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September 2014 The Local Magazine Read Worldwide Nantucket Magazine

Our goal is to change the way you feel about wealth management.

160 Federal Street (617) 330-1288

772 Boylston Street (617) 859-8888 One Post Office Square (617) 423-2888

(866) 810-8919 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC

First Republic Private Wealth Management includes First Republic Trust Company; First Republic Trust Company of Delaware LLC; First Republic Investment Management, Inc., an SEC Registered Investment Advisor; and First Republic Securities Company, LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment and Advisory Products and Services are Not FDIC Insured, Not Guaranteed and May Lose Value.

NantucketMag Issue 5 2014 OurGoalPWM-P ND2014.indd 1

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N GOrDOn GUnD

Curing Blindness

DeBOraH FeInGOLD Photographs Music Legends

P-51 MUsTanG Takes Flight

anDreW PerLMan

Serial Entrepreneur

The Nantucket Project’s

&

TOM scOTT KaTe BrOsnan

Nantucket Magazine September 2014


Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069

Craig Hawkins

Bernadette Maglione

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 119 craig@maurypeople.com

37 Main Street, Nantucket Island, MA 02554 NEW

Polpis $13,750,000

Monomoy $12,500,000

ING LIST

West of Town $9,875,000

SHAWKEMO The quality and finish work throughout this property is exceptional and absolutely must be seen to be appreciated. This incredible main dwelling offers several living areas and views out over butting conservation land. This is an extraordinary execution of a brilliant design. $9,800,000

TOWN Built in 1723, the Barnabas Gardner house is one of Nantucket’s earliest homes, original details intact. Property affords subdivision potential with frontage for two additional lots, approval not required. Renovated in 2006. $5,295,000

WAUWINET One of the most spectacular locations on Nantucket, nestled in the dunes on the haulover with incredible views in both directions. Walk out the front door to the beach or down the driveway to the harbor and boat moorings. Enjoy beautiful sunrises and sunsets. $9,975,000

NEW

Monomoy $7,500,000

Madaket $2,795,000

Sconset $7,500,000

Sconset $1,795,000

Polpis $4,995,000

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

ING LIST

TOWN Just totally restored and perfect in every way. Three finished floors, 7BR/6.5 baths done in Carrera marble, new kitchen, large formal living and dining rooms, big family room, beautiful yard, off street parking. Original moldings, trim, floors, beams, paneling intact. $4,850,000

TOWN Comfortable 4 BR home with nice yard and off-street parking. Owned by the great grandson of original owner/ builder and has always been in the same family. Generous size rooms, high ceilings and original details. Excellent rental history. $1,395,000

TOWN Extremely well designed and built in-town home in perfect condition. Open, bright and finished with attention to detail. Oversized lot with plenty of room for a second dwelling and/or garage. Approximately 2500 square feet of ground cover remaining. $2,395,000

CLIFF Beautifully restored 1747 antique home on desirable Cliff Road, a five minute walk into town. Many original features including four fireplaces, wide pine flooring, moldings and raised paneling. Private yard and gardens, and covered dining patio. Wonderful views of Sound from roof walk. $4,875,000

SURFSIDE Large custom home in Surfside with a private path out to the beach and views out to the South Shore. Built on 2.78 very private acres. The perfect beach house for a large family or entertaining. Extremely private location. Original owner, never rented. $2,995,000

TOWN 4 bedroom/3.5 bath home in the Old Historic District. Large deck and gardens compliment the interior living spaces. Top end kitchen appliances, marble counter tops, surround sound system, A/C, central vac., two fireplaces and custom built-ins and molding throughout the home. Move-in condition. $2,975,000

TOWN Renovated five bedroom, five and 1/2 bath home on Fair Street with original historic details throughout the house. Pine floors, chair rails and original doors are still intact. There is parking for one car with entryway off of parking area. $2,395,000

CLIFF Appealing home on a quiet stone lane off of Cliff Road. Open floor plan w/ half walls & columns defining common rooms - bright, open feel. First floor bedroom, full bath, wrap around covered porch and a beautiful landscaped yard. Original owner. $2,845,000

MID ISLAND Custom built mid-island duplex (one of two units) located on a corner lot. Ample parking on-site, good sized backyard and easy access to bike paths. Four bedrooms, four full baths and four floors of finished living space. Beautiful high-end finishes throughout. $695,000

TOWN Beautifully restored in-town antique on an oversized, corner lot. Everything has been replaced; foundation, plumbing, electrical, roof, shingles, fireplaces, etc. All original moldings, flooring, mantels saved, stripped and refinished. A beautifully restored home in a most convenient location. $3,875,000

SCONSET An incredibly unique offering of over a half acre with a 4 BR fully furnished main house along with a two car garage - guest apartment above for family and friends. 1/4 mile to the ‘Sconset Casino in the heart of the village. Expansion capabilities. $3,350,000

TOWN Renovated antique with large back yard and beautiful landscaping. Three finished floors plus basement. Wonderful floor plan for families and large groups. Bright kitchen with French doors leading to patio and yard. Two off-street parking spaces. $3,875,000

WAUWINET Three acres of privacy and wonderful views of Polpis Harbor. Well-built four-bedroom house with covered porches and decks plus a garage with a two bedroom apartment also with views. Less than 1.5 miles to the public beach access and parking at Polpis Harbor. $3,999,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses, one restored antique, the other new construction, on a large in-town lot. There are a total of 9 bedrooms, and 8+ baths. Each house has a private, outdoor patio area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. $1,995,000

NAUSHOP Construction is underway on this 5 bedroom, 4.5 bathroom home with a first floor en-suite bedroom, finished third floor and unfinished basement with full height ceilings. There is still time to select colors, floor stains, and other details. Estimated completion Aug. 2014. $1,200,000

TOWN Large, totally restored barn. 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, 3 finished floors, custom kitchen with Sub Zero, granite counters, etc. Large rooms throughout. Two patios, yard, garage and off-street parking.

Town $2,750,000

Town $4,995,000

ING LIST

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

$2,250,000

N magazine

Maury People Sotheby’s International Realty | 37 Main Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 | maurypeople.com

TOWN The George C. Gardner House - one of the premier properties in the town of Nantucket. Over a half acre of magnificent gardens and landscaping. Restored in 2004-05 maintaining its historical integrity and original moldings, finishes, ornamentaltrim,replacingplumbing,electricalandnewsystems. $7,900,000

Sconset $9,995,000

NEW

Wauwinet $4,995,000

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 203 bernadette@maurypeople.com

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K at h l e e n H ay D e s i g n s a wa r d - w i n n i n g i n t e r i o r d e s i g n f i r m T: 5 0 8 . 2 2 8 . 1 2 1 9 • www.kathleenhaydesigns.com

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N at u r a l ly I n s p i r e d I n t e r i o r s

Photo by Jeffrey Allen

ingrained

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Powered by rational thinking.

When Sentient Jet Cardholders travel, they choose to do it in the most sensible fashion. So why is The Sentient Jet Card the intelligent choice? Inventor of the jet card model and first to establish an independent safety advisory board All-inclusive pricing with rates and fuel locked-in for 12 months Often 20% less than other jet cards Enjoy the power of rational thinking. Call 800.641.6963.

The Sentient Jet Card sentient.com/nantucketmagazine The Sentient Jet Card is a program of Sentient Jet, LLC (“Sentient”). Sentient arranges flights on behalf of jet card clients with FAR Part 135 direct air carriers that exercise full operational control of charter flights at all times. Flights will be operated by FAR Part 135 direct air carriers that have been certified to provide service for Sentient jet card clients and that meet all FAA safety standards and additional safety standards established by Sentient. (Refer to www.sentient.com/standards for details.)

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Sensible, intelligent private aviation

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12 Main Street, rear • 508.228.2207 • www.dianefirSten.coM na nt u c k e t • Pa l M B e ac h • c in cin nat i


J

Hulbert Avenue - Privacy Abounds at this Extraordinary Property

Situated on nearly a ½ acre of land, there is a 4 plus bedroom Main House and a 3 bedroom Cottage, both renovated in 2008 with great attention to detail and quality.The spacious grounds contain a 16’ x 40’ in-ground swimming pool, deck with pergola, and expansive lawn area. Harbor views and deeded rights to the beach path across the street are additional amenities for this spectacular offering! $12,500,000

Town - Quality and Attention to Detail

The quality and attention to detail is evident throughout this 5 bedroom, 5.5 bath home. The open kitchen, dining, and living areas of the first floor open to the pool and blue stone patio providing lovely views inside and out. The fully finished lower level, pool, cabana, garage and outdoor kitchen are some of the amenities this spectacular property provides. Exquisitely decorated by “Nantucket Looms” this property is offered fully furnished. $3,695,000

N magazine

Quidnet - Gracious Home on 3 Private Acres

This Chip Webster and Associates designed 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath Main House and 2 bedroom, 2 bath Cottage boast multiple living areas inside and out. Close proximity to Sesachacha Pond, the Atlantic Ocean, numerous walking trails as well as harbor access for boating. $3,250,000

8 Federal Street • Nantucket, MA 02554 • Sales & Rentals • Independently Owned and Operated • 508.228.4449

jordanre.com jordanre.com | raveis.com

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ket Design Showroo ms ntuc a N

MARINE HOME CENTER SERVING NANTUCKET SINCE 1944

COUNT ON MARINE HOME CENTER FOR CUSTOM NANTUCKET KITCHENS

In the Details

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Cabinets: Brookhaven® Bridgeport recessed maple wood painted ‘Nordic White’ and a custom Farrow & Ball® match on island Countertops: Silestone, Blanco Zeus Tile: Datile® Egyptian Palm Glass Appliances: Marine Home Center Contractor: S.M. Roethke Design, Inc.

Marine team Bob Williamson and Barry Cohen were presented with many challenges in this older Cliff Road home. Exposed plumbing pipes, slanted floors, and the position of the existing appliances to name a few. Bob was able to work with Brookhaven to create a custom island color to match the Farrow & Ball paint used on the floor accent. Barry worked his magic on custom marble countertops throughout the kitchen and bathrooms. For designing and installing cabinets, countertops, and tile trust the Marine experts.

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marinehomecenter.com 134 Orange Street, Nantucket 508.228.0900


3, 5 & 7 lauretta lane $6.400M Mimi Huber

6 Sankaty road $5.450M

31 Main Street $3.150M

Carolyn Durand

Shellie & Dan Dunlap

94 Main Street $4.900M

3 north Gully road

c

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Jeff Lee & Liza Ottani

Jeanne Hicks

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10 South Beach Street | Nantucket, MA 02554 | 508.325.5800 | leerealestate.com

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MargotLar Ad 2 Final_Layout 1 8/5/14 3:18 PM Page 1

Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Bruce A. Percelay Editor Robert Cocuzzo Art Director Paulette Chevalier Chief Photographer Kit Noble

Margot Lar Designs

Operations Consultant Adrian Wilkins Assistant to the Editor Ellie Nan Storck Contributors Susan Browne Philip Davidson Holly Finigan Sharon Lorenzo Ellie Nan Storck Photographers Maria Carey Zofia Crosby Sharon Lorenzo Jonathan Nimerfroh Brian Sager Joshua Simpson Robyn Walsh

www.MargotLar.com Margot@MargotLar.com

Advertising Director Fifi Greenberg Advertising Sales Audrey Wagner Publisher N. LLC Chairman: Bruce A. Percelay

Nantucket Times 17 North Beach Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508-228-1515

N magazine

NANTUCKET’S PREMIER WATERFRONT OYSTER BAR

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ŠCopyright 2011 Nantucket Times. Nantucket Times (N Magazine) is published seven times annually from April through December. Reproduction of any part of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Editorial submissions may be sent to Editor, Nantucket Times, 17 North Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 02554. We are not responsible for unsolicited editorial or graphic material. Office (508) 228-1515 or fax (508) 228-8012. Signature Printing and Consulting 800 West Cummings Park Suite 2900 Woburn

This premier restaurant and oyster bar offers casually elegant cuisine in the visually stunning waterfront setting of Nantucket harbor.

Open 7 days a week serving lunch, dinner and weekend brunch 11am to 11pm.

ONE STRAIGHT WHARF | 508.228.9CRU (9278) | INFO@CRUNANTUCKET.COM | WWW.CRUNANTUCKET.COM


Sweet September For those in the know, September is the month when Nantucket really shines. The weather is predictably beautiful, and the streets are predictably quieter. However, as the shoulder seasons expand, there is still much activity on the island. Our fall issue clearly suggests that the sidewalks do not roll up after Labor Day, and the early fall is perhaps the most desirable time of the year. Kicking off the après season is the fourth annual Nantucket Project, running from September 26th through September 28th. A literal meeting of the minds, the Project is an extraordinary opportunity to learn about cutting-edge ideas and technology that most of us never knew existed. The use of a helicopter drone by N Magazine’s chief photographer, Kit Noble, to photograph TNP founders Tom Scott and Kate Bronson is symbolic of the direction of this eye-opening event. In a remarkable story about human adaptability and talent, writer Sharon Lorenzo profiles summer resident, gifted businessman, and artist Gordon Gund, who is on a mission to cure blindness by 2020. After suddenly losing his sight in the seventies, Gund has led the charge to find a cure to the disease that has changed his life, but has not limited it. Moving on to another Nantucket visionary, we follow the paths of serial entrepreneur Andrew Perlman, who sold his first company at the age of twenty-five for $200 million and is now on a quest to clean up the environment—starting with China. In another story about a high-flyer, N Magazine caught up with pilot Andrew McKenna and his WWII-era P-51 Mustang fighter plane. Back in WWII, the Mustang racked up nearly five thousand enemy kills in the air. Now McKenna flies this vintage plane in honor of those who fought in the war. As the air begins to become crisp in the fall, we celebrate four Nantucketers who make their living in the great outdoors. Whether it’s harvesting oysters, tracking rare turtles, clearing trees, or working on private gardens, these individuals have stayed close to their roots. As local Nantucketers breathe a sigh of relief that the summer rush is now behind us, it is a time for everyone still on this island to enjoy what is perhaps the best season of year.

Bruce A. Percelay

N magazine

Sincerely,

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2014 N by THE numbers

Nosh news

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36 FARM TO FORK

A numerical snapshot of September on Nantucket.

Only on nantucket N 28

You know you’re living on island time if…

Ndulge 30

The newest name in fine wine won’t fit on your wine rack.

Neat stuff 32

Strap in for the wildest water sports activity this side of the Sound.

Nbuzz

N magazine

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20

News, gossip, and tidbits from around town.

Bartlett’s Farm is the crème of the crop when it comes to eating fresh in the fall.

Nspire 40 MAKING WAVES

Local surf prodigy Spencer Bridges is riding high on the national competitive surf circuit.

46 A CURE IN SIGHT

Longtime seasonal resident and gifted entrepreneur Gordon Gund is on a mission to cure blindness.

Nvestigate 52 BEACON OF BRIGHT IDEAS

Founders Tom Scott and Kate Brosnan celebrate their fourth Nantucket Project this September.


14 Centre Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508 228 0825 14 St Albans Grove London W8 5BP 44 207 368 6367

W A T E R J E W E L S GALLERY


September 2014

N GOrDOn GUnD

Curing Blindness

DeBOraH FeInGOLD Photographs Music Legends

P-51 MUsTanG Takes Flight

anDreW PerLMan

Serial Entrepreneur

Nantucket Magazine

) 330-1288

The Local Magazine Read Worldwide

Our goal is to hange the way ou feel about wealth management.

772 Boylston Street (617) 859-8888 One Post Office Square (617) 423-2888

8919 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC

Management includes First Republic Trust Company; First Republic Trust Company of Delaware LLC; First Republic Inc., an SEC Registered Investment Advisor; and First Republic Securities Company, LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC.

d Advisory Products and Services are Not FDIC Insured, Not Guaranteed and May Lose Value.

7/6/14 3:33:59 PM

The Nantucket Project’s

&

TOM scOTT KaTe BrOsnan

Nantucket Magazine September 2014

&

For the cover of this September issue, Chief Photographer Kit Noble captured Tom Scott and Kate Brosnan watching the sunrise from Sankaty Light using his helicopter drone. Special thanks to Bob Felch and the ‘Sconset Trust for giving N Magazine access to the lighthouse.

Ndepth

NHA

64 GOOD COMPANY

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Serial entrepreneur and seasonal resident, Andrew Perlman, is on a mission to change the world.

71 NATURAL SELECTION

Meet four local Nantucketers making their living in Mother Nature.

76 BIG SHOT

World-famous photographer Deborah Feingold gives N Magazine an exclusive sneak peek of her book MUSIC coming out at the end of the month.

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Nvogue

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88 BOHEMIAN FASHION

Fall colors are in full bloom in this fashion spread shot around the island.

The Nantucket Historical Association digs through its image archives to take a look at harvests past.

NUptials 116

Michael and Rebecca Greeley tie the knot on Nantucket this summer.

Nscene 118

Nantucket blACKbook’s Holly Finigan gives us the scoop on how to celebrate September.

Not so fast 122

A quick chat with Rocky Fox from the Chicken Box.


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S J O N AT H A N N I M E R F R O H Nantucket-based photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh describes himself as “obsessed” with the ocean. when he’s not taking photographs of its swells, he can be found riding waves in all seasons. And when this tiny island gets too small for him, Nimerfroh loves to partake in some adventure travel to exotic places—the only requirement being that there’s an opportunity to surf. Nimerfroh is the founder and owner of three photography businesses: JDN PHOtOGRAPHY, Nantucket Salt, and Runaway Bride Nantucket. His award-winning photography has been featured in such publications as Rolling Stone and Eastern Surf Magazine, as well as on such websites as Passion Passport and Style Me Pretty. For this September issue, Jonathan Nimerfroh jumped into the water to capture local surf prodigy Spencer Bridges.

SHARON LORENZO Sharon Lorenzo has been a summer resident of Nantucket since 1979 and enjoys her family home at the head of Capaum Pond, which was the original proprietors settlement of Old Sherburne from 1659 to approximately 1715. She has advanced degrees in art history, business and law and teaches art law and cultural heritage policy at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She also writes art criticism for a number of publications. Lorenzo is married and has four children and grandchildren who love their summers on Nantucket. She sails her Beetle Cat in the Rainbow Parade and is a member of the all women’s crew in the International One Design echo Syndicate at the Nantucket Yacht Club. For this September issue, Sharon Lorenzo profiled gifted businessman and artist Gordon Gund.

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ROBYN WALSH

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For photographer Robyn walsh, life on earth is strange, alluring, and always changing. the same could be said for her photography. Always something of a curiosity, walsh’s photography evolved into something more when she started traveling. Grand and peculiar landscapes and eccentric people enchanted her. She believes photography is all about movement, emotion, and the strange candid moments in between. “I love the task of portraying a certain sentiment and bringing beauty to all settings,” she says. walsh typically shoots weddings and events, merchandise and lifestyle, portraits, and fine art. “As long as there is natural light, I’m ready to shoot!” For this September issue, walsh photographed the fashion spread “Bohemian Rhapsody.”


Nantucket by the

NUmbers

Numbers

10,700

Tons of trash processed at the dump last year

36.1

Billion

Gallons of rain falls on Nantucket on average each year

111

Feet, highest point on Nantucket

3,200 Average number of calls the Fire Department responds to each year

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7,600 38,149 400

Most number of Boston Med Flights from Nantucket in one day

Years since Nantucket was connected to the mainland

301

$

Square feet, proposed size of new Stop & Shop on Sparks Ave

Years estimated until Nantucket is underwater

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Average price for the cheapest room on Nantucket

Steps at Steps Beach

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2,000

Members of the Nantucket Fire Department

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Estimated deer population

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$

Average price for a large cheese pizza on Nantucket

10,000 Chocolate-covered cranberries sold each summer as Sweet Inspirations


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Only on

NaNtucket...

…is stargazing the best in the country.

...do locals only see each other when the summer is over.

N

…are billionaires listed in the phone book.

…are you considered royalty for being born here.

…can you fine dine in flip-flops.

…can you buy a Louis Vuitton bag at a thrift store.

…is “washashore” a person.

…do locals refer to the mainland as “America.”

…can you buy fresh eggs at a lumberyard.

L

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…do people instantly know where the “Box,” “strip,” and “back bar” are located.

…can you order a free shot of beer called a “Paul.”

…is paving a rocky road called Main Street considered sacrilege.

...is there one deer for every five people in the winter.

T

E a


Nantucket to New York

d

Providing a level of service unique in today’s world, Lydia can help you navigate any sized transaction with personal care that extends way beyond the closing. Lydia Sussek, luxury service at every price... • Full-Service in Sales, Foreign investment, Rentals, Commercial and Residential Property Purchasing and Negotiation • Member of the Multi-Million Dollar Club • Cartus-certified broker qualified to work with Fortune-500 Executives and top international Relocation firms from around the world • Market expertise - with experience and referrals, ranking in top 1% out of 48,000 NRT brokers nationwide • Member of Corcoran Cares

The Lydia Sussek Associati Team at The Corcoran Group I Licensed RE Salespersons I m: 917.721.7853 I lyd.sussek@corcoran.com Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker located at 660 Madison Ave, NY, NY 10065. Real estate agents affiliated with The Corcoran Group are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of The Corcoran Group.

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• Winner 2011 REBNY Deal of the Year

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Ndulge

drinking outside THE

The newest name in fine wine won’t fit in your wine rack Discerning oenophiles have long looked

nia reds and whites have received rave re-

down on boxed wine. The idea of drinking

views—box and all!

from a cardboard box just leaves a bad taste in their mouths. But now a new company

Trading the term “box” for “cask,” the

has uncorked itself onto the luxury market,

Macombers claim that the benefits of drink-

doing away with the boxed-wine stigma and

ing from their sleekly designed containers

putting a fine drinking experience on tap. In-

beat out that of any bottle. Each cask holds

dulge in Andegavia Cask Wines.

the equivalent of four 750ml bottles and

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keeps the wine fresh for up to four weeks.

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Gavin and Kelly Macomber unveiled Ande-

Andegavia’s wines are sourced from vine-

gavia at this year’s Wine Festival on Nan-

yards in Napa and Sonoma and have earned

tucket. After meeting on the island back in

ratings of 90 to 96 from Wine Spectator,

the 2007, the Boston-based couple knew

Wine Enthusiast, and Wine Advocate. When

Nantucket was an ideal location to pour out

the cask runs dry, Andegavia’s container is

their creation. The reaction has been nothing

100 percent recyclable. We can all drink

short of fruitful. With a focus on sustainabil-

to that! To order a cask of your own, visit

ity and exquisite wine, Andegavia’s Califor-

www.Andegavia.com.

B O X


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xactly two years ago, N Magazine told readers about the JetLev, a $100,000 water-propelled jetpack that was soaring around Nantucket Harbor. Onlookers marveled as this futuristic contraption brought the rocketeer into reality, while the JetLev’s exorbitant price tag kept the idea of owning one very much grounded. Now, two local brothers have brought the next generation of extreme watersport technology to the island, and they can get you up and flying in an afternoon for little more than a hundred bucks. Captain Max Perkins and his brother Alex launched ACK Water Sports this past July on the wings of a Flyboard. Invented in 2011 by Franky Zapata, the Flyboard operates with hydro-propulsion similar to a JetLev. “It’s powered by an accompanying Jet Ski,” Captain Perkins explains. “A special bracket fits over the lower unit of the Jet Ski, which connects to what is essentially a fire hose. The hose then connects to the jets on the Flyboard.” Controlled by a trained instructor sitting on the Jet Ski, the Flyboard propels water to send the rider shooting high into the sky. “You pretty much feel like superman,” Captain Perkins says. The Flyboard’s unique surfboard design allows riders to execute maneuvers never possible on the JetLev. “I was shocked at how well the board stayed under my feet,” says Peter Creech, ACK Water Sports’ first customer. “Moving in a straight line by getting airborne and then diving forward repeatedly is something I feel like N magazine

90 percent of riders should be able to accomplish in their first session.” All you need to get airborne is a bathing suit and a sense of

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ACKwatersports.com.

adventure—the Perkins brothers will take care of the rest. “If you have ever wanted to experience the sensation of flight,” Alex Perkins says, “now is your chance.” For more information visit www.


NEAT STUFF

the Jet soNs two local Brothers BriNg the NeXt geNeratioN of eXtreme water sports to the islaNd

N magazine PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

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NBUZZ

SINGING IN THE RAIN Despite abysmal weather, the first annual Nantucket Music Festival went off without a hitch this past August. Both NMF founders Cynthia Dareshori and Cheryl Emery were in high spirits at the closing ceremonies, deeming the weekend a success. With rain pouring down on

TOP

POPS

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t

a

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e

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the opening day’s performances, the Music Fest took on a

t

Woodstock feel with revelers dancing away in the puddles

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forming on Tom Nevers Field. N Magazine’s July cover star Ayla Brown stole the show with a beautiful performance of the National Anthem followed by a repertoire of her top country hits. Grammy-winner Bruce Hornsby closed out the festival, reminding everyone in the audi-

The 18th annual Boston Pops on Nantucket

ence that, rain or shine, sometimes that’s just the way it is.

Concert hit all the right notes last month

R

with an exceptional performance by Keith

THE IN

INNS

Lockhart and his hundred-piece symphony orchestra, followed by a spectacular fireworks display over Jetties Beach. Giant jumbotrons and sophisticated sound systems made every seat in the seven-thousand-person audience feel front and center.

In hospitality news, Boston Maga-

Benefiting the Nantucket Cottage Hospital,

zine recently named 76 Main Inn

the concert also featured a short film of local

the “Best Inn on Nantucket” in

Nantucketers attesting to the need to build

their annual “Best of Boston” is-

a new hospital. Co-chairs Bob and Laurie

sue. Meanwhile on the other side

Monahan, along with event organizers, suc-

of town, Food and Wine magazine

cessfully raised the bar for this island event,

named 76 Main’s sister hotel, the newly opened 21 Broad Street Hotel, one of “Six Amazing

as the evening was a truly fitting tribute to

Retreats Around the World.” Rumor has it that Food and Wine wasn’t the only one singing the

one of Nantucket’s most vital institutions.

hotel’s praises, as Grammy-winner Bruce Hornsby enjoyed his stay there during the Nantucket Music Festival.

N magazine

NANTUCKET NATIVE TOPS THE CHARTS

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Twenty-year-old singer/songwriter Meghan Trainor’s debut single “All About That Bass” skyrocketed up the

A

Billboard Hot 100 this summer, hitting number eight last month. She’s presently number one in Australia. You

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might remember reading about Trainor in N Magazine last summer in a profile piece entitled “The Voice.” A

e

Nantucket native, Trainor moved to Nashville to pursue her music career. After writing songs for other musi-

w

cians, she is now singing and performing her own music and making quite a name for herself. “All About That

s

Bass” has won praise for its catchy lyrics and positive message. Since the song’s debut, Trainor has appeared

a

on Good Morning America, Live with Kelly and Michael, and in publications around the world.

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HIGH SCHOOL ON THE HIGH SEAS Four adventurous Nantucket high school seniors hit the high seas last month aboard

the Lynx, a tall ship dedicated to hands-on educational programs that build character as well as sea worthiness. Partnering up with the Egan Maritime Institute as part of its Sea of Opportunities program, Lynx left Nantucket harbor on August 19th and sailed to Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut where students met up with Nantucketer Matthew Stackpole. Two long years in the making, the Lynx Education Nantucket Scholarship Cruise was made possible through scholarships awarded by Egan Maritime, the Great Harbor Yacht Club and the Lynx. For more information on other exciting educational programs on the high seas, visit www.tallshiplynx.com.

REAL ESTATE CONTINUES TO BUILD

h

Nantucket’s real estate market continues to have a banner

suggest real estate values have increased 12%, on average,

y

year. At press time, there had been 267 property transac-

over the past two years. “The re-sales we analyze are ideal for

-

tions in 2014, totaling $442.5 million, impressive sales fig-

measuring valuation changes as these are homes or vacant land

t

ures which place the 2014 market ahead of every market

parcels that have had no significant renovation/alteration be-

-

since 2006 through the same time period. According to Jen

tween sales,” Shalley explains. “Yet, above and beyond these

-

Shalley of Windwalker Real Estate, this robust sales activi-

pre-existing property sales, it is the new, turnkey properties

.

ty has led to one of the lowest inventory markets Nantucket has seen

that are showcasing the strength of this year’s real estate market. New

,

in nearly a decade—good news for the island’s property values.

construction, furnished homes are in such high demand that they often

l

Shalley reports that several 2014 Nantucket property “re-sales”

sell for full asking price before they even formally come to market.”

d

e

-

,

o

GET SHORTY

IT’S IN THE BAG

After the blockbuster success of last

this summer at One Orange Street, featuring her luxurious line of

year’s Nantucket Shorts Festival, aspir-

handcrafted leather and exotic handbags and accessories. Previously

ing filmmakers are being called once

sold primarily through select retailers such as Niemen Marcus, this

again to submit eight-ten minute films

new flagship store on the corner of Orange and Main is a delight.

to be shown at the Dreamland during

With her chic, bespoke, and modern designs, Jada Loveless hand-

Arts Festival Week in October. Last year’s Shorts Festival featured

bags have been featured in the pages of Vogue, Town and Country,

short films ranging from profiles of artist Matthew Oates and leg-

and Harper’s Bazaar, as well as

endary recluse Underground Tom to adventures in shark-infested

on the red carpet toted by stars

waters with Eric Savetsky to cutting rug with the house music

such as Kate Hudson and Eva

scene on the island. Ten films will be selected for the big screen

Longoria. Now you can spot

and will be shown on Saturday, October 11 at 5:30. For more in-

Jada Loveless on the streets of

formation, visit www.NantucketShorts.com

Nantucket.

Ladies there’s a new shop in town! Jada Loveless opened her doors

N magazine

35


Nosh news

FARM toFORK Written by Robert Cocuzzo

Photography by Brian Sager

When it comes to eating fresh in the fall, Bartlett’s Farm is the crème of the crop.

f all the island’s fall dining venues, few can compare with the farm-to-table feasts at Bartlett’s Farm. Set at an elegantly appointed hundred-person table in one of Bartlett’s green houses, Executive Chef Neil Hudson’s cuisine draws upon the freshest produce around to create a truly unique dining experience. Better still, on September 6th, John Bartlett and his family’s farm are adding another ingredient to this delightful dinner by donating 100 percent of that night’s ticket price to the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club. “Part of our mission at the farm is to give back to the community,” says John Bartlett. “The Boys and Girls Club was a huge part of my childhood. I now serve on the board of directors, so this cause is near and dear to my heart. We wanted to have a farm-to-table dinner to show our support.” The night begins with a champagne reception and passed hors d’oeuvres, followed by six courses paired with wine. Chef Hudson’s menu will include fresh carrots, beets, potatoes, corn, watermelons, cantaloupes, tomatoes and various lettuces and greens—all harvested a stone’s throw away. Bartlett’s Farm hosts these farm-to-table dinners once a month in the fall and winter, so if you miss the September 6th dinner not to worry— Nantucket’s oldest and largest farm isn’t going anywhere soon. For more information, contact

N magazine

amy@bartlettsfarm.com.

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N magazine

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NaNtucket 508.228.1441 annebeckerdesign.com

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NSpire

Making

Waves Written by Ellie Nan StorCk

Photography by Jonathan Nimerfroh

Local surfer Spencer Bridges is riding high on the pro surfing circuit Razor-sharp coral reef. Man-eating

past thirteen years. He caught his first

sharing his surfing stoke with the next

sharks. Cutthroat competition. The

wave at the age of seven with the help

generation. “Teaching kids that have

life of a pro surfer is hardly a day at

of Ted Cahill of the Nantucket Surf

never surfed before is awesome,” the

the beach, but for sixteen-year-old

School. By eleven, he was traveling

surf star says, breaking into a wide

Spencer Bridges the water is just right.

the country competing in national

grin. “They always smile.”

Fresh from placing third at a national

competitions. Time and again, Bridg-

long-boarding competition in Califor-

es has found himself on the winners’

Balancing his life as a profession-

nia, Bridges was back on the shores

podium. Last year on Nantucket, he

al surfer and a high school student

of Cisco teaching at Nantucket Surf

dominated the Young Men’s Division

doesn’t always go so swimmingly.

School this summer, the same school

of the Ozone Surf Classic, handily

“Most of the kids I compete against

that taught him to catch his first wave

winning every heat he entered. “He

in California are all home-schooled,”

just nine years ago. With seven spon-

was one of those kids who picked it up

Bridges says. “They travel nine months

sors now in his corner and with the

quickly and had a lot of natural abil-

out of the year to all of these unbe-

distinction of a National Surf Scholar,

ity and support from his family,” says

lievable places. They’re able to make

this rising local talent is becoming a

Gary Kohner of the Nantucket Surf

their surfing progress a lot.” Still even

force to be reckoned with in the sink

School. “It’s tough for East Coasters

with the rigors of his surfing schedule,

or swim world of competitive surfing.

to compete at the elite level. You’re

Bridges maintains a 4.0 GPA, earning

competing against surfers from places

him the distinction of a National Surf

A New Jersey native, Bridges has

with amazing surf. Being from the

Scholar. “Kids that compete in surf-

been summering on Nantucket for the

East Coast without consistent surf

ing from California and Hawaii don’t

makes it more difficult.” Now in his

go to high school. They’re not in a

second year teaching for Kohner at

college-prep program getting ready to

the Nantucket Surf School, Bridges is

go off to college,” Bridges’s mother, Victoria says. “That’s the competition he’s up against.”

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41


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eyond his fellow competitors, Bridges faces off against fierce forces of nature in the ocean. “There have been lots of scary and dangerous experiences,” he says. When surfing in V-Land, Hawaii, for instance, the young surfer was slammed on the reef by a massive wave, ripping his entire left leg to ribbons. “The worst part was that the leash got wrapped around a coral head. So I was under the water and had to figure out how to unravel myself from the coral.” And then there are the shark incidents, of which Bridges has had several. One was at the East Coast Surfing Championships in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, widely considered the shark-attack capital of the world with around three hundred attacks per year. “In the heat before mine, a kid was paddling for a wave and a shark bit him on the leg,” he have to be sensible.” Time will tell if Spencer Bridges has what it takes to continue to make it in the world of surfing, but whether it’s the looming possibility of shark attacks or the cutthroat competition nipping at his heels, nothing seems strong enough to stop this young talent from chasing his dream wave.

N magazine

says. “I had to go in right after. When you surf in a place like that, you see sharks swimming around you and you just

43


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CURe IN WRITTEN BY ShARoN loRENzo

PHOTOGRAPHY BY kIt NoBlE

Longtime summer resident Gordon Gund is on a mission to cure blindness There is an old English proverb, “What is bred in the bone wills out in the flesh.� For some of us, that means our past catches up with us and diverts our path from a straight line to a curved one. For others, it means that genetic predispositions come forward unexpectedly, and we have to adjust our plans and expectations to meet these new horizons. This is the story of Gordon Gund, a gifted entrepreneur whose vision and plans after Groton School, Harvard University, and four years serving as an officer on a U.S. Navy destroyer came to an abrupt halt.


NSpire


As one of six children of the Cleveland banker George Gund II, Gordon Gund embarked on a finance career at the Chase Manhattan Bank after his service in the Navy and continued to ski, play ice hockey, and even fly an airplane. In 1966, he married his bride Llura (Lulie) Ambler Liggett at her family home in Florida. Their first son Grant was born in 1968, and two years later, a second son named Zachary was born. Then the unexpected happened. Gund was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, and over a short span of time, his sight began

N magazine

to wane. In 1970, he went totally blind.

48


While this might have leveled many others, Gund met the challenge head on. The very next year, he and his wife and a handful of others started the National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation, what is today the Foundation Fighting Blindness. As chairman, Gund has made it the foundation’s mission to cure blindness by 2020. Over the past forty-three years, he has enlisted the finest minds to accelerate research to find treatments and cures for blinding retinal degenerative diseases, which affect ten million people in the US alone. Most recently, Gund pledged $50 million in a challenge grant, vowing to match every contribution over $25,000 dollar-for-dollar.

Gund is completely conversant on the medical intricacies of his foundation’s work, personally following the results of each program that they fund. Using whole genome sequencing to identify and understand the genetic causes of these diseases, they then develop gene therapies to treat them. Simultaneously, Gund’s foundation is working on stem cell, retina restoration, and replacement therapies using animal models for clinical trials. They are developing many drug therapies to stop or reverse the progression of these diseases, and there are now twenty promising human clinical trials going on in these areas. The foundation-supported research has already led to the treatments and cures for patients a normal gene replacement therapy that has already restored sight to more than fifty children and young adults born blind from a retinal disease called Leber’s congenital amaurosis.

N magazine

with some of these diseases. One example of this is

49


eyond inspiring his quest to find

his Nantucket beach house has since expanded

a cure, Gund’s own blindness has

into a collection of massive bronze works that

opened up new opportunities in his life.

now grace the grounds of his summer home on

One of his three brothers, Graham, noted

Nantucket as well as a number of public and pri-

that his other senses began to perk up after he

vate collections around the country. “While my

lost his eyesight. Since going blind, Gund has

eyes can’t see the shapes I create, I feel them

continued to thrive as a businessman, serving

over and over again with my hands, and the re-

as chairman and CEO of the Gund Investment

sult is in my mind forever,” Gund has said about

Corporation as well as a director at the Kellogg

his artistic process.

Company. In 1983, he and his brother George III purchased the Cleveland Cavaliers. The family

Indeed, the results of Gordon Gund’s life and ca-

built the Gund Arena in 1994 and drafted Akron

reer are a credit to the man he’s become in the

native, Lebron James in the 2003 NBA draft. He

face of adversity. He’s applied the same kind of

sold the team in 2005, but still retains a minority

entrepreneurial, adventuresome spirit required to

financial interest.

run a major corporation to the Foundation Fight-

N magazine

ing Blindness and his artistic enterprises. They

50

Most interesting, perhaps, is Gund’s emergence

all take great planning, incredible endurance,

as an artist. Drawing upon his early days study-

and masterful footwork to implement. The last-

ing paintings and photography with his siblings

ing impact of all this is evident in his many ac-

as a child at the Cleveland Museum of Art and

complishments. His legacy speaks for itself, and

later at Harvard University, Gund became inter-

Nantucket is graced with his quiet and unassum-

ested in sculpture. What started as a hobby with

ing presence in our summer community.

a piece of wood, a penknife, and sandpaper in


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51


Beacon of BrightIdeas WRITTEN BY PhIlIP DAvIDSoN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY kIt NoBlE

Inside the Nantucket Project with Tom Scott and Kate Brosnan

First there was Tom and Tom. Then there was Tom and Kate—Tom Scott and Kate Brosnan that is, the co-founders

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of the Nantucket Project. When Tom and Kate step onstage

52

on September 26 to welcome an esteemed group of thinkers and visionaries to the island for the fourth annual Nantucket Project, it will represent the culmination of an enduring friendship and partnership that spans three decades.


NVESTIGATE


he Nantucket Project has established itself as a top-tier conference on the strength of its program, which includes such notable speakers as Google’s Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, former Secretary of the Treasury Larry Summers, Senator John McCain, and the award-winning playwright Eve Ensler, among many others. Despite the event’s success, Scott and Brosnan were not satisfied. There was still a strong desire to somehow use media in conjunction with the event to make an even bigger and more significant impact. They’ve made great strides to that end. This year they have announced an editorial and distribution partnership with America’s most iconic news magazine, Time, and they are also producing a series of

N magazine

short films that will carry the messages of the Project’s speakers far beyond the shores of Nantucket.

54


Scott and Brosnan have both come a long way

upheaval,” Scott says. “While I wasn’t happy

cated to the belief that ideas, when masterfully

since they met at the Straight Wharf in 1989.

with the outcome, I am to this day incredibly

conveyed, are the greatest tools of mankind.

Brosnan, then the restaurant’s manager, hired

proud of the work we did.”

TNP Labs has partnered with BMW as well as joining forces with Harbers Studios, the brain-

Scott as a bartender. Brosnan says she found the budding young entrepreneur incredibly en-

Brosnan says the spirit of Plum lives on in

child of art-world impresario Renee Harbers.

gaging and enthusiastic. Bartending by night,

the Nantucket Project in a number of interest-

Together they’re attempting something truly

Scott and his fellow “Juice Guy,” Tom First,

ing ways. In 2007, Plum and the Atlantic co-

novel—inviting six of the country’s most ac-

spent their days developing Allserve, the com-

produced “Bookmark on the Beach,” a literary

complished experimental filmmakers to create

pany they would eventually grow into Nan-

event that brought speakers like Christopher

short films inspired by talks at this year’s event.

tucket Nectars. Brosnan became the head of

Hitchens and the poet Robert Pinsky to Nan-

These innovative films represent the initial en-

Juice Guys Care, the company’s philanthrop-

tucket. “The community really embraced that,”

tries in the Project’s partnership with Time, a

ic arm. “Good business meant doing good

Brosnan says. “It showed there was a real thirst

body of work to be called the Encyclopedia of

things,” says Brosnan. “There was a strong

for ideas, so the concept for the Nantucket

Ideas. This collection will grow to convey the

sense that the company needed to give back to

Project wasn’t far off from that.”

world’s most important contemporary thought.

Nantucket.”

This year’s TNP theme is art + commerce, In 2010, Brosnan began pitching the concept

which Scott says represents “the new conver-

Fast forward to 2004. Scott invited Brosnan

to a group of Nantucketers who eventually be-

gence that defines human ingenuity in the 21st

to join his next adventure— Plum TV, a local

came the Project’s founding circle. This group

century.” In line with this theme, Michael Spal-

TV network. Scott wanted Kate to serve as the

includes Steve and Jill Karp, Bob and Jennifer

ter, Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the

channel’s general manager and on-air host. He

Diamond, Tim and Alicia Mullen, Bill Frist,

Rhode Island School of Design, will kick off

envisioned Plum as a celebration of the Nan-

Wendy Schmidt and Tom Bresette.

the Project’s main event. Spalter has launched the Cultural Entrepreneurship Initiative at Har-

tucket community. “We helped raise awareness for a lot of on-island organizations— the

“The response was beyond my expectations,”

vard Business School, a major HBS initiative

hospital, the library,” Brosnan points out. “We

Brosnan remembers. “Our founding circle

that he says is exactly in keeping with Scott’s

were always really proud of that.” The network

members really moved mountains to make

thinking. “I think art, design and creativity

eventually grew to eight channels and racked

the event happen.” Scott says, “That’s why the

have never been more important than they are

up over fifty Emmy Award nominations for

support of the community is so vital to our or-

today in the context of modern capitalism,”

outstanding local programming. As a busi-

ganization. It extends to our advisory board, all

Spalter says.

ness, however, Plum proved to be a bruising

the volunteers, and the team Kate and I have

disappointment. “We were growing a media

assembled.”

“We think we’re really on to something with this theme,” adds Scott, “and that’s what we

company at a time of technical and financial No longer just an event business, the Nantucket

strive to do every year—explore ideas that are

Project has grown to include TNP Labs, a me-

emerging, ideas that can make a difference in

dia and production company Scott says is dedi-

the world. That’s also why the setting of Nantucket, with its history of innovative thinking, is ideal for this event.”

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Named one of “6 Amazing New Retreats Around the World”

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– Food & Wine

56


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WRITTEN BY RoBERt CoCuzzo

PHOTOGRAPHY BY kIt NoBlE


NVESTIGATE Watching Andrew McKenna perform a fighter approach at Nantucket Memorial Airport in his P-51 Mustang makes your heart thud like a prop. Coming in hot, McKenna screams low over the tarmac, then pulls up and arches his Mustang high to the left, dumping speed and circling back for a landing. The fighter gleams magnificently in the midday sun, harking back to World War II when Mustangs patrolled the skies and shot down nearly five thousand enemy aircraft. The scene is made all the more surreal watching it alongside World War II veteran and lifelong islander Francis Pease, who actually built a runway during the war for fighter birds like McKenna’s. These days, Pease pulls his car up the airport’s chain-link fence to watch the planes come in. Today McKenna gave the old vet a treat. “Is that one hot aircraft or what!” the ninety-one-year-old yells out.


ndeed, Andrew McKenna’s P-51 Mus-

around his plane with pride—not for own-

to Italy, right when the war ended. Never

tang is one of the hottest planes in the

ing one, but pride for its history. “The say-

seeing any combat, the plane was packed

air, topping out at 505 miles per hour.

ing with these airplanes is that you are the

up in box and shipped back to the States

There’s between 125 and 130 P-51s left in

keeper of the keys,” McKenna says. “Take

where it served in various Air National

the world, but only a handful in this kind

the history, try and carry it for as long as you

Guard outfits before being sold at surplus

of condition. McKenna climbs out of his

can.And when you can’t do it any longer, hand

in the late fifties. “You could have bought

Mustang in a khaki fighter-pilot jumpsuit,

the keys over to someone who will respect it.”

this in the sixties for eight hundred bucks,”

looking as if he just shot out of a time warp from 1944. A tire blew on his landing, but

McKenna’s P-51 was built in May of 1944

to three million depending on what kind

he seems utterly unfazed by what could

as a replacement for the Eighth Air Force.

of shape it is in.” McKenna is the fourth

have been a pretty scary situation. Standing

It was flown from Englewood, California

civilian to own this mint-condition P-51.

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well over six feet tall, McKenna guides us

60

McKenna says. “Now it will run you two


Although he repeatedly insists that the story is about the plane and not him, it’s hard not to wonder about the kind of guy who can own one of these pieces of history—or more importantly, who can fly it. McKenna grew up watching air shows with his father in Pennsylvania. He remembers him once saying, “One day Andrew you’ll get a chance to ride in one of those.” But the boy vowed he wouldn’t just ride in a P-51 Mustang—he’d own one and fly it himself. At the age of sixteen, McKenna did his first solo flight on October 10, 1992, but the budding hobby became too expensive for his family to support. He dreamt about flying everyday, until finally in 2007 when he earned his private pilot’s license. Seven years later, the thirty-seven-year-old performs at air shows with millions in the crowds. He’s come full circle, now performing for kids that dream to be him someday. While performing at air shows is certainly thrilling, McKenna says his greatest pride comes in honoring those who have flown before him. He has done nine flyovers at Arlington National Cemetery, including one for a decorated P-51 ace named Urban Drew. Drew had six aerial kills in World War II, once famously shooting down two Nazis in a single dogfight. His heroism earned him the Air Force Cross. However, when Drew passed away in April 3, 2013, budget cuts in United States Air Force prevented him from receiving the traditional flyover. So Mcthe war.

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Kenna did it, honoring the hero with the same plane he flew in

61


I cKenna has been coming to Nantucket since 2006. He regularly flies back and forth to his home in Virginia in the Mustang. “It’s kind of like driving a monster truck to work,” he laughs, as the Nantucket Memorial attendant finishes filling the P-51 with 103 gallons of gas. “It gets about two miles to the gallon.” Back in Virginia, McKenna is the founder, president, and CEO of McKenna and Associates, a strategic consulting firm strategizing in management and fundraising for Fortune 500 companies, banking interests, national nonprofits, and high-net-worth individuals. Before starting his company, he received a presidential appointment to the US Department of Agriculture and served in the White House Liaison’s Office. All this McKenna says not a word about. For him, it’s all about the plane. Everyday, 550 World War II veterans pass away and the link to our national history becomes thinner and thinner. Thanks to pilots like Andrew McKenna, the spirit of those brave men and women will continue to soar, ever reminding us why they truly were the greatest generation.


I

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G o o D

Company N magazine

Written by Robert Cocuzzo

64

Photography by Kit Noble

Serial entrepreneur Andrew Perlman breaks ground on a project this September that could change the world.


NDepth

ndrew Perlman has lived the Mark Zuckerberg version of the American Dream. While other kids in his hometown of Newton, Massachusetts pinned posters of athletes or rock stars on their bedroom walls, Perlman idolized tech giants Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. He was a natural born entrepreneur—curious, driven and highly intelligent. When Perlman was just twelve years old, he turned his parents’ kitchen into an ethanol still and attempted to sell the fuel to his neighbors. Fifteen years later, he sold his first company for two hundred million dollars. By thirty, Perlman had successfully launched five start-ups across multiple fields. Now on the eve of his fortieth birthday, this longtime seasonal resident is zeroing in on solving global problems. Andrew Perlman is out to change the world.


66

After spending his teens romping through the halls of the engineering department at UMass, hoping to stumble upon new technologies that he could turn into businesses, Perlman enrolled at Washington University in St. Louis. During his sophomore year, he discovered a technology being developed at the university that he thought could make for a profitable company. So he wrote up a business plan, put a team together, and attracted some investors. When the university refused to license the technology to him because he was a student, Perlman dropped out.

Photography by Matthew Piunno

N magazine

was always interested in the intersection of science and technology and the ability to actually turn that into something that changes people’s lives,” Perlman says today outside of the Bean on Nantucket. The thirty-nine-year-old looks cool in a Keanu Reeves kind of way, with slicked back hair and an understated style. He’s fast-talking and personable. While these days Perlman can be found dining with Richard Branson or hunting with T. Boone Pickens, he seems utterly unaffected by his success. “There’s this great quote,” he says, “‘Successful entrepreneurship is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent desperation.’ That was definitely true for me.”


“My parents weren’t too happy about it,” he says. “My mom doesn’t like me to say this, but basically they financially cut me off.” After failing to get the technology from the university, desperation forced Perlman to take a job as a telemarketer. “I was calling people up at dinnertime, trying to get them to switch to Sprint from AT&T, getting hung up on by everybody. It was literally the worst job in the history of the world.” And that’s when Perlman identified the first big opportunity that would launch his career as a serial entrepreneur.

Since selling Cignal in 2000, Perlman has been on a roll, starting innovative companies across several fields. “I think it comes down to one thing: finding pain points where someone is so desperate for a solution that they’ll do whatever it takes, or pay whatever it takes,” he says. “I try to find pain points in markets of ten billion dollars or more and then find a technical solution. There are very few problems that you can’t find a solution to. I have yet to find one.” With the help of scientists, Perlman’s companies have developed high-speed memory chips for smart phones, created cutting-edge anti-obesity drugs, desalinated water, revolutionized clean energy, and even produced drugs that essentially extend life spans. A lifelong lover of Nantucket, Perlman named several of his companies after places on the island. There’s the Coatue Corporation, Coskata, Inc., Alta Rock Energy. “Cisco was already taken,” Perlman laughs.

N magazine

PHOTOGRAPHY BY mAtthEw PIuNNo

After listening to companies complain about the high cost of international calling, Perlman set out to find a cheaper way. This ultimately led him to patent the first technology to send voice over the Internet. A year later, Perlman’s Cignal Global Communications was in twenty-five countries, netting six million dollars a year in revenue. Perlman had even convinced the CEO of Sprint Interna-

tional to leave Sprint and lead his fledgling company. All this around the time he could legally order his first beer.

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he crown jewel of his empire, perhaps, is GreatPoint Energy, which is dedicated to converting coal into cleaner-burning natural gas. “Whether you’re talking about global warming or acid rain or smog or mercury build-up in fish or asthma rates, the leading cause is burning coal,” he says. “Burning coal is a terrible thing for the environment, and whether you can burn it cleanly or not, it’s not burned cleanly enough. It just isn’t being done well.” Perlman and his partner found a scientist in the Midwest who’d developed a solution in the seventies that could turn “the dirtiest fuel in the world to the cleanest commercial fuel in the world.” After years of refining the technology and raising hundreds of millions of dollars, GreatPoint Energy is breaking ground this September on a plant in a place that needs clean energy the most—China.

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“It’s almost indescribable how bad the environment is in China,” Perlman says. “Five out of seven days a week you couldn’t see that house across the street. It’s so disgusting, it’s beyond imagination, and it’s all from burning coal. Thirty percent of the pollution in California comes from China. It’s also now the leading polluter, and the leading cause of global warming. So we’ve been heavily focused on trying to convert China from coal to natural gas.” If GreatPoint’s first plant proves effective in China, Perlman could dramatically impact the fight against global warming and pollution.

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Beyond GreatPoint Energy, Perlman has several other companies in the works, one of which he’s testing out right here on Nantucket. He believes modular construction is the future of building, so he’s working with Smartbuild Modular of Nantucket to build his own home off of Cliff Road. “In China, there’s a company constructing the tallest building in the world and they’re doing it all modular. They’re going to build it in less than a year,” he says. “So I’m convinced that modular construction is the future.” As for Andrew Perlman’s own future, there’s always another company on his horizon, another opportunity for him to change the world.


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natural selection Four Nantucket locals rolling up their sleeves and making their living in Mother Nature.

A

Photography by Kit Noble

XE MAN Sam Myers, Nantucket Yard Guard

Sometimes the best way to save the trees is by cutting them down. Just ask local arborist Sam Myers. “Clearing certain trees can stop the spread

of

disease

and invasive insects,” he explains. “It also allows for native vegetation to return to the landscape.” After attending Nantucket High School, Myers studied forestry at UMass Amherst. He returned to the island and started his business in 2004. Far from the Paul Bunyan fairy tale, the life of an arborist is no stroll through the woods. Falling branches, flying debris and climbing trees with chainsaws make it one of the most dangerous professions. Myers removes around three hundred trees a year, with numbers peaking during hurricane season. Here in the State Forest, Myers cleared 150 trees to make room for the hugely popular Disc Golf Course. Now instead of “Timber!”, you’ll hear people yelling “Fore!”

N magazine On him: Patagonia Nano Puffy Jacket, Fjallraven Greenland No 1 Special Jacket, Crossed Logo Camo Hat from the HaulOver.

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DANIEllE o’DEll, NANtuCkEt CoNSERvAtIoN fouNDAtIoN Danielle O’Dell is a research technician and field supervisor for the Nantucket Conservation Foundation. “Our research really focuses around land management and trying to determine the best ways to appropriately and ecologically manage all our properties in order to promote rare plant and animal specials,” O’Dell explains. Here in Medouie Creek, O’Dell has been tracking Nantucket’s spotted turtle population for the last six years, specifically monitoring how these freshwater N magazine

species have responded to a nearby salt marsh restoration project. “I use radio telemetry to track and follow turtles throughout the active season and also I mark and recapture turtles to get an idea of sex

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On hER: Fjallraven Greenland Jacket, Patagonia Gatos Vest, and Bogs Tacoma boots from the haulOver.

ratios, population size and survivorship,” O’Dell says. “This requires working in some pretty mucky, boggy, shrubby, mosquito- and tick-infested places. But I love it!”


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ATIVE SPECIES

Dylan Wallace, Nantucket Native

Nantucket native Dylan Wallace has never been afraid to get his hands dirty. Co-owner of Faraway Farm, Wallace joins his wife Claudia in taking their time-earned knowledge into the backyards of private properties to construct

bountiful gardens. As an NOFA-accredited organic land-care specialist, Wallace helps design, install and maintain organic landscapes with a focus on edible plants that reconnect clients with their land. “Having our lifelong connection to the island, its environment, its people and its farms has allowed us to take a unique approach,” Wallace says. “Our gardens work with the natural management program. We work to include natural systems that fit the space and clients’ lifestyle.” So it is that Wallace and his team are helping island residents get back to their farming roots.

ON HIM: Patagonia A/C Shirt, Better Sweater Jacket, Nano Puff Jacket Vest from the HaulOver.

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environment rather than against it, encouraging beneficial insects and birds to be a part of the pest

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SImoN EDwARDS, fIfth BEND oyStERS A lot goes into an oyster. For the quickest of bites, a slurp really, oystermen spend two painstaking years battling wind, weather and the ever-looming threat of disease to raise tiny seedlings into mature, delicious oysters. Simon Edwards has been farming oysters on Nantucket for five years now and can attest to the trials and tribulations of harvesting this delicacy on Nantucket. “At some point you take a leap of faith because there’s a whole year of making absolutely no money while having a huge investment in the water,” Edwards says. Born in Kenya and educated in the U.K., Edwards received an undergraduate degree in environmental science before getting his master’s in ecological studies. Here on the island, he’s putting that education to good, hands-on use by providing a large number of the oysters served at local restaurants such as Cru. “They do the town some good too,” Edwards says, “an adult oyster does thirty-five to fifty-five gallons of water filtration a day.” Not bad for a three-dollar bite.

N magazine On him: Patagonia Shirt, ibex Shank Lite, and Prana Ogden Jacket from the haulOver.

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BIG

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NDEPTH

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S H O T

Famed photographer Deborah Feingold returns to Nantucket this fall with her newly released book entitled MUSIC. When photographer Debo-

rah Feingold first discovered Nantucket in the early seventies, her career was just beginning. Growing up in Rhode Island, her father taught her to develop film at the age of twelve and by college she was teaching photo workshops at nursing homes and later juvenile prisons in Boston. Then one summer, her boyfriend, a jazz musician, landed a gig playing at the Brotherhood of Thieves, and Feingold followed him to the island for the season. “During that time, we met Gene Mahon who had a jazz club and we spent time with him over the years,� she says. When September came, Feingold went to New York City where her career began to take off. Forty years later, Deborah Feingold’s portfolio is filled with the most iconic people on the planet, from movie stars to rock stars, pro athletes to presidents. This October, the famed photographer will be returning to the island for Nantucket Arts Festival to unveil her most recent book entitled Music. As a preview, Feingold gave us an exclusive look at some of her greatest images and shared the stories behind the shots.


MADONNA 1982: We shot this in my studio apartment. Everything in the room folded up; bed, table, chairs. By the time Madonna arrived we had a photo studio. The shoot didn’t last more than fifteen to N magazine

twenty minutes. No publicists, no make-up artists, no managers, just two working girls giving it all they had.

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SteVe tYLeR AND JOe PeRRY 1985: Warner Brothers hired me to shoot publicity photos of the band in Boston. Bit of a reunion for

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me...Back in 1971 a group of us drove to New Hampshire from Boston to hear this new band Aerosmith, perform in a roller skating rink!

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AL GReeN 1982: Al was rehearsing with Patti LaBelle for the Broadway hit “Your Arms photograph. This was one of those assignments where the challenge was to make the photo feel intimate even though I was only allowed to shoot him from a distance during a rehearsal. A small man with a large spirit, even from afar.

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Too Short To Box With God� when I took this

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KeItH RICHARDS 2000: A British music magazine sent me to Keith’s house to photograph him for their cover. They wanted him holding the record that had inspired him the most. Did that, then this. That simple, that easy. Then we all sat down for a simple lunch. Just another day‌.


sion. He was easy going and had absolutely no attitude as he was primped and prodded by a dozen or more stylists. Totally cool dude.

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PHARReLL 2003: Pharrell agreed to do a fashion shoot for a men’s magazine I was working with and this is an outtake from that ses-

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PAt BeNAtAR 1993: We did this shoot outside in LA. She was so easy to work with and she knew

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exactly how to work with the camera. No matter what situation I set up she fell right into it. A real pro.

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BILLY IDOL 1983: I knew very little about Billy and his music when I was asked to photograph him. I treated him like I would anyone, which, in this case, may not have been the smartest thing to do. I asked him to move around. He wasn’t comfortable but I kept encouraging in his comfort zone, walked off the set and out of the studio. I remember standing there, stunned and then very quietly saying, “I guess the shoot is over.” Which it was, five seconds after this shot.

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him. He started to get into it but then, quite accidentally, his cape hit my lights and they went crashing to the floor. Billy, now totally not

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ALICIA KeYS 2002: It is always great fun to photograph someone before they become so big that there is nothing spontaneous about shooting them. Perfect example here; we just jammed into my car, drove to Central Park and just played for an hour or so.

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BONO 1981: U2 had just arrived stateside and this was their first official US publicity shoot. It was also my first real deal band shoot in NYC. When I look at these contact sheets I smile remembering what “beginnings� feel and look like.

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JAMeS BROwN 1979: There was a press junket for James Brown and the reporters and photographers lined up in the hallway of the record company for our five minutes to interview and photograph Mr. Brown. I got my shots and rushed home to print my pictures. Five years ago, I revisited that session and found this image. No memory of chasing him out the door and into the street to get my shot!


BB KING 1985: You cannot take a bad photo of this loving and personable musician. This was my first of many shoots with him and he always looks the same. Happy to be wherever he is, as long as he has Lucille.

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Live Life weLL at Main Street’s only boutique hotel.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY RoByN wAlSh STYLEd BY EllIE NAN StoRCk

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Viviana Uchitel dress from Hepburn


NVogue

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Michael Stars blue maxi dress from Hepburn and bracelets from Hepburn

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N magazine Paige skyline ankle peg white jeans from Hepburn, Johnstons of Elgin grey turtleneck from Johnstons Cashmere

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Samuji white top from Isobel and Cleo, Paige skyline ankle peg white jeans from Hepburn


Love and Liberty white eyelet blouse from Hepburn, Amet and Ladoue scarf from Hepburn, Paige Verdugo grey ankle jeans from Hepburn

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Isobel and Cleo: 45 Straight Wharf Johnstons Cashmere: 4 Federal Street Hepburn: 3 Salem Street


N magazine Love and Liberty white cardigan from Hepburn

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NHA

If you ask Nantucketers what their favorite time of year is on the rock, you’ll undoubtedly get the resounding response of autumn. As the days get shorter and the crowds slowly start to dissipate, the island begins to return to its pre-summer ways, but with the added bonus of beautiful weather and a bevy of shops and eateries that remain open. While this island doesn’t boast the same foliage as other parts of New England, there’s something about being able to sit on the beach well into the autumnal season that trumps the sight of a few leaves on the ground. Take a look at how past autumn days were spent on Nantucket, from exploring the fiery colors spreading throughout the moors, to days of harvesting the island’s famous cranberries in the bogs.

N magazine A bountiful harvest in the fall of 1880

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John McCalley’s view of the central moors in the fall, 1960s

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Three men in a field, hauling a cart, supposedly fertilizing circa 1890s.

John McCalley’s view of Quaise in the fall, 1979. PHOTO BY JohN mCCAllEy

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A Quidnet belle on a small haystack, ca. 1920s.


Dry-harvesting cranberries in the 1890s A wagon load of hay on the Chadwick Farm in Polpis, early 1900s Fall foliage on Main Street, 1968

N magazine John McCalley’s view of town over the autumn moors in Shawkemo, 1960s.

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Pops Kick-Off Party at 21 Broad Street

Foggysheet nantucket

T Shelley Sarbey, Jennie Famiglio, Mark Famiglio & Ed Sarbey

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Valerie Rogers & courtney Rogers

Alice & J. Harry Breed

c

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Barbara Stern & Jack Burke

Bud carrey, Ginny carrey, Steve Anderson & Marcia Anderson

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Phyllis & Stuart Freilich

kim Frisbie, kate keith & Melinda Puljic

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Tim Monahan, Laurie Monahan & Bob Monahan

Jay Bowen, Laurie champion & Bob champion

Nancy Vittorini, carlo Vittorini & Susan doughan

cissie Sill & Regina Hartmann

courtney O’Neill, Beth Moyer, Shay Murphy, kate Bartleman & Maeve Markey

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Judy & Bob Brust

Betsy Frye & doreen corkin

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508.325.5977 www.MHumphreyACK.com

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Nantucket Art and Artisans Show Benefiting Small Friends Nantucket

Foggysheet nantucket

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Vladimir Kagan & Tessa Cressman

Alexa, Susan, Charlie & Dakota Dragon

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Kerry Tilton, Bridgette Hynes, Melanie Sabin & Lauren Marttila

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Jo Sullivan & Adam Sabin

Shay Murphy & Neil Maguire

david Feltz & Sharon Sterk

Bruce & Helen Howard

Alana cullen & Marcus Foley

Alexi Mintz, Grace Hull & Aaron Hull

Andrew & Mary Mintz

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chris Bonelli & Melissa dudley

105 PHOTOS BY BRIAN SAGER


The Roberts Collection

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The Gate House

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The Roberts House

www.therobertscollection.com 1-800-872-6830

The Manor House


Maria Mitchell Association Gala at Sankaty

Foggysheet nantucket

Meg Panetta. Emily Phillips Longley & Erin Lotridge

Patricia Brennan & Jane Tausig

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Pat Miller, Meaghan Maureen & Eliza Miller

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Scott Widmeyer & Alan Yount Alison Green, Libby & Bill Allard, christina & Michael Hirtenstein

Holly Wilson, Janet Schulte & Scott Wilson

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HEIDI WEDDENDORF Nantucket Knot Bracelet with Pearl Bangles, Leather Wraps and Gold Wave Bracelet Professional Pearl Restringing

508-228-2592 heidiweddendorf.com Showing at Erica Wilson • The Artist’s Association

Maia Gokhale & Alisia Trevino

Judy Lee, Michael West & Malcolm MacNab

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Tabatha Hawkins, Allison Gayo & kyra Taylor

Maggie Naylon , Maureen Maher & Julie Gasco

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“The New Nantucket” Opening Reception

Foggysheet nantucket

Tom Olcott, Andrew kotchen & Matthew Berman

Brian Rice & James Browers

Vladimir kagan

Joe donelan & Steve Roethke

Julie & chuck Gifford

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donna Elle, Audrey Sterk & Mikayla Molta

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Bruce & Elisabeth Percelay

chris & Marybeth Gibson PHOTOS BY JoNAthAN NImERfRoh


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Nautican Foundation 7th Anual Summer Soiree benefitting Nantucket Community Sailing

Foggysheet nantucket

Stephanie Mangano, Mark Fayne & Zach Trudeau

Ly Sarah Vickers & kiel James Patrick

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callan Vessels & Alex Shukis

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courtney Smith & chris Halloran

Nicola Stevens & chris Gatto

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Lyddy O’connell, kerrigan cotter, Jaclyn Sheperd, carolyn Bothwell, Lauren cochran & Molly Barfuss

Jessica Radford, Mark, katherine & danny Herrick

Julie Naidu & chris Naidu

Sara Bonafair & Ian Boldt

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carolyn Lee, Lindsay Walker, Abby Slotnick & Ryan clunan

Jade Sperlinga & Paige canavan PHOTOS BY BRIAN SAGER

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NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

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Becomea member today!

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NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION WHALING MUSEUM AND HISTORIC SITES

508 228 1894

nha.org


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Nuptials Featured Wedding

Bride & Groom: Michael & Rebecca GReeley Ceremony: St. MaRy’S chuRch WeddinG reCeption: NaNtucket yacht club Stationery: PaRchMeNt FloriSt: SoiRee FloRal Hair and makeup: DaRya SaloN Bride’S GoWn: aMSale BrideSmaidS’ dreSSeS: JoaNNa auGuSt GroomSmen: altoN laNe tuxeS & ViNeyaRD ViNeS cuMMeRbuNDS Cake: JoDi’S cakeS Band: beaNtowN pHotoGrapHy: ZoFia & co

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VideoGrapHer: JeFF bRouillet

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WRITTEN BY holly fINIGAN

IMAGE BY ChARlottE CAREy PhotoGRAPhy

Ahhh, September…the best month of the year. The weather is still beach-worthy, the traffic is gone, the weeks are calm, and the weekends fill up with Nantucket nuptials. It’s no wonder that September is widely thought the most special thirty days on the island. With this downtime comes the ability to go on dates again! As a ten-year bartending veteran, my favorite part of September is dining and drinking at all my favorite restaurants that were always booked up in summer. So here, with fall flings on the horizon, I give you a week’s worth of hot date spots and how to enjoy them.

the date: The First date the spot: The Nautilus the dish: This new island hotspot has been jam-packed since its

the date: Sunset for Two the spot: CurrentVintage the dish: Nothing says sweet September like a sunset at stunning Steps

Memorial day opening, so if you’re in the mood for something new—a

Beach. So throw a big blanket in the back of your Jeep and stop by cur-

new love interest, a new handcrafted cocktail, a new way to enjoy a

rentVintage to pick up a bottle of wine and some delicious cheese and

Rib Eye for two— well, then this is your new spot. Bonus: they take

crackers. Toast to the end of the season with light pinot noir, and get that

same-day rezzies at 3pm so The Nautilus is perfect for a last-minute

feeling of an endless summer as the sun drops into the Atlantic.

rendezvous, too.

the date: The Proposal the spot: Galley Beach the dish: Popping the big question? Get a little liquid confidence in an

the date: Romance on Rock the spot: Topper’s Restaurant at the Wauwinet the dish: Long summers with loads of work mean relationships often

oh so gorgeous setting at Galley Beach. Or did she say yes? Take her to

take the back seat. Reignite your flame with something special by tak-

the Galley and sit in one of their lounges next to their chic fire pits and

ing the boat out to Topper’s at the Wauwinet. Enjoy the feeling of being

begin to plan your big day in this inspiring spot.

a world away as you sip and savor in their beautiful dining room. Make sure to save room for a cheese plate as you finish off a bottle of something fabulous and relish the moments of being away from it all.

the date: The day date the spot: B-ACK Yard BBQ the dish: With football season upon us, a Sunday date can often become

the date: The Blind date the spot: LoLa 41 the dish: When it comes to a blind date, pick a spot that is social and

one of the most fun days out there. Get over to the new B-Ack Yard BBQ

comes with a lot of action. That’s why I recommend reserving two stools

obviously.)

and snack on some comfort food (their Mac & cheese is amazing!) while you sip on some good brews and cheer on your favorite team (the Pats,

at the ever-popular LoLa 41 sushi bar. Seats forty-one and forty-two give

If things are going well, make sure to order the salted caramel pretzel

the date: The classic the spot: The Chanticleer the dish: I am a huge fan of ‘Sconset, especially in the fall. Get a little

parfait—a sweet and savory combo ideal for two spoons!

dressed up and take your love out to the east side of the Island. Sit back

a fantastic view of everything that goes on in this busy restaurant. If the conversation gets awkward, you can always chat with the sushi chef.

and relax as the leisurely pace of dining surrounds you. After dinner,

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head over to their bar area and let their veteran bartender Vegas make

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you a little dessert drink as you soak in the old-school feeling of this special spot.


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Photo by Jeffrey Allen Photography

Photo by Zofia & Co.

Photo by Claudia Kronenberg

Susan Warner Catering Nantucket Clambake Co. 508.228.9283 www.susanwarnercatering.com www.nantucketclambake.com

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Photo by Runaway Bride Nantucket

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Nantucket Restaurant week

Fall Join us

September 29th Through

October 5th Junior Chef Sunday October 5th

Enjoy Your Favorite Restaurants Thank you to our Sponsors, The Inquirer & Mirror, N Magazine The NCAF, Bartletts Farm, American Seasons

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NOT SO FAST

a quick chat with rocky foX of the chickeN BoX N magaZiNe: When did you get your start at the Box? rocky foX: I started at the Box twenty-five years ago.

N magaZiNe: What can we expect at this year’s See Ya Later Alligator Party?

N magaZiNe: How have you seen the bar change since you

rocky foX: Pretty much the same thing

started?

as you’ve seen the last thirty-plus years.

rocky foX: The biggest change is the new bathrooms. If you

Good food and good company make for a good time.

had ever been in the old ones, then you know what I mean.

N magaZiNe: What do most people not know about what it

N magaZiNe: Any funny memories stick out? rocky foX: The time when I wasn’t in a particularly great

takes to run the Chicken Box?

mood one night and Packy wheeled my car in through the

rocky foX: That it’s a year-round job that my two partners

double doors and put it on the dance floor with the hazards

Packy Norton and John Jordin run. Just because there’s no

flashing and the radio blaring. The entire staff hid behind

line doesn’t mean that there’s no work to be done.

the bar. I mean how can you stay in a bad mod after that. Classic.

have come through?

N magaZiNe: What’s the legacy that Robert “Seaweed” Reed

rocky foX: World Premier, Concrete Jungle and the Wailers.

has left behind for you guys to carry on?

rocky foX: Don’t screw with the recipe! I think everyone

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N magaZiNe: Don’t you also have a radio show? rocky foX: Yes, the Boom Box with Rocky Fox. DC Col-

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lins and I have done over a hundred shows now. We’re on every Friday night on WACK 97.7 from 8-11. We play old school hip-hop, funk and R&B. Our goal is to get the ladies dancing before they go out on a Friday night…preferably to the Box.

needs a good ol’ fashioned dive bar—a five-star dive bar I might add!

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JoShuA SImPSoN

N magaZiNe: Who are some of your favorite performers to


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JoShuA SImPSoN

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N Magazine Advertising directory

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56,57 21 broad 87 76 main street Inn 44 ACK eye 70 Angel Frazier 38 Anne becker Design 103 berkshire bank 124 Cape Air/Nantucket Airlines 51 Christopher Gaffney Photography 14 Christopher’s Home Furnishings 107 Cisco brewery 86 Clarke brothers Construction 45 Cold Noses 15 Congdon & Coleman re 29 Corcoran 18 Cru 45 Current Vintage 111 Darcy Creech re 10 Diane Firsten 124 Dreamland 38 east Wood Trading 106 emeritus 126 First republic bank 45 Geronimo’s 8,23 Great Point Properties 70 Haulover 108 Heidi Weddendorf 27 Island Properties 6,17,31 J. Pepper Frazier Co. 114 Jessica Hicks 44 John’s Island re 38 Johnston’s Cashmere 11 Jordan real estate 5 Kathleen Hay Designs 7 Land rover Cape Cod 13 Lee real estate 18 margot Lar Designs 12 marine Home Center 125 maury People - Craig Hawkins 2,25,63 maury People - Gary Winn 102 michael Humphrey 103 milly & Grace 120 Nantucket Clambake 115 Nantucket Cottage Hospital 114 Nantucket Historical Assoc 16 Nantucket Insurance 4 Nantucket Lightshop 44 Nantucket media systems 123 Nantucket Project 121 Nantucket restaurant Week 120 Nantucket Tents 102 Nina mcLemore 19 Nobby shop 86 Peter beaton 70 Peter england 96 Pumpkin Pond Farm 106 roberts Collection 96 sconset Gardner 69 sconset real estate 3 seamon schepps 9 sentient Jet 51 stephens & Co. 45 susan Lister Locke 120 susan Warner Catering 70 TCe Contractors 4 Tile room 39 Tonkin of Nantucket 39 Victoria Greenhood 4 Water Closet 21 Water Jewels Gallery 19 Zero main

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Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069

Craig Hawkins

Bernadette Maglione

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 119 craig@maurypeople.com

37 Main Street, Nantucket Island, MA 02554 NEW

Polpis $13,750,000

Monomoy $12,500,000

ING LIST

West of Town $9,875,000

SHAWKEMO The quality and finish work throughout this property is exceptional and absolutely must be seen to be appreciated. This incredible main dwelling offers several living areas and views out over butting conservation land. This is an extraordinary execution of a brilliant design. $9,800,000

TOWN Built in 1723, the Barnabas Gardner house is one of Nantucket’s earliest homes, original details intact. Property affords subdivision potential with frontage for two additional lots, approval not required. Renovated in 2006. $5,295,000

WAUWINET One of the most spectacular locations on Nantucket, nestled in the dunes on the haulover with incredible views in both directions. Walk out the front door to the beach or down the driveway to the harbor and boat moorings. Enjoy beautiful sunrises and sunsets. $9,975,000

NEW

Monomoy $7,500,000

Madaket $2,795,000

Sconset $7,500,000

Sconset $1,795,000

Polpis $4,995,000

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

ING LIST

TOWN Just totally restored and perfect in every way. Three finished floors, 7BR/6.5 baths done in Carrera marble, new kitchen, large formal living and dining rooms, big family room, beautiful yard, off street parking. Original moldings, trim, floors, beams, paneling intact. $4,850,000

TOWN Comfortable 4 BR home with nice yard and off-street parking. Owned by the great grandson of original owner/ builder and has always been in the same family. Generous size rooms, high ceilings and original details. Excellent rental history. $1,395,000

TOWN Extremely well designed and built in-town home in perfect condition. Open, bright and finished with attention to detail. Oversized lot with plenty of room for a second dwelling and/or garage. Approximately 2500 square feet of ground cover remaining. $2,395,000

CLIFF Beautifully restored 1747 antique home on desirable Cliff Road, a five minute walk into town. Many original features including four fireplaces, wide pine flooring, moldings and raised paneling. Private yard and gardens, and covered dining patio. Wonderful views of Sound from roof walk. $4,875,000

SURFSIDE Large custom home in Surfside with a private path out to the beach and views out to the South Shore. Built on 2.78 very private acres. The perfect beach house for a large family or entertaining. Extremely private location. Original owner, never rented. $2,995,000

TOWN 4 bedroom/3.5 bath home in the Old Historic District. Large deck and gardens compliment the interior living spaces. Top end kitchen appliances, marble counter tops, surround sound system, A/C, central vac., two fireplaces and custom built-ins and molding throughout the home. Move-in condition. $2,975,000

TOWN Renovated five bedroom, five and 1/2 bath home on Fair Street with original historic details throughout the house. Pine floors, chair rails and original doors are still intact. There is parking for one car with entryway off of parking area. $2,395,000

CLIFF Appealing home on a quiet stone lane off of Cliff Road. Open floor plan w/ half walls & columns defining common rooms - bright, open feel. First floor bedroom, full bath, wrap around covered porch and a beautiful landscaped yard. Original owner. $2,845,000

MID ISLAND Custom built mid-island duplex (one of two units) located on a corner lot. Ample parking on-site, good sized backyard and easy access to bike paths. Four bedrooms, four full baths and four floors of finished living space. Beautiful high-end finishes throughout. $695,000

TOWN Beautifully restored in-town antique on an oversized, corner lot. Everything has been replaced; foundation, plumbing, electrical, roof, shingles, fireplaces, etc. All original moldings, flooring, mantels saved, stripped and refinished. A beautifully restored home in a most convenient location. $3,875,000

SCONSET An incredibly unique offering of over a half acre with a 4 BR fully furnished main house along with a two car garage - guest apartment above for family and friends. 1/4 mile to the ‘Sconset Casino in the heart of the village. Expansion capabilities. $3,350,000

TOWN Renovated antique with large back yard and beautiful landscaping. Three finished floors plus basement. Wonderful floor plan for families and large groups. Bright kitchen with French doors leading to patio and yard. Two off-street parking spaces. $3,875,000

WAUWINET Three acres of privacy and wonderful views of Polpis Harbor. Well-built four-bedroom house with covered porches and decks plus a garage with a two bedroom apartment also with views. Less than 1.5 miles to the public beach access and parking at Polpis Harbor. $3,999,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses, one restored antique, the other new construction, on a large in-town lot. There are a total of 9 bedrooms, and 8+ baths. Each house has a private, outdoor patio area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. $1,995,000

NAUSHOP Construction is underway on this 5 bedroom, 4.5 bathroom home with a first floor en-suite bedroom, finished third floor and unfinished basement with full height ceilings. There is still time to select colors, floor stains, and other details. Estimated completion Aug. 2014. $1,200,000

TOWN Large, totally restored barn. 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, 3 finished floors, custom kitchen with Sub Zero, granite counters, etc. Large rooms throughout. Two patios, yard, garage and off-street parking.

Town $2,750,000

Town $4,995,000

ING LIST

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

$2,250,000

N magazine

Maury People Sotheby’s International Realty | 37 Main Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 | maurypeople.com

TOWN The George C. Gardner House - one of the premier properties in the town of Nantucket. Over a half acre of magnificent gardens and landscaping. Restored in 2004-05 maintaining its historical integrity and original moldings, finishes, ornamentaltrim,replacingplumbing,electricalandnewsystems. $7,900,000

Sconset $9,995,000

NEW

Wauwinet $4,995,000

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 203 bernadette@maurypeople.com

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September 2014 The Local Magazine Read Worldwide Nantucket Magazine

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P-51 MUsTanG Takes Flight

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Serial Entrepreneur

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Nantucket Magazine September 2014

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