties of the 1840’s and 1850’s. Only clergy and older gentlemen adhere to styles that were popular in prior decades. Furniture follows suit, from the bold fancy-painted arm and side-chairs of the 1810’s and early 1820’s, to the Hitchcock-style gold-stenciled chairs of the late 1820’s and 1830’s, to the heavy velvet-upholstered armchairs of the 1840’s and 1850’s. The impact of Daguerreotype photography, which swept the region in the early 1840’s, must have been profound. We know that some portrait artists turned to the Daguerreotype process, or abandoned their portrait profession altogether. Phillips may have been knocked off his feet for a time. His productivity suddenly declined in the early 1840’s, and never fully recovered to the levels of the 1820’s and 1830’s. His style became less expansive and imaginative from that point forward, and something that appeals to our modern eye was lost. This may have been a question of economy of time and money, since he needed to simplify and shorten his process to complete with the sheer speed and low cost of photography. More importantly, I believe, he needed to accommodate changing tastes and expectations. The elaborate costumes and exaggerated poses of the 1830’s may have suddenly seemed unrealistic to his clientele. And the restrictions of photography, with its rigid postures and short focal plane, may have changed the popular concept of what a portrait should look like. Whether he actually worked from Daguerreotypes during this period is unknown. Based on the formulaic poses whose use transcends years and locales, we presume that he did not. For any or all of these reasons, the result clearly imitated the competition. An exception is his portraits of children, where he managed to retain much of his old freedom. Still, he trudged on, and with apparent success. Only late in his career does his demographic shift noticeably to children and older 6


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 clientele. This may reflect the challenges of child photography, and a preference for traditional portraiture among older persons. Interestingly, some of his last works are close relatives of persons he depicted early in his career. Perhaps he was revisiting old acquaintances and capitalizing on old connections. The stylistic periods of Phillips’s work have been well analyzed and described in the work of Mary C. Black and Stacy C. Hollander, and it is not my objective to replicate or replace those analyses. The reader is referred to Black’s introduction to Ammi Phillips: Portrait Painter, 1788-1965 (1968) and Hollander’s critical insights in Ammi Phillips: Revisiting Fifty Years of American Portraiture (1994). In making this arrangement, however, I have made a somewhat finer classification of stylistic periods. Phillips made no abrupt shifts in style, so no such classification has perfectly-defined boundaries. In the arrangement, I have used the following headings, with my personal observations as follows: The Early Period (circa 1810-11) The earliest indicators of Ammi Phillips’s professional activity are his advertisements as a portrait artist in Pittsfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts in 1809 and 1810. No works are specifically known from these years, however the portrait pair of Patience Bolles Stoddard and Ashbel Stoddard, of Hudson, Columbia County, New York, may date as early as 1810. He is holding a copy of Washington’s Farewell Address in quarto, which was published in that format only in that year. Four portraits are known from 1811. These include the portraits of Gideon Smith and Chloe Allis Judson (unrelated to each other) both inscribed 1811 and both inscribed as painted by Phillips, and also the portraits of child siblings Charles Rollin Barstow and Pluma Amelia Barstow. These are documented, in the surviving diary of their father, Dr. Samuel Barstow, as having been painted by Phillips in 1811. The aforementioned subjects were residents of the nearby towns Stockbridge, Sheffield and Great Barrington (respectively) in southern Berkshire County, Massachusetts. The portraits of this period are the most primitive of Phillips’s known work, and are characterized by stiff poses, anatomically simplified (or absent) hands, faces lacking in distinctive detail, and oddly acorn-shaped heads. The full-length portrait of an unidentified boy in a skeleton suit, holding a hat and book, appears to date from this early period. The “Border Limner” Period (circa 1812-18) The “Border Limner” was an unidentified portrait artist, active along the New York-Massachusetts border prior to about 1820, ultimately identified as Ammi Phillips (see Appendix B). The portraits of Dr. Isaac Everest and Sarah Cornwall Everest are datable to September 1812, no more than a year after Phillips’s earliest known portraits. While remaining primitive to our eye, with distortions of scale and perspective, they already evidence a more relaxed and confident style. The only factually-attributable portraits from this entire period are those of John and Phoebe Haynes, both inscribed as painted by “A. Phillips” in 1814. They are convincingly similar to many other attributed works from this period. The known subjects of this period are residents of the adjoining New York counties of Columbia, Rensselaer and Washington. The only two known portraits of this period from Massachusetts are from Goodrich Hollow, which is on a steep west-facing slope, and only accessible from Rensselaer County, New York. The portraits of this period are notable for their pale backgrounds in a variety of hues, the depiction of limbs which are often gangly and tubular, the expansive and somewhat awkward postures, and the extensive use of chairs, tables, books and other items. The canvases of this period are often larger than Phillips’s typical later works, and with the subject placed low on the canvas. In some instances, I have shown these larger portraits at a scale which reflects their relative size (and this is so-indicated on the page heading). Notable in this period, and the earlier Barstow portraits, are the large, narrow, full-length portraits of standing children. Phillips would not return to this format after the Border Limner period.

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 The Troy Period (circa 1818-21) The Troy period, which immediately follows the Border Limner period, is named by me for the time in which Phillips was known to be residing in Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. These portraits show Phillips coming out of the wilderness, both in emulation of academic style and in increasing competence. As has been noted elsewhere, he is clearly under the influence of Ezra Ames, who dominated the nearby Albany market, and Phillips may have unsuccessfully attempted to enter that market. Stylistic influences include more restrained and classical poses, including some bust-like poses of gentleman without hands, women clutching wrapped shawls, the depiction of drapery in the upper corner of the canvas, and dark backgrounds. For some notable clients such as General David Robinson and The Reverend Jonas Coe, Phillips used the large canvases of his Border Limner period. But during the Troy period he seems to have abandoned large and varied canvas sizes and standardized on the 30 by 24 inch portrait which would become his mainstay for the next decade. The dark backgrounds he adopted during this period would remain his style for the next forty years. During this period, Phillips continued to work in Rensselaer and Columbia counties, with steady clientele and apparently no further need to venture as far north as Washington County. Exceptions are the Robinson portraits, done in Bennington, Vermont, but barely four miles from Rensselaer County, New York. Most evident in the portraits of the Troy period is Phillips’s strongly developing skill at faces. No longer are they similar, or distinguished by gross features, but have a striking individuality and personality which would continue to improve. The earliest evidence of Phillips’s emerging classical style is the bust-like depiction of N.B. (Napoleon Bonaparte) Buell dated 1818. Both the portraits of Rev. Gabriel Gebhard and Anna Maria Magdalene Carver Gebhard of Claverack, Columbia County, New York are inscribed with the subjects’ names, “1820” and “Painted by A. Phillips” and “Delineavit A. Phillips”, respectively. Two portraits signed and dated 1821 are Dr. John McClellan and Jonathan Lane, both of Livingston, Columbia County, New York, the latter inscribed “by Mr. Ammi Phillips of Troy.” The portrait of George Selby holding a letter addressed to him in Albany, New York may in fact have been painted at the time of his marriage in May 1821, possibly at Schodack, Rensselaer County, New York. The restrictions of the prevailing classical style did not always play to Phillips’s strengths or preferences, and he may have realized this. Gradually he returned to his more expansive and varied poses, retaining some of the academic conventions which he had emulated, combining them with his own idiosyncratic details and drawing from both worlds as suited him. The Rhinebeck Period (circa 1821-22) The Rhinebeck period is a bridge between the styles of the Troy period and the West Bank and Southwest Hudson portraits. This group may coincide with Phillips’s relocation of his residence to Rhinebeck in Dutchess County, New York sometime after 1820. In this time period he turns his sights to the south and west. Several subjects are in towns close to Rhinebeck, including Red Hook and Pine Plains. It also includes Phillips’s first journeys farther south to Fishkill in Dutchess County and may have been his springboard across the Hudson. The portraits of this period continue in the Troy period motif, with single-handed or bust-style gentlemen and women in plain bonnets and ruffled collars, often with crossed wrists. Subjects are often depicted in red or yellow painted side chairs, and I originally dubbed this Phillips’s “yellow chair” period. The few available dates include the portrait of Dr. Abijah Gilbert Benedict (and Charlotte H. Newcomb Benedict) of Red Hook, with a letter dated August 23, 1822; and the portrait of Judge Isaac Smith (and Phoebe Lewis Smith) with “The Plough Boy” (published 1819-23). The West Bank and Southwest Hudson Portraits (circa 1823-26) The “West Bank” portraits illustrate Phillips’s initial work in the counties bordering the west bank of the Hudson River: Ulster and Greene Counties, New York. If Phillips had been unsuccessful in penetrating the Albany market, his search for clientele among prosperous rural families south of Albany was more productive. From some evidence 8


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 we can discern that these first trans-Hudson works were produced circa 1823. An 1825 letter by John Vanderlyn indicates that Phillips had painted likenesses of the Jacobus Hardenburgh family a year or two earlier in Kingston, Ulster County, New York. The portrait of an unidentified young man holding Milton’s Works is inscribed “Ammon Philips July 20th 1823 Woodstock, New York,” in Ulster County, and is associated with this stylistic period. Identified, and tentatively identified, subjects in Ulster and Greene Counties comprise this grouping, which also includes a pair (Rev. Winslow Paige and Clarissa Keyes Paige) from south-easternmost Schoharie County, bordering Greene County. The “Southwest Hudson” portraits represent slightly further excursions southward in Ulster County and to Orange County, New York about 1824. Among these are several portraits of related members of the Hasbrouck family of New Paltz, Ulster County, New York, and the Thompson family of Orange County, New York, two inscribed “Painted by Ammi Phillips AD 1824.” It is in this period that Phillips employs the device of a shawl wrapped around the female subject’s arm. These include subjects in black dresses with a white shawl with green floral border, and the striking portraits of women in white dresses with a red shawl similarly arranged. Gentleman of the period are shown in both bust-like portraits, sans hands, and in more casual poses involving fancy-painted and bamboo-painted chairs and holding books. The portrait of Daniel Bull (related by marriage to the Thompson family) shows the deeply half-shaded facial depiction which is characteristic of Phillips’s Realistic period. The Realistic Period (mid-to-late 1820’s) Mary C. Black referred more broadly to a period that marked “a dramatic departure from the visions of the Border period to the meticulous realism that dominated his work from about 1820 to 1828.” Within this context, Phillips employed costumes which are usually as dark as the backgrounds, and faces which are deeply shaded and with striking individuality. The only definitively datable portraits are four from Mount Hope, Orange County, New York dated explicitly to 1826. Other subjects hold books published in 1827 or 1828. I closed this grouping with three portraits of infants in similar attire, only one of which can be identified as from Orange County, New York and dating to about 1828. The Amenia Portraits (circa 1829-30) The Amenia portraits, although from a relatively brief period, are a large and cohesive grouping, and many of the subjects are from Amenia, Dutchess County, New York or nearby. This seems to represent a peak period of productivity, when Phillips had a steady clientele in one small area. A characteristic element is a distinctively painted pillow-back chair which might have belonged to Phillips. A number of portraits also show Hitchcock-style chairs with gold stencils in various leaf patterns. There is evidence that Phillips may have used some of the commercially available decorative stencils directly on the canvas. In some, the subject appears to be gesturing toward the stenciling. Elaborate tall bonnets become the norm for female subjects of this period, each unique. A pose with long untied ribbons hanging one in front and one in back is also characteristic of the period. Several portraits are specifically dated to 1829 or 1830 from newspapers or letters in the subjects’ hands. The overwhelming majority of this group are from Amenia itself, or neighboring villages. The Early “Kent Limner” Period (early to mid-1830’s) No abrupt change marks the boundary of Phillips’s “Kent Limner” or “Kent” period, which Mary C. Black more broadly defines as 1829-1838. Indeed the Amenia Portraits begin to show that exuberant style. Women’s bonnets often show a triangular shape, as though Phillips was struggling to fit them within the canvas. Women may also be depicted instead with a large ruffled collar or large trim to their neckline, their unadorned head showing off their fashionable “Apollo’s Knot” hairstyle. The effect is the same, with the bonnet or collar providing a stark contrast with the dark background and clothing, and highlighting the subject’s face. Gentlemen’s fashions include pale vests and the newly-popular black stock. The pale vests appear a passing fashion, but the black stock forever replaces the white stock, except for the occasional older subject. Most characteristic of this period is the women’s full-body leaning pose, not just the leaning head as used in the Amenia period. This would become the hallmark of Phillips’s Kent period portraits of women. Most notable of the dated portraits is the Columbia County, New York group, which is datable to 1834. 9


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 The “Kent Limner” Period (circa 1834-1839) In the summer of 1836, Phillips’s commissions took him to the isolated but prosperous (due to iron ore) village of Kent, Connecticut, just across the state border from Dutchess County, New York. It is unknown how many portraits of Kent’s leading families Phillips painted that summer, but eight survived. These came to light as a group 88 years later when they were exhibited at a local fair. The then-forgotten artist was dubbed the “Kent Limner” and was lauded by Mrs. Helen Carlotta Nelson, wife of a local artist, in International Studio in 1925. The stylized portraiture, with upright gentlemen and leaning ladies with elaborate bonnets and hands in the lowerleft corner of the canvas became exemplars of what became known as Phillips’s “Kent Limner” or simply “Kent” period. Unfortunately, Mrs. Nelson also promoted the myth that these were faces added to stock bodies. The boundaries of Phillips’s Kent Limner period are not crisp, but are centered, by definition, on the Kent portraits of 1836. These eight portraits, which are of special significance in the emergence of interest in anonymous American folk portraiture, are shown on a single page. The portraits of this fully-developed period are characterized by somewhat lighter backgrounds of medium brown, boldly stylized black dresses with balloon sleeves, and women with a characteristic leaning posture, usually (but not always) to proper right on a small table, often with books. Curiously, Phillips mostly dispenses with furniture, other than the occasional sofa, and women of this period typically have no visible means of support. Women’s heads are sometimes unadorned, but are more often depicted with elaborate bonnets. The darkness of the women’s black dresses and men’s black jackets and stocks are boldly contrasted with broad white collars and white shirts. During this period, Phillips seems to have worked primarily in Dutchess County, New York, with excursions slightly south to Putnam and Westchester counties. By 1836, Phillips was listed as a Poughkeepsie artist, and sometime before 1838 he had moved his residence from Rhinebeck to Amenia, Dutchess County, New York. The Late “Kent Limner” Period (circa 1839-40) The portraits of the late 1830’s and 1840 use a reliable formula, somewhat more restrained than the most exuberantly stylized portraits of the mid-1830s. Gentlemen are depicted in what almost appears as a standing pose. Women’s headwear is less elaborate, or absent, and the poses with close-together hands and frequent use of small books are less imaginative. A distinctive prop of this period is a small table covered in green leather with brass tacks. The datable portraits which continue in the “Kent Limner” tradition include Judge Ebenezer Foster (and Frances Sprague Foster) of South East, Putnam County, N.Y, with a letter dated 1839; Gerard Crane and Roxanna Purdy Crane of Somers, Westchester, New York, inscribed 1839; Reverend Ashbel Green, recorded as painted by “Phillips” in July 1840 in Bedford, Westchester Co., N.Y.; and George C. Sunderland, also of Somers, Westchester County, New York, boldly inscribed in Phillips’s hand: “By Mr. Ammi Phillips in the fall 1840.” The Children in Red Dresses Although shown on a single page for comparison purposes, this grouping may represent at least three periods. The fact that all nine are unidentified represents a mystery and a challenge. The first unidentified boy and girl (top row) from the Balken collection, now at Princeton, are likely the earliest. It has been suggested, from provenance, that the child with teething ring may be related to an unidentified man with quill from the Realistic period (midto-late 1820’s). The portrait of an unidentified child, aka “Hannah Standish”, bears an extremely close resemblance to the identified portrait of James Mairs Salisbury (born 1834). And the three similar portraits of young girls in red dresses with necklaces are also similar to the portrait of Andrew Jackson Ten Broeck which is dated 1834. It has been suggested, based on provenance, that the iconic portrait of the girl holding a white cat (page center) may belong to the Raymond family, and hence the related Foster family, including Augusta Maria Foster. By stroke of luck, and close scrutiny, the portraits of Frances Sprague Foster and Judge Ebenezer Foster are datable to 1839. On this basis, and a satisfying resemblance between the child and the rosy-cheeked couple, I have formed a hypothesis that the child is Ann Amelia Foster (1833-1883). This remains speculative, however.

10


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Of the three very similar portraits (middle row and lower center), the number of necklace strands may be a device to distinguish between related individuals. An examination of the number of strawberries held by the subjects of these and other portraits (e.g., John Younie Luyster) leaves little doubt that they represent the child’s age. The two portraits with red drapery, depicting somewhat older children, may date from a slightly later period, and bear some similarities to the portraits of the “Litchfield Children” [q.v.]. The Early Daguerreotype Period (early to mid-1840’s) An abrupt change in Phillips’s style is evident in the early 1840’s, which perfectly coincides with the stunningly swift popularity of Daguerre’s photographic process in the United States. Most pronounced is the introduction of the upholstered armchair with men depicted from a side angle and slightly above, as though shown in an aisle seat of a theater or train. The women are less severely affected but are shown in an equivalent sofa pose which Phillips had abandoned a decade earlier. Smaller bonnets have become the norm. Dating is available starting about 1843, with Joseph Bogardus’ “Anti-Bank Democrat” (published 1842-43), and Harriet Simmons Hasbrouck’s book dated 1843. Two newspapers of 1845 are depicted, and the portrait of Rachel Divine is dated 1846 in Phillips’s careful block lettering. One hallmark of this period is the use of side light crossing the page of a newspaper or book, leaving part of the page brightly lit, and the rest in shadow. This device was used frequently by Phillips in the mid-1840’s but not before or after. The Daguerreotype Period (late 1840’s and 1850’s) During this period, Phillips painted what Stacy C. Hollander has described as “a virtual army of black-suited, stern-faced New Yorkers.” The poses are drummingly repetitive for both men and women. Phillips depicts most men facing proper left, and one-handed, usually with an unobtrusive book or newspaper. Black stocks have evolved into black ties, and pleated shirts are ever present. Women are mostly facing proper right, with an arm resting on a sofa arm, and a small book or other object held in the left hand. Gone are the elaborate headwear and occasionally colorful dresses. All is black and restrained, as was the fashion of the period, and women are frequently bareheaded. Only in the faces themselves, and in the meticulous depiction of lace, does Phillips make each portrait unique. Occasionally, the gentleman is holding a dated newspaper, and some identifiable books have publication dates which lend a clue as to date and occupation. By 1850, Phillips had moved from Amenia to the town of North East, Dutchess County, New York. The Litchfield Children (circa 1848-53) As noted earlier, Phillips’s portraits of children are a refreshing departure from the rigid formality and dark tonality of his Daguerreotype period. Phillips took obvious delight in devoting extra time and artistic license to depicting juvenile subjects of this period. Among these are a number of children in blue and red dresses from Litchfield County, Connecticut. Included in this grouping are several adult females with paisley shawls who are the sister or mother of a child depicted in the same portrait or a related portrait. Although no specific dating is available, the ages of the known subjects date these from the late 1840’s to the early 1850’s. The portrait of Susan W. Kinney was possibly done on the occasion of her sister’s marriage to Lucius Culver in 1853, which took place at the home of Ammi Phillips, who was a cousin of their father. The portrait, prior to damage and canvas reduction, was said to have included white pantalets and a cat and flower in the subject’s lap. In its original form, it may therefore have resembled the unidentified girl with flower and cat (see Children in Red Dresses, lower left). The Late Period (mid-1850’s to early 1860’s) In the early 1850’s Phillips moved from the town of North East in Dutchess County, New York to Berkshire County, Massachusetts, first moving to New Marlborough by 1855 and finally to Curtisville, located between the villages of Stockbridge and West Stockbridge, by 1860. This brought him full circle to his Berkshire County base of fifty years earlier. He also came full circle with a portrait of the now-elderly daughter-in-law of Gideon Smith of Stockbridge, who he had painted fifty years earlier. Commissions from the Beckwith and Husted families also represented a connection to his long-ago Rhinebeck period. 11


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Few portraits from Phillips’s last decade are dated. Among these are three portrait pairs from West Stockbridge, dated 1857, and his portrait of a man with a newspaper “Agriculture” dated November 30, 1860. The last known dated portrait is that of Elizabeth Harris Husted, dated “by A. Phillips, June 20 th 1862.” Phillips productivity has declined, either by choice or circumstances, in his last years. And the radius of his travels decreases to a relatively short distance from his home. As noted earlier, a disproportionate number of his late subjects are small children and the elderly. Several of the late portraits are distinguished by a lack of subtlety in the shading, resulting in a certain flattening and more pronounced facial planes. Another curious hallmark, increasing from the mid-1850’s, is a pronounced distortion in the form of a diagonal elongation from the upper left to the somewhat lower right of the canvas. Whether these changes were by conscious choice, or were an artifact of failing eyesight, is unknown. Addenda – Contemporary Hudson Valley Portraiture For comparative purposes, I have included just four examples of Phillips’s potential competition among academic portraitists, which may also have been early sources of inspiration. These are works attributed to Reuben Moulthrop (1763-1814), Ezra Ames (1768-1836), John Vanderlyn (1775-1852), Bass Otis (1784-1861), and John Vanderlyn II (1805-1876). The Evidential Works At the time of the first 1965-66 exhibit there was knowledge of 16 evidential works, those either signed by Phillips or with contemporary records of their creation by Phillips. Of these, only five were included in the exhibit and catalog examples. This left ample room for skepticism as to whether Phillips was solely responsible for this varied collection of portraiture. The fact that the 1965 catalog images were arranged alphabetically by the subject’s name no doubt added to the skepticism, with images spanning 50 years effectively juxtaposed at random. By 1968 the number of evidential examples had increased to 21, and 11 were shown. Although a marked improvement, no signed examples had been discovered from the years 1812 through 1819. This still left a significant stylistic and evidentiary gap between the earliest known example of 1811 and Phillips’s far more accomplished work of the 1820’s. And the issue of whether Phillips was the Border Limner remained technically unproven. By 1994 the number of evidential works had increased by half again, with important new discoveries added from 1811, 1814 and 1819, and several from the 1820’s. Of the new total of 35, however, only five were included among the 50 exhibit and catalog examples. Although the proof existed, without extensive research it was not entirely evident. In this catalog we have increased the total number of illustrated examples by twelvefold, and we have included all 36 of the evidential works now known (see Table 1). We will leave final judgement to the reader, but with the added depth and continuity of examples, and the inclusion of 36 evidential examples, the unbroken evolution of Phillips’s work seems clear.

12


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2

Table 1 – Portraits Signed or Recorded as by Phillips CHS 1965 Gideon Smith, 1811, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Mass. Chloe Allis Judson, 1811, Sheffield, Berkshire, Mass. Pluma Amelia Barstow, 1811, Great Barrington, Berkshire, Mass. Charles Rollin Barstow, 1811, Great Barrington, Berkshire, Mass. John Haynes, 1814, Hoosick, Rensselaer, N.Y. Phebe Haynes, 1814, Hoosick, Rensselaer, N.Y. James Van Schoonhoven, 1819, Troy, Rensselaer, N.Y. Anna Maria Carver Gebhard, 1820, Claverack, Columbia, N.Y. Rev. John Gabriel Gebhard, 1820, Claverack, Columbia, N.Y. Dr. John McClellan, 1821, Livingston or Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. Jonathan Lane, 1821, Livingston, Columbia, N.Y. Gentleman Holding a Copy of Milton's Works, 1823, unknown Alexander Thompson II, 1824, Crawford Twp., Orange, N.Y. Hannah Bull Thompson, 1824, Crawford Twp., Orange, N.Y. Catharine Helen Miller Bull, 1824, Crawford Twp., Orange, N.Y. Daniel Bull, 1824, Crawford Twp., Orange, N.Y. James Ketcham, 1826, Cornwall, Dutchess, N.Y. Anne Stoddard Pelton, 1826, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y., probably Peleg Pelton, 1826, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y., probably Alsop Vail, 1826, Mount Hope, Orange, N.Y. Frances Seybolt Vail, 1826, Mount Hope, Orange, N.Y. Philo Reed, 1829, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y. Abigail Reynolds Reed, 1829, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y. Abigail Penoyer Reynolds, 1829, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y. George Greenwood Reynolds, 1829, Amenia, Dutchess, N.Y. Catherine Ten Broeck de Witt, 1834, Germantown, Columbia, N.Y. Leonard William Ten Broeck, 1832, Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. William Henry de Witt, 1834, Germantown, Columbia, N.Y. Anna Benner Ten Broeck, 1834, Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. Helen Livingston Ten Broeck, 1834, Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. Jacob Ten Broeck, 1834, Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. Lena Helen Ten Broeck, 1834, Clermont, Columbia, N.Y. Rev. Ashbel Green, 1840, Bedford, Westchester, N.Y. George C. Sunderland, 1840, Somers, Westchester, N.Y. William H. Stewart, 1862, Stanford, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Elizabeth Harris Husted, 1862, Pine Plains, Dutchess, N.Y.

H&H 1968 ■ ■

H&F 1994 ■

■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ ■

■ ■ ■

Key:

DRA 2019 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

catalog with photo catalog only unknown at time

13


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Geographic Analysis The image of the itinerant portrait artist as a Johnny Appleseed is romanticized and does not quite fit Phillips. He owned homes and had a large family. This he used as a central base for commissions which took him to neighboring towns or counties. His ventures took him across the Hudson River, or into Connecticut, seemingly relying on word of mouth, and exhausting the local supply of relatives and neighbors of his subjects. Sometimes he appears to have visited a place only once or twice, perhaps repeating the visit the following year, never to return. His well-known Kent period was named for eight portraits completed over the course of perhaps two months in the summer of 1836, and he may never have crossed the state border into nearby Kent, Connecticut again. On the basis of his birthplace in Connecticut, his identification as the Kent Limner, and the first major exhibit of his work by the Connecticut Historical Society, Phillips has a well-established image of being a Connecticut portraitist. An examination of the data shows that he was overwhelmingly a New York State artist (see Table 2). On the basis of 500 credible subject identifications, we find that 77% of his portraits were executed in New York State, 12% in Connecticut, and 11% in Massachusetts. During his most prolific decade of the 1820’s, not a single work is known from Connecticut. Only late in his career, in the 1850’s, does his base shift strongly to Connecticut and Massachusetts. Table 2 – Ammi Phillips Geography by Decade 1810's New York: Connecticut: Massachusetts:

1820's

1830's

1840's

1850's

1860's

Overall

80%

100%

89%

63%

2%

14%

77%

0%

0%

11%

34%

50%

0%

12%

16%

0%

0%

3%

48%

86%

11%

Vermont:

4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Sample Size:

57

183

127

62

50

21

500

If we rely on specifically datable portraits (see Table 3) the geographic chronology of Phillips’s work from 1811 to 1862 breaks down as follows: 1) A beginning in the southwest corner of Berkshire County, Massachusetts in 1811 in the nearby towns of Stockbridge, Great Barrington and Sheffield. 2) An extended Hudson Valley period from 1812 to 1847, mostly in New York State on the east side of the Hudson River, except for excursions to the west side of the river during the 1820’s and a brief foray across the state border into Kent, Litchfield Co., Connecticut in mid-1836. The Hudson Valley period may be further broken down into: -

A northerly subperiod in Washington, Rensselaer and Columbia counties from 1812 to 1821 corresponding to his residence in Troy, New York (1820 census) with his wife and children.

-

The aforementioned ‘West Bank’ subperiod (1823-26), which took him across the river to Ulster and Orange counties. There are undated portraits which suggest that he also did work in Schoharie and Sullivan counties at this time, and may have worked sporadically on the west side of the Hudson in Greene and Ulster counties as late as the mid-1830’s.

-

A subperiod close to home in Dutchess County from 1828-32, and coincident with the death of his first wife and prompt remarriage. Paradoxically, there are undated portraits which suggest that he may have done work in Delaware and Chenango counties around 1829, his furthest journey from home. This may have been prior to his wife’s death in February 1830.

-

A return to Columbia County in 1832 and 1834.

-

The aforementioned Kent, Connecticut border-crossing in 1836. 14


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 -

A venture as far south as Putnam and Westchester counties in 1839-40.

In the remainder of these decades he mostly confined himself to Dutchess County where his family was residing in Rhinebeck (1830 census) and Amenia (1840 census). 3) A Litchfield County, Connecticut period from 1848 to 1850, beginning with portraits of relatives near his childhood home of Colebrook, Connecticut. This coincides with his relocation to the town of North East, Dutchess County, New York (1850 census) bordering on Litchfield county. 4) A late period from 1857 to 1862 with a return to southwestern Berkshire County, Massachusetts and his residence in New Marlborough, Massachusetts (1855 census) and Curtisville (Stockbridge), Massachusetts (1860 census) with a final short excursion to northern Dutchess County, New York in 1862. Geographic Outliers In the earlier checklists there exists some evidence that Phillips travelled further west and north in New York State, as far as the Mohawk Valley, Finger Lakes, and northern Adirondacks. Further research has mostly discounted these assertions, including: -

Arthur Leonard “Lenny” Olcott of Cherry Valley, Otsego County, New York [portrait unlocated], done by a “Mr. Phillips” in 1857 is known from references in the diary of the subject’s sister. This was found, on a full reading of the original diary, to have been done at an artist’s studio in lower Manhattan, possibly that of artist and daguerreotypist Benjamin R. Phillips (1821-1881).

-

Catherine A. May (Mrs. Lucius Stimson) of Cortlandville, Cortland Co., N.Y., circa 1830 [National Gallery of Art]. Recorded as from upper New York State by dealer Albert W. Force of Ithaca, N.Y. We have found that she was residing with her newlywed husband in Delhi, Delaware Co., N.Y. at the estimated date of the painting.

-

Jane Bevier Deyo (Mrs. Abraham Deyo) of Guilford, Chenango Co., N.Y., circa 1824. The location “Guilford” more likely refers to the hamlet of Guilford in the Town of Gardiner, Ulster Co. N.Y.

-

Mr. and Mrs. Vail from Afton, N.Y. [Chenango Co.]. Also suggested as possibly being James and Anna Vail of Hamden, Delaware Co., N.Y. The identity of the sitters remains speculative and appears, along with the tentative locations, to be surmised only from recorded occurrences of the Vail surname.

-

Man of the Border Period, Waterloo, Seneca Co., N.Y. [Waterloo Library and Historical Society]. On personal inspection, this oil-on-panel portrait is not the work of Ammi Phillips. It was similarly dropped from the 1994 checklist.

-

Mrs. Smith of Elmira, N.Y. [Chemung Co.] appears to be an assigned name and no specific identity or connection with that location has been established.

-

A boy of the Cook family, aka Samuel Cook, Jr., possibly Ticonderoga, Essex Co., N.Y., circa 1817, about whom no supporting biographical or geographic evidence is found.

-

Mary Morrison, possibly Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., circa 1835, who purportedly died in that location but about whom no supporting biographical or geographic evidence is found.

-

Mrs. Caleb Keese, purportedly of Keeseville in Clinton Co. and Essex Co., N.Y., circa 1825 [portrait unlocated], about whom no supporting biographical or geographic evidence is found.

The above notwithstanding, the portrait identified by later inscription as Leonard Newton Allis of Coventry, Chenango Co., N.Y., circa 1829, has strong supporting evidence of his residence in that location. A group of four related portraits constitute the only examples from Schoharie and Montgomery counties, New York. The subjects, which include Rev. Winslow Paige and Clarissa Keyes Paige, Anna Shuler Cady, and Louisa Heyer Jackson, are all related by marriage and all have ties to Florida, Montgomery Co., N.Y. The Paige portraits were attributed to “Phillips” by Thurston Thacher in 1952 and were included in the Holdridges’ 1965 and subsequent checklists and in the 1968 exhibit. The other two are more recent, albeit tentative, attributions. None are entirely typical of Phillips’s work. 15


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1811: The Early Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. (shown to relative size)

Gideon Smith 1 inscribed “Ped by A. Phillips 1811” Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Chloe Allis Judson 2 oil on panel inscribed “P...d By A Phillips October 18th 1811 / C Judson Agd 72" Sheffield, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Charles Rollin Barstow (b.1805) and Pluma Amelia Barstow (b. 1803) 3 recorded in Dr. Samuel Barstow’s diary, October 6, 1811, as painted by “Philips”, Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass.

16

Unidentified Boy [781] 4 (cf. Frederick A. Gale, p. 25)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1810’s: The Early and “Border Limner” Periods – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Patience Bolles Stoddard and Ashbel Stoddard 5 holding Washington’s Farewell Address (pub. as 24 p. quarto in 1810) Hudson, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman 7 aka Mrs. Jenkins of Albany (unconfirmed locale)

Mr. and Mrs. Hardy 8

Unidentified Woman and Man [756 and 644] 9

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Unidentified Man [596] 6


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Washington, Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y.

Mr. and Mrs. Folsom 10 Possibly Araspus Folsom and Susan Pendleton Folsom of Greenwich, Washington Co., N.Y.

Dr. Nicholas Brown Harris 11 Sand Lake, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Joseph Heath and Mabel Rising Heath 12 Galesville, Greenwich Twp., Washington Co., N.Y.

Moses Cowan 13 Greenwich, Washington Co., N.Y.

Harriet Betts Hall (d. 1817) and Dr. Philander Hall 14 Lebanon Springs (New Lebanon), Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [625] 15

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and vicinity

Sarah Cornwall Everest and Dr. Isaac Everest 16 holding open letter dated “September 17, 1812” New Lebanon, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Mrs. Goodrich & child and Mr. Goodrich 17 and 18 Goodrich Hollow, Berkshire Co., Mass. (accessible only via Columbia Co., N.Y.)

Unidentified Woman and Man [723 and 623] 19 and 20 19


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – The Dorr family, Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Polsapianna Bull Dorr & Esther Maria Dorr (b. 1814) and Dr. Russell Dorr Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Paulina Dorr (b. 1803) 22 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Henrietta Dorr (b. 1808) 23 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Joseph Priestly Dorr (b. 1805) 25 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Robert Lottridge Dorr (b. 1812) 26 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y. 20

21

Catherine Van Slyck Dorr (b. 1804) 24 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Russell Griffin Dorr (b. 1807) 27 Chatham, Columbia Co., N.Y.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Hoosick and Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

“John Haynes Aged 41 Years Painted by A Phillips Ad 1814” Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

28

“Phebe Haynes Aged 41 Years Painted by A Phillips Ad 1814” 29 Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Rebecca Rouse Eddy and Jonathan Eddy with bible and ledger Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

30

21


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Wilbur Sherman and Sarah Stearns Sherman & daughter 31 inscribed “Aged 39 Years 1815” and “Aged 26 Years 1815” Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Caleb Sherman 32 father of Wilbur Sherman [left] and Alsa Sherman Slade [p. 23] Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Johan Georg Fake, Jr. and Catherine Sneider Fake 33 Inscribed “George Fake, Age 49 years, and 9 months. Nov.16, 1815” and “Catherine Fake, Age 45 years 5 months - Nov.16, 1815” Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

22


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. (all large-format, shown at reduced scale)

Alsa Sherman Slade and Joseph Slade 34 inscribed “Aged 49 Years AD 1816” and “Aged…Years AD 1816” holding Erastus Darwin’s “Temple of Nature” (published 1804) Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Milton Dorr 35 Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Mary Eddy Spicer and Cyrus Spicer Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Milton Dorr (purportedly) 37 or possibly Josephus Dorr Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

36

Sarah Bull Dorr and Col. Joseph Dorr 38 Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Amy Chase Bull 39 mother of Sarah Bull Dorr Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. 23


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Mrs. Crane and Dr. Crane 40 holding “Boyer on the Bones” (published 1805) (unknown locale)

Unidentified Man and Woman [630 and 740] 41

Philip Slade 42 inscribed “Aged 56 AD 1818” Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman 43 with “Holy Bible” possibly Mrs. Philip Slade 24

Napoleon Bonaparte Buell 44 inscribed “N.B. Buel” and “1818” (uncertain locale)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1810’s: The “Border Limner” Period – Washington and Rensselaer Co., N.Y. (shown to relative size)

“M.A. Barker Age 3 years 1816” 45 possibly Easton, Greenwich Twp., Washington Co., N.Y.

Harriet Campbell (b. 1808) 46 Greenwich, Washington Co., N.Y.

Harriet Leavens (b. 1802) 47 Lansingburgh (now part of Troy), Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Jerusha Rogers (b. circa 1804) 48 Greenwich, Washington Co., N.Y. (canvas possibly reduced)

Mary Elizabeth Gale (b. 1813) 49 Galesville, Greenwich Twp., Washington Co., N.Y.

Frederick A. Gale (b. 1810) 50 Galesville, Greenwich Twp., Washington Co., N.Y. 25


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1818-20: The Troy Period – Rensselaer Co., N.Y. and vicinity (shown to relative size)

Nancy Caldwell Church Robinson and Gen. David Robinson 51 Sheriff of Bennington County from 1789 to 1811 and United States Marshall until 1819 Bennington, Vermont (adjoining Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.)

Rev. Jonas Coe 52 Pastor of First Presbyterian Church from 1792 to 1822 Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

26


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1818-20: The Troy Period – Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Sally Morgan Walbridge 53 Lansingburgh (now part of Troy) Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

James Van Schoonhoven 54 frame inscribed "Ammi Phillips Painted June 7th, 1819” Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Jane Daney Smith 55 Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [641] 56 holding snake cane

Ruth Haynes Palmer 57 daughter of John and Phebe Haynes [p. 21] Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. (large format)

Nancy Smith Lamphear 58 daughter of Jane Daney Smith Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [737] 59 holding Thomas “Chalkley’s” Journals (published 1808 and 1818)

Rhoda Goodrich Bentley and Louisa H. Bentley (b. 1813) 60 and William Northrup Bentley 61 holding “History of Slavery” Lebanon Springs (New Lebanon), Columbia Co., N.Y. 27


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1820-21: The Troy Period – Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Betsy Brownell Gilbert 62 Columbia Co., N.Y., possibly

Harriet Hill 63 Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman and Man [725 and 631] 65 inscribed “July 1820” on the original stretchers

Catherine Couenhoven Clark Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

64

Unidentified Woman “1820” 66 aka Jane A. Fort Van Rensselaer Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Samuel Robert Campbell and Sarah Mynderse Campbell 67 parents of Jane Ann Campbell [p. 31] Schodack, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. 28

Unidentified Man [567] 68


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1820-21: The Troy Period – Rensselaer and Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Woman [736] 69

Bithiah Soullard Haskell and John Haskell Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

70

Gertrude Snyder Harder and William G. Harder 71 letter postmarked Albany, addressed to “William Harder, Ghent” Ghent, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Jonathan Lane 72 “by Mr. Ammi Phillips of Troy March 30, 1821” Livingston, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Catherine Douw Hoffman Philip and Col. Henry G. Philip Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Dr. Thomas Broadhead 74 Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

29

73


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1820-21: The Troy Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Rev. John Gabriel Gebhard and Anna Maria Magdalene Carver Gebhard 75 inscribed "J. Gebhard Ætatis 71 1820 Painted by A. Phillips" and “Anna M. Gebhard Ætatis 64 1820 Delineavit A. Phillips” Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Lydia Mary Williamson Schureman Sluyter and Rev. Richard Sluyter 77 protégé and successor of Rev. John Gabriel Gebhard Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Judge James Vanderpoel and Anna Doll Vanderpoel 79 Kinderhook, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Dr. John A. McClellan 76 “1821 / Painted by A. Phillips” Livingston, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Dr. Asa Jordan 78 possibly Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [768] 80

30


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1815-22: The Troy Period – Young People

Philip Titus Heartt (b. 1806) 81 labeled “1815 at eight year of age” Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Boy with dog [776] 82 Jane Ann Campbell (b. 1817) 83 (canvas possibly reduced) daughter of Samuel and Sarah Campbell [p. 28] Schodack, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Jonas Coe Heartt 84 brother of Philip Titus Heartt Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Girl [789] 85 possibly a member of the Thompson family of Rensselaer Co., N.Y.

Mary Anne Steenback Gale 86 (b. 1806) 2nd cousin of Mary E. and Frederick A. Gale [p. 25] (uncertain locale)

Boy of the Cook family 87 (uncertain locale)

Unidentified Man [665] 88

George Edward Selby 89 of Albany married at age 17 in May of 1821, possibly at Schodack, N.Y.

31


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Eliza DuBois 90 Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Hannah Cooper du Bois and Garret du Bois (possibly) parents of Eliza DuBois and Charles Louis du Bois Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Mary Thorn Du Bois and Coert Du Bois 93 Rhinebeck or Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

91 and 92

Charles Louis du Bois 94 Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Ruth Roe Sleight and Abraham Sleight 95 holding knitting and “Scott’s Bible / Gen - Jos / Vol. I” (pub. 1810) Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 32


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Red Hook and Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Mr. Dilbee (likely Isaac Dibble) 96 Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Tobias Teller and Caroline Sammis Teller Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Col. Nathan S. Beckwith and Elizabeth “Betsey” Gale Beckwith 98 with address and names inscribed on letter and book Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

97

Unidentified Man [597] 99

Charlotte H. Newcomb Benedict and Dr. Abijah Gilbert Benedict 100 inscribed "Doct. A G Benedict / Red Hook / Dutchess Cy. N Y" on letter postmarked "NEW YORK / AUG / 23, 1822" 33


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Red Hook and Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified (cont’d.)

Lois Atherton Allerton 101 mother of Dr. Cornelius Allerton, holding “The Gospel Herald” (pub. 1820-29) Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Dr. Cornelius Allerton 102 holding “Parr’s Medical Dictionary” (pub. 1819), with horse in background Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Lois Davis Hamlin and David Hamlin 104 Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Polly Smith Husted 103 motherin-law of Dr. Cornelius Allerton Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Rhoda Bennett Couch 105 mother of Dr. John W. Couch [p. 52] Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman and Man [750 and 642] 106 with eagle snuffbox and silver-tipped cane

Unidentified Woman [681] 107

34


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1821-22: The Rhinebeck Period – Lithgow, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Phoebe Lewis Smith and Judge Isaac Smith 108 holding “The Plough Boy” (published Albany, N.Y., June 1819 – July 1823) Lithgow, Washington Twp., Dutchess Co., N.Y.

35


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Greene, Schoharie and Montgomery Co., N.Y. and unidentified

William Schuneman and Elizabeth De Meyer Schuneman 109 Catskill, Greene Co., N.Y.

Clarine Peck Van Bergen (possibly) holding “Henry on Prayer” Coxsackie, Greene Co., N.Y.

111

John Kenyon (possibly) 110 Catskill, Greene Co., N.Y.

Rev. Winslow Paige and Clarissa Keyes Paige 112 in-laws of Anna Shuler Cady Broome, Schoharie Co., N.Y. (uncertain attribution)

Unidentified Man and Woman [627 and 731] 113 holding the “Plough Boy” (published 1819-23) and strawberry sprig 36

Anna Shuler Cady 114 Florida, Montgomery Co., N.Y. (uncertain attribution)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y.

Maria Van Leuvan Overbagh and Rev. Peter Abraham Overbagh 115 parents of Rachel Ann Maria Overbagh Ostrander [p. 74] Saugerties, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Blandina Margaret Oliver 117 niece of Kate Elting [p. 40] Marbletown, Ulster Co., N.Y.

William Cockburn 116 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Maria Oliver Hardenburgh and Jacobus Hardenburgh (possibly) 118 holding “Life of Christ” and “Portraiture of Methodism” Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Dr. Abraham Ten Eyck De Witt 119 and Leah Dubois Wynkoop De Witt 120 holding “Cullen’s Practice of Physic” Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. 37

Rev. Thomas De Witt 121 holding “Horne on the Psalms” Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1823: The West Bank Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Unidentified Man [661] 122 Ten Eyck De Witt 123 holding “Milton’s Works,” inscribed Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. “Ammon Philips [sic] July 20th, 1823 Woodstock [Ulster Co.], New York”

John Ten Eyck 124 brother of Blandina Ten Eyck Hurley, Ulster Co., N.Y

Unidentified Man and Woman [647 and 766] 125

Blandina Ten Eyck 126 sister of John Ten Eyck Hurley, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman and Man of the Van Keuren family 127 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. (cf. Anna Seward Swartwout, p. 39)

Member of the Newkirk family holding “Milton’s Works” West Hurley, Ulster Co., N.Y.

38

128


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Ulster Co., N.Y. and related Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Philip Bevier Hasbrouck and Esther Bevier Hasbrouck 129 holding “Hume / Vol 3” and leaning on “Milton’s Works” New Paltz, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Jane Bevier Deyo 131 (problematic identification) Guilford, Gardiner Twp., Ulster Co., N.Y.

Aaltje Swartwout Sleight 133 (problematic identification) Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Ann DeWitt Bevier 130 mother of Esther Bevier Hasbrouck and Hylah Bevier Hasbrouck Accord, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Levi Decker Hasbrouck and Hylah Bevier Hasbrouck 132 New Paltz, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Anna Seward Swartwout 134 Unidentified Man [591] 135 holding “Cowper’s Task” Swartwoutville (Fishkill), Dutchess Co., N.Y. 39


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Ulster, Sullivan and Orange Co., N.Y.

Jane Hasbrouck (Hasbrouck) 136 or Sarah Maria DuBois (Easton) New Paltz, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Maria Eliza Hasbrouck (Reeve) 137 or Pamela DuBois (Hasbrouck) New Paltz, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Elizabeth Smith Hunter and David Hunter 139 holding “Speech of His Excellency De Witt Clinton” as published in 1822 Bloomingburg, Sullivan Co., N.Y.

Samuel Sloane 141 brother of Letitia Sloane [p. 41] Wallkill, Orange Co., N.Y.

Kate Elting (Crispell) 138 New Paltz, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Catharina Van Keuren 140 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Ann Eliza Sloan Dorrance and Dr. Benjamin Brewster Dorrance 142 holding “Orfila on Poisons” (translation published 1818) Bloomingburg, Sullivan Co., N.Y. 40


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1824: The Southwest Hudson Portraits – Orange and Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Daniel Bull 143 signed “A Phillips” father of Hannah Bull Thompson Crawford Twp., Orange Co., N.Y.

Hannah Bull Thompson and Alexander Thompson II 144, 145 both inscribed “Painted by Ammi Phillips AD 1824” Crawford Twp., Orange Co., N.Y.

Robert R. Thompson and Sarah McCurdy Thompson 146 holding letter “Mrs. Sarah Thompson, Crawford” Thompson Ridge (Crawford Twp.), Orange Co., N.Y.

John A. Sleight 148 brother of Abraham Sleight [p. 32] Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Letitia Sloane (Chapman) 147 sister of Samuel Sloane [p. 40] Wallkill, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [593 and 667] 149 holding “Bell’s Surgery” (published 1795-1826) 41


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified

“Peleg Pelton aged 67 years / 150 Ammi Phillips – Pinct” [1826] Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

“James Ketcham Aged 69 / 151 Year 1826 / Ammi Phillips Pinxit” Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

Pauline Darling Denton and Samuel Denton 153 Middletown (Wallkill Twp.), Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [636] 155 holding clay pipe

“Alsop Vail Aged / 65 Years 152 1826 / A. Phillips Pincit" Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [629] 154

Unidentified Man and Woman [640 and 751] 156

42


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Woman [695] 157

Dr. Gabriel Norton Phillips and Elizabeth Payne Phillips 158 Phillipsburg (Wallkill Twp.), Orange Co., N.Y.

Cicero Hinds 159 (uncertain locale)

Unidentified Man and Woman [572 and 713]

Unidentified Man [664]

162

160, 161

Esther Cummins Fisk and Rev. Ezra Fisk 163, 164 Goshen, Orange Co., N.Y. 43


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Man [585] 165

Unidentified Man [573] 168

Unidentified Man [562] 166 possibly the father of child with teething ring and dog [p. 75]

Unidentified Man [663] 167 with quill and ledger book

Dr. Seth Capron and Eunice Mann Capron 169 holding “Niles’ Weekly Register” (published 1811-36) Walden (Montgomery), Orange Co., N.Y.

Mr. and Mrs. John Lawrence 170 (unknown locale)

Ester Stakley or Betsy Sutherland 171 (uncertain locale) 44


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange, Dutchess and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Unidentified Woman [709] 172 in floral-upholstered wingchair (uncertain attribution)

“Frances [Seybolt] Vail Aged 69 Years 1826 / A. Phillips Pincit” 173 wife of Alsop Vail [p. 42] Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

“Anne [Stoddard] Pelton aged 67 years / A. Phillips - Pinct” 174 wife of Peleg Pelton [p. 42] Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [735] 175

Catharine Helen Miller Bull 176 wife of Daniel Bull [p. 41] and mother of Hannah Bull Thompson [p. 41] Crawford Twp., Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [679]

Ruth Wolsey Griffin 178 (uncertain identification) Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Elizabeth Du Bois Bailey 179 sister of Coert Du Bois [p. 32] Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Abigail Greele Eliot 180 Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y.

45

177


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Col. William Shultz Little and Betsey Ketcham Little 181 son-in-law and daughter of James Ketcham [p. 42] Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [693] 182 (aka Mrs. Andrew Thompson, Crawford, Orange Co., N.Y.)

Unidentified Woman and Man [767 and 588] 183 possibly Frances Smith Strong and Benjamin Strong Goshen, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [687] 184

Unidentified Woman [674] 185

Dr. Charles Winfield and Margaret Crawford Winfield (d. 1828) Crawford, Orange Co., N.Y. 46

186


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Man [637] 187 holding “Boyer’s [French] Dictionary” (first American edition published 1822)

Unidentified Man and Woman, aka Mr. & Mrs. Warburton 188 holding Dr. Samuel Parr’s “Warburton’s Letters” (a volume from The Works of Samuel Parr, published 1828)

Dr. David R. Arnell (d. 1826) 189 holding “Bell’s Surgery” and spectacles Goshen, Orange Co., N.Y.

Dr. John T. Jansen and Clarissa LeFevre Dolson Jansen Minisink, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [643 and 700] 191, 192

190

Unidentified Woman [683] 193

47


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. (continued)

Samuel Callender Howell and Sally Jane Beakes Howell 194 holding “Ramsay’s History, Vol. II” (published 1816-17) and white rose Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y.

Col. James Smith and Fanny Waterbury Smith 195 holding a piece of fruit, parents of Mary Elizabeth Smith [opposite] Wallkill, Orange Co., N.Y.

Stacy Beakes, Jr. and Mary Smith Beakes 196 with crystal-tipped cane and holding a pink rose Wallkill, Orange Co., N.Y. 48


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Orange Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Child [792] 197

Mary Elizabeth Smith (b. 1827) 198 Wallkill, Orange Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman and Child [706] 199

49


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Delaware and Chenango Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Leonard Newton Allis 200 holding “Revised Statutes of New York, Vol. I” (published 1829) Coventry, Chenango Co., N.Y.

Catherine A. May (Stimson) 202 Delhi, Delaware Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [613] 205 holding “Cooper’s Surgery, Vol. I” (published 1825)

William Wheeler and Eleanor Knox Wheeler 201 parents of Malina Wheeler Knapp Deposit, Delaware Co., N.Y.

Charles Augustus Marvine 203 Delhi, Delaware Co., N.Y.

Malina Wheeler Knapp 204 Deposit, Delaware Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman with strawberries [606 and 728] 206 (heavily in-painted) 50


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1820’s: The Realistic Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Ebenezer Punderson 207 with book “Common Prayer” Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (one of four copies)

Palmer Cook and Mary Halsley Cook 208 holding newspaper New-York “Enquirer” for the “Country” dated “August 8, 1828” Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Samuel Deuel 209 father of Mary Margaret Deuel [p. 76] Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Clarissa Benton Hunt and Joseph Drake Hunt 210 holding letter dated “December 1828” Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman, aka Mr. & Mrs. Sheffield (unknown locale)

211

51

Margaret Platt Bockee 212 Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1829-30: The Amenia Portraits – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity

Mary Christopher Van Doorn Couch and Dr. John Whitfield Couch holding a Laennec stethoscope, inscribed “M.C. Couch 1829 AE 24” and “J.W. Couch 1829 AE 33”, North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

213

Philo Reed and Abigail Reynolds Reed 215 “Aged 42, Taken by Phillips 1829” and holding letter dated “Feb 19th” brother-in-law and sister of George Greenwood Reynolds Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Dr. Elmore Everitt, M.D. 217 holding “Studies of Nature, Vol. I” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [684] 214 identical, except chair/book, to Mariah Durkee Soggs (below)

Mariah Durkee Soggs 216 mother of Henry Soggs and Mary Jane Soggs [p. 76] Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y.

George Greenwood Reynolds and Abigail Penoyer Reynolds 218 “Painted by A. Phillips June 24, 1829”, holding “Intelligencer" dated “June 24, 1829.” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 52


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1829-30: The Amenia Portraits – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity (continued)

Robert Hoag (brother of Tripp Hoag) and Phebe Pugsley Hoag 219 holding “[The Dutchess] Inteligencer” [sic] dated “July 10, 1829” Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Abigail Adams Hoag (Mrs. Milton Hoag) daughter of Olivia Kimberly Adams Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

221

Olivia Kimberly Adams 220 mother of Abigail Adams Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Tripp Hoag (brother of Robert Hoag) and Sally Ann Hoag holding “[The Republican Teleg]raph & Observer” dated “August 12, 1829”, Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

“Isaac Hunting aged Sixty five Years and Ten months, 1829” 223 and Hannah Lewis Husted Hunting 225 parents of Morgan Hunting [p. 54] Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 53

Mrs. Dr. Downe 224 (unknown locale)

222


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1829-30: The Amenia Portraits – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity (continued)

“John Garnsey Aged / 61 Years 1830” and “Mercy Garnsey / Aged 59 Years 1830” (inscribed in red on front of canvas) 227 North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman 226 aka Mrs. Smith of Elmira, N.Y. (unconfirmed locale)

Unidentified Man and Woman [622 and 730] 228 holding “Holy Bible”

Mary Hamilton Ingraham 229 mother of Lucy Hamilton inscribed “M. Ingraham 1829”

Morgan Hunting and Julia Barton Hunting 230 holding letter “Mr. Morgan Hunting / Pine Plains, NY” Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Lucy Hamilton 231 with same bible behind chair Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 54


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1829-30: The Amenia Portraits – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity (continued)

Louisa Park Benjamin 232 mother of Jane Ann Benjamin Powers Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [772] 235

Unidentified Woman [771] 238

Charles Wesley Powers 233 and Jane Ann Benjamin Powers holding “Morning Courier” dated “October 30, 1829” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Mary Powers 236 sister of Charles and Caroline Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

234

Caroline Powers 237 sister of Charles and Mary Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Sherman Bassett and Hannah Sornborger Bassett 239 holding “Niles’ Register” dated “April 10, 1830” and letter postmarked “April 10” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 55


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1830: Dutchess Co., N.Y. vicinity and unidentified

Dr. Peter B. Guernsey (and patient) 240 and Mary Ann Thorne Guernsey 241 books on shelf include Travers’ Diseases of the Eye (pub. New York, 1825) Town of Milan, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [563]

243

Thomas Isaac Storm 246 Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [646]

244

Fanny Brush Rundle 242 New Hartford, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Mrs. Cobb 245 (unknown locale)

Hendrick Hulst, holding Baxter’s “[The] Saints’ [Everlasting] Rest”, and Aletta Van Alst Hulst, holding spectacles and with “History” 247 Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 56


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1830: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Greene Co., N.Y. and unidentified

John Van Deusen 248 father-in-law of Dr. Horatio Dewey Columbia or Greene Co., N.Y.

Katherine Salisbury Newkirk Hickok Catskill, Greene Co., N.Y.

Dr. Horatio Dewey 249 holding “Anatomy” Leeds, Greene Co., N.Y.

251

Horace Austin and Mary Ludlow Austin Cairo, Greene Co., N.Y.

James Elting of Leeds 250 Greene Co., N.Y. (possibly)

Dr. Levi King and Lovisa Peck King 252 holding “Cooper’s Surgery, Vol. I” (published 1825) Cairo, Greene Co., N.Y.

Elizabeth Mygans (or Mygatt) 254 (uncertain locale)

253

57


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1832: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Gen. Samuel Ten Broeck 255 with cane initialed “S.T.B.” Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Leonard William Ten Broeck and Helen Livingston Ten Broeck 256 son of Gen. Samuel Ten Broeck and stepdaughter of Elizabeth McKinstry Livingston, holding “Albany Argus” dated “May 8, 1832” Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Elizabeth McKinstry Livingston 257 mother of Jane Livingston Sanders Blue Stores (near Clermont), Columbia Co., N.Y.

Judge John Sanders III and Jane Livingston Sanders 258 with “Plutarch, Vol. I” and holding sewing box Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [589] 259

Unidentified Woman and Man [675 and 602] 260 holding “New-York Enquirer” dated “July 3, 1832.” 58


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1833: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Welcome B. Arnold and Mary L. Rowe Arnold 261 with letter on table dated “Rhinebeck, Feb. 1, 1833” Town of Clinton, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [581] 263 holding riding crop

Unidentified Woman [744] 262

Dr. William Cantyne De Witt and Elizabeth Hardenbergh De Witt with “Good’s Study of Medicine” vols. IV and V (pub. 1826) 264, 265 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Henry Schenck Teller and Jane [Catherine] Storm Teller 266 with unusual forward-leaning pose and leaf-carved sofa Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 59

Unidentified Woman [752] 267


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early 1830’s: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Greene and Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Marius Schoonmaker 268 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Sarah Ann Palen Northrop and Lewis Northrop Cairo, Greene Co., N.Y.

Sarah Ann Sleight De Witt 270 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. (canvas reduced)

Mrs. Day and Mr. Day (aka Mrs. Bradley and Mr. Bradley) 271 holding “Religious Intelligencer” (published 1816-37)

Unidentified Man and Woman [579 and 719] 272 holding “Albany Argus” (published 1813-56)

269

Mrs. Mayer and Daughter 273 (cf. Children in Red Dresses, p. 75) 60


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1834: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Columbia Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Helen [Lena] Ten Broeck 274 inscr. “aged 30 years 1834” Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y.

William Henry De Witt and Catherine Ten Broeck De Witt sister of Helen [Lena] Ten Broeck Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y.

275

Jacob Wessel Ten Broeck, Sr. and Anna Benner Ten Broeck 276 holding pamphlet “Agricultural Society of the County of Columbia 1834 Clermont” Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [692] 277

Henry Lawrence and Christiana Rockefeller Lawrence 278 labeled “1834 / Aged 29 Years” and “1834 / Aged 28 Years” Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [747] 279 aka Mrs. Zachariah Flagler

61


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1834-35: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Abraham Patterson 280 holding “Telegraph” dated “July 9, 1834” Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

John Hughes [John Hughson] 283 holding the New-York American dated “November 6, 1835” Hughsonville, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Caroline Jane Opie 285 Staatsburg or LaGrangeville Dutchess Co., N.Y.

James de Long 281 holding “Washington’s Farewell Address” Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [592] 282

Unidentified Woman and Man [726 and 655] 284 possibly of Dutchess Co., N.Y.

William Stevens 286 (brother of Margaret Stevens Bentley) Pawling, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 62

Margaret Stevens Bentley 287 or Elizabeth Buckley (uncertain locale)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1830’s: The Early “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Unidentified Woman and Man of the Russell family 288 with leaf-carved sofa and unusual backward-leaning pose

James Ketcham and Lois Belding Ketcham 289 with ledger, quill, and spectacles Dover Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [619 and 721] 290

63


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1836: The “Kent Limner” Portraits - Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn. and vicinity

Rufus Fuller and (2nd wife) Elizabeth Drake Fuller 291 father and stepmother of Julia Ann Fuller Barnum Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn.

John Milton Raymond and Florilla Mills Raymond holding “Observer” dated “July 4, 1836” Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Almira Lucretia Mills Adams (Perry) 292 sister of Florilla Mills Raymond Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Hannah Mills Raymond (Newcomb) or Myra Ann Mills Raymond (Haxtun) 294 dau. of John and Florilla Mills Raymond Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn.

293

Matthew Starr Barnum 295 and Julia Ann Fuller Barnum 296 holding “Morning Courier” dated “June 13, 1836” and parsley sprig Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn. 64

Phoebe E. Preston Haviland 297 Wingdale, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (adjacent to Kent, Conn.)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1830’s The “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Marquis de La Fayette Phillips and Jane Maria Pells Phillips 298 holding books inscribed “M.D.L.F. Phillips” and “J.M. Phillips” Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

“A.E. Allen / Aged 30 / 1836” 299 probably Ann Eliza Frear Allen, first cousin of J.M. Pells Phillips Poughkeepsie, Dutchess, Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [628] 300 holding newspaper “Telegraph” possibly Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Abraham Burton and Celia B. Sayrs Burton 301 holding letter “Abram Burton / Amenia, New York” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

John Guy Vassar, Jr. 302 holding blank letter Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [578 and 697] 303 with “Revised Statutes, Vol. I” (pub. 1829) and “Common Prayer” 65


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Ulster Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Jeremiah Russell and Elizabeth Moose Russell 304 holding quill pen and spectacles Saugerties, Ulster, Co., N.Y.

Hannah Masten Radcliff 305 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [624] 306

Thomas Cornell 308 son of Peter Cornell Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Peter Cornell 307 father of Thomas Cornell Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Captain Isaac Cox with letter and Mrs. Cox with parsley sprig possibly Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. 66

309

Jacob Hasbrouck De Witt 310 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Litchfield Co., Conn and Westchester Co., N.Y.

Jeanette Payne 311 holding parsley sprig Warren, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Ann Miller Tompkins 312 holding parsley sprig Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y.

Mary Hoyt 313 holding parsley sprig and book (uncertain locale)

Unidentified Man and Woman [590 and 689] 314

Unidentified Man [611] 315 found in Gaylordsville, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Man [614] 316 holding “Wesley’s Sermons”

Unidentified Man [638] 318 holding bible

Unidentified Woman [739] 317

67


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Putnam Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Helen Cornell Manney 319 holding book “H. Manney” Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Sarah Rogers 320 or possibly Eveline Cornell Rogers Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Elder Luman Burtch and Esther Patrick Burtch 322 Dated to 1837 based on age on frame. Elder Luman Burtch officiated at the marriage of Ammi Phillips to Jane Ann Caulkins in 1830. Bangall, Town of Stanford, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Ruth Wright Hoag 324 Baldwin Place, Town of Carmel, Putnam Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [668] 321 with pink rose

Anna Farrington Noxon 323 Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Archibald Campbell 325 and Elizabeth Mitchell Campbell 326 holding the New-York “Spectator” dated “June 5, 1837” Pawling, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 68


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Putnam Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Woman [708] 327

Unidentified Man and Woman [580 and 720] 328 from Dover Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. holding “Minutes of the Baptist Missionary Convention”

Jonathan Akin Taber and Abigail Julia Ayers Taber 329 parents of William Frederic Taber [p. 76], holding parsley sprig and “Report on Agriculture and Internal Improvement, New York, 1838” Pawling, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Mary Morrison 330 (uncertain locale)

Unidentified Man and Woman [657 and 769] 331 holding newspaper “…Eagle.” (probably the Poughkeepsie Eagle, published 1834-44)

Unidentified Woman [673] 332 found in Saugerties, Ulster Co., N.Y.

69


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess and Putnam Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Jeannette Elizabeth Woolley 333 sister of Sarah Woolley Haxtun [p. 77] holding letter and with books “History” Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Girl, possibly a Raymond family member 337 (possibly Frances Anne Foster)

Frances Sprague Foster and Judge Ebenezer Foster 334 with letter on table dated “1839” South East, Putnam Co., N.Y.

Augusta Maria Foster (Raymond) 335 dau. of Frances and Ebenezer Foster South East, Putnam Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [595 and 682] 338

Nancy Hungerford 336 (uncertain locale)

Unidentified Woman [669] 339

70


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Mr. Doane 340 Dover Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Mr. and Mrs. Vail from Afton, N.Y. 341 (unconfirmed locale)

Unidentified Man [576] 342 holding pamphlet “Agriculture”

Unidentified Man and Woman [610 and 704] 343 holding a pamphlet “Agriculture”, and leaning on a large bible

Unidentified Man [559] 344 holding a pamphlet “Agriculture”

Unidentified Man and Woman [645 and 757] 345

71


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Westchester Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Polly Clason Brady 346 (Mrs. Simeon Brady) Lewisboro, Westchester Co., N.Y.

George C. Sunderland 348 “Painted When at the Age of 21 years / By / Mr. Ammi Phillips In the fall of 1840” Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [609] with dog stick-pin

351

Gerard Crane and Roxanna Purdy Crane inscribed “48 Years Old. 1839” Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y.

Rev. Ashbel Greeen 349 recorded as painted by Phillips July 9-14, 1840, and holding “Η KAINH ΔIAΘHKH” Bedford, Westchester Co., N.Y.

347

Rev. Walter Smith Lyon 350 Bedford, Westchester Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [587 and 685] 352

72


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1838-40: The Late “Kent Limner” Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified

Unidentified Man [575] 353

Mr. Goodwin 354 Lime Rock, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Mr. Bates 355

Unidentified Man [586] 356 Unidentified Man and Woman [582 and 773] 357 (three portraits descended in the same family, pairing uncertain)

Unidentified Man [600] 358 holding pamphlet “Agriculture”

Unidentified Woman [698] 359

73

Unidentified Woman [760] 360 inscribed “January First 1840”


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1830’s: The “Kent Limner” Period – Well-suited Boys (shown to relative size)

Jacob Wessel Ten Broeck, Jr. (reaching for pear) and William Henry Ten Broeck (holding peach) 361 inscribed with names and “Aged 10 Years 1834” Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

John Younie Luyster (b. 1828) 362 holding sprig with ten strawberries LaGrangeville, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Rachel Ann Maria Overbagh Ostrander (holding handkerchief embroidered “R.A.M.O.”) and son Titus Ostrander (b. 1829) 364 Saugerties, Ulster Co., N.Y.

74

Unidentified Boy with peach and book possibly Aaron D. Smith (b. 1830) Catskill, Greene Co., N.Y.

363


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Late 1820’s to late 1830’s: The Children in Red Dresses (shown to relative size)

Unidentified Boy [779] 365 holding two strawberries and mallet

Unidentified Girl [786] 366 fingering necklace and holding sprig with one strawberry

Unidentified Child [791] 368 Unidentified Girl [787] 369 aka “Hannah Standish” 4-strand necklace, black shoes, red shoes, holding four strawberries holding cat, with dog

Unidentified Girl [796] 371 red shoes, holding flowers and cat, with drapery

Unidentified Girl [785] 372 2-strand necklace, red shoes, holding four strawberries, with dog 75

Unidentified Child [797] 367 holding teething ring and dog

Unidentified Girl [788] 370 3-strand necklace, black shoes, holding parsley sprig, with dog

Unidentified Girl [793] 373 green shoes, holding parsley sprig and bird, with dog, table and drapery


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Late 1820’s to late 1830’s: More Children in Dresses (shown to same relative size as preceding pages)

Henry Soggs (b. 1829) and Mary Jane Soggs (b. 1824) with strawberries, on patterned floor Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y.

Andrew Jackson Ten Broeck (b. 1832) 378 with hickory nut and dog inscribed “Aged 1 year & 6 months 1834” Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y.

375

Mary Margaret Deuel (b. 1827) 374 with four strawberries, patterned floor Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (cf. infants in white dresses, p. 49)

James Mairs Salisbury (b. 1834) 377 with five strawberries and dog Catskill Landing, Greene Co., N.Y. (cf. “Hannah Standish” p. 75)

76

William F. Taber 376 (b. 1836), holding two strawberries, with dog Pawling, Dutchess, Co., N.Y. (parents dated to 1838, see p. 69 )


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Late 1830’s: The Haxtun family, Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (shown to relative size)

William Woolley Haxtun (b. 1829) with dog and drapery Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Almira Haxtun (1831-1841) 380 with rose sprig and kitten 381 Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (canvas reduced, with fragment preserved)

379

Sarah Woolley Haxtun and Benjamin Haxtun 382, 383 parents of William Woolley Haxtun and Almira Haxtun [above] and sister and brother-in-law of Jeannette Elizabeth Woolley [p. 70] Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

77


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1840’s: The Early Daguerreotype Period – Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Joseph White Phillips (b. 1835) 384 son of Elias and Elizabeth N. Phillips Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Elias Phillips and Elizabeth Northrup Phillips parents of Joseph White Phillips Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Cynthia Birdsall Phillips 386 stepmother of Elias Phillips Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Elizabeth Phillips Storm, daughter of Elias Phillips by his first wife, and John Curry Storm 387 reading “Life of Clay” (published 1843) Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man [571] 388 with spectacles and “Holy Bible”

385

Joseph Bogardus and Barbara Moffet Bogardus 389 holding newspaper “Anti-Bank Democrat” (published 1842-43) Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 78


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1840’s: The Early Daguerreotype Period – Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Isaac Simmons and Sarah Simmons 390 parents of Harriet Simmons Hasbrook, each with name on book and inscribed (verso) with with name, age, and “1843” in Phillips’s hand Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Catherine Collins Flagler 392 (Mrs. Zachariah Flagler) Beekman, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [696] 394

Harriet Simmons Hasbrook 391 holding book “H.M. Hasbrook” and inscribed ”Aged 30 1843” Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Phebe Van Amburgh Hasbrook and Francis Jacob Hasbrook 393 sister-in-law and brother-in-law of Harriet Simmons Hasbrook holding newspaper [New-York] “Observer” dated “1843” Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Tunis Cooper and Maria Budd Cooper 395 Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 79


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Early to Mid-1840’s: The Early Daguerreotype Period – Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified

Unidentified Man [620] 396 with Methodist Hymnal (possible brother of Ira Williams)

Ira Williams and Melissa Calkins Williams 397 co-founder, with brothers, of Sharon Methodist congregation Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Hon. John Cotton Smith (d. 1845) 398 former Governor of Conn. (1812-17) Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Phebe Doud Gay and Calvin Gay (d. 1848) 399 and 400 with “Dwight’s Sermons” (published New Haven: 1828) Sharon, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Sarah (Sally) Totten Sutherland 401 (one of four copies) Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [710] 402 aka “Quaker Woman” 80

Unidentified Woman [729] 403 holding “Religion of the Heart and Life” (pub. Hartford: 1840)


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified

Thomas Parker 404 Hyde Park or Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Catherine De C. Stoutenburgh 406 sister of Tobias Isaac Stoutenburgh Hyde Park, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Woman [745] 408 possibly of the Stoutenburgh family

Charles Brown and Elizabeth Marshall Brown 405 holding newspaper “Telegraph” dated “August 13, 1845” Salt Point, Town of Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Tobias Isaac Stoutenburgh and Maria Albertson Stoutenburgh 407 holding newspaper “Baptist Advocate” dated “September 9, 1845” Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman [650 and 707] 409 holding newspaper “Christian Advocate” dated “October 24, 1845” 81


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Dutchess Co., N.Y. and unidentified (continued)

Deacon Benjamin Benedict 410 with tinted spectacles and bible North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Mr. and Mrs. Keese 411 with music book and holding bible (possibly John Mumford Keese and Cornelia Hoffman Keese Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.)

“Rachel Divine. Aged 60. 1846.” 412 highlighting Psalm XXXVII Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Unidentified Man and Woman 413 inscribed “Dr. J. Ransom, DD, Poughkeepsie” and holding herb sprig Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Julia Anna Stone Morehouse 414 Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

Col. Henry Rundall and Nancy Totten Sutherland Rundall 415 inscribed “1847 Aged 48” and “Nancy T. Rundall Aged 44 1847” Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. 82


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified

Rebecca Beebe Rockwell 416 Colebrook, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Judge Miles Tobey Granger and Caroline S. Ferguson Granger 417 holding "Statutes of Connecticut" (published Hartford: 1844) Canaan, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Theron Bronson and Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson 418 parents of Edward Hiram and Henry Theron Bronson [p. 89] Winchester, Litchfield Co., Conn. (cf. Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson and Wilbur Bronson, p. 88)

Unidentified Woman [703] 420

Margaret Phelps Higley (d. 1850) 419 Falls Village, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Man and Woman [568 and 676] 421

83


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Mid-to-Late 1840’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified (continued)

Sarah J. Kinney 422 daughter of Nisus and Sarah W. Kinney Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Nisus Kinney 423 (Ammi Phillips’s cousin) and Sarah Wakefield Kinney 424 parents of Sarah J., Jane E. [p. 88] and Susan W. Kinney [p. 88] holding “Hartford Times” dated “June 24, 1848” Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn.

(possibly) Sen. John Henry Hubbard and Julia Ann Dodge Hubbard 425 holding newspaper “Hartford” dated “April 21, 1849” Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Woman [732] 427 holding thistle

Lucius Culver 426 son-in-law of Nisus Kinney, married in 1851 at the home of Ammi Phillips

Theron Daniel Ludington and Eleanor Bailey Ludington 428 Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn. 84


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified

Augustus Miles and Roxa Norton Miles 429 holding newspaper “Tribune” dated “June 24, 1850” Goshen, Litchfield, Conn.

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour of Connecticut 430 holding newspaper “Tribune” dated “August 27, 1850” (uncertain locale)

Milo Bartholomew and Milia Holbrook Bartholomew 431 holding “The Cultivator” dated “October 5, 1850” and holding an unfolded envelope with four locks of hair. Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn. 85


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850: The Daguerreotype Period – Litchfield Co., Conn. and unidentified (continued)

William Miles 432 Goshen or Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Man 433 likely a Miles family member Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Woman [666] 434

Dr. Ovid Plumb and Abiah Lawrence Plumb 435 with pear blossoms, brass microscope and “Gray’s Bottany” [sic] Salisbury, Litchfield, Conn.

Unidentified Woman [702] 436

Unidentified Man and Woman [598 and 677]

Unidentified Woman [738] 438

437

86


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1853: The Daguerreotype Period – The Hotchkiss family, Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Dyer Hotchkiss 439 father of Charles Hotchkiss Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Charles Hotchkiss and Electa Susannah Brace Hotchkiss 440 holding the “Advent [Herald]” (published as depicted, 1848-56) parents of Edward C., Lucia E. and Henry E. Hotchkiss Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Edward C. Hotchkiss (b. 1833) 441 Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Lucia E. Hotchkiss (b. 1835) 442 Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn. 87

Henry E. Hotchkiss (b. 1841) 443 Torrington, Litchfield Co., Conn.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1848-53: The Litchfield Children and related portraits with Paisley shawls (shown to relative size)

Susan W. Kinney (b. 1842) 444 sister of Jane E. Kinney Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn. (canvas reduced) Jane E. Kinney 445 sister of Susan W. Kinney Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Emily Miner Palmer Fox 446 Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson and son Wilbur Bronson (b. 1848) 448 Winchester, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Woman [701] 447

Leonard Richardson and Lucy Anne Barnum Richardson 449 holding annual report “Directors of the Housatonic Railroad Company� Lime Rock, Litchfield Co., Conn. 88

Milo Barnum Richardson (b. 1849) 450 son of Leonard and Lucy Richardson Lime Rock, Litchfield Co., Conn.


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1848-53: The Litchfield Children (shown to same relative size as preceding page)

Edward H. Bronson (b. 1842) and Henry T. Bronson (b. 1845) 451 sons of Theron Bronson [p. 83] and Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson [pp. 83, 88] holding “Picture Multiplier� (published 1843-47) Winchester, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Virginia Ludington (b. 1846) and Theron Simpson Ludington (b. 1850) Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn.

Unidentified Children [783] 452 and their cat

453

89


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. and unidentified

Unidentified Man and Woman 454 holding book on agriculture Possibly Hiram Bartholomew and Betsy Barnum Bartholomew of Sheffield, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Mr. and Mrs. James Reed (unknown locale)

Unidentified Woman [690] 457

456

Henry W. Langdon 458 with “History of Western Massachusetts” (pub. 1855) Monterey, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Nathan Gaylord Benjamin 455 holding “Henry’s Commentary, Vol. I Gen-Sam” (as pub. 1856) Egremont, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Man and Woman [584 and 686] 459 holding “Prince of David” (pub. 1855) and embroidered handkerchief 90


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Man [583] 460 holding newspaper “Flag” from a Sheffield, Mass. family

Dr. Clarkson T. Collins and Lydia Coffin Collins 461 with “Wood’s Practice of Medicine” (published 1847-67) Sheffield, Berkshire Co., Mass. (cf. Henry W. Langdon, p. 90)

Dr. Joseph Priestly Dorr 462 Hillsdale, Columbia Co., N.Y. (three miles from Berkshire Co., Mass.)

Henry Sisson and Lucy Amanda Howe Sisson New Marlborough, Berkshire Co., Mass.

463

Unidentified Woman [775] 464 Unidentified Woman [759] 465 Unidentified Woman [678] 466 with mourning ribbons with mourning ribbons with mourning ribbons (three women suggested by B. Holdridge (1968) as being likely sisters and probably from Berkshire, Co., Mass.) 91


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Berkshire Co., Mass. and unidentified (continued)

Unidentified Man [601] 467 holding Whiston’s “Complete Works of Flavius Josephus” (1851 ed.)

Unidentified Man [574] 468

Unidentified Man [617] 469 with “Holy Bible”

Unidentified Man [561] 470 with “Dunglison’s Human Physiology” (published 1832 to 1856)

Unidentified Man [599] 471 with book “History”

Mr. Cooper 472 with book “History of the U.S.” (unknown locale)

Unidentified Man [648] 473

Unidentified Man [656] 474 holding a glove

Asa Beckwith 475 with book “History”

92


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1850’s: The Daguerreotype Period – Berkshire Co., Mass and unidentified (continued)

Ebenezer Chadwick 476 New Marlborough or Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Man [569] 477 holding Winslow’s Merchant’s and Mechanic’s Guide (pub. 1851-55)

Unidentified Man [560] 478 with “Watson’s Practice of Medicine” found in Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Boy [658] 479 holding “Ballou’s Pictorial” as issued January to June 1855

Unidentified Man [634] 480 holding newspaper “Spectator” dated “March 19, 1855”

Unidentified Man [660] 481 with book “History”

Unidentified Man [564] 482

Lorrin Smith and Eliza Smith 483 New Marlborough, Berkshire Co., Mass. 93


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1857: The Late Period – West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass and unidentified

Elisha Barnes 484 father of Thomas Williams Barnes West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Mrs. Lyman 486 West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Woman [733] 488

Thomas Williams Barnes and Zilpha Arnold Barnes 485 holding newspaper “New York” dated “July 3, 1857” and white flower, with “Mysteries of Bee-Keeping Explained” (pub. 1853) West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Perry Green Comstock and Elizabeth M. Comstock 487 holding newspaper “Argus” dated “July 30, 1857” West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Ethan Allen Van Deusen and Clymena Tobey Van Deusen 489 holding newspaper “New York” dated “August 17, 1857” West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. 94


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1860: The Late Period – Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. vicinity and unidentified

Unidentified Man [633] 490 newspaper “Agriculture” on table dated “November 30, 1860”

Thomas Carter 491 father of Edward Church Carter Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Chauncey Erastus Dewey and Caroline Bailey Dewey 493 parents of Duane Bailey Dewey [p. 97] with “Ledger / 1860” New Lenox, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Henry Sedgwick 495 Lenox, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Edward Church Carter 492 uncle of the three Carter children and Florence Maria Carter [p. 96] Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Woman [765] 494

Anna Benedict Smith 496 and Enos Smith (d. 1857) 497 daughter-in-law and son of Gideon Smith [p. 16] who was painted by Phillips in 1811 Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. 95


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1860: The Late Period – Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. and vicinity (shown to relative size)

Anna Electa Carter (b. 1845), Mary Adele Carter (b. 1856) and John Calvin Calhoun Carter (b. 1846) 498 recorded as painted 1860 in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Sarah King Dewey and Harriet Maria Dewey (b. 1859) 499 New Lenox, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Girl 500 aka “Mary O’Connel”, probably Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Mass. vicinity

Emily Cooper (b. 1839) 501 Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Edward Harmon Langdon 502 painted posthumously (d. 1855) Monterey, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Boy [794] 503 with bell, peach and mallet

Florence Maria Carter 504 (b. 1859) Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass.

Unidentified Boy [782] 505 with mallet (in octagonal frame)

96


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1860: The Late Period (continued) – shown to relative size

Unidentified Woman and Boy [711] 506 with long curls

Unidentified Boy [795] 507 with dog Unidentified Woman [718] (cf. George Beckwith, p. 98) (canvas reduced) 508

Unidentified Boy [780] 509 with long curls, hat and large dog

Unidentified Boy [778] 510 with long curls, hat and dog

Unidentified Child [790] 511 in blue dress, with large dog

Duane Bailey Dewey (b. 1858) 512 New Lenox, Berkshire Co., Mass. 97


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Circa 1862: The Late Period – Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. and vicinity

Elizabeth Harris Husted 513 “Taken by A. Phillips / June 20th 1862” niece of Polly Smith Husted [p. 34] Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

George Beckwith and dog 514 son of Col. Nathan S. Beckwith and Elizabeth Gale Beckwith [p. 33] Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

“Wm. H. Stewart Age 57 Painted by A. Phillips 1862” Stanford, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (six miles from Pine Plains)

These are the last dated portraits by Ammi Phillips

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Table 3 – Chronology of Datable Portraits Dated

Subject

Locale

1811 October 6 1811 October 6 1811 October 18 1811 1812 September 17 1814 1814 1815 November 16 1815 November 16 1815 1815 1815 1816 1816 1816 1818 1818 1819 June 7 1820 July 1820 July 1820 1820 1820 1821 March 30 1821 1822 August 23 1823 July 20 1824 1824 1826 1826 1826 1828 August 8 1828 December 1829 February 19 1829 May - June 1829 June 24 1829 June 24 1829 July 10 1829 August 12 1829 October 30 1829 1829 1829 1830 April 10 1830 April 10 1830

Charles Rollin Barstow Pluma Amelia Barstow Chloe Allis Judson Gideon Smith Sarah Cornwall Everest John Haynes Phebe Haynes Catherine Fake Johan Georg Fake, Jr. Sarah Stearns Sherman Wilbur Sherman Philip Titus Heartt Alsa Sherman Slade Joseph Slade M.A. Barker Philip Slade Napoleon Bonaparte Buell James Van Schoonhoven Unidentified Woman [725] Unidentified Man [631] Jane A. Fort Van Rensselaer (?) Rev. John Gabriel Gebhard Anna Magdalena Carver Gebhard Jonathan Lane Dr. John A. McClellan Dr. Abijah Gilbert Benedict Unidentified Man [661] Hannah Bull Thompson Alexander Thompson James Ketcham Alsop Vail Frances Seybolt Vail Palmer Cook Joseph Drake Hunt Philo Reed Isaac Hunting George Greenwood Reynolds Abigail Pennoyer Reynolds Robert Hoag Tripp Hoag Charles Wesley Powers Mary Christopher Van Doorn Couch Dr. John Whitfield Couch Mary Hamilton Ingraham Sherman Bassett Hannah Sornborger Bassett John Garnsey

Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass. Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass. Sheffield, Berkshire Co., Mass. Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. New Lebanon, Columbia Co., N.Y. Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. Easton, Washington Co., N.Y. Hoosick, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. unknown Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. unknown unknown Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y. (?) Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y. Claverack, Columbia Co., N.Y. Livingston, Columbia Co., N.Y. Livingston, Columbia Co., N.Y. Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Woodstock, Ulster Co., N.Y. Crawford, Orange Co., N.Y. Crawford, Orange Co., N.Y. Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y. Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y. Mount Hope, Orange Co., N.Y. Red Hook, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y. North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (probably) Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

99

Page 16 16 16 16 19 21 21 22 22 22 22 31 23 23 25 24 24 27 28 28 28 30 30 29 30 33 38 41 41 42 42 45 51 51 52 53 52 52 53 53 55 52 52 54 55 55 54


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Table 3 – Chronology of Datable Portraits (continued) 1830 1832 May 8 1832 July 3 1833 February 1 1834 July 9 1834 1834 1834 1834 1834 1834 1835 November 6 1836 June 13 1836 July 4 1836 1837 June 5 1837 July - August 1838 1839 1839 1840 January 1 1840 July 9-14 1840 fall 1842-43 1843 1843 1843 1843 1845 August 13 1845 September 9 1845 October 24 1846 1847 1847 1848 June 24 1849 April 21 1850 June 24 1850 August 27 1850 September 15 1850 October 5 1855 January - June 1855 March 19 1857 July 3 1857 July 30 1857 August 17 1860 November 30 1860 1862 June 20 1862

Mercy Garnsey Leonard William Ten Broeck Unidentified Man [602] Welcome B. Arnold Abraham Patterson Helen Ten Broeck Jacob Wessel Ten Broeck Henry Lawrence Christiana Rockefeller Lawrence Jacob W. and William H. Ten Broeck Andrew Jackson Ten Broeck John Hughson Matthew Starr Barnum John Milton Raymond Ann Eliza Frear Allen Archibald Campbell Elder Luman Burtch Jonathan Akin Taber Judge Ebenezer Foster Gerard Crane Unidentified Woman [760] Rev. Ashbel Greene George C. Sunderland Joseph Bogardus Isaac Simmons Sarah Simmons Harriet Simmons Hasbrook Francis Jacob Hasbrook Charles Brown Tobias Isaac Stoutenburgh Unidentified Man [650] Rachel Divine Col. Henry Rundall Nancy Totten Sutherland Rundall Nisus Kinney Sen. John Henry Hubbard (possibly) Augustus Miles Mr. Seymour Hosea W. Crandall Milo Bartholomew Unidentified Boy [658] Unidentified Man [634] Thomas Williams Barnes Perry Green Comstock Ethan Allen Van Deusen Unidentified Man [633] Chauncey Erastus Dewey Elizabeth Harris Husted William H. Stewart 100

North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y. unknown Clinton, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y. Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y. Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y. Germantown, Columbia Co., N.Y. Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y. Clermont, Columbia Co., N.Y. Hughsonville, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn. Kent, Litchfield Co., Conn. Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pawling, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Bangall, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pawling, Dutchess Co., N.Y. South East, Putnam Co., N.Y. Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y. unknown Bedford, Westchester Co., N.Y. Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Fishkill, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y. unknown Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn. Salisbury, Litchfield Co., Conn. Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn. unknown Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn. Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn. unknown unknown West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. West Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. unknown New Lenox, Berkshire Co., Mass. Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Pine Plains, Dutchess Co., N.Y.

54 58 58 59 62 61 61 61 61 74 76 62 64 64 65 68 68 69 70 72 73 72 72 78 79 79 79 79 81 81 81 82 82 82 84 84 85 85 n/a 85 93 93 94 94 94 95 95 98 98


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Addenda – Contemporary Hudson Valley Portraiture

Boy of the Overbagh family, probably Ulster Co., N.Y. 515 with drape, patterned floor covering, and dog at feet attributed to John Vanderlyn II (1805-1876) (cf. Kent Period children with dogs)

Mary Ann Halsey DeMott 516 probably Albany, N.Y., dated 1822 by Ezra Ames (1738-1836) (cf. Troy Period women with shawls)

Ann Dunkin and Dunkin Henry Van Rensselaer 517 Albany, N.Y., circa 1818 by Bass Otis (1784-1861) (cf. mid-to-late 1820’s infants in white dresses, p. 49)

William Cockburn 518 Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. attributed to John Vanderlyn (1775-1852) (cf. Phillips’s portrait of William Cockburn, p. 37)

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Addenda – Contemporary Hudson Valley Portraiture (continued)

Rev. Ammi Ruhamah Robbins, Norwalk, Litchfield Co., Conn., 1812 519 by Reuben Moulthrop (1763-1814) (cf. Gen David Robinson, p. 26)

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Appendix A: Ammi Phillips Family and Historical Records Ammi Phillips’s hundreds of surviving works, many dated or datable, provide an exceptional record of his whereabouts over a period of half a century, as illustrated elsewhere in this volume. Biographical sketches have also been provided in other publications. Nevertheless, we thought it useful to other researchers to document what we know of his family and their historical record as follows. Ammi Phillips was born on April 24, 1788 (or 1787) in Colebrook, Litchfield Co., Connecticut. He was the son of Samuel Phillips (1760-1842), a farmer and Revolutionary War veteran, and Millea (Kellogg) Phillips (1763-1861). His paternal grandparents were Samuel Phillips (1737-1792) and Elizabeth (Ayer) Phillips (1735-1778), early land purchasers in Colebrook, Connecticut. His maternal grandparents were Isaac Kellogg (1727-1800) and Martha (Merrill) Kellogg (1727-1807) of New Hartford, Litchfield Co., Connecticut. Ammi was apparently named for Rev. Ammi R. Robbins (1740-1813), Congregational minister in adjacent Norfolk, Connecticut and a Revolutionary War chaplain [see opposite]. By general consensus, Ammi Phillips was born in Colebrook, Litchfield Co., Connecticut in 1788. The various census ages, however, yield a possible birth year between 1786 and 1788. The ages given in his death notice (78) and cemetery inscription (78 years 3 months) imply his birth in April 1787. Ammi Phillips was one of purportedly 11 children born to his parents, of whom only six younger siblings are known. These include two younger brothers, Halsey Phillips, 1790-1882 (married Sally Hungerford) and Benjamin Franklin Phillips, 1802-1882 (married Emeline Beckwith and later Lucretia A. Miller), and four younger sisters, Harriet Phillips, 1793-1889 (Mrs. Eri Tuttle), Cleora Phillips, 1797-1875 (Mrs. Asahel Canfield), Calista Phillips, 1798-1851 (Mrs. Nathan Allen), and Millea Cordelia Phillips, 1809-1876 (Mrs. Daniel Loomis). Ammi Phillips’s parents and all of his younger siblings eventually moved from Connecticut to northeastern Ohio. The 1800 census for the Samuel Phillips household in Colebrook, Connecticut enumerates three male children and four female children which would account for all of the above. The 1810 census still enumerates three male children and four female children, but includes one male born since 1800 and two females born since 1800. There remains one male age 16 to 25, but this is likely Ammi’s slightly younger brother Halsey (age 20), implying that Ammi (age 22) has left the household by 1810. This differs from the Holdridge’s interpretation that this remaining male was Ammi himself. By 1820 there are no new children born since 1810, the number of male children remains three and the number of female children remaining in the household has reduced to one. Beginning in 1808 Ammi Phillips’s father, Samuel Phillips, assisted with a party surveying 16,000 acres of land in Ashtabula County, Ohio, which township was named Colebrook in honor of Colebrook, Connecticut. Ammi’s brother Halsey Phillips was among the first to settle permanently in Colebrook, Ohio in 1814. Samuel Phillips made his fourth and final trip to Colebrook, Ohio in the spring of 1821 and his wife and three of Ammi’s sisters joined him later that year, as did Halsey Phillips’s wife by the fall of 1821, making them the second and third families to settle in the township. They were joined by Ammi’s youngest brother Benjamin Franklin Phillips by 1828 and probably earlier. A fourth married sister, Harriet Phillips Tuttle, moved there from Colebrook, Connecticut in 1839. 1, 2 Ammi’s mother, Millea Phillips, was reputedly an energetic woman who not only made the arduous 500-mile trek to Ohio in the record time of 28 days, but walked the forested township caring for the sick. 3, 4 Ammi’s father made

Bob Grigg, “Historic Bytes: Colebrook, Ohio Revisited,” reprinted from Winsted Journal, courtesy Colebrook [Connecticut] Historical Society. 2 Mrs. Gertrude Van Rensselaer Wickham (editor), Memorial to the Pioneer Women of the Western Reserve, Part IV, (Women’s Department of the Cleveland Centennial Commission, February 1897) pp. 800-805: Pioneer Women of Colebrook, 1819-1850. 3 Grigg. 4 Wickham. 103 1


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 that journey to or from Ohio no less than seven times. It is apparent that Ammi may have inherited a stamina and proficiency with horse and wagon that served his itinerancy well. Ammi’s father, Samuel Phillips, died in 1842 at age 82 in Colebrook, Ohio and is buried in North Colebrook Cemetery, New Lyme, Ashtabula Co., Ohio. Ammi’s mother, Millea Kellogg Phillips, died in 1861 at age 98 in Colebrook, Ohio and is buried with her husband. Until her death she received a Revolutionary War veteran widow’s pension of four dollars per month. 5 Earliest professional records Having reached maturity, and with his family and siblings having set their sights on Ohio, Ammi Phillips struck out on his own before 1810. In July 1809 and again in January 1810 he advertised in the Berkshire Reporter as a purveyor of “correct likenesses” at William Clarke’s tavern in Pittsfield, Mass. 6 The advertisement implies that these were profile portraits. The diary of Dr. Samuel Barstow of Great Barrington, Berkshire Co., Mass., dated October 6, 1811 mentions small profiles of himself and his wife taken by Phillips. 7 Nothing more is known of these early profile portraits and any that survive may remain unrecognized. Phillips apparently felt no further need of advertisement and there are no others known over the next 50 years. First marriage and family Ammi Phillips was married on March 18, 1813 in Nassau, Rensselaer Co., N.Y., to Laura Brockway of Schodack, Rensselaer Co., N.Y. She was the daughter of Joseph Brockway (1760-1822) and Jane (Doty) Brockway (17571824) who had moved to Schodack from Sharon, Connecticut in 1789. According to the Brockway genealogy published in 1890, Ammi Phillips and Laura (Brockway) Phillips had four children: George Phillips, Henry Phillips, William Phillips, and Russell Phillips. 8 The order of birth is implied but no dates are given. The census enumeration indicates one son born by 1815, two more sons between 1815 and 1820, and a fourth son between 1825 and 1830. The 1840 census record shows no males between the age of 10 and 15, suggesting that the youngest son may not have survived. The 1820 and 1830 census enumerations also indicate a daughter born between 1816 and 1820 about whom nothing is known. Of the four sons by this first marriage, only William has any associated information in the Brockway genealogy, stating that he was a harness maker who settled in Elmira, N.Y. This is corroborated by the 1880 census record for Elmira, N.Y. which shows a William Phillips as a carriage trimmer. Interestingly, he is married to a first cousin once removed, Mary Helen Brockway, daughter of Smith Payne Brockway (his mother’s cousin) and Minerva Northrup. The household includes his widowed mother-in-law Minerva Brockway (75). Of the other three siblings no subsequent records have been found. Laura (Brockway) Phillips died on February 2, 1830 at age 38 and was buried in the Dutch Reformed Church Cemetery in Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., N.Y., leaving Ammi Phillips with five children of teen age or younger. Second marriage and family On July 15, 1830, five months after the death of his wife Laura Brockway, Ammi Phillips of Rhinebeck, N.Y. was married to Jane Ann Caulkins of North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y. Jane, 20 years his junior, was the daughter of Ledgers of Payments, 1818-1872, to U.S. Pensioners Under Acts of 1818 Through 1858 From Records of the Office of the Third Auditor of the Treasury; Record Group Title: Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury; Record Group Number: 217; Series Number: T718; Roll Number: 20; Page 325. 6 Berkshire Reporter as reproduced in Hollander (1994) p. 12, see Volume 1, bibliography. 7 Lila S. Parish, “Dr. Samuel Barstow’s Great Barrington Diary, Part III,” Great Barrington Historical Society Newsletter, No. 3 (Summer 1983): p. 3. 8 D. Williams Patterson (comp.), The Brockway Family: some records of Wolston Brockway and his descendants, compiled for Francis E. Brockway (Owego, N.Y.: Leon L. Brockway’s Power Print, 1890) p. 96. 5

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Daniel Douglas Caulkins (1782-1864) and Ann (Baker) Caulkins (1784-1846). The marriage was officiated by and recorded in the diary of Rev. Luman Burtch, who states that the bride and groom were both personally known to him. 9 It is possible that Jane Ann Caulkins was related to Laura Brockway via marriage in the Baker family. The 1830 census of Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., N.Y. enumerates Ammi Phillips, his recently-married second wife, and his five children by his first wife. Ammi Phillips and Jane Ann Caulkins had three daughters and one son, all born between 1832 and 1840: Anna Caulkins Phillips (born 1832), Jane Elizabeth “Jennie” Phillips (born 1836), Samuel Baker Phillips (born 1838), and Sarah Phillips (born 1840). Sarah Phillips died in April 1845 at age 4-1/2 and was buried in the Caulkins plot in Amenia Island Cemetery, Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (SARAH PHILLIPS / DAUGHTER OF / AMMI AND JANE A. PHILLIPS / Æ 4 Yrs 6 Mos.). Ann Caulkins Phillips was listed with her parents in the 1850 census of North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y. in 1850 (age 18). No subsequent record is known, and she was probably married by 1860. Samuel Baker Phillips was listed with his parents in the 1855 census of New Marlborough, Berkshire Co., Mass. (age 19) with occupation given as merchant. No subsequent record is known. Jane Elizabeth “Jennie” Phillips, the last to remain at home, was listed with her parents in the 1860 census of Curtisville P.O., Town of Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass. (age 23) with occupation given as teacher. She subsequently married Lucius Jonah Woodford (1819-1888) and moved to Hartford, Connecticut (by 1870) and Springfield, Mass. (by 1880) where he died at age 65. Lucius Woodford, described as a well-to-do farmer from Winsted, Connecticut, had been sentenced to life in prison for the 1861 murder of a brother-in-law, James H. Tuttle, but was ordered released in July 1868 by petition to the Connecticut legislature on the grounds of selfdefense. 10 They had one child, Luella Jane “Lulu” Woodford (1874-1927) who in 1897 married Marvin Estes Tucker (1873-1955). They had no children. 11 Jennie, as a widow, lived with her daughter and son-in-law in Boston, Mass. for two decades, dying there in 1920. Residences Ammi Phillips had a different residence in every decennial census record (and every five years starting in 1855), as follows. Note that census records prior to 1850 list only the name of the head of household and counts of household members by gender and age ranges. Each household member is named starting in 1850. 1820 – Troy, Rensselaer Co., N.Y., Ammi Phillips (26-44) with (1st) wife and four children. A property purchase in Troy, N.Y. (in which he is listed as a resident) on May 1, 1817] and unclaimed letters at the Troy post office as of April 1, 1818 and October 1, 1820 also attest to his residence and travels. 12, 13 1830 – Rhinebeck, Dutchess Co., N.Y., Ammi Phillips (40-49) with (2nd) wife and five children. He was listed as a resident of Rhinebeck in the May 20, 1828 sale of his Troy property. A 45-acre land purchase in Rhinebeck was also recorded on May 1, 1829 (30 acres were sold back to the original owner on May 16, 1831, the remaining 15 acres were sold to Phillips’s brother-in-law, William W. Caulkins, on July 28, 1834). 14

Sue Whitman, “On Finding a Folk Art Treasure.” Year Book: Dutchess County Historical Society, Vol. 59 (1974): p. 80. 10 The New England Farmer [Boston, Mass.], Vol. XXIII, No. 28 (July 11, 1868): p. 3. 11 Marvin Estes Tucker, Jr. (1930-1990) was the son of Marvin Estes Tucker and his second wife, Margaret A. Hyde (1894-1973), and was not a direct descendant of Ammi Phillips. 12 Property records as detailed in Holdridge (1968) p. 41, see Volume 1, bibliography. 13 The Northern Budget [Lansingburg, N.Y.], April 21, 1818 and October 10, 1820. 14 Holdridge (1968) pp. 42-43. 105 9


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 1840 – Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y., Ammi Phillips (50-59) with (2nd) wife and three children. Phillips was recorded as a resident of Amenia as early as August 16, 1838 when he purchased one acre of land in Amenia (that land was sold by Phillips on March 5, 1842). 15 1850 (September 14th) – North East, Dutchess Co., N.Y., Ammi Phillips (age 64, Portrait Painter), with wife Jane A. Phillips (42), daughters Anna C. Phillips (18) and Jane E. Phillips (14), and son Sam’l B. Phillips (12). 1855 (September 10th) – New Marlborough, Berkshire Co., Mass., Ammi Phillips (age 68, Artist), with wife Jane A. Phillips (47), daughter Jane E. Phillips (20), and son Samuel B. Phillips (19, merchant). 1860 (June 18th) – Curtisville P.O., Town of Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass., Ammie Philips [sic] (age 73 or 75, Portrait Painter) with wife Jane Ann Phillips (55) and daughter Jennie Phillips (23, teacher). 1865 (May 1st) – Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Mass., Ammi Phillips (age 77, Portrait Painter) with wife Jane A. Phillips (57). Death Ammi Phillips died on July, 11 1865 at his home in Curtisville, Mass. A death notice in the Berkshire County Eagle, Pittsfield, Mass. of 10 August 1865 reported “In Curtisville, July 14 [sic], Ammi Phillips, Aged 78. Albany and Troy papers please copy.” 16 He was buried in the Caulkins plot in Amenia Island Cemetery, Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (AMMI PHLLIPS / DIED / July 11, 1865. / Æ. 78 Yrs 3 Mo.). Ammi Phillips’s will had been dated two years earlier, on July 29, 1863, and witnessed by Enoch G. Caulkins and Louisa B. Caulkins (Phillips’s brother-in-law and wife). It gave all of his real estate and personal estate to “my dear and beloved wife Jane Ann Phillips, with all that remains (if any) upon her decease to be divided equally among my lawful heirs.” The will does not list any other individuals. 17 His widow, Jane A. Phillips, was listed in the 1870 census of Hartford, Connecticut (age 62) living with her daughter Jennie and son-in-law. She died on April 29, 1873 and was buried alongside her husband Ammi Phillips in Amenia, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (JANE A. PHILLIPS / DIED / Apr 29, 1873 / Æ. 65 Yrs 4 Mo.).

Holdridge (1968) pp. 43-44. The Berkshire County Eagle [Pittsfield, Mass.],Vol. XXXVIL, No. 4 (August 10, 1865): p. 3. 17 Berkshire County, Massachusetts, Probate Records, Vol. No. 12, pp. 89-90. 15 16

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Appendix B: The Rediscovery and Identification of Ammi Phillips The name Ammi Phillips was virtually unknown to collectors, dealers, museum curators, and art researchers until revealed by Barbara Cohen (later Holdridge) and Lawrence B. Holdridge in August 1959. A scholarly perception of groupings of stylistically-related New York and Connecticut folk portraits had been building for 35 years, but without making the key connection to the identity of the unknown artist or artists. The chronology of this rediscovery and identification is illustrative of the gradual awareness, disconnected efforts, and wrong turns which may characterize such research. 1924-25: Helen C. Nelson ̶ “The Kent Limner” In the summer of 1924 a street fair and art exhibit was held in the small town of Kent, Connecticut, which in the preceding decade had become both a summer and year-round colony for professional artists from New York City. As part of the exhibit long-time residents were encouraged to loan their early-19th Century oils and watercolors. Among these was a group of strikingly similar oil portraits of forward-leaning ladies in black dresses that attracted attention, including that of Helen C. Nelson, wife of G. Laurence Nelson, a founding member of the Kent Artists Association. Based on the newspapers depicted in the companion portraits of two gentlemen, the group was datable to the summer of 1836 [p. 64]. This came at a time when interest in early American history, architecture, and antiques was surging. The 1920’s and 1930’s also marked a new appreciation of long-neglected American “primitive” or “provincial” paintings, especially among artists, dealers and curators of contemporary or modern American art. In 1925 Helen C. Nelson published an article about the Kent portraits in the art magazine International Studio. This marked the first publication, as a group, of the work of a specific anonymous portraitist who subsequently became known as the Kent Limner, and who would remain unidentified for the next 33 years. Unfortunately, Mrs. Nelson chose as a central thesis for her article the scenario that itinerant artists were “head hunters” who painted headless stock bodies during the winter and sallied forth in the spring, armed with a cartload of nearly-finished canvases, in search of patrons’ heads. This was supported by the recollection by “certain present owners” of hearing their grandparents speak of a man who would drive up from New York with horse and wagon, hire a room in each hamlet, and proceed to paint the likenesses of those who would pay him a very modest fee. 18, 19 While the recollection of [Phillips’s] itinerancy appears accurate, in hindsight we now know that the artist did not come up from New York City but simply across the narrow ridge of the Taconic Mountains which separates Kent, Connecticut from Dutchess County, New York. The “head hunter” method of executing portraits has long since been discredited as without documentation or material evidence. Faces were demonstrably painted first, and no headless portrait has ever surfaced. Nonetheless, and perhaps because of its air of Yankee ingenuity and amusing quaintness, this persistent myth continues to be promulgated by some small museums and historical societies. Seven of the Kent portraits were given a more formal public viewing at Holger Cahill’s pioneering exhibit “American Primitives” at the Newark Museum in 1930, with but one example (Julia Ann Fuller Barnum) illustrated in the exhibit catalog and in a corresponding article in The Magazine Antiques. 20, 21 No further special exhibition or publication of the Kent Limner’s works took place in the following decade.

Mrs. H. C. Nelson, "Early American Primitives," International Studio, Vol. LXXX, No. 334 (March 1925): pp. 454-459. 19 This is likely the recollection of Miss Mary Ann Hopson (1850-1937), owner of the Fuller and Barnum portrait pairs as of 1925, and possibly based on the recollection of her grandmother, Elizabeth Drake Fuller (1792-1876) who was painted by Ammi Phillips in 1836. 20 Robinson, Elinor Blake (comp.). American Primitives: An exhibit of the paintings of nineteenth century folk artists, November 4, 1930 to February 1, 1931. Newark, N.J.: The Newark Museum, 1930. 21 Robinson, Elinor B. “American Primitive Paintings.” The Magazine Antiques, Vol. XIX, No. 1, Jan. 1931, pp. 3336. 107 18


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 1933: Perry T, Rathbone ̶ “The Kent-Kingston Group” In a Harvard University master’s thesis submitted in 1933 Perry T. Rathbone, later director of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, made a connection between the Kent portraits and a group of stylistically similar portraits at the Senate House Museum in Kingston, N.Y. Although the author of these works remained unidentified, Rathbone was the first to span the Hudson River in describing this expanding body of work as the “Kent-Kingston group.” 22

1945: Jean Lipman ̶ “I. J. H. Bradley” Ironically, the Holdridges were not the first to announce the “discovery” of the identity of the Kent Limner and the author of related works, only the first to correctly do so. In the July 1945 issue of Art in America editor Jean Lipman published an article “I. J. H. Bradley, Portrait Painter.” Lipman advanced the conclusion, based on four signed portraits, that I. J. H. Bradley (or I. Bradley, or J. Bradley of 128 Spring Street, New York) was responsible for the work of the Kent Limner and related works identified by Perry T. Rathbone as comprising the KentKingston group. In the accompanying checklist of 49 portraits by I. J. H. Bradley the majority have since been attributed to Ammi Phillips. In so doing, Lipman inadvertently published the first significant, albeit incorrectly attributed, checklist of portraits by Ammi Phillips. 23 Lipman also elaborated at great length on the itinerant “head hunter” scenario put forth 20 years earlier by Mrs. Helen C. Nelson, confidently describing it as “common procedure in that day.” This was employed to explain the prevalence of subjects in the Kent and Rhinebeck vicinity being painted by Bradley, who was a resident of New York City. In a 1966 article in the National Gallery of Canada Bulletin, Mary C. Black and Stuart P. Feld provided a revised study of the works of the artist by then identified as John Bradley, who was active in New York, Staten Island, and New Jersey between 1832 and 1847. They began by stating that, after years of study, none of the 45 unsigned paintings in Jean Lipman’s 1945 checklist can be accepted as by Bradley. The Black and Feld article documents 18 additional portraits by Bradley uncovered since the 1945 article, all signed. Of the 45 unsigned portraits in the Lipman checklist, 31 were attributed to Ammi Phillips by 1966. 24 Others whose whereabouts are known are currently (as of this writing) attributed to artists as diverse as Erastus Salisbury Field, M.W. Hopkins, Deacon Robert Peckham, Sheldon Peck, and John Blunt. 1950’s to 1960: Agnes Halsey Jones ̶ “The Border Limner” In the 1950’s Agnes Halsey Jones, art researcher and wife of the director of the New York State Historical Society at Cooperstown, N.Y., identified a group of anonymous early-19th Century primitive portraits as the work of the same hand. Many of these were of identified sitters whose locations could be ascertained, and some were dated. Because the locations clustered around the New York-Massachusetts state line, she dubbed the artist the “Border Limner.” A number of these portraits had existed in private collections, were not widely known, and had never been published. That changed in 1958 with museum acquisitions of two major folk portrait collections. Edward Duff Balken (1874-1960) of Pittsfield, Massachusetts donated his entire collection to his alma mater, Princeton University. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. purchased the entire collection of the late J. Stuart Halladay (1892-1951) and Herrel George Thomas (1903-1957) of Sheffield, Massachusetts on behalf of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum at Colonial Williamsburg. The Halladay-Thomas collection was rich with examples of Ammi Phillips’s work, though still anonymous, including six of the Dorr family portraits [p. 20]. Selections from the HalladayThomas collection had been exhibited at the Whitney Museum in 1942, but the only early examples included were the young Robert Lockridge Dorr [p. 20] and the dour Mrs. Jenkins of Albany [p. 17], with no suggestion that they

Perry Townsend Rathbone, Itinerant Portraiture in New York and New England, 1820-1840. March 1933. Harvard U., M.A. thesis (unpublished). 23 Jean Lipman, "I. J. H. Bradley, Portrait Painter," Art in America, Vol. 33, No. 3 (July 1945): pp. 154-166. 24 Mary Childs Black and Stuart P. Feld, "Drawn by I. Bradley From Great Britton," [National Gallery of Canada] Bulletin 8, Vol. IV, No. 2 (1966). 108 22


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 could be by the same hand. 25 The Balken collection encompassed several examples, also still anonymous, from the 1810’s through the 1850’s, including the primitive Mr. and Mrs. Goodrich [p. 19] from the New YorkMassachusetts border. Selections from the Balken collection had been exhibited at the Carnegie Institute in 1947, with Mr. Goodrich as the only early example. 26 Other portraits in the expanding Border Limner group included Alsa and Joseph Slade [p. 23], donated in 1953 by Edgar and Bernice Chrysler Garbisch to the National Gallery of Art, and Mary and Cyrus Spicer [p. 23] owned by descendants. In the catalog for the 1958-59 travelling exhibit “Rediscovered Painters of Upstate New York” Agnes Halsey Jones first discussed the work of the Border Limner, including the Dorr family portraits at Colonial Williamsburg, and illustrated the Alsa and Joseph Slade portraits, loaned by the National Gallery of Art, and Harriet Leavens [p. 25], loaned by Harvard University. This was the first published reference to the Border Limner. 27 In yet another 1958 windfall, the New York State Historical Association at Cooperstown, New York acquired a significant portion of the previously unknown folk painting collection of the late Marion (1881-1957) and William Gunn (1877-1952) of Newtonville, Massachusetts. 28 Two years were spent evaluating and conserving the new acquisitions prior to public unveiling. The 1960 exhibit catalog, entitled “New-Found Folk Art of the Young Republic” by Agnes Halsey Jones and NYSHA director Louis C. Jones falls short of attributing the portrait of the “Mother and Child in White” [p. 49] to Ammi Phillips, but cites the anonymous artist as belonging to “the same tradition as the Kent and Border Limners.” 29 Whether the Joneses were aware of the Holdridges’ work at the time their 1958 and 1960 exhibit catalogs were being compiled is unclear. In any event, this was the last time the term Border Limner was unassociated with Ammi Phillips. 1958 to 1965: Barbara (Cohen) Holdridge and Lawrence B. Holdridge ̶ “Ammi Phillips” The all but unknown name of “Ammi Phillips” was first connected with this body of work by Barbara Cohen (later Holdridge) and Lawrence B. Holdridge. A comprehensive full-page article in the Berkshire Eagle (Pittsfield, Mass.) in August 1959 was their first public announcement. This was the product of an intensive year of research and documentation following their 1958 purchase of the signed and dated 1840 portrait of George C. Sunderland [p. 72]. In addition to determining a few sketchy details about Ammi Phillips, their first major insight was that this was the same artist responsible for the small but recognized body of work by the so-called Kent Limner of 1836. These previously unattributed works were recently represented in several museum collections, including those who were beneficiaries of the of the aforementioned Garbisch, Balken, Halladay-Thomas, and Gunn collections. Although clues had been hiding in plain sight, including portrait reproductions published in 1897 in the Ten Broeck genealogy as “by Phillips,” the Holdridges were the first to fit the puzzle pieces together. 30, 31 As noted in their 1959 article, Ammi Phillips had not been entirely forgotten in his last residence near Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Indeed, a 1952 exhibit at the Stockbridge Library had featured “family portraits painted by Ammi Phillips a resident of Curtisville 100 years ago.” 32 This knowledge had not been promulgated among art scholars, 25 American

Provincial Paintings, 1680-1860, from the collection of J. Stuart Halladay and Herrel George Thomas. Benefit Exhibition for the American Field Service, October 27 to November 19, 1942. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1942. 26 American Provincial Paintings, 1790-1877, From the Collection of Edward Duff Balken, January 9 through February 23, 1947. Pittsburgh: Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute, 1947. 27 Agnes Halsey Jones, “The Border Limner: Active first quarter 19 th century,” in Rediscovered Painters of Upstate New York, 1700-1875 (Utica, N.Y.: Winchester Printing for Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, 1958) pp. 19-21. 28 The entire collection of 630 paintings was purchased from the Gunn estate by Miss Mary Allis. Of these, 154 were selected with her appraisal and guidance for purchase by Stephen C. Clark, Jr. on behalf of the NYSHA. 29 Agnes Halsey Jones and Louis C. Jones, New-Found Folk Art of the Young Republic (Cooperstown, N.Y.: New York State Historical Association, 1960) pp. 14-15. 30 Barbara Cohen and Larry Holdridge, "Found: A Berkshire Old Master," The Berkshire Eagle, Vol. 68, No. 100 (August 29, 1959): p. 10A. 31 Anna Ten Broeck Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy (New York: De Vinne Press, 1897). 32 “Historical Data of Interlaken A Library Feature in February,” The Berkshire Evening Eagle, Vol. 60, No. 187 (January 22, 1952): p. 14. 109


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 however, and prior to the Holdridges no apparent connection had been made between this remembered Massachusetts artist of the 1850’s and the anonymous Kent Limner of the 1830’s. The Holdridges’ second, and far less obvious, leap of intuition was that the much earlier and more primitive portraits of Joseph Slade and Alsa Sherman Slade, dated 1816, at the National Gallery of Art were by the same hand. By coincidence, the aforementioned travelling exhibit entitled “Rediscovered Painters of Upstate New York, 1700-1875” had opened at the New York State Historical Association in Cooperstown, N.Y. in June 1958 and the catalog contained the same Slade portraits under the heading “The Border Limner.” Recalling that they had previously been introduced to the term Border Limner by Mary C. Black, then curator of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, the Holdridges elicited her assistance in further research. The portrait pair of the Rev. and Mrs. John Gabriel Gebhard [p. 30], dated 1820 and signed “A. Phillips”, still with the Gebhard family, bore little resemblance to the work of the Kent Limner but provided a crucial intermediate link. A round of stylistic evaluations and forensic analyses of handwriting and stretcher construction followed. With the assistance of Mary C. Black the Holdridges were able to conclude that Ammi Phillips was not only the Kent Limner of the 1830’s but also the Border Limner of the 1810’s. 33 The conclusion that Ammi Phillips was also the Border Limner was put forth by Cohen and Holdridge from their first article of 1959, but apparently took some time to gain acceptance. The initial regional newspaper article of 1959 may have attracted limited notice but was followed by the Holdridges’ well-illustrated articles on Ammi Phillips in Art in America (Summer 1960) and The Magazine Antiques (December 1961), the latter with a checklist of previously-anonymous works they had identified in museum collections. 34, 35 The Holdridges’ 1961 article included the aforementioned, and previously anonymous, “Mother and Child in White” in their checklist of Phillips’s work (though incorrectly dated to 1816) and citing the Jones’s 1960 exhibit catalog. The first comprehensive exhibit of Phillips’s work, now encompassing the Border Limner period, Kent Limner period, and intermediate works, was staged by the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford in 1965 on the centennial of Phillips’s death. The exhibit was supplemented by an illustrated catalog compiled by the Holdridges which occupied an entire issue of the CHS Bulletin. This was a huge leap in documentation and public awareness, and helped cement, perhaps misleadingly, Phillips’s reputation as a Connecticut artist. 36 Post-1965 A major exhibit of Phillips’s work at the American Folk Art Museum just four years later, including late works and accompanied by a hardcover catalog and chronology, reached an even greater audience. 37 By the Americana and folk art boom of the 1970’s, and with the widespread publication of such iconic works as “Girl in Red Dress with Cat and Dog” [p. 75], Phillips was among the best recognized of non-academic portraitists. 38 At the time of the museum’s 1994 retrospective, on the 25th anniversary of their 1969 exhibit, the once-forgotten Ammi Phillips had risen from near total obscurity to become the most widely known creator of 19th Century American folk art.39

Mary Black, "The Search for Ammi Phillips," ARTnews, Vol. 75, No. 4 (April 1976): pp. 86-89. Barbara and Larry Holdridge, "Ammi Phillips," Art in America, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Summer 1960): pp. 98-103. 35 Barbara and Larry Holdridge, "Ammi Phillips, limner extraordinary," Antiques, Vol. LXXXI, No. 6 (December 1961): pp. 558-563. 36 Barbara and Lawrence B. Holdridge, "Ammi Phillips, 1788-1865," The Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, Vol. 30, No. 4 (October 1965): pp. 97-146. 37 Barbara C. and Lawrence B. Holdridge, Ammi Phillips: Portrait Painter 1788-1865 (New York: C. N. Potter for the Museum of American Folk Art, 1969). 38 Girl in Red Dress with Cat and Dog had garnered only an addenda entry in the Holdridges’ 1968 checklist and was neither exhibited nor illustrated, but was featured prominently in the Whitney Museum’s landmark 1976 exhibit and accompanying book The Flowering of American Folk Art, 1776-1876 by Jean Lipman and Alice Winchester. 39 Stacy C. Hollander and Howard P. Fertig (curators), Revisiting Ammi Phillips: Fifty Years of American Portraiture (New York: Museum of American Folk Art, 1994). 110 33 34


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Photo Credits Gideon Smith: Hollander (1994), see bibliography Chloe Allis Judson: Historic Deerfield, 2005.1 3 Charles Rollin Barstow and Pluma Amelia Barstow: Heslip (1990), see bibliography 4 Unidentified Boy: Chrysler Art Museum, 76.53.16 5 Patience Bolles Stoddard and Ashbel Stoddard: Stair Galleries, 2012 6 Unidentified Man: Cottone Auctions, 2015.599 7 Unidentified Woman (aka Mrs. Jenkins of Albany): Sotheby’s, 7591.119 8 Mr. and Mrs. Hardy: Sotheby’s, 1992.47 9 Unidentified Woman and Man: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1969.33.2 and 1969.33.1 10 Mr. and Mrs. Folsom: Christie’s, 5148.260 11 Dr. Nicholas Brown Harris: private collection 12 Joseph Heath and Mabel Rising Heath: Washington County Historian’s Office, Fort Edward, N.Y. 13 Moses Cowan: Architectural Digest (June 2003) 14 Harriet Betts Hall and Dr. Philander Hall: Northeast Auctions (11/1993), 677 15 Unidentified Man: private collection 16 Sara Cornwall Everest and Dr. Isaac Everest: private collection 17 Mrs. Goodrich & child: Berkshire Museum, 37.63 18 Mr. Goodrich: The Art Museum, Princeton University, y1958-65 19 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 2468.54 20 Unidentified Man: Skinner, Inc., 3278M.525 21 Polsapianna Bull Dorr, Esther Maria Dorr and Dr. Russell Dorr: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 58.100.15 and 58.100.16 22 Paulina Dorr: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 79.100.7 23 Henrietta Dorr: The Art Museum, Princeton University, y1958-66 24 Catherine Van Slyck Dorr: Hollander (2009), see bibliography [private collection] 25 Joseph Priestly Dorr: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 79.100.8 26 Robert Lottridge Dorr: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 58.100.8 27 Russell Griffin Dorr: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, R58.100.25 28 John Haynes: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. 29 Phebe Haynes: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. 30 Rebecca Rouse Eddy and Jonathan Eddy: private collection 31 Wilbur Sherman and Sarah Stearns Sherman & daughter: Yale University Art Gallery, 2008.198.1 and 2008.198.2 32 Caleb Sherman: Yale University Art Gallery, 2008.198.3 33 Johan Georg Fake, Jr. and Catherine Sneider Fake: Antiques, 2004 [Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc.] 34 Alsa Sherman Slade and Joseph Slade: National Gallery of Art, 1955.5.53 and 1955.5.52 35 Milton Dorr: Antiques & Fine Art [Katcher Collection] 36 Mary Eddy Spicer and Cyrus Spicer: Christie’s, 9052.320 37 Milton Dorr: Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum, Rockford, Ill. 38 Sarah Bull Dorr and Col. Joseph Dorr: Historic New England, 1992.168 and 1992.167 39 Sarah Bull Dorr or Amy Chase Bull: Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum, Rockford, Ill. 40 Mrs. Crane and Dr. Crane: Newark Museum, 2001.69.2 and 2001.69.1 41 Unidentified Man and Woman: private collection 42 Philip Slade: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 64.309.3 43 Unidentified Woman (possibly Mrs. Phillip Slade): Sotheby’s, 7521.38 44 Napoleon Bonaparte Buell: Copake Auction, 2007.1.1.110 45 M.A. Barker: Washburn Gallery (Antiques, December 1978) 46 Harriet Campbell: Clark Art Institute, 1991.8 47 Harriet Leavens: Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, 1945.27 48 Jerusha Rogers: Northeast Auctions (8/2014), 299 49 Mary Elizabeth Gale: Art News (April 1976), see bibliography 50 Frederick A. Gale: private collection 51 Nancy Caldwell Church Robinson and Gen. David Robinson: Sotheby’s, 4911M.12 52 Rev. Jonas Coe: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1997.195 53 Sally Morgan Walbridge: Christie’s, 1129.144 54 James Van Schoonhoven: Sotheby’s, 5736.283 55 Jane Daney Smith: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1983.164 56 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 1959.727 57 Ruth Haynes Palmer: Sotheby’s, 5375.64 58 Nancy Smith Lamphear: Sotheby’s, N10303.1075 59 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, N09805.983 60 Rhoda Goodrich Bentley and Louisa H. Bentley: Sotheby’s, N09805.877 1 2

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William Northrup Bentley: private collection Betsy Brownell Gilbert: The Huntington Library, L2015.41.163. 63 Harriet Hill: private collection [HPF] 64 Catherine Couenhoven Clark: The Clark Art Institute (2017) 65 Unidentified Woman and Man: Sotheby’s, 6957.1643 66 Unidentified Woman (aka Jane A. Fort Van Rensselaer): Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Art Museum, 58.100.36 67 Samuel Robert Campbell and Sarah Mynderse Campbell: private collection 68 Unidentified Man: Shelburne Museum, 1955-512.3 69 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 13791.633 70 Bithiah Soullard Haskell and John Haskell: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. 71 Gertrude Snyder Harder and William G. Harder: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 58.100.29 and 58.100.28 72 Jonathan Lane: Northeast Auctions, 2015.659 73 Catherine Douw Hoffman Philip and Col. Henry G. Philip: Connecticut Historical Society (1965), see bibliography 74 Dr. Thomas Broadhead: R.H. Blackburn & Assoc., Kinderhook, N.Y. 75 Rev. John Gabriel Gebhard and Anna Maria Magdalene Carver Gebhard: Frick Art Reference Library (gift of John G. Gebhard III) 76 Dr. John A. McClellan: Northeast Auctions, 2015.833 77 Lydia Schureman Sluyter and Rev. Richard Sluyter: Northeast Auctions, 1989.654 78 Dr. Asa Jordan: Christie’s, 1980.1.29.314 79 Judge James Vanderpoel and Anna Doll Vanderpoel: Albany Institute of History and Art, 1958.30.1 and 1958.30.2 80 Unidentified Woman: Tillou (1973), illus. 36, see bibliography 81 Philip Titus Heartt: Olde Hope Antiques 82 Unidentified Boy: private collection 83 Jane Ann Campbell: private collection 84 Jonas Coe Heartt: Clars Auction Gallery, 2016.2211 85 Unidentified Girl: Amon Carter Museum, 1967.199 86 Mary Anne Steenback Gale: Antiques & Fine Art (2006) 87 Boy of the Cook Family: private collection 88 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N08665.49 89 George Edward Selby: Joan R. Brownstein 90 Eliza DuBois: Antique Associates at West Townsend 91 Hannah Cooper du Bois: The American Museum in Britain 92 Garret du Bois: Pook & Pook, 2006.44 93 Mary Thorn Du Bois and Coert Du Bois: Sotheby’s, N08728.462 94 Charles Louis du Bois: Peter Tillou (Antiques, January 1976) 95 Ruth Roe Sleight and Abraham Sleight: Currier Museum of Art, 1982.27.2 and 1982.27.1 96 Mr. Dilbee (likely Isaac Dibble): Christie’s, 2095.546 97 Tobias Teller and Caroline Sammis Teller: Copake Auction, 2007.1.1.100 98 Col. Nathan S. Beckwith and Elizabeth “Betsey” Gale Beckwith: Brooklyn Museum of Art, 79.133.2 and 79.133.1 99 Unidentified Man: Skinner, Inc., 2669.90 100 Charlotte H. Newcomb Benedict and Dr. Abijah Gilbert Benedict, Springfield Museum of Art, 2000.020 and 2000.019 101 Lois Atherton Allerton: Art Institute of Chicago, 1946.395 102 Dr. Cornelius Allerton: Art Institute of Chicago, 1946.394 103 Polly Smith Husted: Sotheby’s, N07095.759 104 Lois Hamlin and David Hamlin: Bonhams & Butterfields 105 Rhoda Bennett Couch: Skinner, Inc., 2509.833 106 Unidentified Woman and Man: Sotheby’s, N08053.922 107 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 8238.29 108 Phoebe Lewis Smith and Judge Isaac Smith: Christie’s, 1247.90 109 William Schuneman and Elizabeth De Meyer Schuneman: Christie’s, 2200.49 110 John Kenyon (possibly): Northeast Auctions, 2007.661 111 Clarine Peck Van Bergen (possibly): Albany Institute of History and Art 112 Rev. Winslow Paige and Clarissa Keyes Paige: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 113 Unidentified Man and Woman: Robert C. Eldred & Co., 2018.1035 114 Anna Shuler Cady: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 115 Maria Van Leuvan Overbagh and Rev. Peter Abraham Overbagh: Antiques (March 1987) 116 William Cockburn: Frick Art Reference Library, 16721 [Pennington Studio, Kingston, N.Y.] 117 Blandina Margaret Oliver: Frick Art Reference Library, 16720 [Pennington Studio, Kingston, N.Y.] 118 Maria Oliver Hardenburgh and Jacobus Hardenburgh: Christie’s, 7000.429 119 Dr. Abraham Ten Eyck De Witt: Rufus King Museum 120 Leah Dubois Wynkoop De Witt: Historic Huguenot Street 121 Rev. Thomas De Witt: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 61 62

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Unidentified Man: University of Michigan Museum of Art, 2002/1.99 Ten Eyck De Witt: Frick Art Reference Library 124 John Ten Eyck: Frick Art Reference Library 125 Unidentified Man and Woman: Northeast Auctions, 2009.429 126 Blandina Ten Eyck: Hollander (1994), see bibliography 127 Unidentified Man and Woman of the Van Keuren family: The Huntington, 2016.25.107 and 2016.25.106 128 Member of the Newkirk Family: Hudson River Antiques, Highland, N.Y. 129 Philip Bevier Hasbrouck and Esther Bevier Hasbrouck: Historic Huguenot Street/ Locust Lawn Estate [David Stansbury] 130 Ann DeWitt Bevier: Bevier (1916), see bibliography 131 Jane Bevier Deyo: Doyle New York (2015), 8 [Sotheby Parke Bernet, 4316.859] 132 Levi Decker Hasbrouck and Hylah Bevier Hasbrouck: Historic Huguenot Street / Locust Lawn Estate [David Stansbury] 133 Aaltje Swartwout Sleight: Holdridge (1968), see bibliography 134 Anna Seward Swartwout: Yost Conservation LLC, Oxford, Conn. (2018) 135 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 2533.258 136 Jane Hasbrouck (Hasbrouck) or Sarah Maria DuBois (Easton): Historic Huguenot Street 137 Maria Eliza Hasbrouck (Reeve): Brownstein and Terkowitz (2007), see bibliography [Michael Gold] 138 Kate Elting (Crispell): Brownstein and Terkowitz (2007), see bibliography [Thomas Eaton] 139 Elizabeth Smith Hunter and David Hunter: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. 140 Catharina Van Keuren: Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 2009 exhibit catalog 141 Samuel Sloane: Sotheby’s, N10303.1106 142 Ann Eliza Sloan Dorrance and Dr. Benjamin Brewster Dorrance: Sotheby’s, 5429.473 143 Daniel Bull: Sotheby’s, 7521.30 144 Hannah Bull Thompson: The Huntington Library, 83.8.38 145 Alexander Thompson II: Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Museum of Art, 86.16.12 146 Robert R. Thompson and Sarah McCurdy Thompson: Christie’s, 7294.66 147 Letitia Sloane (Chapman): Sotheby’s, N10303.1106 148 John A. Sleight: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 149 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, 6866.574 150 Peleg Pelton: New York Historical Society, 1984.70 151 James Ketcham: Cordier Antiques & Fine Art (5/2008) 152 Alsop Vail: Christie’s, 8238.17 153 Pauline Darling Denton and Samuel Denton: Olde Hope Antiques 154 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 2095.630 155 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 5680.1562 156 Unidentified Man and Woman: Frick Art Reference Library [O.E. Nelson] 157 Unidentified Woman: Metropolitan Museum of Art, L1992.16.3 158 Dr. Gabriel Norton Phillips and Elizabeth Payne Phillips: University of California Berkeley Art Museum 159 Cicero Hinds: Sotheby’s (5/2005), 120 160 Unidentified Man: Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc., 3978.8 161 Unidentified Woman: David Wheatcroft [David Stansbury] 162 Unidentified Man: private collection 163 Esther Cummins Fisk: Frick Art Reference Library 164 Rev. Ezra Fisk: Cordier Auctions (5/2008) 165 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 5551.1103 166 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N07905.765 167 Unidentified Man: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, 2009.12 168 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 5429.486 169 Dr. Seth Capron and Eunice Mann Capron: Catalog of American Portraits (private collection) 170 Mr. & Mrs. John Lawrence: Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, 0000.0202 and 0000.0201 171 Ester Stakley or Betsy Sutherland: Kuehnert’s Auction Gallery (2007), 1014 172 Unidentified Woman: Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, 2007.70 173 Frances Seybolt Vail: Christie’s, 8238.17 174 Anne Stoddard Pelton: New York Historical Association [Annual Report, 1983-1984] 175 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 8238.28 176 Catharine Helen Miller Bull: Antiques (January 1971) 177 Unidentified Woman: Galerie St. Etienne 178 Ruth Wolsey Griffin: Frick Art Reference Library [Thurman Rotan] 179 Elizabeth Du Bois Bailey, Skinner, Inc., 3278M.756 180 Abigail Greele Eliot: Frick Art Reference Library (gift of Eliot Rowlands) 181 Col. William Shultz Little and Betsey Ketcham Little: Newark Museum of Art, 84.564 182 Mrs. Andrew Thompson: Hudson River Valley Institute 183 Unidentified Woman and Man: Godel & Co., New York, N.Y. 122 123

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Unidentified Woman: National Gallery of Art, 1959.11.9 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 5551.1038 186 Dr. Charles Winfield and Margaret Crawford Winfield: Sotheby’s, 6483.29 187 Unidentified Man: Doyle New York (2015), 10 188 Unidentified Man and Woman (aka Mr. and Mrs. Warburton): Philadelphia Museum of Art, 73-258-1 and 73-258-2 189 Dr. David R. Arnell: Stair Galleries, 2014.565 190 Dr. John T. Jansen and Clarissa LeFevre Dolson Jansen: Sotheby’s, 4999.190 191 Unidentified Man: private collection 192 Unidentified Woman: Frick Art Reference Library (gift of Harry Shaw Newman Gallery) 193 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 5680.1605 194 Samuel Callender Howell and Sally Jane Beakes Howell: Sotheby’s, 6075.101 195 Col. James Smith and Fanny Waterbury Smith: William Doyle Galleries (1982) 196 Stacy Beakes, Jr. and Mary Smith Beakes: Historical Society of Middletown and Wallkill Pct. [author photos] 197 Unidentified Child: National Gallery of Art, 1953.5.59 198 Mary Elizabeth Smith: Terra Foundation for American Art, 1992.56 199 Unidentified Woman and Child: New York State Historical Association, N-267-61 200 Leonard Allis: Sotheby’s, 7253.275 201 William Wheeler and Eleanor Knox Wheeler: private collection 202 Catherine A. May (Stimson): National Gallery of Art, 1978.80.16 203 Charles Augustus Marvine: Main Street Museum, White River Junction, Vt. [2017] 204 Malina Wheeler Knapp: Deposit Historical Society 205 Unidentified Man: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 58.100.42 206 Unidentified Man and Woman: Garth’s Auctions, Inc., 1061.405 207 Ebenezer Punderson: Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York, N.Y. 208 Palmer Cook and Mary Halsley Cook: Concept Art Gallery, Pittsburgh, Pa. 209 Samuel Deuel: Neal Auction (11/2009), 14 210 Clarissa Benton Hunt and Joseph Drake Hunt: Wilderstein Preservation, Rhinebeck, N.Y. 211 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc., 3572.28 212 Margaret Platt Bockee: Butterscotch Auction Gallery (2018) 213 Mary Christopher Van Doorn Couch and Dr. John Whitfield Couch: Hirschl & Adler (1988), see bibliography 214 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 9686.524 / H.L. Chalfant 215 Philo Reed and Abigail Reynolds Reed: Stair Galleries (2009), 186 216 Mariah Durkee Soggs: Christie’s, 6400.83 217 Dr. Elmore Everitt, M.D.: Shelburne Museum, 27.1.1-26 218 George Greenwood Reynolds and Abigail Penoyer Reynolds: San Diego Museum of Art 219 Robert Hoag and Phebe Pugsley Hoag: Northeast Auctions (2005), 1331 220 Olivia Kimberly Adams: Clars Auction Gallery (2005), 6396 221 Abigail Adams Hoag: Clars Auction Gallery (2005), 6395 222 Tripp Hoag and Sally Ann Hoag: Sotheby, Parke Bernet, Inc., 4369.230 223 Isaac Hunting: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. 224 Mrs. Dr. Downe: American Museum of Folk Art, 1999.11.12 [Adam Reich] 225 Hannah Lewis Husted Hunting: Charles Lenhert 226 Unidentified Woman: Lewis Scranton, Killingworth, Conn. 227 John Garnsey and Mercy Mead Garnsey: Eldred’s, 2015.1352 228 Unidentified Man and Woman: Hunter Museum of American Art, 1993.17 and 1993.16 229 Mary Hamilton Ingraham: Skinner, Inc., 2640B.70 230 Morgan Hunting and Julia Barton Hunting: Benson Ford Research Center, Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village 231 Lucy Hamilton: Northeast Auctions (10/2007), 662 232 Louisa Park Benjamin: Frick Art Reference Library [Carl. L. Lanio, Kansas City, Mo., 1948] 233 Charles Wesley Powers: Frick Art Reference Library [Carl L. Lanio, Kansas City, Mo., 1948] 234 Jane Ann Benjamin Powers: Dayton Institute of Art 235 Unidentified Woman: Jeffrey Tillou Antiques 236 Mary Powers: Public Museum of Grand Rapids, 184408 237 Caroline Powers: Public Museum of Grand Rapids, 123111 238 Unidentified Woman: Giampietro Gallery 239 Sherman Bassett and Hannah Sornborger Bassett: Currier Museum of Art, 2003.1.1 and 2003.1.2 240 Dr. Peter Bennett Guernsey (and patient): New York State Historical Association [private collection] 241 Mary Ann Thorn Guernsey: Tillou (1973), see bibliography 242 Fanny Brush Rundle: San Diego Museum of Art, 1934.19 243 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N08665.77 244 Unidentified Man: Mattatuck Historical Society, X68.166 245 Mrs. Cobb: Courtesy Howard Fertig 184 185

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Thomas Isaac Storm: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1980.360.1 Hendrick Hulst and Aletta Van Alst Hulst: Albany Institute of History and Art, 1971.24.1 and 1971.24.2 248 John Van Deusen, Senate House Historic Site, Kingston, N.Y. (Antiques, Sep 1982) 249 Dr. Horatio Dewey, Senate House Historic Site, Kingston, N.Y. (Antiques, Sep 1982) 250 James Elting: Carlsen Gallery (6/2011), 131 251 Katherine Salisbury Newkirk Hickok: Florence Griswold Museum, 2002.1.103 252 Dr. Levi King and Lovisa Peck King: Mr. & Mrs. William H. Smith, Fairbanks, Alaska 253 Horace Austin and Mary Ludlow Austin: Antiques, May 1979 (George E. Schoellkopf) 254 Elizabeth Mygans: Antiques & Fine Art (2010) 255 Gen. Samuel Ten Broeck: Columbia County Historical Society 256 Leonard William Ten Broeck and Helen Livingston Ten Broeck: Albany Institute of History and Art, 1977.16.1 and 1977.16.2 257 Elizabeth McKinstry Livingston: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 258 Judge John Sanders III and Jane Livingston Sanders: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 259 Unidentified Man: Jeffrey Tillou Antiques 260 Unidentified Woman and Man: Princeton University Art Gallery, y1958-79 and y1958-78 261 Welcome B. Arnold and Mary L. Rowe Arnold: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 262 Unidentified Woman: Frick Art Reference Library [Harry Stone Gallery] 263 Unidentified Man: Hemphill (1978), see bibliography 264 Dr. William Cantyne De Witt: Frick Art Reference Library [Geoffrey Clements] 265 Elizabeth Hardenbergh De Witt: Northeast Auctions (2014), 192 266 Henry Schenck Teller and Jane [Catherine] Storm Teller: National Gallery of Art, 1953.5.30 and 1953.5.31 267 Unidentified Woman: Tillou Gallery (Antiques, January 1982) 268 Marius Schoonmaker: Sotheby’s, 5744.165 269 Sarah Ann Palen Northrop and Lewis Northrop: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, K1986.3 and K1986.2 270 Sarah Ann Sleight De Witt: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 271 Mrs. Day and Mr. Day: National Gallery of Art, 1953.5.29 and 1953.5.28 272 Unidentified Man and Woman: Christie’s, 8238.32 273 Mrs. Mayer and Daughter: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 62.256.2 274 Helen [Lena] Ten Broeck: Joan R. Brownstein 275 William Henry De Witt and Catherine Ten Broeck De Witt: private collection 276 Jacob Wessel Ten Broeck, Sr. and Anna Benner Ten Broeck: author photos 277 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, N07959.307 278 Henry Lawrence and Christiana Rockefeller Lawrence: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History 279 Unidentified Woman (aka Mrs. Zachariah Flagler): Princeton University Art Museum, y1958-60 280 Abraham Patterson: Sotheby’s, 6444.211 281 James de Long: Sotheby’s, 5810.1132 282 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s: 6444.197 283 John Hughes: Sotheby’s, N08708.1062 284 Unidentified Woman and Man: Sotheby’s, 6731.25 285 Caroline Jane Opie: Sotheby’s, 5744.11 286 William Stevens: Sotheby’s, 5280.188 287 Margaret Stevens Bentley or Elizabeth Buckley: Village Green Antiques, Richland, Mich. (Antiques, January 1982) 288 Unidentified Woman and Man of the Russell family: Sotheby’s, 7420.423 289 James Ketcham and Lois Belding Ketcham: Marguerite Riordan [Antiques, May 1980] 290 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby Parke Bernet, Inc, 4209.246 291 Rufus Fuller and Elizabeth Drake Fuller: Kent Historical Society 292 Almira Lucretia Mills Adams: Corbis Images, IE001821 [Geoffrey Clements] 293 John Milton Raymond and Florilla Mills Raymond: Frick Art Reference Library [Peter A. Juley & Son, 1925] 294 Hannah Mills Raymond (Newcomb): Frick Art Reference Library [Peter A. Juley & Son, 1925] 295 Matthew Starr Barnum: Robinson (1930), see bibliography 296 Julia Ann Fuller Barnum: Robinson, Antiques (January 1931) [Newark Museum] 297 Phoebe E. Preston Haviland: Frick Art Reference Library [Peter A. Juley & Son, 1925] 298 Marquis de La Fayette Phillips and Jane Maria Pells Phillips: Sotheby’s / private collection 299 A.E. Allen: Christie’s, 3703.98 300 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 1387.76 301 Abraham Burton and Celia B. Sayrs Burton: Antiques (January 1968) [John Gordon] 302 John Guy Vassar, Jr.: Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center [author photo] 303 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, 6392.686 304 Jeremiah Russell and Elizabeth Moose Russell: Christie’s, 1591.121 305 Hannah Masten Radcliff: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 306 Unidentified Man: Frick Art Reference Library reproduced from Lipman (1942), see bibliography 246 247

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Peter Cornell: Maine Antique Digest (May 1988) Thomas Cornell: Maine Antique Digest (May 1988) 309 Captain Isaac Cox and Mrs. Cox: private collection 310 Jacob Hasbrouck De Witt: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin] 311 Jeanette Payne: Northeast Auctions / Godel & Co., New York, N.Y. 312 Ann Miller Tompkins: Joan R. Brownstein 313 Mary Hoyt: Christie’s, 1787.291 314 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, NY7705.134 315 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 7590.473 316 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N09609.5071 317 Unidentified Woman: Crystal Bridges Museum of Art [photo courtesy Washburn Gallery] 318 Unidentified Man: David Wheatcroft 319 Helen Cornell Manney: Dutchess County Historical Society 320 Sarah Rogers: Baltimore Museum of Art, 1973.92.1 321 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 7590.470 322 Elder Luman Burtch and Esther Patrick Burtch: Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, L146.78.1/2 and L146.78.2/2, or EL.2001.2.1 and EL.2001.2.2 323 Anna Farrington Noxon: Washburn Gallery (1976) 324 Hoag family member: private collection 325 Archibald Campbell: Francis Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College 326 Elizabeth Mitchell Campbell: private collection 327 Unidentified Woman: Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, 84.22 328 Unidentified Man and Woman: Doyle New York, 12AM02.7 329 Jonathan Akin Taber and Abigail Julia Ayers Taber: private collection 330 Mary Morrison: Antiques (Apr 1972) 331 Unidentified Man and Woman: Skinner, Inc., 2640B.15 332 Unidentified Woman: Skinner, 3303T.1499 333 Jeannette Elizabeth Woolley: Brooklyn Museum of Art, 69.7 334 Frances Sprague Foster and Judge Ebenezer Foster: Jeffrey Tillou Antiques 335 Augusta Maria Foster (Raymond): David A. Schorsch & Eileen M. Smiles 336 Nancy Hungerford: Chrysler Museum of Art, 74.6.13 337 Unidentified Girl, possibly a Raymond family member: Sotheby’s, N08280.7 338 Unidentified Man and Woman: American Folk Art Museum, 1991.30.2 and 1991.30.1 339 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 5680.1510 340 Mr. Doane: Doyle New York (2015), 7 341 Mr. and Mrs. Vail from Afton, N.Y.: Pook & Pook (2014), 674 342 Unidentified Man: Doyle New York, 15AM02.5 343 Unidentified Man and Woman: Cottone Auctions (2006), 240 344 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N07959.309 345 Unidentified Man and Woman: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 73-263-1 and 73-263-2 346 Polly Clason Brady: Sotheby’s, N09805.1025 347 Gerard Crane and Roxanna Purdy Crane: Somers Historical Society 348 George C. Sunderland: private collection 349 Rev. Ashbel Green: The First Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia 350 Rev. Walter Smith Lyon: Emeline Howe Malpas, Little River, Ca. 351 Unidentified Man: Samuel Herrup Antiques 352 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, N08512.177 353 Unidentified Man: Pook & Pook (2012), 79 354 Mr. Goodwin: Antiques & The Arts Weekly (Feb 5, 1993) 355 Mr. Bates: Skinner, Inc., 2384.463 356 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 6392.881 357 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, 6392.880 358 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, N08400.206 359 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, N07960.16 360 Unidentified Woman: Milwaukee Art Museum, M1966.113 [P. Richard Eells photo] 361 Jacob Wessel Ten Broeck, Jr. and William Henry Ten Broeck: Skinner, Inc., 2640B.7 362 John Younie Luyster: Chrysler Museum of Art, 74.6.4 363 Unidentified Boy, possibly Aaron D. Smith: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2001-13-1 364 Rachael Ann Maria Overbagh Ostrander and Titus Ostrander: Jane Katcher Collection 365 Unidentified Boy: Princeton University Art Museum, y1958.75 366 Unidentified Girl: Princeton University Art Museum, y1958.74 367 Unidentified Child: Sotheby’s, N10306.1637 307 308

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Unidentified Child: Sotheby’s, N08710.303 Unidentified Girl: American Folk Art Museum, 2001.37.1 370 Unidentified Girl: Christie’s, 16796.1205 371 Unidentified Girl: Christie’s, 1787.289 372 Unidentified Girl: Terra Foundation for American Art, 1992.57 373 Unidentified Girl: Sotheby’s, N08823.260 374 Mary Margaret Deuel: Sotheby’s, N08665.1 375 Henry Soggs and Mary Jane Soggs: Northeast Auctions (2006), 859 376 William Frederic Taber: private collection 377 James Mairs Salisbury: Gavin Ashworth Photography, New York City 378 Andrew Jackson Ten Broeck: private collection 379 William Woolley Haxtun: Connecticut Historical Society (1965), see bibliography 380 Almira Haxtun: Connecticut Historical Society (1965), see bibliography 381 Haxtun kitten (canvas fragment): Connecticut Historical Society (1965), see bibliography 382 Sarah Woolley Haxtun: private collection 383 Benjamin Haxtun: Connecticut Historical Society (1965), see bibliography 384 Joseph White Phillips: Fishkill Historical Society [author photo] 385 Elias Phillips and Elizabeth Northrup Phillips: Fishkill Historical Society [author photos] 386 Cynthia Birdsall Phillips: private collection 387 Elizabeth Phillips Storm and John Curry Storm: D’Ambrosio and Emans (1987), see bibliography 388 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 1787.290 389 Joseph Bogardus and Barbara Moffet Bogardus: Fishkill Historical Society 390 Isaac Simmons and Sarah Simmons: private collection 391 Harriet Simmons Hasbrook: Sotheby’s, 5736.270 392 Catherine Collins Flagler: private collection 393 Phebe Van Amburgh Hasbrook and Francis Jacob Hasbrook: Catalog of American Portraits [private collection] 394 Unidentified Woman: Christie’s, 2133.324 395 Tunis Cooper and Maria Budd Cooper: Cottone Auctions (2005), 152 396 Unidentified Man: Leslie Antiques Ltd., New York 397 Ira Williams and Melissa Calkins Williams: Sharon Historical Society 398 Hon. John Cotton Smith: Sharon Historical Society 399 Phebe Doud Gay: Sharon Historical Society 400 Calvin Gay: Sharon Historical Society [author photo] 401 Sarah (Sally) Totten Sutherland: Christie’s, 9468.25 402 Unidentified Woman: Shelburne Museum [2002] 403 Unidentified Woman: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 64.100.5 404 Thomas Parker: Northeast Auction (2007), 110 405 Charles Brown and Elizabeth Marshall Brown: Pugsley (1976), see bibliography 406 Catherine De Cantillon Stoutenburgh: private collection 407 Tobias Isaac Stoutenburgh and Maria Albertson Stoutenburgh: private collection 408 Unidentified Woman of the Stoutenburgh family: Capsule Auctions (2020), 66 409 Unidentified Man and Woman: Northeast Auctions (2006), 1042 410 Deacon Benjamin Benedict: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc. (1970) 411 Mr. and Mrs. Keese: Stair Galleries (2018), 79 412 Rachel Divine: Copake Auction (2013), 30a 413 Unidentified Man (“Dr. J. Ransom, DD”) and Woman: Sotheby’s, N07998.178 414 Julia Anna Stone Morehouse: Copake Auction (9/2011), 25 415 Col. Henry Rundall and Nancy Totten Sutherland Rundall: Kenneth Hammitt (Antiques, Jul 1971) 416 Rebecca Beebe Rockwell: Frick Art Reference Library [Ira W. Martin, 1942] 417 Judge Miles Tobey Granger and Caroline S. Ferguson Granger: Weston’s Auction Gallery (2004) 418 Theron Bronson and Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson: Alex Cooper Auctioneers (2018), 912 419 Margaret Phelps Higley: Falls Village-Canaan Historical Society 420 Unidentified Woman: EBTH, Inc., 18DCC700.116 421 Unidentified Man and Woman: Christie’s, 2815.164 422 Sarah J. Kinney: Litchfield Historical Society 423 Nisus Kinney: Litchfield Historical Society 424 Sarah Wakefield Kinney: Carlsen Gallery (2004), 172 425 (possibly) Sen. John Henry Hubbard and Julia Ann Dodge Hubbard: Post Road Gallery 426 Lucius Culver: Litchfield Historical Society 427 Unidentified Woman: Bruce Museum 428 Theron Daniel Ludington and Eleanor Bailey Ludington: Christie’s, 2287.125 429 Augustus Miles and Roxa Norton Miles: Pook & Pook, Inc. (1998), 221 368 369

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Mr. and Mrs. Seymour of Connecticut: Skinner, Inc. (2009), 953 Milo Bartholomew and Milia Holbrook Bartholomew: Shannon’s, Milford, Conn. (2013), 177 432 William Miles: The Salisbury Association, Inc. 433 Possible Miles family member: Holley-Williams House Museum, Lakeville, Conn. [author photo] 434 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, N08158.350 435 Dr. Ovid Plumb and Abiah Lawrence Plumb: Pook & Pook, Inc. (1998), 220 436 Unidentified Woman: Skinner, Inc., 2824T.1070 437 Unidentified Man and Woman: Skinner (2012), 334 438 Unidentified Woman: Newark Museum, 66.620 439 Dyer Hotchkiss: Torrington Historical Society 440 Electa Susannah Brace Hotchkiss: Torrington Historical Society 441 Edward C. Hotchkiss: Torrington Historical Society 442 Lucia E. Hotchkiss: Torrington Historical Society 443 Henry E. Hotchkiss: Torrington Historical Society 444 Susan W. Kinney: Gratz Gallery, New Hope, Pa. 445 Jane E. Kinney: author photo 446 Emily Miner Palmer Fox: Tillou Gallery 447 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 7590.469 448 Maria Rachel Munsill Bronson and Wilbur Bronson: Jane Katcher Collection 449 Leonard Richardson and Lucy Anne Barnum Richardson: private collection 450 Milo Barnum Richardson: private collection 451 Edward Hiram Bronson and Henry Theron Bronson: Katcher (2011), see bibliography 452 Unidentified Children: Christie’s, 8984.24 453 Virginia Ludington and Theron Simpson Ludington: Christie’s, 2287.124 454 Unidentified Man and Woman: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, 48.100.1 and 48.100.2 455 Nathan Gaylord Benjamin: Carlsen Gallery (2004), 171 456 Mr. and Mrs. James Reed: Skinner, Inc., 2494.114 457 Unidentified Woman: Pook & Pook, Inc. (2014), 673 458 Henry W. Langdon: private collection 459 Unidentified Man and Woman: Sotheby’s, 5599.65 460 Unidentified Man: C. L. Prickett 461 Dr. Clarkson T. Collins and Lydia Coffin Collins: American Folk Art Museum, 2016.18.3 and 2016.18.4 [Adam Reich] 462 Dr. Joseph Priestly Dorr, private collection [courtesy George C. Colcough, Jr.] 463 Henry Sisson and Lucy Amanda Howe Sisson: Sotheby’s, 7420.459 464 Unidentified Woman: Northeast Auctions (2005), 614 465 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby’s, 3981.452 466 Unidentified Woman: Sotheby Parke Bernet, 4268.188 467 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 9686.929 468 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 4211.588 469 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 5141.334 470 Unidentified Man: private collection 471 Unidentified Man: Sotheby’s, 6613.94 472 Mr. Cooper: Christie’s, 6320.119 473 Unidentified Man: Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, 430.723 474 Unidentified Man: Marguerite Riordan (Antiques, Nov. 1974) 475 Asa Beckwith: Doyle New York, 15AM02.7 476 Ebenezer Chadwick: Charles L. Flint Antiques 477 Unidentified Man: private collection 478 Unidentified Man: Skinner, Inc., 2460.259 479 Unidentified Boy: private collection 480 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 8238.31 481 Unidentified Man: Freeman’s, 1456.171 482 Unidentified Man: James D. Julia, Inc. (2014), 2211 483 Lorrin Smith and Eliza Smith: George E. Schoellkopf, New York, N.Y. (1975) 484 Elisha Barnes: Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Mass., 1972.18 485 Thomas Williams Barnes and Zilpha Arnold Barnes: Berkshire Co. Historical Society, author photo 486 Mrs. Lyman: Doyle New York (2015), 15 487 Perry Green Comstock and Elizabeth M. Comstock: Stockbridge Library 488 Unidentified Woman: Northeast Auctions (8/2014), 300 489 Ethan Allen Van Deusen and Clymena Tobey Van Deusen: Frick Art Reference Library [Thurman Rotan] 490 Unidentified Man: Christie’s, 8238.30 491 Thomas Carter: private collection 430 431

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Edward Church Carter: Doyle New York (2015), 9 [Sotheby’s, 7329.130] Chauncey Erastus Dewey and Caroline Bailey Dewey: Wood (1969), see bibliography 494 Unidentified Woman: Quinn’s Auction Galleries (2014), 249 495 Henry Sedgwick: Richard Opfer Auctioneering (2004), 186 496 Anna Benedict Smith: Wintergarden Auction Service (2013) 497 Enos Smith: Christie’s, 6842.155 498 Anna Electa Carter, Mary Adele Carter and John Calvin Calhoun Carter: Heritage Auction Galleries, 5057.64068 499 Sarah King Dewey and Harriet Maria Dewey: private collection 500 Unidentified Girl (aka Mary O’Connel): Princeton University Art Museum, y1985-71 501 Emily Cooper: Northeast Auctions, 1989.485 502 Edward Harmon Langdon: Jeffrey Tillou Antiques 503 Unidentified Boy: Freeman’s, 1530.472 504 Florence Maria Carter: Christie’s, 2815.250 505 Unidentified Boy: Hollander (2009), see bibliography [private collection] 506 Unidentified Woman and Boy: private collection 507 Unidentified Boy: William J. Jenack (2017) 508 Unidentified Woman: Larry Burke, Inc. 509 Unidentified Boy: Christie’s, 4999.185 510 Unidentified Boy: Skinner, Inc., 2608.917 511 Unidentified Child: Jones and Mears, Hudson Valley Regional Review (1987), see bibliography 512 Duane Bailey Dewey: private collection 513 Elizabeth Harris Husted: Holdridge, Antiques (1961), see bibliography 514 George Beckwith: Jones and Mears, Hudson Valley Regional Review (1987), see bibliography 515 Boy of the Overbagh family (attributed to John Vanderlyn II): Frick Art Reference Library, 40069 (courtesy Senate House Association, Kingston, N.Y.) 516 Mary Ann Halsey DeMott (by Ezra Ames): The Potomack Company, Alexandria, Va. (ex-Dumbarton House collection) 517 Ann Dunkin and Dunkin Henry Van Rensselaer (by Bass Otis): Albany Institute of History and Art, 1995.31 518 William Cockburn (attributed to John Vanderlyn): Frick Art Reference Library, 15355 [Ira W. Martin] 519 Rev. Ammi Ruhamah Robbins (by Reuben Moulthrop), Yale University Art Gallery, 1943.104 492 493

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My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Index to Named Examples (Volume 2)

Brown, Elizabeth Marshall, 81 Buckley, Elizabeth, 62 Buell, Napoleon Bonaparte, 24 Bull, Amy Chase, 23 Bull, Catharine Helen Miller, 45 Bull, Daniel, 41 Burtch, Esther Patrick, 68 Burtch, Luman (Elder), 68 Burton, Abraham, 65 Burton, Celia B. Sayrs, 65 Cady, Anna Shuler, 36 Campbell, Archibald, 68 Campbell, Elizabeth Mitchell, 68 Campbell, Harriet, 25 Campbell, Jane Ann, 31 Campbell, Samuel Robert, 28 Campbell, Sarah Mynderse, 28 Capron, Eunice Mann, 44 Capron, Seth (Dr.), 44 Carter, Anna Electa, Mary Adele Carter and John Calvin Calhoun Carter, 96 Carter, Edward Church, 95 Carter, Florence Maria, 96 Carter, Thomas, 95 Chadwick, Ebenezer, 93 Clark, Catherine Couenhoven, 28 Cobb, Mrs., 56 Cockburn, William, 37 Coe, Jonas (Rev.), 26 Collins, Clarkson T. (Dr.), 91 Collins, Lydia Coffin, 91 Comstock, Elizabeth M., 94 Comstock, Perry Green, 94 Cook family, Boy of the, 31 Cook, Mary Halsley, 51 Cook, Palmer, 51 Cooper, Emily, 96 Cooper, Maria Budd, 79 Cooper, Mr., 92 Cooper, Tunis, 79 Cornell, Peter, 66 Couch, John Whitfield (Dr.), 52 Couch, Mary Christopher Van Doorn, 52 Couch, Rhoda Bennett, 34 Cowan, Moses, 18 Cox, Isaac (Captain), 66 Cox, Isaac (Mrs.), 66 Crane, Dr., 24 Crane, Gerard, 72 Crane, Mrs., 24 Crane, Roxanna Purdy, 72 Culver, Lucius, 84 Day, Mr. (aka Mr. Bradley), 60 Day, Mrs. (aka Mrs. Bradley), 60 de Long, James, 62 De Witt, Abraham Ten Eyck (Dr.), 37 De Witt, Catherine Ten Broeck, 61 De Witt, Elizabeth Hardenbergh, 59

Adams, Almira Lucretia Mills (later Perry), 64 Adams, Olivia Kimberly, 53 Allen, A.E., 65 Allerton, Cornelius (Dr.), 34 Allerton, Lois Atherton, 34 Allis, Leonard Newton, 50 Arnell, David R. (Dr.), 47 Arnold, Mary L. Rowe, 59 Arnold, Welcome B., 59 Austin, Horace, 57 Austin, Mary Ludlow, 57 Bailey, Elizabeth Du Bois, 45 Barker, M.A., 25 Barnes, Elisha, 94 Barnes, Thomas Williams, 94 Barnes, Zilpha Arnold, 94 Barnum, Julia Ann Fuller, 64 Barnum, Matthew Starr, 64 Barstow, Charles Rollin, 16 Barstow, Pluma Amelia, 16 Bartholomew, Betsy Barnum (possibly), 90 Bartholomew, Hiram (possibly), 90 Bartholomew, Milia Holbrook, 85 Bartholomew, Milo, 85 Bassett, Hannah Sornborger, 55 Bassett, Sherman, 55 Bates, Mr., 73 Beakes, Mary Smith, 48 Beakes, Stacy Jr., 48 Beckwith, Asa, 92 Beckwith, Elizabeth ‘Betsey’ Gale, 33 Beckwith, George, 98 Beckwith, Nathan S. (Col.), 33 Benedict, Abijah Gilbert (Dr.), 33 Benedict, Benjamin (Deacon), 82 Benedict, Charlotte H. Newcomb, 33 Benjamin, Louisa Park, 55 Benjamin, Nathan Gaylord, 90 Bentley, Margaret Stevens, 62 Bentley, Rhoda Goodrich and Louisa H. Bentley, 27 Bentley, William Northrup, 27 Bevier, Ann DeWitt, 39 Bockee, Margaret Platt, 51 Bogardus, Barbara Moffet, 78 Bogardus, Joseph, 78 Bradley, Mr. (aka Mr. Day), 60 Bradley, Mrs. (aka Mrs. Day), 60 Brady, Polly Clason, 72 Broadhead, Thomas (Dr.), 29 Bronson, Edward Hiram and Henry Theron Bronson, 89 Bronson, Maria Rachel Munsill, 83 Bronson, Maria Rachel Munsill and Wilbur Bronson, 88 Bronson, Theron, 83 Brown, Charles, 81 120


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 De Witt, Jacob Hasbrouck, 66 De Witt, Leah Dubois Wynkoop, 37 De Witt, Sarah Ann Sleight, 60 De Witt, Ten Eyck, 38 De Witt, Thomas (Rev.), 37 De Witt, William Cantyne (Dr.), 59 De Witt, William Henry, 61 Denton, Pauline Darling, 42 Denton, Samuel, 42 Deuel, Mary Margaret, 76 Deuel, Samuel, 51 Dewey, Caroline Bailey, 95 Dewey, Chauncey Erastus, 95 Dewey, Duane Bailey, 97 Dewey, Horatio (Dr.), 57 Dewey, Sarah King and Harriet Maria Dewey, 96 Deyo, Jane Bevier, 39 Dilbee, Mr. (likely Isaac Dibble), 33 Divine, Rachel, 82 Doane, Mr., 71 Dorr, Catherine Van Slyck, 20 Dorr, Henrietta, 20 Dorr, Joseph (Col.), 23 Dorr, Joseph Priestly, 20 Dorr, Joseph Priestly (Dr.), 91 Dorr, Josephus, 23 Dorr, Milton, 23 Dorr, Paulina, 20 Dorr, Polsapianna Bull & Esther Maria Dorr, 20 Dorr, Robert Lottridge, 20 Dorr, Russell (Dr.), 20 Dorr, Russell Griffin, 20 Dorr, Sarah Bull, 23 Dorrance, Ann Eliza Sloan, 40 Dorrance, Benjamin Brewster (Dr.), 40 Downe, Mrs. Dr., 45 du Bois, Charles Louis, 32 Du Bois, Coert, 32 du Bois, Garret (possibly), 32 du Bois, Hannah Cooper, 32 Du Bois, Mary Thorn, 32 DuBois (Easton), Sarah Maria, 40 DuBois (Hasbrouck), Pamela, 40 DuBois, Eliza, 32 Eddy, Jonathan, 21 Eddy, Rebecca Rouse, 21 Eliot, Abigail Greele, 45 Elting, James, 57 Elting, Kate, 40 Everest, Isaac (Dr.), 19 Everest, Sarah Cornwall, 19 Everitt, Elmore (Dr.), 52 Fake, Catherine Sneider, 22 Fake, Johan Georg, Jr., 22 Fsik, Esther Cummins, 43 Fisk, Ezra (Rev.), 43 Flagler, Catherine Collins, 79 Flagler, Zachariah (Mrs.), 66

Folsom, Mr., 18 Folsom, Mrs., 18 Foster, Augusta Maria (later Raymond), 70 Foster, Ebenezer (Judge), 70 Foster, Frances Sprague, 70 Fox, Emily Miner Palmer, 88 Fuller, Elizabeth Drake, 64 Fuller, Rufus, 64 Gale, Frederick A., 25 Gale, Mary Anne Steenback, 31 Gale, Mary Elizabeth, 25 Garnsey, John, 54 Garnsey, Mercy Mead, 54 Gay, Calvin, 80 Gay, Phebe Doud, 80 Gebhard, Anna Maria Magdalene Carver, 30 Gebhard, John Gabriel (Rev.), 30 Gilbert, Betsy Brownell, 28 Goodrich, Mr., 19 Goodrich, Mrs. & child, 19 Goodwin, Mr., 73 Granger, Caroline S. Ferguson, 83 Granger, Miles Tobey (Judge), 83 Green, Ashbel (Rev.), 72 Griffin, Ruth Wolsey, 45 Guernsey, Mary Ann Thorne, 56 Guernsey, Peter Bennett (Dr.), 56 Hall, Harriet Betts, 18 Hall, Philander (Dr.), 18 Hamilton, Lucy, 54 Hamlin, David, 34 Hamlin, Lois Davis, 34 Hardenburgh, Jacobus (possibly), 37 Hardenburgh, Maria Oliver (possibly), 37 Harder, Gertrude Snyder, 29 Harder, William G., 29 Hardy, Mr., 17 Hardy, Mrs., 17 Harris, Nicholas Brown (Dr.), 18 Hasbrook, Francis Jacob, 79 Hasbrook, Harriet Simmons, 79 Hasbrook, Phebe Van Amburgh, 79 Hasbrouck (Reeve), Maria Eliza, 40 Hasbrouck, Esther Bevier, 39 Hasbrouck, Hylah Bevier, 39 Hasbrouck, Jane, 40 Hasbrouck, Levi Decker, 39 Hasbrouck, Philip Bevier, 39 Haskell, Bithiah Soullard, 29 Haskell, John, 29 Haviland, Phoebe E. Preston, 64 Haxtun kitten, 77 Haxtun, Almira, 77 Haxtun, Benjamin, 77 Haxtun, Sarah Woolley, 77 Haxtun, William Woolley, 77 Haynes, John, 21 Haynes, Phebe Peck, 21 121


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Heartt, Jonas Coe, 31 Heartt, Philip Titus, 31 Heath, Joseph, 18 Heath, Mabel Rising, 18 Hickok, Katherine Salisbury Newkirk, 57 Higley, Margaret Phelps, 83 Hill, Harriet, 28 Hinds, Cicero, 43 Hoag, Abigail Adams, 53 Hoag, Phebe Pugsley, 53 Hoag, Robert, 53 Hoag, Ruth Wright, 68 Hoag, Sally Ann, 53 Hoag, Tripp, 53 Hotchkiss, Charles, 87 Hotchkiss, Dyer, 87 Hotchkiss, Edward C., 87 Hotchkiss, Electa Susannah Brace, 87 Hotchkiss, Henry E., 87 Hotchkiss, Lucia E., 87 Howell, Sally Jane Beakes, 48 Howell, Samuel Callender, 48 Hoyt, Mary, 67 Hubbard, John Henry (Sen.), possibly, 84 Hubbard, Julia Ann Dodge (possibly), 84 Hughes, John, 62 Hulst, Aletta Van Alst, 56 Hulst, Hendrick, 56 Hungerford, Nancy, 70 Hunt, Clarissa Benton, 51 Hunt, Joseph Drake, 51 Hunter, David, 40 Hunter, Elizabeth Smith, 40 Hunting, Hannah Lewis Husted, 53 Hunting, Isaac, 53 Hunting, Julia Barton, 54 Hunting, Morgan, 54 Husted, Elizabeth Harris, 98 Husted, Polly Smith, 34 Ingraham, Mary Hamilton, 54 Jansen, Clarissa LeFevre Dolson, 47 Jansen, John T. (Dr.), 47 Jenkins, Mrs., 17 Jordan, Asa (Dr.), 30 Judson, Chloe Allis, 16 Keese, Mr., 82 Keese, Mrs., 82 Kenyon, John (possibly), 36 Ketcham, James, 42, 63 Ketcham, Lois Belding, 63 King, Levi (Dr.), 57 King, Lovisa Peck, 57 Kinney, Jane E., 88 Kinney, Nisus, 84 Kinney, Sarah J., 84 Kinney, Sarah Wakefield, 84 Kinney, Susan W., 88 Knapp, Malina Wheeler, 50

Lamphear, Nancy Smith, 27 Lane, Jonathan, 29 Langdon, Edward Harmon, 96 Langdon, Henry W., 90 Lawrence, Christiana Rockefeller, 61 Lawrence, Henry, 61 Lawrence, John, 44 Lawrence, John (Mrs.), 44 Leavens, Harriet, 25 Little, William Shultz (Col.) and Betsey Ketcham Little, 46 Livingston, Elizabeth McKinstry, 58 Ludington, Eleanor Bailey, 84 Ludington, Theron Daniel, 84 Ludington, Virginia and Theron Simpson Ludington, 89 Luyster, John Younie, 74 Lyman, Mrs., 94 Lyon, Walter Smith (Rev.), 72 Manney, Helen Cornell, 68 Marvine, Charles Augustus, 50 May (Stimson), Catherine A., 50 Mayer, Mrs. & daughter, 60 McClellan, John A. (Dr.), 30 Miles family member, 86 Miles, Augustus, 85 Miles, Roxa Norton, 85 Miles, William, 86 Morehouse, Julia Anna Stone, 82 Morrison, Mary, 69 Mygans, Elizabeth, 57 Newkirk family member, 38 Northrop, Lewis, 60 Northrop, Sarah Ann Palen, 60 Noxon, Anna Farrington, 68 O’Connel, Mary (aka), 96 Oliver, Blandina Margaret, 37 Opie, Caroline Jane, 62 Ostrander, Rachel Ann Maria Overbagh and Titus Ostrander, 74 Overbagh, Maria Van Leuvan, 37 Overbagh, Peter Abraham (Rev.), 37 Paige, Clarissa Keyes, 36 Paige, Winslow (Rev.), 36 Palmer, Ruth Haynes, 27 Parker, Thomas, 81 Patterson, Abraham, 62 Payne, Jeanette, 67 Pelton, Anne Stoddard, 45 Pelton, Peleg, 42 Philip, Catherine Douw Hoffman, 29 Philip, Henry G. (Col.), 29 Phillips, Cynthia Birdsall, 78 Phillips, Elias, 78 Phillips, Elizabeth Northrup, 78 Phillips, Elizabeth Payne, 43 Phillips, Gabriel Norton (Dr.), 43 Phillips, Jane Maria Pells, 65 122


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Phillips, Joseph White, 78 Phillips, Marquis de La Fayette, 65 Plumb, Abiah Lawrence, 86 Plumb, Ovid (Dr.), 86 Powers, Caroline, 55 Powers, Charles Wesley, 55 Powers, Jane Ann Benjamin, 55 Powers, Mary, 55 Punderson, Ebenezer, 51 Radcliff, Hannah Masten, 66 Ransom, J. (Dr.), 82 Ransom, J. (Mrs.), 82 Raymond family member (possibly Frances Anne Foster), 70 Raymond, Florilla Mills, 64 Raymond, Hannah Mills (or Myra Ann Mills Raymond), 64 Raymond, John Milton, 64 Reed, Abigail Reynolds, 52 Reed, James (Mr.), 90 Reed, James (Mrs.), 90 Reed, Philo, 52 Reynolds, Abigail Penoyer, 52 Reynolds, George Greenwood, 52 Richardson, Leonard, 88 Richardson, Lucy Anne Barnum, 88 Richardson, Milo Barnum, 88 Robinson, David (Gen.), 26 Robinson, Nancy Caldwell Church, 26 Rockwell, Rebecca Beebe, 83 Rogers, Eveline Cornell (possibly), 68 Rogers, Jerusha, 25 Rogers, Sarah, 68 Rundall, Henry (Col.), 82 Rundall, Nancy Totten Sutherland, 82 Rundle, Fanny Brush, 56 Russell family man & woman, 63 Russell, Elizabeth Moose, 66 Russell, Jeremiah, 66 Salisbury, James Mairs, 76 Sanders, Jane Livingston, 58 Sanders, John III (Judge), 58 Schoonmaker, Marius, 60 Schuneman, Elizabeth De Meyer, 36 Schuneman, William, 36 Sedgwick, Henry, 95 Selby, George Edward, 30 Seymour, Mr., 85 Seymour, Mrs., 85 Sheffield, Mr., 51 Sheffield, Mrs., 51 Sherman, Caleb, 22 Sherman, Sarah Stearns & daughter, 22 Sherman, Wilbur, 22 Simmons, Isaac, 79 Simmons, Sarah, 79 Sisson, Henry, 91 Sisson, Lucy Amanda Howe, 91

Slade, Alsa Sherman, 23 Slade, Joseph, 23 Slade, Philip, 24 Slade, Philip (Mrs.), possibly, 24 Sleight, Aaltje Swartwout (possibly), 39 Sleight, Abraham, 32 Sleight, John A., 41 Sleight, Ruth Roe, 32 Sloane, Letitia (later Chapman), 41 Sloane, Samuel, 40 Sluyter, Lydia Mary Williamson Schureman, 30 Sluyter, Richard (Rev.), 30 Smith, Aaron D. (possibly), 74 Smith, Anna Benedict, 95 Smith, Eliza, 93 Smith, Enos, 95 Smith, Fanny Waterbury, 48 Smith, Gideon, 16 Smith, Isaac (Judge), 35 Smith, James (Col.), 48 Smith, Jane Daney, 27 Smith, John Cotton (Hon.), 80 Smith, Lorrin, 93 Smith, Mary Elizabeth, 49 Smith, Mrs., 54 Smith, Phoebe Lewis, 35 Soggs, Henry and Mary Jane, 76 Soggs, Mariah Durkee, 52 Spicer, Cyrus, 23 Spicer, Mary Eddy, 23 Stakley, Ester, 44 Standish, Hannah (unidentified child), 75 Stevens, William, 62 Stoddard, Ashbel, 17 Stoddard, Patience Bolles, 17 Storm, Elizabeth Phillips, 78 Storm, John Curry, 78 Storm, Thomas Isaac, 56 Stoutenburgh family member, 81 Stoutenburgh, Catherine De Cantillon, 81 Stoutenburgh, Maria Albertson, 81 Stoutenburgh, Tobias Isaac, 81 Strong, Benjamin (possibly), 46 Strong, Frances Smith (possibly), 46 Sunderland, George C., 72 Sutherland, Betsy, 44 Sutherland, Sarah (Sally) Totten, 80 Swartwout, Anna Seward, 39 Taber, Abigail Julia Ayers, 69 Taber, Jonathan Akin, 69 Taber, William Frederic, 76 Teller, Caroline Sammis, 33 Teller, Henry Schenck, 59 Teller, Jane [Catherine] Storm, 59 Teller, Tobias, 33 Ten Broeck, Andrew Jackson, 76 Ten Broeck, Anna Benner, 61 Ten Broeck, Helen (Lena), 61 123


My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2 Ten Broeck, Helen Livingston, 58 Ten Broeck, Jacob Wessel, Jr. and William Henry Ten Broeck, 74 Ten Broeck, Jacob Wessel, Sr., 61 Ten Broeck, Leonard William, 58 Ten Broeck, Samuel (Gen.), 58 Ten Eyck, Blandina, 38 Ten Eyck, John, 38 Thompson family member (possibly), 31 Thompson, Alexander II, 41 Thompson, Andrew (Mrs.), aka, 46 Thompson, Hannah Bull, 41 Thompson, Robert R., 41 Thompson, Sarah McCurdy, 41 Tompkins, Ann Miller, 67 Vail, Alsop, 42 Vail, Frances Seybolt, 45 Vail, Mr., 71 Vail, Mrs., 71 Van Bergen, Clarine Peck (possibly), 36 Van Deusen, Clymena Tobey, 94

Van Deusen, Ethan Allen, 94 Van Deusen, John, 44 Van Keuren family man & woman, 38 Van Keuren, Catharina, 40 Van Rensselaer, Jane A. Fort, 28 Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler (aka), 78 Van Schoonhoven, James, 27 Vanderpoel, Anna Doll, 30 Vanderpoel, James (Judge), 30 Vassar, John Guy Jr., 65 Walbridge, Sally Morgan, 27 Warburton, Mr. (aka), 47 Warburton, Mrs. (aka), 47 Wheeler, Eleanor Knox, 50 Wheeler, William, 50 Williams, Ira, 80 Williams, Melissa Calkins, 80 Winfield, Charles (Dr.), 46 Winfield, Margaret Crawford, 46 Woolley, Jeannette Elizabeth, 70

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Profile for David R. Allaway

My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2  

My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - by David R. Allaway. Two volumes. A catalog with titles or subject identification with life dates, w...

My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - Volume 2  

My People: The Works of Ammi Phillips - by David R. Allaway. Two volumes. A catalog with titles or subject identification with life dates, w...

Profile for n2xb