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SOUTHERN

FARM&GARDEN An Agricultural Journal

We nPeanuts! Sp Digit ecial al Ed ition ! R

ECIP E INSID S E

A special digital publication by: southernfarmandgarden.com

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The Rise of the Peanut Crunchy, salty, satisfying: the peanut is an iconic treat that has been around for thousands of years.

The peanut

plant most likely originated in Peru or Brazil. As early as 1500 B.C., the Incans of Peru used peanuts as sacrificial offerings and entombed them with mummies to help in the afterlife. Tribes in central Brazil ground peanuts with maize to make a drink. There are no fossil records to prove peanuts originated in South America, but people in South America made pottery in the shape of peanuts and decorated jars with peanuts as long as 3,500 years ago.

A special digital publication by: southernfarmandgarden.com. This feature editorial appears in the Fall / Winter 2017 issue of SF&G. Digital publication may vary from the printed version. To read the complete article subscribe online today or pick up a copy at your 86 Southern Farm & Garden local natural food market, grocery store or Barnes & Noble.


To learn more about peanuts click the link below: The Perfectly Powerful Peanut

Design and production by Nancy Suttles, Co-Founder & Publisher of Southern Farm & Garden and owner of Suttles LLC. 87 SouthernDesign, Farm & Garden


PEANUT FARMING

Labor-saving equipment was invented for planting, cultivating, harvesting, picking, shelling, and cleaning the peanuts. In the early 1900s, the peanut became a major agricultural crop when the boll weevil threatened the South’s cotton crop. Based on the research of noted scientist Dr. George Washington Carver, peanuts served as an effective commercial crop and even rivaled the position of cotton in the South. Here, the digger flips the peanut plant after harvest to dry the peanuts before being stored.


To learnmore about peanuts click the link below: Peanuts: The Crop of Now


PEANUT FARMING

DID YOU KNOW?

One acre of peanuts will make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. It takes just 4.7 gallons of water to grow a one ounce serving of peanuts


PEANUT BUTTER FACTS Peanut butter is an inexpensive source of plant protein, providing 8 grams in two tablespoons. Peanut butter is also an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, and plant-based compounds that are important for good health. So rest assured, you can feel good about digging into your favorite jar—whether it’s creamy or crunchy—to reap the nutrition benefits from peanut butter. Peanut butter today is remarkably similar to that produced a century ago. To legally label the spread as "peanut butter,” it must contain a minimum of 90 percent peanuts with no artificial sweeteners, colors, or preservatives. Some brands add natural sweeteners and salt, plus stabilizers for freshness. Natural peanut butter has no stabilizer, but may contain natural sweeteners and salt. Did You Know? • Peanuts for peanut butter primarily come from the Southeast. • Peanut butter was introduced at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. • Peanut butter accounts for $850 million in retail sales per year. • One acre of peanuts will make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. • The most common peanut varieties grown in the United States are Virginia, Spanish, and Runner. • Peanut shells are used to make kitty litter, wallboard, fireplace logs, paper, and animal feed, and are sometimes used as fuel for power plants. Source: peanutbutterlovers.com

Top left: By law, anything labeled “peanut butter” in the United States must be at least 90 percent peanuts. Above: One acre of peanuts will make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. It takes just 4.7 gallons of water to grow a one ounce serving of peanuts. Below: Many people are surprised to learn that peanuts grow beneath the soil and do not grow on trees like pecans or walnuts. Peanuts grow in pods and are classified as a legume, like lentils and peas.


PEANUT FARMER PROFILE: JAN JONES Jan is a 27-year-old peanut farmer who lives and farms in Climax, Georgia. As a fifth-generation farmer, Jan works together with her father to tend to their 1,000-acre farm growing cotton, corn, and peanuts. Southern Farm & Garden caught up with Jan this summer. Read the complete profile in the Fall/Winter 2017 issue. How did your family get started in the peanut industry? JJ: My great-grandfather, Harvey Lewis Jones, first grew peanuts on our farm. H. L. Jones farmed in the early 1900s and grew peanuts primarily for livestock feed, since peanut vines and nuts are known to be good sources of protein and minerals. When peanut butter hit grocery store shelves in the 1930s, peanut demand increased, and peanuts became a “cash crop.� So my family no longer farmed peanuts solely for livestock feed. Over the years, we have continued to grow peanuts because they fit so well into our crop rotation and environment. Did you always plan to join your father on the farm? JJ:No, I grew up on the farm but was originally planning to be a teacher. I chose to move back to the farm in 2013 after one year of teaching when I quickly realized I was much happier farming than teaching.

Over the years, the popularity of peanuts has continued to rise. Today, peanuts are the 12th most valuable cash crop grown in the United States with a farm value of over $1 billion U.S. dollars. Americans eat more than six pounds of peanut products each year (more than any other nut), worth more than $2 billion at the retail level. The Southeast is a major peanut production area which includes Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. The Southeast region produces about 65 percent of all American-grown peanuts. Approximately 5,500 Southeastern farmers grow more than 1.15 million acres of peanuts, and peanut farming has a nearly $2.5 billion annual impact on the Southeastern economy. The Southeast region has been growing peanuts since the early 1900s with the exception of Mississippi, which started growing peanuts only 20 years ago. The runner peanut is a specific type of peanut grown primarily in the Southeast region. It is preferred for peanut butter because of its strong peanut flavor and uniform size, necessary for even roasting. Peanut butter accounts for about half of the U.S. edible use of peanuts, accounting for $850 million in retail sales each year. The peanut farming story is a surprising one. Unlike most plants, the peanut plant flowers above ground, but fruits below ground. The entire growing cycle of a peanut takes four to five months, depending on the type and variety of peanut. Peanuts are planted in May when soil temperatures have warmed up and are usually harvested in September and October. A special digital publication by: southernfarmandgarden.com. This feature editorial appears in the Fall / Winter 2017 issue of SF&G. Digital publication may vary from the printed version. To read the complete article subscribe online today or pick up a copy at your local natural food market, grocery store or Barnes & Noble.


Peanut Butter Pie

This is a very easy, no bake recipe for homemade peanut butter pie. It is perfect for any holiday and sure to please. Ingredients 1 cup crunchy peanut butter 1 cup sugar 1 tablespoon butter 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 8 ounces whipped topping 6 regular (or 4 jumbo) Reese’s Cups, chopped 1 pre-made chocolate pie crust Method Mix peanut butter, sugar, butter and cream cheese with an electric mixer. Fold in whipped topping. Stir in chopped Reese’s cups. Spoon mixture into prepared pie crust. Freeze for 2 hours. Slice and serve.

Photo by Kristina LaRue, loveandzest.com Peanut butter pie recipe developed by Casey Cox.


By Chef Shelly Bojorquez Second & Saint, Long Beach, California Ingredients 2 cups peanut oil 1 ounce Guajillo chile, dry, stems removed 1 ounce New Mexico chile, dry, stems removed 4 large garlic cloves, peeled ½ cup raw peanuts 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, roasted, cooled 1 tablespoon white onion, minced ¼ cup apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon brown sugar 2 tablespoons peanut powder 1 tablespoon garlic powder ½teaspoon salt, to taste

PEANUT FARMER PROFILE: JONATHAN SANDERS Jonathan is a 25-year-old peanut farmer living in Dothan, Alabama. Jonathan farms in partnership with his father on their 1,000-acre farm, where they have about 300-400 acres devoted to peanuts. Please tell us how you got into farming. JS: My family started farming peanuts in the early 1900s because of the cotton crisis in the Southeast. We needed a new crop to add into our rotation. I always knew I wanted to be involved in agriculture. Once you have the farming blood in you, it’s hard to ignore. There is nothing like watching a plant grow and mature and harvest into a peanut crop that will be enjoyed by many. My dad has also been active in the farming community and is an active member of the Alabama Peanut Association. I followed in my dad’s footsteps and became active in the young farmers community in college. What is it about your farm that makes it unique? JS: We have a father-son operation, which is becoming scarcer as fewer young people are returning to the farm.

Method Heat peanut oil in small saucepan. Rough chop Guajillo and New Mexico chilies and set aside. When oil is hot, place garlic cloves in oil to fry to golden brown; remove and let drain and cool. Place peanuts in oil and fry to golden brown, remove, drain and cool. Add chilies to oil to fry, cooking no longer than a minute (do not over fry as it will make the chili bitter). Remove, drain and cool. Allow oil to cool completely. Place cooled chilies, peanuts, garlic in a food processor with sesame seeds. Pulse mixture until mixture is well chopped but not pureed. Place mixture in bowl with onion, vinegar, honey, brown sugar, peanut powder and garlic powder. Mix together and allow to sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Add cooled oil to bowl and add salt to taste. Salsa flavor will change as it sits, so salt as needed. Place in glass jar to hold. Can be held for 1 week. Variations: • Can be made with vinegar, or oil only, depending on use • Salsa can also be made dry

For more information click on these links: Alabama Peanut Producers Association Florida Peanut Producers Association Georgia Peanut Commission Mississippi Peanut Growers Association National Peanut Board PeanutAllergyFacts.org • Peanut-Institute.org Southern Peanut Growers PeanutButterLovers.com


Salsa Macha


mooth Protein Smooth Protein S FACT SHEET AMER Farmers AMERICA Farmers PB Recipes FAVORITE Recip VORITE FA RMERS How much do you know about the creamy or crunchy staple found in nearly everyone’s pantry? Discover more about the peanuts that go into peanut butter and the American farmers who grow them. PEANUTS = AMERICA’S FAVORITE NUT • Americans eat more than 7 pounds of peanuts per person each year – more than 4 times as much as any other nut. • Americans eat 3 pounds of peanut butter per person every year – enough PB to coat the floor of the Grand Canyon. • More than 90 percent of American homes have a jar of peanut butter in the pantry.

PEANUT BUTTER = DELICIOUS + HEALTHY • Peanut butter is 127 years old! It was developed in 1890 and promoted as a health food at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. • By law, any product labeled “peanut butter” in the U.S. must be at least 90 percent peanuts. • Peanut butter is so versatile you can find it in every meal from breakfast to dinner and every snack from a healthy protein bar to a decadent dessert. • Peanuts have 7 grams of protein per serving – more than any other nut. • Just a handful of peanuts a day may help maintain healthy cholesterol levels and is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease when eaten as part of a healthy diet.

PEANUT (BUTTER) FARMING 101 • Runner peanuts are preferred for peanut butter because they have the strongest peanut flavor and are uniform in size so they roast evenly before grinding. • Georgia, Alabama, Florida and Mississippi peanut farmers grow mostly runner peanuts. • The Southeast region produces about 65 percent of all American-grown peanuts. • Approximately 5,500 Southeastern farmers grow more than 1.15 million acres of peanuts. • Peanut farming has a nearly $2.5 billion annual impact on the Southeastern economy. • One acre of peanuts will make 30,000 peanut butter sandwiches. • The peanut plant is unusual because it flowers above the ground, but fruits below the ground. • Peanuts are harvested 120-180 days after planting, usually in September and October. • Peanuts have a natural ability to fix nitrogen from the air and ground so farmers don’t have to apply fertilizer – and they leave some nitrogen behind for other crops. • Two former U.S. Presidents were peanut farmers: Thomas Jefferson and Jimmy Carter. • Many believe George Washington Carver founded peanut butter – while he did not, he led an extraordinary life and is recognized as the father of the peanut industry because he convinced farmers to grow peanuts as part of the new crop rotation method of farming and invented many other uses for peanuts like cooking oil and axle grease.

VISIT WWW.PEANUTBUTTERLOVERS.COM/PB-FARMERS TO LEARN MORE.


Makes 2 1/2 cups Ingredients 1 cup vegetable oil, for frying ¼ cup dried long red chilies (or other hot red chilies) ½ cup Kaffir lime leaves, fold back and pull out veins, ripped into 1-inch pieces 2 cups raw peanuts, skinned 2 stalks lemongrass, trimmed and minced 2 tablespoons tamarind pulp ½ teaspoon kosher salt, ground extra fine 1½ teaspoons granulated sugar Method In a small sauté pan or wok, heat oil over medium heat to about 350°F. Add chilies, cook briefly, 5 to 10 seconds, stirring to ensure even cooking. The chilies should lighten in color, and may puff slightly. Drain on towels and set aside. Blanch the lime leaves in the frying oil the same way, cooking until they stop sizzling (15 seconds at most, uneven lighter appearance is normal); drain on towels and set aside. Add the peanuts to the oil. Cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Scoop or strain out peanuts. Drain oil from pan, reserving one tablespoon. Set the pan over high heat. Stir-fry lemongrass for 10 seconds, it should not brown. Add the fried peanuts and stir-fry 10 seconds. Add sugar, salt and tamarind and mix rapidly coating the peanuts evenly. Continue to stir-fry until the excess moisture has evaporated and mixture has coated the peanuts. Add whole fried chilies and lime leaves; toss well. Transfer to towel-lined pan, sprinkle evenly with salt and sugar. Cool to room temperature before serving. Serving suggestions: - Add to bar snack menu; pair with ice cold beer - Create a tableside condiment by adding vegetable oil and unseasoned rice vinegar to roughly chopped Tom Yum Krob - Allow customers to customize dishes – from noodles to soups – by finely chopping dry Tom Yum Krob and serving it tableside in glass jars with a perforated top - Customize flavor profile by adding minced ginger or ground coriander

Tom Yom Krob

Fried Peanuts with Kaffir Lime, Lemongrass and Chilies By Chef Robert Danhi • RD Coder


SOUTHERN

FARM& GARDEN

An Agricultural Journal

Love A Peanut Farmer Today! The family farm is central to the identity of our nation. Today, more than every there is a real desire to re-connect to the natural world, eating wholesome food and living a more sustainable life.

Southern Farm & Garden takes you behind the scenes to learn more about where your food originates and the history of agriculture with focus on the Southeastern United States and a special spotlight on Georgia. ​ ur content is dedicated to the “why” and the “how” factor O showcasing informative and interesting stories about farmers, growers, gardeners, chefs, seasonal recipes and artisans. Subscribe online today or pick up a copy at your natural food market, grocery store or Barnes & Noble.

A special digital publication by: southernfarmandgarden.com. This feature editorial appears in the Fall / Winter 2017 issue of SF&G. Digital publication may vary from the printed version. To read the complete article subscribe online today or pick up a copy at your local natural food market, grocery store or Barnes & Noble.

Design and production by Nancy Suttles, Co-Founder & Publisher of Southern Farm & Garden and owner of Suttles Design, LLC.

Profile for n.suttles

We Love Peanuts!  

Over the years, the popularity of peanuts has continued to rise. Today, peanuts are the 12th most valuable cash crop grown in the United Sta...

We Love Peanuts!  

Over the years, the popularity of peanuts has continued to rise. Today, peanuts are the 12th most valuable cash crop grown in the United Sta...

Profile for n.suttles