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NOURISH Flourish and

Presents

Tales&Treats A Guide for Loving and Caring for Your Animal Family Volume 1 • 2020

Meet Zu: Our Loyal Mascot!

Fast, Fresh, and Healthy Dog Recipes

UNCONDITIONAL LOVE Older Dogs, Deeper Love

By Jane Klobel Klonsky

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VED O R APP

Remi’s Toy Box

Unique Gifts & Products

Scout’s Legacy:

The Fight Against Cancer A Veracity Media Group Special Interest Publication


Welcome to

Tales&Treats

A Guide for Loving and Caring for Your Animal Family

“Animals are the bridge between us and the beauty of all that is natural. They show us what’s missing in our lives and how to love ourselves more completely and unconditionally. They connect us back to who we are and to the purpose of why we’re here.” ~ Trisha McCagh, Stories from the Animal Whisperer: What Your Pet Is Thinking and Trying to Tell You

Published by:

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VERACITY MEDIA GROUP

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© Copyright 2020 by Veracity Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means including digital, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Veracity Media Group, LLC. All images and materials are protected by © copyright and all rights are reserved in any medium and any form of reproduction worldwide. Any reproduction or use of these materials without the prior written consent of Veracity Media Group, LLC is strictly prohibited.


We know how much you love your animals . . . and we do too! Humans have lived and worked closely with animals for centuries. From companion cats in ancient Egypt to messenger pigeons in the 19th century to therapy and service dogs and horses, we have long needed and wanted animals in our lives. Most humans, by nature, possess an instinct to protect the well-being of animals both domestic and wild. Studies have shown that affection for animals goes hand-in-hand with concern for the natural world. It is also possible that deep in our psyches, there is a simple and profound recognition of our similarities: that we all see, hear, touch, smell, eat, rest, play, mate, raise young, and die. These are experiences shared by all living beings on earth. Tales & Treats was created to bring you stories that will help you understand and love your animals even more. From our creative team, Woof! Woof!! Meoowwww! Squeak! Quack! Chirp! Chirp! Ribbit! Bleat! Mooo! Oink! Oink! Baaaa! Cluck! Cluck! Hee-Haw! Coo!

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Tales&Treats IN THIS ISSUE

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30 TALES: Feature Stories

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Healthy Dogs are Happy Dogs! A Look Inside Pet Foods

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A Man’s Best Friend: The Power of Social Media

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Comfort Zone

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Unconditional Love: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Klobel Klonsky

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Part 1: Scout: A Story of Love and Courage

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Remi’s Toy Box: Products from Around the World

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Silver in Their Furr, Gold in Their Hearts: Senior Adoptions

Once Upon A Time . . .The Photography of Harry Frees

TREATS: Wholesome Recipes 10 15 24 48 3 TALES AND TREATS

Morgan’s Organic Sweet Potato and Carrot Cookies Bacon and Pumpkin Dog Cookies Peanut Butter, Pumpkin, and Oat Dog Treats Doggie Birthday Beef Cake

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Meet Zu:

Our Loyal Mascot!

Hello . . . my name is Zu and I am proud to be the brand ambassador for Tales & Treats, a special magazine dedicated to the animal kingdom. I have many friends around around the world that I can’t wait for you to meet! As a German Shepherd, I am fiercely loyal, courageous, determined, and intelligent. I also have very high standards and I am the official “taste tester” in my mom’s kitchen. Thanks for joining us and please, share with your family and friends.

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A Look Inside Pet Foods Story and Recipes by Morgan Rhodes

Healthy Dogs Are Happy Dogs! Dogs are special. They wait eagerly for us to arrive home, protect us, love us unconditionally, and forgive us for just being human. They don’t ask for anything but our love and some playtime. One of the most important decisions we can make for them is providing nutritious food.

United States’ consumers spent an estimated $30.32 billion on food for their pets in 2018, according to the American Pet Products Association, an increase of 4.3 percent from 2017. According to PetFoodIndustry.com, dry pet food production reached 8.085 million metric tons, holding steady since 2017, even with the introduction of raw and freeze-dried products. Much of the dry food sold today is dense and artificially preserved for shelf life. Some of it may contain cheap fillers and lowgrade meats—some correlatedly linked to obesity, possible cancers, and other diseases. Even made with the healthiest of ingredients, “dry” is the equivalent of fast food. So, where exactly did dry dog food come from?

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Photo by Morgan Rhodes 7 TALES AND TREATS


Morgan’s Organic Sweet Potato and Carrot Cookies Recipe on next page

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If you enjoy baking as much as I do, you can take that first step of providing better nutrition by making your own organic dog treats. The recipes are very simple and basic, a fun project to do with your kids.

~ Morgan Rhodes, Photographer, Food Blogger, and Baker

Food specifically for pets, “pet food,” was first introduced around 1860 by Ohio electrician James Spratt. He had seen dogs being fed leftover biscuits meant for sailors, so he formulated his own “dog biscuit” consisting of wheat meal, vegetables, beet root, and beef ’s blood. It was a huge success, and Spratt was providing a valuable resource for sporting dogs in Great Britain. Spratt began producing his dog biscuits around 1895 for the United States market. Other companies started developing recipes for both biscuits and dry food or “kibble.” Ken-L-Ration canned dog food, containing horsemeat, was introduced in 1922. The nutrient values and ingredients being used were acceptable at the time based on the knowledge of the industry. Dogs went from eating human-grade table scraps to processed condensed food in a sixty-year span. As animal science progressed, so did nutrition, according to PetFoodInstitute.org. Horsemeat is no longer used, and many of the ingredients are now human-grade or organic; vitamin levels are more balanced for a dog’s lifespan. And we now have regulations on processing to ensure the safety of the food. Within the last twenty years, human-grade organic pet foods have gained more traction. According to PackagedFacts.com, millennial consumers, ages 18 to 34, are partly responsible for the increase, as they choose to live a more sustainable and holistic lifestyle. As we became more interested in putting cleaner foods into our bodies, our thoughts naturally turned to what we were actually feeding our pets. Many are feeding dogs raw food, going back to the time when the wolf was “top dog.” Questions are still asked: Is it safe? Is it really healthy for our dogs when we’ve been told over and over that it’s not good to feed our dogs “people” food? It all depends on what you’re actually feeding them.

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Morgan’s Organic Sweet Potato and Carrot Cookies Ingredients When possible, use all organic ingredients. 3 cups oat flour ½ cup boiled or baked sweet potato ½ cup grated carrots 2 eggs ¾ cup water Method Preheat oven to 350˚F/177°. Line a baking sheet with parchment. In a large bowl, add oat flour, sweet potato, carrots, 1 egg, and water. Mix well until combined into a ball. With a rolling pin, roll dough out to ¼ inch in thickness on an oat-floured surface. Use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes and place them on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Whip second egg in a bowl and brush the top of each treat. Bake at 350˚F/177° for 30 minutes, until treats are golden brown. Time will vary depending on your oven. Turn off your oven and allow treats to cool for 1 hour. This will help make them crunchier. If still warm after removing from oven, cool on a wire rack. Treats can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 2 weeks or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Photo by Morgan Rhodes

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I remember the first day I picked up my German Shepherd, Zu, more than six years ago. He was eight weeks old and already weighed nineteen pounds. He was going to be big, and he is: a seven-year-old, large-boned, 112-pound protective tank! Since I chose not to have children, my animals are my kids. I knew going in the responsibility of having a powerful working dog like Zu, and I also knew that even though he was tested for genetic health issues, there was no guarantee. I wanted to start early by giving him the best food I could and the best chance to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible.

“I wanted to start early by giving him the best food I could and the best chance to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible.� ~ Morgan Rhodes

Photos by Morgan Rhodes

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He grew fast. In six months, he was sixty pounds. In seven months, he was seventy pounds. I switched him to adult food in that first year in order to slow down his growth rate, concerned that the development of his joints and hips would suffer long term. His back right hip joint is not smooth, possibly from genetics or from a growth spurt, and he deals with pain and inflammation. In the early days, I was feeding him a mixture of organic dry food with cooked chicken and vegetables. I was still researching dog nutrition, nervous that I might not be giving him the vitamins he needed, so I continued with the dry food. At eight months, he became sick and was rushed to the vet. After a series of tests, it was discovered he was allergic to barley. There are trace amounts of barley in many organic, healthy dog foods and treats. That was the moment it all changed for me, and I began reading every label. Then, when Zu was almost four years old, I began switching him to a raw food diet.


When Zu was eight weeks old, he already weighed nineteen pounds. I knew he was going to be big, and he is: a seven-year-old, large-boned, 112-pound protective tank—with special dietary needs.

~ Morgan Rhodes, Photographer, Food Blogger, and Baker

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Raw food is not recommended by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Their policy states that raw or undercooked animal-source protein is a public health risk. They are correct in that if you do not handle uncooked meat properly, you can make yourself ill–just as you would if you mishandled the meat for your own meals. If your dog licks your child’s face after eating, your child could get germs from the meat. Feeding a raw food diet takes some forethought and food safety skills, but it does not differ from the steps you take to protect yourself. Dogs are carnivores, and their digestive systems are designed to handle foodborne illnesses that we cannot. There are a lot of warnings out there against feeding a raw diet to dogs, usually followed by “there is no hard evidence that raw meat-based diets are healthier” (AAHA.org).

The pet food industry is a multibillion-dollar business, so there is a real conflict between processed food and feeding basic raw food. More in-depth research is needed, so for now it falls to the pet parent to take into account a veterinarian’s advice and current health of the dog.

I have found success with both a cooked food and raw diet for Zu. It comes down to assessing how much time you can spend, the cost, and how your dog responds to one or the other. I think our dogs grow and change as we do, just faster. What may work at age three may not at age five. At five years old, Zu’s metabolism seemed to slow down (remember yourself at 30?). It’s been a balancing act to find the correct number of calories to coincide with his activity level. I was lucky to find a great local Georgia company that sources local meats and delivers to my house. If you’re interested in feeding a raw food diet, do your research on feeding guidelines for your breed of dog and make sure the food contains the entire animal in the grinding process: bones, liver, muscle, ligaments, etc. Zu’s food is completely ground up, with no chance of him choking on tiny raw bones. This process also provides micronutrients essential for good health. Make sure you check with your veterinarian. Many will advise against a raw food diet, but you should still have the conversation at your next checkup. If you enjoy baking as I do, you can take that first step of providing better nutrition by making your own organic dog treats. The recipes are very simple and basic, a fun project to do with your kids. Treats will last in the refrigerator for two weeks and in the freezer for three months. They’re great gifts for friends and family. Zu loves them, and we think your pets will, too!

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Sources: petfoodindustry.com, avma.org, petfoodinstitute.org, packagedfacts.com, aaha.org 13

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Photo by Morgan Rhodes

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From Morgan’s Kitchen Recipe by Morgan Rhodes

Bacon and Pumpkin Dog Cookies

EXPLORING THE WORLD WITH THEIR NOSE! You’ll find evidence of their very thorough sniffing everywhere – walls, doors, windows, and more. All dogs have a better sense of smell than humans – 10,000 to 100,000 times better in fact thanks to having millions more scent receptors. But compared to other breeds, the German Shepherd ranks near the top in scenting ability. It’s no wonder they make such great police and detection dogs. Among many other jobs, they are known for their bomb and drug sniffing work, tracking, and search and rescue.

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Ingredients ½ or 1 slice of bacon, finely chopped ½ cup pumpkin puree 2 large eggs ½ cup old fashioned oats 1 ¾ cups oat flour • Use organic ingredients when possible Method Preheat oven to 350˚F/177°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, set aside. Finely chop already cooked bacon, or heat a large skillet and fry bacon until crisp. Drain, cool and pat bacon with paper towels to remove some of the grease. In a large bowl, combine pumpkin puree, 1 egg, oats, and oat flour. Add chopped bacon, mix until combined. Lightly flour work surface and roll dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Use cookie cutters to cut out shapes, place on baking sheet. Mix up last egg and wash over each cookie with a pastry brush. Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes until edges are golden brown. Cool on a wire rack completely before feeding to dog. Notes: This recipe made 23 cookies with the pig cookie cutter. There will be more, or less, depending on the cookie cutter you choose. Adjust baking time according to your oven.

We know your pup will love to eat bacon; however, since it is high in fat and salt, only give your pup very small amounts. This recipe calls for just one slice finely chopped. Just enough to give the treats that tasty bacon flavor.


Photo by Morgan Rhodes

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The Power of Social Media

Story and photos by Hannah Stonehouse Hudson

A Man’s Best Friend

John Unger would take Schoep, a rescue that he adopted when he was a puppy, into Lake Superior each day to help ease the aging dog’s arthritis. Here is testimony to the unconditional love and trust of a man and his best friend . . .

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“I never imagined the tender moment I captured here would eventually go viral and touch the hearts of hundreds of thousands.�

~ Hannah Stonehouse Hudson TALES AND TREATS

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The Power of Social Media

Story and photos by Hannah Stonehouse Hudson

The universe gives you what you need, sometimes in the oddest ways. In this instance, it was a social media community that took care of me when I needed it most. It all started in June of 2012 when I told my husband I wanted to take photos of dogs for the rest of my life. He laughed at me and said, “Something very weird will have to happen for that to work.” I had been a wedding photographer for over a decade at that point, and I was getting burnt out. My dream was to make a living taking dog photos, but in a town of 300 people 45 minutes from the nearest Wally World, this all seemed very unlikely. Something really weird indeed did have to happen. Over the next few months, I kept running into a friend of mine with an old dog who reminded me so much of an old dog I had. My friend John and his dog Schoep were on my daily walks with my dog Scout, and almost every time I ran into them, we talked about doing photos of Schoep. At the end of July 2012, I spoke to John, and he asked me to come down to the beach and take photos of Schoep in the water. He was concerned that he was going to have to put Schoep down the next week due to his arthritis, and he didn’t want to wait any longer for photos. I ran down to the beach, snapped a few photos, and could not believe what I saw: total love and trust in the form of an elderly dog fast asleep on a man’s shoulder while they floated in Lake Superior. (Photo of John and Schoep on previous page.) I asked John if I could post a preview to Facebook. He said yes, and very shortly after that (like a few hours after) our lives would change in surprising ways. 19

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Here is the short version of a long story. It became a photo called (at the time) “the most viral photo of all time.” So much good came from that photo, both from a professional and personal standpoint. Schoep got another comfortable year of life thanks to people who donated for his care, and I was taken care of in a way that I would have never imagined or expected. A vast virtual community built itself around the photo. People met online who would not have met otherwise. Virtual groups formed, and in one case created a project that still exists almost 7 years later. This project creates blankets by sending fleece material from one woman to another (all over the world), and they create the blankets and send them to a shelter of the group’s choice. The photo was on the cover of newspapers and magazines all over the world for months, and I was being interviewed by major TV shows and networks about my photography and my free workshops for animal shelters. The attention that this photo and the story that surrounded it garnered was a combination of amazing, overwhelming, heartwarming, and slightly frightening. For me personally, my business took a turn that I had wanted but never thought I’d have happen. I was taking photos of dogs because “something really weird had happened.” My husband couldn’t stop laughing that I really was on the way to taking photos of dogs for the rest of my life. For about four months I was flying all over the United States taking photos of dogs and visiting animal shelters. My phone was ringing off the hook with inquiries and interview requests. I was hired to go as close as Chicago and as far as Seattle. My dream was coming true, and I was in slight shock on some days. Then the unthinkable happened. On January 26th, 2013 at 5:30 am my husband Jim kissed me goodbye as I lay in bed. He left to take his clients ice fishing Photo by Hannah Stonehouse Hudson

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“Social media is now a part of our lives permanently, so I have taken what I learned over the past and created a speaking business that helps individuals and groups as varied as broadcast organizations, animal shelters, and law enforcement. “ on Lake Superior (he was a successful fishing guide). At about 10:30 am my phone starting ringing off the hook, and I ignored it because I didn’t recognize the number and my life was still chaos from all the publicity the photo had received. I just wanted to catch up on work so I could actually hang out with Jim that night when he returned from fishing. The phone rang and rang and rang, and I just continued to ignore it. Then there was a BANG BANG BANG on the front door. I opened it up, and the Bayfield police officer (who, ironically, had replaced Jim on the police force when he retired to become a fulltime guide) was standing in front of me pale as a ghost. “Your husband went in. It doesn’t look good.” What he meant was that Jim’s snowmobile had gone through the ice while he was with his clients, and he had spent 45 minutes submerged in the cold water of Lake Superior. I was driven to our local hospital 45 minutes away and waited for the ambulance to deliver my husband to the ER. When he arrived, I was handed his soaking wet wallet and asked to identify him. I walked into the room as they were doing CPR and confirmed that it was indeed my husband. As a last-ditch effort to save him, they put him on a helicopter to Duluth, MN where there was a higher level trauma center. You know what I did as he flew away? I posted on Facebook, begging my huge virtual community to pray for him. Then I was driven the 2 hours to the hospital in Duluth, and as we made our way there, the doctor called me to let me know they had pronounced him deceased. The next two weeks before the funeral were a blur. I don’t

totally recall everything that occurred, but I do know that people came out to help me and my family in an incredible way with food, fundraisers, and so much love. It was very similar to the things that had happened with the Schoep and John photo. This time, though, it was a combination of the local community and the virtual community. In the weeks and months following Jim’s death, I could have either hidden in my house and avoided the world or I could have jumped on a plane to see all of the beautiful people that I met because of the wild popularity of the photo of the man and his dog. So I jumped on a plane and traveled the world taking photos of dogs. Texas, California, Florida, Georgia, Belize. I went everywhere with my Canon. I was so thankful for the opportunity to live my dream and for the people who hired me to do what I do best. The community that was created because of that image is one that still exists today. Eight years have passed, and though I take fewer dog photos than I did before, it is for a very special reason. The overwhelming chaos of social media when I took that viral photo and when my husband died gave me some particular skills that I now teach to other people and companies. Dealing with social media after a tragic event is not something that I want anyone to have to experience. Social media is now a part of our lives permanently, so I have taken what I learned over the past and created a speaking business that helps individuals and groups as varied as broadcast organizations, animal shelters, and law enforcement. Without the photo I took and the community that I met because of it, I would not have been able to bounce back so fully from my husband’s death. They took care of me when I needed it most, and now it is my turn to help others with what I learned.

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Newfoundlands, Newfies, are large, fluffy, and resemble bears. They are known for their sweet temperament. Their sterling character is expressed in their affinity for kids. Trusting and trainable, “Newfies” respond well to gentle guidance and make great therapy dogs.

Hannah Stonehouse Hudson is a public speaker, social media strategist, certified trainer, writer, widow, old dog lover,. and outdoor enthusiast. Her in-depth knowledge of the viral nature of the internet comes from being thrust unwittingly into the spotlight when in the space of four months she had the photo of John and Schoep go viral worldwide and she lost her husband to a tragic accident. In 2015 Hannah’s TEDx Talk on Empathy and the Power of Virtual Communities had one goal: to empower people to face their fears and live their lives fully when their world blows up. Hannah now leads seminars on social media and grief, social media strategy, social media crisis communication, and how to move forward when tragedy strikes.

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Recipe and Photo by Morgan Rhodes

Peanut Butter, Pumpkin, and Oat Dog Treats Make around 36 cookies Prep Time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 35 minutes Ingredients When possible purchase all organic ingredients. 2½ cups oat flour 2 eggs ½ cup canned pumpkin (can use sweet potatoes instead) 2 tablespoons peanut butter ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon Method Preheat oven to 350°F/177°C. Mix together oat flour, eggs, pumpkin, peanut butter, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Add water, if needed, for the dough to be workable. With a rolling pin, roll dough out to ¼–inch thickness on an oat–floured surface. Use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes and place them on the parchment–lined baking sheet. Bake at 350°F/177°C for 30 minutes, until treats are golden brown. Time will vary depending on your oven. Turn off your oven and allow treats to cool for 1 hour. This will help make them crunchier. If still warm after removing from oven, cool on a wire rack. Notes This recipe makes 36 cookies using this particular biscuit stamp. It may make more or less depending on the cookie cutter used. Store cookies in air tight container in refrigerator for 2 weeks, or freeze for 3 months.

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Recipe and Photos by Morgan Rhodes

Organic Peanut Butter and Oat Dog Treats Ingredients 2 cups oat flour 1 cup rolled oats ⅓ cup smooth peanut butter 1 cup hot water 1 egg (for egg wash) Method Preheat oven to 350°F/177°C. Place all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Pour water over rolled oats and peanut butter. Add more oat flour if too wet, more water if too dry. Knead the dough. Roll out dough into ¼–inch thickness and use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Beat the egg in a small bowl and brush each cookie. Bake for 40 minutes. Move to a cooling rack or turn off oven and let cookies cool for an hour inside of oven, then move them to a rack. Treats are good for 2 weeks in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

Making your own homemade dog treats is healthy for your dog and a great activity for your kids! By controlling what goes into the recipe, you can ensure that your pet is getting a nutritious and wholesome snack. You can also tailor your dog treat recipes to your dog’s taste preferences as well as cater to any dietary restrictions. 26

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The smallest feline is a masterpiece.

- Leonardo da Vinci

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Once Upon a Time... Harry Frees’s photographs were uncommon because he used live animals and no tricks were involved. He initially added a bow, a hat or some small clothing accessory to his four-legged subjects. About 10 years into his career, Frees began expanding the animals’ wardrobe (making it easier to pose them) and created elaborate settings for his models.

Article source: Mary L. Weigley, Pennsylvania Heritage Magazine, Volume XL, Number 2, Spring 2014. www.phmc.pa.gov

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Pennsylvania native Harry Whittier Frees (1879-1953) became famous for his unusual photographs of young cats, dogs, rabbits, and chickens wearing all sorts of garments and engaged in a variety of activities. Frees created images for magazines, calendars, books, and postcards for more than a half century from 1902 to 1953. He began to pose fancifully garbed animals in 1905; because of their popularity, they became his signature work. Frees became a staff animal photographer for the Rotograph Company of New York. According to an article which appeared in the March 1, 1937, issue of Life, Frees began his career purely by accident. Shortly after the opening of the 20th century, one of the Frees family brought a paper hat to the dinner table for a birthday celebration. The family gaily passed the hat from head to head until, in a final burst of hilarity, someone placed it on the head of the family cat, who, up until that time, had taken no part in the fun. Then and there Frees took a photograph of the fashionable feline. The odd picture was so much admired that he took others and sold some to a postcard printer. The printer clamored for more. And so an unconventional career commenced.


Left : Hanging up the wash. Above:The nurse TALES AND TREATS

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Harry Whittier Frees was once widely known throughout the United States, initially for his novelty postcards, and later for his children’s books. Here, animals are dressed and posed as people in a variety of settings. These wonderfully cute photographs from the early decades of the twentieth century are as surprising and appealing as ever. It is Frees’ first book to be published in almost fifty years.

Frees’s photographs were uncommon because he used live animals, and no tricks were involved. He initially added a bow, a hat, or some small clothing accessory to his four-legged subjects. About 10 years into his career, Frees began expanding the animals’ wardrobe (making it easier to pose them) and created elaborate settings for his models. He attired them in dresses, work uniforms, smocks, shawls, robes, and aprons made by his mother or his housekeeper Annie Edelman. The clothes were held in place by pins so the animals could be quickly dressed and undressed. They were then posed in human situations: ironing clothes, cooking on an old-fashioned cast-iron stove, hanging laundry, playing a piano, pumping water, even casting votes in a wooden ballot box! The work was challenging, time-consuming, and nerve-racking. It caused Frees so much anxiety that he photographed his furry subjects for only three months a year. To make the situation even more difficult for Frees, only about 30 negatives out of every 100 could be used. Consequently, he needed the remainder of the year to recuperate from exhaustion and formulate new ideas. “These unusual photographs of real animals were made possible only by patient, unfailing kindness on the part of the photographer at all times,” Frees said. He borrowed pets from neighbors and rented animals from nearby pet stores. The most popular model for his work was his cat Rags, who was later joined by Fluff, an Angora kitten. Rags was an ordinary short-haired cat and the model Frees photographed the most. According to the article in Little Folks, Rags evidently enjoyed being photographed and was a good model. “Rags possesses an unusual intellect for a cat. He has been known to keep a pose for several minutes without as much as the flicker of a whisker. When the very limit of his endurance has been reached, he will give a protesting little murmur. A short romp on the ground, together with a choice bit of meat as a reward, will at once restore him to his former amiability.”

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Top left: Cats, Dogs & Other Rabbits: The Extraordinary World of Harry Whittier Frees Published by Dewi Lewis Publishing, 2006 Top right: When bedtime comes Bottom: The wedding June, 1914 Photo source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

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By Jane Sobel Klonsky, Co-Founder, Project Unconditional

COMFORT ZONE How your Animals can Help During Challenging Times Covid-19 is affecting all of us, isolating us and unleashing emotions like fear, anxiety, depression, frustration, anger, and boredom. How we can keep ourselves and our families safe? Will we be able to survive financially? Our dogs have no idea that we are in the midst of a pandemic, but they do pick up on our moods and feelings. Social isolation can take its toll on us. Our dogs can provide welcomed emotional support during self-quarantine periods. Our dogs, in particular, give us companionship and security and help brighten our days. They give us a reason to focus on positive energy, getting out in the fresh air and exercising (keeping in mind social distancing), and playing with our dog or maybe teaching our dog a new trick. These are all great stress reducers. Life is slower now. We have more time at home with our dogs. If we let them, our dogs can help us become stronger, more patient, and more compassionate individuals. And what if a dog owner gets ill with the virus? Who will care for the dog? It’s a time to help our local shelters and senior dog rescue organizations that have seen an influx of dogs in this crisis. Whether you have a dog, young or old, or are thinking about getting a dog, we all know that our dogs give us a tremendous amount of the unconditional love we so desperately need, especially now. Our relationship with dogs and other pets can help us find peace and comfort.

Charlie, The Klonsky’s beloved Goldendoodle, outside his home in Vermont. Photo © Jane Sobel Klonsky 34

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“Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” ~ Anatole France


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PROJECT UNCONDITIONAL Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky This article is dedicated to the memory of all of the precious dogs in our lives who have shared their love and lives with us. All the memories of our lives together still live strong. They have all left a piece of their souls with us and are watching us and helping guide us through what life brings our way.

“Project Unconditional is for all who appreciate

the connection, unconditional love, and bond that a canine companion provides. It’s for those who can’t imagine life without their beloved dog. It’s for all the people who have lost their dogs, who don’t want to get another because they just aren’t ready yet. It’s for the people who love dogs but haven’t yet had the chance to bring one home. Through stories, photographs and film, Project Unconditional has documented the relationships of more than 300 senior dogs and their human partners. It is a beautiful reminder–both wistful and vibrantly hopeful–to cherish our older animals and the rich moments we have with them, and to thank them for the love and friendship they unconditionally offer us.” ~ Jane Sobel Klonsky, Co-Founder, Project Unconditional

projectunconditional.com

Photo © Jane Sobel Klonsky 36

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“This story is also dedicated to my boy Charlie, whose unconditional love helped make everyday a better day and was with me and gave me encouragement and love to help navigate the waters through the creation of my “Project Unconditional” “When I started my project, my Goldendoodle Charlie was 5 years old, in the prime of his life. I never imagined Charlie getting older. He was the energizer bunny! He was ageless. Charlie was perpetually joyful and silly. He was an accomplished obedience dog (he heeled beautifully...when he wanted to), and made so many kids and hospital patients smile during his therapy dog visits. He was a happy boy dressed up in one of the silly costumes we would put him in - a lion’s mane or even a pink tutu!” RIP Charlie. 6/17/2007 - 10/23/2019 ~ Jane Sobel Klonsky, Charlie’s mom

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Project Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky

We are proud to showcase Jane’s book in this issue of Tales & Treats. We met in Jane in 2016 when she released her book and was fortunate to have interviewed her for another publication. We caught up with Jane recently and wanted to share her ongoing journey with you. ~ Tales & Treats Creative Team

The idea for Project Unconditional came to Jane as she was sitting in the office of her insurance broker, Angela, watching her caress her old Bulldog, Clementine, who came to work with her every day. Touched by the tender yet powerful connection between the two, Jane asked if she could take some photos. Clemmie, who had just been diagnosed with cancer, would be the first subject for a project that has taken the Vermont-based photographer across the country, meeting and photographing people of diverse backgrounds and dogs of all different shapes and sizes.

The one common element among the dogs photographed for Project Unconditional is their age, but the photos themselves defy many preconceptions about older dogs. The dogs in Jane’s photos are not only full of love, but also contentment. This is part of what Jane thinks makes senior dogs so special: their ability to live in the moment and take pleasure in just being with their humans. For her, Project Unconditional is about capturing the gratitude and joy older dogs share with their human companions.

Above: Clementine with Phil Arbolino, Angela’s husband, Dorset, Vermont. Right: Top left: Judy Coates and Walt, Granbury, Texas. Photo © Jane Sobel Klonsky. 38

TALES AND TREATS

Initially Jane felt the photos in her series should speak for themselves, but at the encouragement of her husband Arthur she began asking her human subjects to write anecdotes and reflections about their dogs. She was glad she did. These personal accounts are poignant, honest, and heartwarming. Although each story is unique, they are all universal testaments to the enduring bond between humans and dogs. Through her project, Jane Sobel Klonsky has connected with many different organizations dedicated to furthering the relationship between dogs and humans, whether through training service and working dogs, or finding homes for dogs in need. Those groups that rescue abandoned senior dogs have a special place in Jane’s heart. In October 2016, a selection of photos and stories from Project Unconditional was published as a book, Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love (National Geographic Books, 2016). Jane hopes that Unconditional, a celebration of the bonds between older dogs and the people who love them, inspires its readers to reflect on what their own dogs mean to them and to appreciate the gift of loving and caring for dogs in their final years. Since the release of the book, some of the elder dogs featured have crossed the Rainbow Bridge. This is a tribute to all of them.


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Project Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky

Please tell us about Project Unconditional. I always wanted to produce a body of work that would combine my love of photography with my love of dogs. This remained for years at the back of my mind, and it would occasionally resurface, but I couldn’t figure out what I wanted to do. It finally clicked in one chance moment of seeing the comfort, tenderness, and care shared between a person and her old dog. What I witnessed was love flowing in both directions. Seeing that mutual commitment between human and animal made me realize that photographing people and dogs together was a way to visually represent unconditional love. Dogs don’t care if you are rich or famous; they don’t judge or criticize. You are just their family and they love you. Although humans unfortunately don’t always reward dogs with the same loyalty, those who do often go to great lengths to ensure that their canine companions are happy, healthy, safe, and loved. Why did you want to do a project about older dogs? Our relationships with older dogs have a special depth. As dogs age, they become more vulnerable and need us more, but at the same time they have more experience and thus more to teach. I have heard so many people describe their older dogs as “wise.” I think that means that they show us what truly matters: being present in the moment, and being with friends and loved ones. Everything else—ego, concerns about the future—falls away. Senior dogs live their lives at a slower pace and make us slow down and enjoy ours. I love looking in old dogs’ eyes and feeling the wisdom of their souls.

Sandra Coley-Greene and Clyde, , Mesa, Arizona. Photo © Jane Sobel Klonsky. TALES AND TREATS 41


“Ol’ Red was a Boxer-Pit Bull mix and was 15 years old when he came to Lionel’s Legacy, a recue group with a committment to saving senior dogs that I founded in 2011. He had recently been diagnosed with lymphoma and was deemed a hospice rescue. Ol’ Red helped us see the world through his eyes, to appreciate the sweet simple things in life, and to enjoy each other’s company instead of moving at the speed the rest of the world demands.” ~ Laura Oliver, Founder, Lionel’s Legacy, El Cajon, California 42

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Project Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky

You have photographed a number of senior dogs in families with young children. What do you think caring for a senior dog teaches young people? Some of my favorite photo shoots have been with senior dogs and kids. Especially when the dogs have special needs, it’s wonderful to see how gentle and understanding the children are with them. A number of those shoots have been with fosters or adopters for Lionel’s Legacy, an organization in San Diego which has as its mission both senior dog rescue and humane education for children. The founder, Laura Oliver, has two daughters who accompany her when she rescues dogs from shelters and who are very involved in caring for them. The girls even sing to some of the dogs when they cross over. Having older dogs in their lives taught them about patience and compassion, and that getting old doesn’t make animals or people any less valuable. What are your photo shoots like and where have they taken you? For many of my shoots, because the dogs are older and can’t travel far or get around like they used to, I go to people’s homes and take it from there. Wherever we are, I spend time getting to know them and letting the dogs get comfortable with me. I encourage people to be natural and candid, to cuddle, talk to, and play with their dogs as if I wasn’t there. I want to understand what the dogs mean to their humans and do justice to the connection I see in the companions. Above: Laura Oliver and her family, Lionel’s Legacy’s founders, took Ol’ Red in as a foster dog and ended up keeping him. Her daughters, Reina and Madi Oliver, loved him until he crossed the Rainbow Bridge. Photos © Jane Sobel Klonsky.

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Project Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky

When I have the opportunity, I arrange a shoot at a location that is unique to or characteristic of a part of the country—a beach in California, a forest in Vermont, or a mountainside in Alaska. My first photo sessions for the project were with older dogs in and around my hometown in Vermont, but thanks to the wonderful organizations I have partnered with, I have met people from coast to coast and have had the chance to photograph all different kinds of dogs: big ones and little ones; pure bred and mixes; companion dogs and working dogs; dogs that have been treasured their entire lives and dogs that have only recently found loving homes. My experience has been that people all over the country, of all different ages and backgrounds, have been thrilled to share their love for their dogs with me. This project has given you the opportunity to work with your daughter, Kacey Klonsky, a filmmaker. What has that meant to you?

Jane Sobel Klonsky is an award-winning commercial photographer known for her work in travel, lifestyle, and sports. Over the past four decades, Jane has published several books and has captured, through photographs, the vibrancy of local cultures across the US as well as in China, Myanmar and the African continent. She continues to do extensive work for Getty Images. Jane lives with her husband, Arthur, and their dogs, Greta and Sam, in Vermont, and is mother to Kacey, a filmmaker with whom she collaborates. Kacey Klonsky is a filmmaker, photographer and producer based in Portland, Oregon. After graduating from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts with a major in film in television, Kacey made her way out west, eventually landing in Portland, Oregon. Her passion for travel and documentary production has taken her all over the world telling stories from the highlands of Papua New Guinea to Denali Alaska. She has always had a passion for documentary storytelling and a deep love of the outdoors. She is currently a producer at Wieden + Kennedy where she brings some of the best campaigns to life for world class clients. You can almost always find her outside with her camera and her Great Dane Ruthie. 44 TALES AND TREATS

Since the beginning of my project, Kacey has been living on the West Coast and working as a videographer, but she joins me on shoots when she comes home, or meets me in locations like Alaska. Because she was a documentary film major at NYU Tisch School, it made sense for her to start shooting video and interviewing my subjects. She accompanied me on shoots in CA, Or, Alaska, and VT and created videos of the people and dogs I was photographing. She created a short film, Love Unleashed, that has won awards at many film festivals. I think her films bring my subjects to life in a new way and add a new depth to my still photos. I’ve always had a close relationship with Kacey, but working together on this project has taken our relationship to a new level. www.projectunconditional.com www.kaceyklonsky.com


Senior dogs live their lives at a slower

pace and make us

slow down and enjoy ours. I love looking

in old dogs’ eyes and

feeling the wisdom of their souls.

Above: John Hembree and Forrest, Oxnard, California Below: Deperro family and Tiro, Bend, Oregon. Photos Š Jane Sobel Klonsky TALES AND TREATS 45


Project Unconditional: Older Dogs, Deeper Love By Jane Sobel Klonsky

What would you like people to take away from Project Unconditional? I hope that people who have dogs will appreciate them even more, and those who don’t will consider adopting a senior dog. What I have learned from this project is how rewarding it is to spend time with an older dog. I think that for adopters of senior rescues, the time together is especially meaningful knowing the difference that they have made in their dog’s life. However, whether our journey with old dogs is coming soon to a close or we have just begun our adventure with them, we can make that time richer and seem to last longer by letting dogs teach us how to take joy in the present moment. Does your project have a personal story that you want to share? Since I first worked with Nancy Suttles, Publisher of Tales & Treats, my project has made a complete circle and affected me close to home. When I started my project, my Goldendoodle Charlie was 5 years old, in the prime of his life. I never imagined Charlie getting older and being included in the general population of senior dogs that I was featuring. But life goes on and we all change and age, even though I always told Charlie that he would live forever. He was the energizer bunny! He was ageless. On October 23, 2019, our boy Charlie bravely lost his battle with hemangiosarcoma. Charlie was 12. We weren’t ready for him to leave us, but would we ever be? Charlie lived life to the fullest every day with exuberance and joy and

love. The morning he passed, he walked 2 miles with my husband Arthur, and even jumped on our bed with my slippers in his mouth (a matched pair, of course!), like he did every morning. He never missed a night sleeping on our bed with his head resting on “Charlie’s pillow”. Charlie was perpetually joyful and silly. He was an accomplished obedience dog (he heeled beautifully...when he wanted to), and made so many kids and hospital patients smile during his therapy dog visits. He was a happy boy dressed up in one of the silly costumes we would put him in - even a pink tutu! His greatest joys were retrieving balls and swimming. He would swim around and around in circles until he could retrieve 2 and sometimes 3 tennis balls at the same time and when he was younger, he would always drop a tennis ball at our feet for another throw. Everything in our lives was better with Charlie. He made us smile, take time to smell the roses, he taught us about humility and responsibility and caring, he taught us not to take ourselves so seriously and to love unconditionally. Charlie was the glue that held our family together when Kacey went to college, spreading joy and love. Charlie was my “heart dog” and my husband Arthur’s best friend. We were so fortunate to have had Charlie in our lives. We feel peace knowing that our Charlie boy is chasing balls and squirrels and swimming and eating all the yummy treats he desires with Molly, Otto, Moose, Rosie, Brandy, Lucky, Humphrey and all our other beloved fur babies.

A 46 TALES AND TREATS


Everything in our lives was

better with Charlie. He made us smile, take time to smell

the roses, he taught us about

humility and responsibility and

caring, he taught us not to take ourselves so seriously and to love unconditionally.

Above: Charlie having fun in woods. Below: Charlie was perpetually joyful and silly. He was an accomplished obedience dog and made so many kids and hospital patients smile during his therapy dog visits. He was a happy boy dressed up in one of the silly costumes we would put him in—even a pink tutu! TALES AND TREATS 47


Recipe and Photos by Morgan Rhodes

Doggie Birthday Beef Cake Ingredients 1 pound ground beef 1 egg ½ cup fresh or frozen peas and carrots, plus more frozen peas for decorating 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into 2-inch cubes Method Preheat oven to 350° F. Combine ground beef, egg, peas and carrots in a large bowl. Form into patties and distribute evenly into mini pans. Place pans on a baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, depending on your oven. While baking patties, bring water to a boil in a large pot to boil sweet potatoes. Boil sweet potatoes for 20 minutes, drain and allow to cool. Mash sweet potatoes with a potato masher or fork. Allow both the beef patties and sweet potatoes to cool completely before assembling the cake. Notes: Sweet potatoes can be spread on to the beef cake with a knife or small spatula. If you would like to get fancy, put mashed sweet potatoes into an icing bag with a decorative tip and pipe as you would a regular cake.

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Yummy!


Source: University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, @wtscout/Instagram and WeatherTech

PART 1:

SCOUT:

A Story of Courage When clinicians at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine began caring for Scout in July 2019, they had no idea they would soon inspire, and appear in, a 2020 Super Bowl commercial. But they had a canine star on their hand, and a very appreciative client who set in motion the ad’s production. Super Bowl LIV aired in February 2020, and Scout appeared alongside members of the school’s faculty and staff who were part of the 7-year-old golden retriever’s cancer treatment journey. The 30-second commercial, titled “Lucky Dog,” aired during the game’s second quarter and was paid for by WeatherTech, manufacturer of automotive accessories and home and pet care products. Scout is a member of the family of WeatherTech founder and CEO David MacNeil. The ad features Scout’s journey as a cancer survivor, celebrating the work being done at the UW School of Veterinary Medicine. It encouraged viewers to donate to the school’s cancer research efforts. This is the first time UW–Madison has been the subject of a Super Bowl commercial. It was created by Chicago-based agency Pinnacle Advertising and filmed in December 2019 at the school and its teaching hospital, UW Veterinary Care. “This was an amazing opportunity not only for the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the School of Veterinary Medicine, but for veterinary medicine worldwide,” says Mark Markel, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. “So much of what’s known globally today about how best to diagnose and treat devastating diseases such as cancer originated in veterinary medicine. We were thrilled to share with Super Bowl viewers how our profession benefits beloved animals like Scout and helps people, too.” Photos: Courtesy of WeatherTech 52 TALES AND TREATS


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The Fight Cancer is the number one cause of illness and death in the aging dog population. Having lost his last three dogs to cancer and with Scout now also affected by the disease, efforts to advance life-saving treatments and technology are close to MacNeil. “Scout’s illness devastated us,” says MacNeil. “We wanted this year’s Super Bowl effort to not only raise awareness, but also financial support for the incredible research and innovative treatments happening at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, where Scout was a patient. We wanted to use the biggest stage possible to highlight Scout’s story and these incredible breakthroughs, which are not just limited to helping dogs and pets. This research will help advance cancer treatments for humans as well, so there’s the potential to save millions of lives of all species.” Last summer, tragedy struck when Scout collapsed at home. He was rushed to his local animal hospital, where an ultrasound revealed a tumor on his heart. Scout was given a grave prognosis: a life expectancy of no more than one month. He was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma, an aggressive cancer of blood vessel walls. Searching for more information, Scout and his family rushed to UW Veterinary Care on the recommendation of their local veterinarian. There, specialists with the emergency and critical care and oncology teams stabilized Scout’s condition and arrived at a cutting-edge treatment plan.

Photos: Courtesy of WeatherTech 54 TALES AND TREATS


“We wanted to use the biggest stage possible to highlight Scout’s story and these incredible breakthroughs, which are not just limited to helping dogs and pets. This research will help advance cancer treatments for humans as well, so there’s the potential to save millions of lives of all species.” ~ The MacNeils, Scout’s family

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“Sweet is just the beginning when describing Scout. He was something larger than life that is hard to put into words. Kind, loving, caring, joyful, happy, intuitive, and brave are just a few. Nonetheless, he had an ability to reach right into your heart and make you feel loved. He lived to love and to be loved.”

~ @wtscout/Instagram

In mid-July, he began chemotherapy at UW Veterinary Care, followed by radiation therapy targeting his heart tumor. He also received immunotherapy aimed at stimulating his immune system to attack cells expressing specific tumor proteins. Just a month later, Scout and his family received good news: His heart tumor had decreased in size by 78 percent. By September, the tumor was 90 percent smaller than its original size. Scout continued to fight his cancer right along with his family and extended family at UW Veterinary Care. Unfortunately, Scout lost his courageous battle in March 2020. The treatments Scout received are the result of years of scientific inquiry involving experts and collaborators from many different fields. Oncologists at the UW School of Veterinary Medicine, where more than 3,500 patient visits were seen in 2019 through the Oncology Service, are world-renowned for advancing clinical treatments for dogs and cats with cancer. The school is also a leader in comparative oncology research, where companion dogs and cats are included in clinical trials to investigate new cancer therapies with the goal of informing clinical treatments in both animal and human patients. The goal is to create new cancer diagnostics and treatments that result in a bidirectional flow of information between veterinary patients and people. Dogs and people not only share similar cancer rates—about one in four dogs and one in three people will develop cancer in their lifetime—but naturally occurring tumors in dogs often share almost identical characteristics to human cancers in terms of recurrence and spread (metastasis), response to treatment, and more.

Right page top: Scout with members of the radiation oncology and anesthesia services. Bottom right: Scout snuggles with Bianca Ferlisi, a fourth-year veterinary medical student from Ross University, who completed her clinical rotations at UW-Madison. Bottom left: Ruthanne Chun DVM’ 91, associate dean for clinical affairs and teaching hospital director at the UW School of Veterinary Medicine, embraces Scout in the oncology waiting room at UW Veterinary Care. 56 TALES AND TREATS


Click here to learn more about UW Veterinary Medicine

Photos: Courtesy of WeatherTech

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Scout’s Instagram post: Dear friends, Our beloved Golden Retriever Scout MacNeil has crossed the rainbow bridge into a place where he does not have to fight cancer anymore. In the last couple of weeks the cancer tumors started to bleed around his heart and around his lungs. The doctors were able to stop the bleeding for a while, but his body became anemic and weak.

Past clinical studies at the School of Veterinary Medicine have yielded new technologies and treatments with better effectiveness and less toxicity. For instance, successful clinical trials in pet dogs with naturally occurring nasal tumors in the early 2000s at UW Veterinary Care led to widespread use of TomoTherapy in human medicine. This state-of-the-art machine, developed at UW–Madison, uses CT-guided radiation treatments to attack cancer with pinpoint accuracy while sparing nearby healthy tissues—a form of treatment that Scout benefited from. The school is also one of three institutions participating in a five-year clinical trial to test a vaccine for the prevention of many types of cancer in dogs—a potential paradigm shift in veterinary and human medicine.

Scout was fighting hard and he bravely tried his best to stay strong, but it became clear his quality of life had seriously declined. Of course there is much sadness as he will be unbelievably missed, but we have so much to be grateful for because we knew his sweet and loving soul.

Funds raised by the Super Bowl commercial (100 percent of gifts) will be used to support research at the School of Veterinary Medicine to better diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer and for the purchase of specialized equipment that will aid clinicians and researchers in identifying new cancer-fighting drugs and treatments—discoveries that are shared with the world.

Sweet is just the beginning when describing Scout. He was something larger than life that is hard to put into words. Kind, loving, caring, joyful, happy, intuitive, and brave are just a few. Nonetheless, he had an ability to reach right into your heart and make you feel loved. He lived to love and to be loved.

“Having the opportunity to use and apply this ‘one medicine’ approach more globally will allow us to aid veterinary patients while also helping humans with cancer. It’s a huge need that we are working to move forward, and we are extremely grateful for the support,” says David Vail, professor of comparative oncology at the School of Veterinary Medicine.

Scout will live on in all the people he met including his amazing Doctors at the University of Wisconsin Veterinary School who valiantly tried to save him.

An important goal of comparative oncology clinical trials is to raise the current standard of cancer care. In veterinary and human medicine, recurrence and metastasis for aggressive tumors are “a very real problem,” says Vail. “We have such a long way to go both in physician-based and veterinarian-based oncology.”

Scout’s legacy will live on by the lives he touched with his enormous spirit and by bringing international attention to canine cancer and his own personal fight against hemangiosarcoma cancer. When Scout passed away today, a little of all of us died with him. Scout started his life in Midway, Texas playing with all of his siblings on a farm. Today he died a hero. He was everyone’s sweet little baby puppy golden angel and will remain in our hearts forever.

z

This is Part 1 of a three part series. Read more in the next issue of Tales & Treats and follow us on social media. To learn more about Scout’s care and how you can make a difference, please visit: vetmed.wisc.edu/scout weathertech.com/donate Photo: Courtesy of WeatherTech

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Scout’s legacy will live on by the lives he touched with his enormous spirit . . .

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Remi’s

TOY BOX s

Hi, my name is Rambunctious Remington. However, my human parents call me “Remi” among some other cute names that I can’t mention here… ha! ha! I am a Cairn Terrier (like Toto in The Wizard of Oz), and I am fiercely loyal to my family. Unlike Toto, who was a dark brindle, I have more of a girly wheaten coloring. My mommy says I have a baby wolf face. I do love to chew, but only toys… no shoes! I am adaptable to most environments because I am a hearty, sturdy little breed. I love to dig and hunt (especially for bargains), and you better have lots of energy because I enjoy a very active and playful lifestyle. I may be small, but I am very smart. I have animal friends all over the world who share their favorite toys and products with me through our social media pages. Just like me, no matter how a pet dog, cat, bird, horse, or other “family member” comes into your life, the bond we share is a special one. We animals can be quirky, happy-go-lucky, weird, smart, grouchy, or even lazy… and toys help us to be active and stay out of time-out! “Remi’s Toy Box” is full of my favorite products that I am sure your furry (or not-so-furry) family and friends will love. Check out my Instagram page @ Rambunctious_ Remington and let me hear from you. Let me know what you’re up to, where you live, and how you like to spend your day.

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Until next time . . . let’s keep shopping!

Remi

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Zzzzz . . . in the Lap of Luxury Super soft and luxurious! The raised rim makes your cat feel safe and secure, allowing them to sleep better. The beds are easy to clean and completely machine washable (gentle cycle, tumble dry on low or lay flat to air dry). purrfectiion.com

Plush Harness Extra soft and comfortable no-pull harness. Available in black, pink, and blue and 4 sizes; XS, S, M, and L. Both products available at: nequis.com


ore See M ! here Click

e to se here . video

Seat Protectors

The WeatherTech Seat Protectors are a much needed accessory for the family “road trip warriors” or pet “car ride” companions to prevent scratches, damage, or spills from ruining the seat surface. Heavy duty and easy to install.

Easy In and Easy Out

The WeatherTech Pet Ramp was designed for the comfort of our furry friends and their handlers. The portable Pet Ramp features a non-slip surface providing dogs, cats, and pets of all sizes easy access to SUVs, minivans, trucks, and hard-to-reach household spaces. Easily folds for storage and carrying. Ultrahigh, American-made quality.

Elevated Bowls

This elevated bowl stand raises your dog’s or cat’s bowls off the floor, providing them with a more comfortable eating and drinking experience. The protective mat features a raised outer lip, ensuring that any spills or mealtime messes are kept off your floors. Includes two ergonomically designed stainless steel dog bowls or cat bowls, ensuring your pet won’t have to strain to get at every morsel of food or drop of water. TALES AND TREATS 61


Remi’s

TOY BOX

Let’s Go! Ruff Wear’s Float Coat™ dog life jacket is the ultimate in canine flotation and water safety. For dogs that love to join their humans rafting, kayaking, boating, surfing, and paddle boarding, this life jacket is designed for dogs of all shapes and sizes. This is a premium, fully-featured dog life jacket that includes thoughtful details like a strong handle, optimally positioned to lift dogs out of the water, and reflective trim for enhanced visibility in or out of the water. Available in Wave Orange, Sockeye Red, or Blue Atoll and in multiple sizes from XXS - XL.

Coolin’ It!

The Ruffwear Jet Stream™ efficiently cools dogs during light and fast, highintensity adventures through shading and evaporative cooling. In warm climates, dogs typically stay cool by seeking shade in the heat of the day. The light and sleek Jet Stream™ uses shade-providing spandex over the back, while Ruffwear’s three-layer evaporative cooling chest panel disperses heat from the dog’s core. To activate the Jet Stream™, soak in water, wring out, zip on your dog, and go. Available in Salamander Orange or Blue Lagoon.

e to Us How ooling the C r Dogs fo Gear to here Click deo! i

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ruffwear.com 62 TALES AND TREATS


It’s Vacation Time!

Cypress Inn, an elegant pet-friendly boutique inn located in the heart of Carmel, is a wonderful place to stay when you travel with your pet. Carmel is one of the most pet-friendly cities in the country, a place where dogs can run free on beautiful Carmel Beach, walk on leash throughout the quaint village, and often find water bowls and doggie treats at many of the businesses. Doggie pick-up bags and a spot to wash off your pet after a romp on the beach are located in the Courtyard at Cypress Inn. Photo: Cypress Inn. cypress-inn.com

Climb a Tree This 69” Cleopatra Cat Tree is a purrfect way to treat your furry felines while providing a place for them to perch or play. Crafted from solid and manufactured wood, it showcases four tiers of space for your cat to lounge and perch. With a removable cover, you can keep it clean and ready to be pounced on again! jossandmain.com

Drink Up ThirstyCat Fountains are completely handmade from start to finish. Each fountain is one-of-a-kind, food safe, easy to clean, antimicrobial and quiet. thirstycatfountains.com To all my animal friends,

Soooo Comfy! This is the Faux Fur and Velvet Orthopedic Dog Sofa from Josh and Main. Finally, a solution for your arthritic pet's pain! The bed features a soft sleep surface providing your pet comfort while the orthopedic ("egg crate") foam base supports your dog's joints and pressure points. The Jumbo Plus option, for larger breeds, features solid slab orthopedic foam for greater support and comfort. A luxurious velvet gusset is dyed to match the faux fur sleep surface, creating a bed fit for a furry king or queen. The sofa bed has three walls to give your pup a variety of positions to lie in while remaining comfortable. Your best friend deserves a good night’s rest and now, it’s possible. jossandmain.com

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s

I hope you have enjoyed “Remi’s Toy Box.” I created this section to showcase my favorite products, services, and resources with you. If you have something you would like to share, please email a photo, description, and website address. Don’t forget to visit my Instagram page @ Rambunctious_ Remington. I look forward to hearing from you! Until next time . . . let’s keep shopping!

Remi s

vmgeditorial@gmail.com TALES AND TREATS 63


A Special Tribute

Buster My Best Bud Hello. It’s Zu, the loyal mascot for Tales & Treats. I wanted to share a special tribute to my best bud, Buster. When I was a young pup, I was lucky enough to live in the mountains. I hiked every day with my mom, and best friend, Buster. He was an American Bulldog, almost a year older than I am. We were both big boys weighing in at around 100 pounds. We loved to explore the mountain together, hiking the trails, chasing bunnies, and meeting up with our other friends in the community. We had the best time in Buster’s dad’s truck driving around the town barking and drooling out the window. Buster’s brother Tucker, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, was always along for the ride and very tolerant of us. Some people were scared of Buster because they thought he was a Pit Bull, but his dad educated them about how amazing the American Bulldog breed is and it seemed to make them feel better. Neighbors were also scared of me because I am also big and have a black coat. None of that mattered because Buster and I had each other. American Bulldogs are generally happy, family-loving dogs that do well in homes where they have plenty of space to roam. The American Bulldog is stocky and muscular, but also agile and built for chasing down stray cattle and helping out with work on the farm. In fact, some are known to jump six feet or more into the air. American Bulldogs are intelligent and affectionate, features which make them protective family dogs, though they have high exercise needs and require an experienced, active owner. They can vary in appearance. There are multiple types, including the Bully or Classic type, also known as the Johnson type, the Standard or Performance type, also called the Scott type, and hybrids of the two.

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Eventually, we moved away from the mountain, as did Buster, and we didn’t get to play together anymore. Last year, Buster’s mom told us he had crossed the Rainbow Bridge. He developed lymphoma and was not able to fight it for very long. We were really sad. Buster was still a young dog like me. That’s why it’s so important to support cancer research. With it we can give our best buds a longer, healthier life, and the research can also help our parents fight cancer. We love and miss you, Buster. Your furry brother, forever,

Zu


Dogs naturally love to source their own toys. They possess a curious nature that compels them to forage for unique treasures. Often, the things they find are items we wish they had just left where they found them! Foraging allows our dogs to explore and follow where their noses and curiosity take them, and it also affords the opportunity to claim prizes to enjoy later. Because they are plentiful in nature, sticks play a prominent role in prize gathering. Depending on their location, they can carry smells that are particularly enticing to the sensitive canine nose, making the treasure that much more special. Another theory indicates that many dogs chew bones to alleviate dental-related pain. Puppies love to chew things when they are teething, and a stick is an excellent choice from a puppy’s perspective. Read more at: wagwalking.com TALES AND TREATS 65


Silver in Their Fur, Gold in Their Hearts! Senior dogs in animal shelters and rescues can have a harder time finding a home than younger pets, despite often being just as affectionate and playful as younger dogs, and usually better behaved, too. Senior dogs can make a great addition to any family! Adopting an older dog may save its life. Shelters are overcrowded and unfortunately older dogs are among the first to be euthanized if they aren’t adopted in a timely manner. By adopting a senior dog, you are not only providing it with a better life but are also saving it from being put down No need for basic training. Most older dogs have long since been house-trained and leash-trained, and in some cases crate-trained, too. No huge lifestyle change. Older dogs are not a 24/7 job. Most of them don’t require the constant monitoring and training that puppies do and leave you with more time to do your own thing. This flexibility can be a great fit for single people, retirees, and first-time dog owners. Wisdom comes with age. Senior dogs have already learned many of life’s lessons. They know that dog toys, not shoes, are for chewing, and that if they get into the trash, there will be repercussions. They also know the meaning of “no.” (Well, no dog is perfect, of course, but the average senior dog knows a lot more than the average puppy.) Easier transition. Older dogs often settle into their new homes more easily than younger dogs. Often, shelters and rescues may know more about an older dog’s history (i.e. have they lived with other dogs, cats, or kids before) that they can use to better match you with the perfect pup. 66 TALES AND TREATS

Shelters are full of older dogs hoping for a second chance at life. Many of these animals were once owned and loved by someone, but for various reasons end up homeless.

Lower maintenance. Most senior dogs are content with casual walks and cuddling. They are perfectly happy to nap the day away while you’re at work and will greet you calmly at the door when you get home. Easy to Train. Old dogs CAN learn new tricks. They are generally calmer, more mature, and more focused than younger dogs, and most will easily pick up new tricks. What You See Is What You Get. Older dogs have grown into their shape, size, temperament, and personality. Older dogs have all their adult teeth and are out of the energetic puppy phase, resulting in less destruction to your home. Many of them do well with young children as they have a lower energy level and have possibly lived with them in their past homes. Instant companions. Many older dogs are ready to be your new best friend. Whether you want to go to the park, visit friends, or just hang out on the couch, they are ready. Please spread the word and make a difference! By sharing this information about how great senior dogs are, you can encourage others to consider an older dog otherwise overlooked.


Senior Dog Rescue and Advocacy Groups We will continue to add to this list. In you have a rescue organization and would like to be listed, please visit our website for more information: veracitymediagroup.com

Ready to Find a Forever Home!

Click the photos to learn more about each dog. Left page, top left: LEXI: 9-year-old, 70 pound senior female Boxer, The Grey Muzzle Organization Lexi has a proliferation of boney development and bone displacement on one knee due to a very old injury; her other knee has an old ligament injury which was never repaired and is now stabilized by arthritic changes. In foster care and with medical attention, Lexi has been gaining strength and has greatly improved her mobility. She now gets around very well! She has met children and cats and is a sweetheart to everyone. Lexi is a brilliant girl and learns very quickly. The newest thing she’s working on, now that she’s feeling so good, is restraining herself a bit on walks. She’s just so full of enthusiasm for life and is so excited to be out in the world! Lexi would love to find her forever home with another dog and people who want to spend as much time with her as she wants to spend with them. Middle left: RANDY: 10-year-old, 50 pound Retriever mix, The Grey Muzzle Organization Randy is a gentle beauty. She is intelligent, kind, and wellmannered. She is poised to be your best friend and loyal sidekick. Time and good friends are two things that become more valuable the older you get. Don’t wait another moment to meet Randy and start your own adventure together. Top left: MAMA CASS: 12 year old senior female, German Shepherd Dog / Cattle Dog mix, Lionel’s Legacy, El Cajon, California Rosie is a lovable Jack Russell. Don’t let her age fool you: this girl is young at heart! She loves going for long walks, cuddling, and constant company. Rosie is a sweetheart and will follow you around like your shadow. She requires a lot of love and someone who loves to snuggle. lionelslegacy.org • (619) 212-5623 Top right: OZZY: Senior Male, Min-Pin Doxie Ozzy is completely potty trained, as long as he’s taken outside for breaks. He sleeps through the night in his pen and prefers to nap in it as well making him a good candidate to leave at home once this crisis is over. This sweet boy is great on leash, loves his walks and looks forward to some lap action anytime of day. lionelslegacy.org • (619) 212-5623

Partial list: The Grey Muzzle Organization (National) greymuzzle.org Grand-Paws Senior Sanctuary (Acton, CA) grandpawsrescue.org Lily’s Legacy Senior Dog Sanctuary (Petaluma, CA) lilyslegacy.org Lionel’s Legacy Senior Dog Rescue (San Diego, CA) lionelslegacy.org Muttville Senior Dog Rescue (San Francisco, CA) muttville.org Old Dog Haven (Lake Stevens, WA) olddoghaven.org The Sanctuary for Senior Dogs (Cleveland, OH) sanctuaryforseniordogs.org Young at Heart Senior Pet Rescue (Palatine, IL) adoptaseniorpet.com For more information about Project Unconditional and additional resources please visit:

projectunconditional.com

TALES AND TREATS 67


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Nancy Suttles, Founder Publisher and Chief Creative Officer Robert H. Witcher Chief Operating Officer Daniel R. George Senior Vice-President Development Sarah V. Bell Copy and Content Editor Morgan Rhodes Photographer, Senior Producer and Test Kitchen Director Maude Campbell Proofreader This publication would not be possible without the collaboration of our international contributors and patrons. For editorial and brand collaboration and placement inquiries, please contact: nancy@veracitymediagroup.com A limited number of printed copies of Nourish and Flourish™ , the coffee-table journal, are available for sale online at: nourishandflourish.site veracitymediagroup.com Published in the United States by Veracity Media Group, LLC. Copyright © 2020 Veracity Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved

© Copyright 2020 by Veracity Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means including digital, electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Veracity Media Group, LLC. All images and materials are protected by © copyright and all rights are reserved in any medium and any form of reproduction worldwide. Any reproduction or use of these materials without the prior written consent of Veracity Media Group, LLC is strictly prohibited. Other images and/or product names mentioned or depicted herein may be protected by copyright or trademark and are the property of their respective rights holder. Nourish and Flourish / Veracity Media Group LLC has not independently tested any services or products that are featured on these pages herein and has verified no claims made by these companies and or individuals regarding those services or products. All recipes in this publication have been submitted by professional contributors. Veracity Media Group, LLC has received permission and approvals to publish all content in this edition as provide by the contributors. Produced in the USA.

Welcome to Veracity Media Group . . . a dynamic new media company offering a diverse range of interactive content. Nourish and Flourish™ was created and launched by Veracity Media Group (VMG) as a stand-alone title in the summer of 2019. Due to the overwhelming success and positive feedback, VMG is launching a series of other specialinterest digital publications in 2020 to be offered on multiple international digital platforms. Each publication features advertising-free, original, mindful editorial content, complemented by a clean, visual-centric design, stunning color photography, and graphics. Check out our family of titles including: FOOD & DRINK • The Allure of Chocolate: the history, culture, recipes, and future of this amazing ingredient. • Nourish and Flourish: Flavors of the Season: simple, delicious, and healthy recipes • Fire • Flavor • Spice: cooking with live fire and spices from around the world HEALTH & FITNESS • Healthy Living: Inspiration for home cooks of all ages ANIMALS & PETS • Tales & Treats: A Guide for Loving and Caring for Your Animal Family And the list is growing! Expanded editorial content, blogs, and videos are published on our website and social media channels. Editorial focus includes, but is not limited to: • Earth Matters • Nutritional Healing through Healthy Food • Regenerative Agriculture + Soil Health + Seed Preservation • Food Culture + History • International Farms & Gardens • Travel + Exploration • Food + Wine + Seasonal Recipes • Animals + Pets + Farms + Gardens • Arts + Science + Technology and beyond . . . nourishandflourish.site | veracitymediagroup.com


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“Scout’s legacy will live on by the lives he touched with his enormous spirit and by bringing international attention to canine cancer. When Scout passed away, a little of all of us died with him. Scout started his life in Midway, Texas playing with all of his siblings on a farm. He died a hero. He was everyone’s sweet little baby puppy golden angel and will remain in our hearts forever.” ~ The MacNeil Family, via @wtscout/Instagram

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Pets make a difference in your life. You can make a difference in theirs. Gifts to the Pets Make A Difference Fund will be used to support clinical research at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine to better diagnose, treat and prevent cancer and for the purchase of specialized equipment that will aid clinicians and researchers in identifying new cancer-fighting drugs and treatments — discoveries that are shared with the world.

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TALES AND TREATS: A Guide for Loving and Caring for Your Animal Family