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N Exclusive Interview from Space

DREW FEUSTEL

DR. ROCCO MONTO

Secrets to Longevity

Massachusetts Representative

JOE KENNEDY III

Boston Globe Advice Columnist

JAMAICAN Lacrosse Stars

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MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN

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Nantucket Magazine July 2018


LIVE NANTUCKET

DIONIS | $11,950,000 4 Bedrooms 4 Bathrooms

CLIFF | $9,875,000 6 Bedrooms 7+ Bathrooms

DIONIS | $8,950,000 3 Bedrooms 3 Bathrooms

WAUWINET | $4,995,000 6 Bedrooms 5.5 Bathrooms

CISCO | $4,695,000 4 Bedrooms 3.5 Bathrooms

SCONSET | $2,250,000 4 Bedrooms 5 Bathrooms

WAUWINET | $1,675,000 4 Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms

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QUIDNET | $13,500,000 8 Bedrooms 9+ Bathrooms

Gary Winn, Broker

gary@maurypeople.com | 508.330.3069 2 37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


“I’ve never been to a First Republic office, and I haven’t needed to – they bring the Bank to me.” S K I P B E N N ET T

Founder and Owner, Island Creek Oysters

MEMBER FDIC AND EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

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160 Federal Street, Boston (617) 478-5300 (855) 886-4824 | firstrepublic.com | New York Stock Exchange symbol: FRC

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PA L M B E A C H

NANTUCKET 47 MAIN STREET 508.325.5806

SEAMANSCHEPPS.COM

NEW YORK


in tune nantucket

•

boston

•

T 508.228.1219

beyond

www.kathleenhaydesigns.com

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photo by Jane Beiles

K at h l e e n H ay D e s i g n s award-winning interior design firm

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TOP LUXURY BROKER AWARD

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WindwalkerWilliam William Raveis is proud to announce that William Raveis Real Estate has been recognized as the Raveis Real Estate has been recognized the Top Luxury Brokerage in the United States Top Luxuryas Brokerage in the United States by Estate Companies Companiesofofthe theWorld. World. byLeading Leading Real Real Estate 130,000 • 565 premier real estate firms • Over 65 countries Your onsales islandassociates Broker has the reach to every location you live and vacation.

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WINDWALKERREALESTATE.COM 508-228-9117 | 12 OAK STREET | NANTUCKET | MA 02554


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Success in September Begins this

Summer

PRIVATE K-12 TUTORING, SAT & ACT PREP, ISEE & SSAT PREP COLLEGE ESSAY COACHING, PRIVATE SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

The Most Comprehensive Educational Programs on Nantucket

Keeping students one step ahead.

508.228.3015 | 12 Main St. | Nantucket | NantucketLearning.com

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Nantucket Learning Group

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Your real estate experience REDEFINED.

4.195 Ocean Views & Approved Plans

Pristine Sunset Ridge

Brant Point Coastal Chic

2.850 Spacious Living & Sweeping Vistas 2.395 Masterfully Crafted

CHANDRA MILLER & SPENCER HEYDT

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508.360.7777 TEAM@LIVNANTUCKET.COM @livnantucket

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Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

1.595

2.795


MICHAEL PARTENIO

RUSTICALLY refined N magazine

Trudy Dujardin, FASID, LEED Accredited Professional +ID + C

Eco-Elegant interiors by award-winning Dujardin Design. Creating rooms where function and ease come together beautifully.

11 508.228.1120 Nantucket, MA. | 203.838.8100 Westport, CT. | dujardindesign.com


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RAQUEL ALLEGRA

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CELINE

EXCLUSIVELY AT GYPSY NANTUCKET CONSERVATION BRACELET

SPINELLI KILCOLLIN

®


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4 WINGSPREAD LANE ————————————————————————————————————————— Shawkemo

This absolutely stunning property is situated on over 3.5 acres and was developed with design in mind by Botticelli and Pohl, construction by J Brown Builders, interior by Kathleen Hay Designs, and both hardscape and landscape by Ernst Land Design; a team considered best in class on Nantucket. Harbor and Town views complete with phenomenal sunsets demand your attention from this commanding private location in Shawkemo. The 5 Bedroom Main House includes top end finishes throughout, a spectacular master suite, and a lower level complete with an exceptional theater, custom wine cellar, gym and spa. The property continues outside with areas for dining, a pool and spa, private tennis court, play areas and an expansive yard. The thoughtfulness of scale, design, layout and attention to every detail are not to be missed and should not be overlooked in this magnificent Nantucket offering. $12,750,000

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BRIAN SULLIVAN EXCLUSIVE

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Mobile: (508) 414–1878 sully@fishernantucket.com


Jean-Michel Basquiat Mark Bradford Alexander Calder John Chamberlain Christo George Condo Willem de Kooning Jim Dine Sam Francis Adolph Gottlieb Keith Haring Damien Hirst Robert Indiana Alex Katz Jeff Koons Yayoi Kusama Roy Lichtenstein John McCracken

————————

Joan Mitchell Takashi Murakami Yoshitomo Nara Kenneth Noland Robert Rauschenberg Gerhard Richter Ed Ruscha Sean Scully Richard Serra Frank Stella Andy Warhol

CASTERLINE GOODMAN

Ed RUSCHA

g

a

l

l

e

r

y

Magic Isle 1982 Pigment on paper 30 x 40 inches

Nantucket, MA 02554 508.680.1367

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40 Centre Street

info@casterlinegoodman.com

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www.casterlinegoodman.com


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architecture | interior design

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quidnet residence

17 workshopapd.com

new york | nantucket


11 COLUMBUS AVENUE | $3,795,000 | MADAKET

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50 LOVERS LANE | $4,495,000 | SURFSIDE

88 POCOMO ROAD | $6,295,000 | POCOMO

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CHIP WEBSTER

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A R C H I T E C T U R E

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508.228.3600 CHIPWEBSTER.COM


Ready to sell? looking to buy?

it’s time foR elliman

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elliman.com/massachusetts

NEW YORK CITY | LONG ISLAND | THE HAMPTONS | WESTCHESTER | CONNECTICUT | NEW JERSEY | FLORIDA | CALIFORNIA | COLORADO | MASSACHUSETTS | INTERNATIONAL

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© 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


CHÂTEAU D’ESCLANS EN PROVENCE Château d’Esclans is located on an exceptional site, on elevated land near the Gorges de Pennafort, twenty five kilometers northwest of the ancient Roman city of Frejus on the Mediterranean coast.

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4005 route de Callas, 83920 La Motte en Provence, France

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TOURS AND TASTINGS BY REQUEST +33 (0) 494-604-040 | esclans.com

IMPORTED BY SHAW-ROSS INTERNATIONAL IMPORTERS, LLC. MIRAMAR, FLORIDA. SHAWROSS.COM. DRINK RESPONSIBLY.

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D, R-ROUN A E Y E L B S AVAILA P I H S R E EMB WEEKLY & Y L H CLUB M T N ALLY, MO N O S A E S

Nantucket’s Only Downtown Club

★ Two outdoor heated pools (family/kiddie and adult lap)

★ Fitness and yoga classes

★ Breeze Restaurant; poolside ★ Drop-in Day & Evening Kids’ Club dining and bar service Programs (ages 3 to pre-teen) ★ 4,500-square foot ★ Outdoor hot tub

★ Massage treatment rooms, locker rooms, saunas

fitness facility

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Weekly, old-fashioned New England Clambakes with entertainment

We welcome renters staying in homes of Full Family Members

To join, or for more information contact Deb Lawrence, Club Manager; clubmanager@thenantuckethotel.com • 508-901-1295

26 AT THE NANTUCKET HOTEL • 77 EASTON STREET, NANTUCKET, MA 02554 • thenantucketclub.com


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401 BEACON STREET | BACK BAY Developed by Georgantas Design & Development Single floor residences starting at $6,200,000

www.TheLydon.com RENE RODRIGUEZ 617-896-5006 RENE@CABOTANDCOMPANY.COM

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BEACON ON THE PARK

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89 BEACON STREET | BEACON HILL Pre-construction offering from $4,195,000 to $15,995,000 Once in a Lifetime Opportunity to own a south facing luxury condo on the iconic Boston Public Garden. Epic Views, Christopher Peacock Kitchens, Garage & Roof Garden.

www.BeaconOnThePark.com SHELAGH BRENNAN 617-840-6168 SHELAGH@CABOTANDCOMPANY.COM


“We were so pleased to have chosen Cheney Brothers Building for our Nantucket project. Steve and his team were recommend Cheney Brothers and would absolutely use them again on any future projects.” – John Galiher

15 North Beach Street

508.325.6983

cheneybrothersbuilding.com

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professional, communicative, and the entire construction process was streamlined and efficient. We would highly

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GREY LADY LANE WEST MIACOMET

NANTUCKET ISLAND

Lots Starting at $625K - Exclusively Listed with Congdon & Coleman Real Estate

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www.greyladylane.com | info@greyladylane.com

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1 West Creek Road Nantucket, MA 02554 508 228 5631 nantucketarchitecture.com

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LIVE SUMMER

ESCAPE TO TUCKERNUCK ISLAND

WAUWINET RETREAT

POLPIS ESTATE

PERFECTION ON THE CLIFF

Relax & unwind time your day to the tide - excellent fishing off the south shore & dinner by candle light-this island is entirely off the grid! This well maintained main house, studio & barn is powered via sunlight & generator $2,750,000

Privacy & Views-Main House & Cottage built to play both indoors & out! Over 7,000 sf of living space, extensive decking and roof walk large enough to observe the stars with champagne in hand and guests in tow! $5,750,000

Enjoy this pastoral setting & miles of walking trails near Polpis Harbor with all the amenities for a perfect vacation! 5 Bedroom Main House, Pool, Studio & Garage $4,995,000

What’s better than a stylish retreat on Nantucket Island-perfect for you & select house guests-near shopping, dining & beaches? Immaculate & well appointed 2 Bedroom pied-a-terre situated on a quiet shell lane servicing only a few select vacation homes. $2,395,000

LAND WELL LOCATED & PERFECT FOR THE VISIONARY WITH A DREAM SURFSIDE

Over 2 acres of land covered with Pines, Bayberry & Blueberries $1,995,000

SHIMMO

Nearly two acres of rolling land. Exclusive setting affording water views of both Harbor & Ponds. Deeded access to the harbor. $5,150,000

TOWN

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Incredible setting downtown on cobblestone tread lane. Includes HDC approved plans for a Main House & Cottage. $2,295,000

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HISTORIC TOWN

Lovely 4 Bedroom, 4 Bath, Antique in Town, very close to Brant Point and the Cliff. Enjoy the benefits and conveniences of living in Nantucket’s Historic District! $1,995,000

Mary Taaffe, Broker mary@maurypeople.com 508.228.1881 office | 508.325.1526 cell 37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554 Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


The Evolution of Dry Eye Treatment

Medical technology is evolving rapidly. At ACK Eye, we work diligently to evaluate developing technologies in eyecare that might have potential benefit to our island community. Investing in beneficial technologies is a primary reason ACK Eye is able to offer eyecare of preeminent quality. Early diagnosis of disease, expanded treatment options, the ability to monitor clinical outcomes, and implementation of improved clinical protocol are all secondary benefits of technological advancement. We love our island community, and will continue to improve eyecare for it. It's our vision. For your sight. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common factors in patients who experience dryness, burning, stinging, and other eye irritations. Over time, the Meibomian glands inside our eyelids can become congested and lose their ability to emit the oil they produce. If the oil layer is deficient, our tears evaporate rapidly leading to symptoms of dryness and irritation, potentially damaging the eyes. LipiFlow treatment clears the congestion from the glands, allowing the oil flow to improve, which helps to stabilize the tear layers, improving symptoms, and reducing further progressive damage. LipiFlow treatment takes less than fifteen minutes, and the benefit can last up to a year. LipiFlow treatment presents a momentous advancement, and ACK Eye is proud to add LipiScan and LipiFlow to our armament of treatment options in the battle against the underlying causes of dry eye disease.

Please Call to Schedule a Personal Evaluation N magazine

ACKEye.com

13 Old South Road 33 (508) 228-0844


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Nantucket

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Hand-made nautical jewelry crafted on island, custom diamond jewelry, Nantucket themed watches and more. 6 STRAIGHT WHARF I 508.228.2448 I WWW.JEWELINTHESEA.COM


e x p e r i e n c e a

w o r l d

o f

wonders right outside y o u r

d o o r

.

YOUR URBAN OASIS F O R WAT E R F RO N T L I V I N G . Yo u r o n e - o f - a - k i n d s e a s i d e s p a c e t o e x p e r i e n c e a l l t h e b e s t o f living on t he water awa its. Here, you will f ind unique places for recreation, shopping, socia lizing, or simply for getting a breath of f re sh a i r. At Pier 4, you w i l l h ave e ver y t h i ng you need r ig ht out side you r door. C ome a nd e x per ienc e t he v ie w s for you r sel f a nd le a r n about a l l t h at t he S e apor t neig hborhood h a s to of fer.

d e l i v e r i n g

s c h e d u l e p i e r

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Tw o b e d r o o m s s t a r t i n g a t $ 2 m i l l i o n

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13 CENTRE STREET, NANTUCKET GREENVALE • GREENWICH • NEW YORK CITY • PALM BEACH • ASPEN • SOUTHAMPTON SHARISPLACE.COM


New Price Cliff

New Listing

Cliff Road 5 BR, 5.5 BA

$4,895,000 John Arena

New Price Town

Pocomo Road 6 BR, 7 Full & 3 Half BA

$9,450,000 Susan Lister Locke & John McGarr

New Price

West Chester Street 3 BR, 2 BA

Lincoln Street 4 BR, 2 BA

$2,195,000 Sue Jemison

Sconset

Seven Mile Lane 3 BR, 4 BA

$1,795,000 Roberta White

Sconset

Codfish Park Road 2 BR, 2 BA

WINDWALKERREALESTATE.COM 508-228-9117 | 12 OAK STREET | NANTUCKET | MA 02554

$2,695,000 Melanie Gowen

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Sconset

Pocomo

$2,495,000 Mark Burlingham

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伀 唀 刀   ㈀   ㄀ 㠀   䈀 刀 䄀 一 䐀 匀   䤀 一 䌀 䰀 唀 䐀 䔀   䈀 䔀 䄀 唀   ☀   刀 伀   䈀 䄀 䜀   䌀 伀 䴀 倀䄀 一 夀Ⰰ   䔀 䰀 䰀 匀 圀 伀 刀吀 䠀   ☀   䤀 嘀 䔀 夀Ⰰ   䰀 伀 刀 䔀 一   䠀 伀 倀 䔀 Ⰰ   䈀 唀 刀唀 Ⰰ   䰀 䔀 䴀 䰀 䔀 䴀 Ⰰ 匀 伀 䰀 䤀 䐀   ☀   匀 吀 刀 䤀 倀 䔀 Ⰰ   匀 吀 刀 伀 一 䜀 䈀 伀 䄀 䰀 吀Ⰰ   䴀 䤀 娀 娀 䔀 一   ⬀   䴀 䄀 䤀 一 Ⰰ   伀 刀 䰀 䔀 䈀 䄀 刀   䈀 刀 伀 圀 一 Ⰰ   䴀 䤀 䄀 一 匀 䄀 䤀 Ⰰ   伀 䰀 䤀 倀 䠀 䄀 一 吀Ⰰ   匀 唀 一 匀 䬀 䤀 Ⰰ   䬀 ⸀   䬀 䄀 一 䔀 Ⰰ 䄀 刀吀 䔀 䴀 䤀 匀   䐀 䔀 匀 䤀 䜀 一   䌀 伀 ⸀ Ⰰ   䬀 䄀吀 䤀 䔀   䈀 䄀 刀吀 䔀 䰀 匀 Ⰰ   䌀 伀 刀 䄀 䰀   䌀 伀 䄀 匀 吀   䌀 䰀 伀 吀 䠀 䤀 一 䜀 Ⰰ   䠀 䄀 刀 䐀 䤀 一 䜀   䰀 䄀 一 䔀 Ⰰ   匀 䴀 䤀 䰀 䤀 一 䜀   䈀 唀 吀 吀 伀 一 Ⰰ   䴀 䄀 䤀 一 匀 吀䄀夀Ⰰ   䠀 䄀 刀吀   匀 吀 唀 䐀 䤀 伀 Ⰰ   䌀 䄀 一 䐀 夀   匀 䠀 伀 倀   嘀 䤀 一 吀䄀 䜀 䔀 Ⰰ   䰀 伀 匀 吀   ☀   䘀 伀 唀 一 䐀   䈀 夀   䨀   䘀 刀 䤀 䔀 䐀 䴀 䄀 一 Ⰰ   䬀 䔀 一 一 夀   䘀 䰀 伀 圀 䔀 刀匀 Ⰰ   匀 䈀 䨀   䄀 唀 匀 吀 䤀 一 Ⰰ   匀 䄀夀 䰀 伀 刀 Ⰰ 䴀 䄀吀 䌀 䠀 䈀 伀 伀 䬀   䐀 䤀 䄀 刀 䤀 䔀 匀 Ⰰ   䈀 伀 一 嘀 䤀 嘀䄀 一 吀 匀 Ⰰ   䴀 伀 吀 吀   㔀   Ⰰ   䄀 䌀 䬀   嘀   䠀 䄀 䴀 倀 匀 Ⰰ   䠀 䄀 娀 䔀 一   ☀   䌀 伀 ⸀ Ⰰ   䨀 唀 匀 吀   䴀 䄀 䐀 刀 䄀 匀 Ⰰ   䄀 唀 䜀 唀 匀 吀   䴀 伀 刀 䜀 䄀 一 Ⰰ   䈀 唀 䌀 䬀 䰀 䔀 夀   䬀 Ⰰ   吀䄀 䤀 䰀 伀 刀   嘀 䤀 一 吀䄀 䜀 䔀 Ⰰ   唀 一 䔀 䴀 倀 䰀 伀 夀 䔀 䐀   䐀 䔀 一 䤀 䴀 Ⰰ   䌀 刀 䄀 䈀   ☀   䌀 䰀 䔀 䔀 䬀 Ⰰ   䠀 伀 䰀 匀 吀   ☀   䰀 䔀 䔀   䄀 一 䐀   䴀 䄀 一 夀   䴀 伀 刀 䔀 ℀  

㈀㌀ 漀 氀搀  猀 漀 甀 琀栀  眀栀 愀爀昀 猀 栀 漀 瀀琀栀 攀搀 椀瀀⸀挀漀 洀  䀀猀 欀椀渀 渀 礀搀 椀瀀渀 愀渀 琀甀 挀欀攀琀

 


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www.crossripbuilders.com


West of toWn

$6,995,000

This spectacular high-end custom-built estate was designed and built with the utmost attention to detail, materials and craftmanship. 5-bedroom suites, multiple living areas, 9 ½ foot ceilings, an 18’ x 45’ pool w/elevated spa, cabana, detached one-car garage and more!

N magazine

Quidnet $2,395,000

“Quintessential Nantucket” This charming three-bedroom, three and a half bath home is nestled in a private and cozy setting minutes from the village of Quidnet and Sesachacha Pond. The first-floor master bedroom, living room with fireplace and ample built-ins, spacious and bright sun room, full basement, and detached garage are a sampling of this special home’s many features.

8 Federal Street • Nantucket, MA 02554 • Sales & Rentals • 508.228.4449

jordanre.com | raveis.com jordanre.com

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Distinctive Homes Unique Interiors Seasonal Property Care

Limited Only by Your Imagination. One-of-a-kind homes and custom interiors—from chic city remodels and mountain retreats—to the perfect island escape.

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We love what we do!

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WOODMEISTER MASTER BUILDERS BOSTON | NEW YORK | NANTUCKET | STOWE

508.228.6611

www.woodmeister.com


9 Wampanoag Way | 508.228.1961 | arrowheadnursery.com

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Celebrating 20 Years as Nantucket’s Best Resource for Outdoor Living

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SALES CENTER NOW OPEN ~ SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY

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TheArcherResidences.com 888.543.9456


P R I VAT E J E W E L E R

F I N E D I A MO N D S & D E S IG N E R J EWELRY

info@calistawest.com

BY AP P O I NT M E NT

617.855.7778 www.calistawest.com

NA NT UC KET

BO STO N

calistawest

N EW YORK

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Full service jeweler • upgrades • custom designs • repurposing • repairs • appraisals

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LIVE HISTORIC LONG HILL , SITUATED AT T HE CREST OF HISTORIC OR ANGE STREET $15,950,000 30 Orange Street is in the heart of town. Dating back to 1823, this estate combines Federal, Georgian and period architectural styles throughout its 7,200 square feet. 8 bedrooms, 8.5 baths, and 8 fireplaces with sweeping views of the Harbor, Brant Point and Monomoy from two 90’ verandas on the 1st and 2nd floors. Includes a 2-car garage on a separate buildable lot. The central entry hall with 14’ ceilings leads to reception, drawing rooms and a generously proportioned living room. French doors lead onto the first 90’ veranda facing the harbor. A paneled library, formal dining room, windowed butler’s pantry and renovated kitchen complete the first floor layout. All major rooms have fireplaces. The second floor features a large central hall off of which are 5 en suite bedrooms. The second 90’ veranda adjoins 3 of the bedrooms. 4 of the 5 bedrooms have fireplaces. A 3rd floor offers 3 charming bedrooms and baths. Stairs lead to a widow’s walk with 360 degree views of Nantucket.

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Gary Winn, Broker

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gary@maurypeople.com | 508.330.3069 37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


josepholsoninteriors.com | 508.257.0384

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MODERN. SOPHISTICATED. NANTUCKET

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8 Williams Lane | Nantucket

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508.325.4995 | emeritusdevelopment.com

D e s i g n, P l a n n i n g a48 n d D e v e l o p m e n t

Photo: Tom Olcott


LIVE TIMELESS 9 CA BOT L AN E | CLI FF $ 10,9 9 5,000 Without a doubt, the best view on the Cliff. This fabulous 5 bedroom home, perched high upon the Cliff, was beautifully renovated in 2005, retaining it’s original character with high ceilings, wood floors, four fireplaces, and an abundance of Nantucket charm. A spacious and sun filled home, sited on a quiet corner of Cabot Lane and within walking distance of Steps Beach, Jetties Beach and Town. The house was built in 1880 by Housewright James H. Gibbs for Reverend William H. Fish and Helen Case Fish of Troy, NY. It is one of the earliest houses on the bluff built for simplistic summer living and sea views.

Lisa Winn, Broker

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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lisa@maurypeople.com Cell: 617-281-1500 Office: 508-228-1881 ext. 126 37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554 www.maurypeople.com

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56 Monomoy Road • Monomoy $22,500,000 l Carolyn Durand

22 Nonantum Avenue • Surfside $8,800,000 l Carolyn Durand

27 Monomoy Road • Monomoy $10,895,000 l Carolyn Durand

8 Shawkemo Road • Shimmo

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$6,499,000 l Carolyn Durand

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Jeff Lee • Bruce Beni • Chloe Bruning • Dan Dunlap • Shellie Dunlap • Carolyn Durand • Peter Engen Hal Herrick • Sam Herrick • Jeanne Hicks • Mimi Huber • Maya Kearns • Jane King • Denise LaBombard Bob Lang • Joe Lloyd • Lindsley Matthews • Liza Ottani • Jonathan Raith

10 South Beach Street, Nantucket, MA • 508-325-5800 • leerealestate.com


The Beach Residences at Cliffside The Ultimate Family Compound

1 Acre | Private Sandy Beach | 3 Buildings | 6 Residences | 10 Bedroom Suites Denise LaBombard, Liza Ottani & Jeff Lee

2 Lincoln Avenue • Cliff

$9,995,000 l Jeff Lee & Carolyn Durand

48 Orange Street • Town $7,495,000 l Bruce Beni

10 South Beach Street, Nantucket, MA • 508-325-5800 • leerealestate.com

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Jeff Lee • Bruce Beni • Chloe Bruning • Dan Dunlap • Shellie Dunlap • Carolyn Durand • Peter Engen Hal Herrick • Sam Herrick • Jeanne Hicks • Mimi Huber • Maya Kearns • Jane King • Denise LaBombard Bob Lang • Joe Lloyd • Lindsley Matthews • Liza Ottani • Jonathan Raith

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2018 N NUMBERS 62

A statistical snapshot of Nantucket in July.

TRENDING N 64

What went viral on #Nantucket this early summer.

NTOPTEN 66

Your official guide to the best events happening on the island this month.

HEALTHNWELLNESS N 70

Shamanic practitioner and owner of Nantucket Healing Arts Alexandra Catchpole gives her top tips for healthy living.

NEW TO THE SCENE

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Climb aboard Nantucket Tug Boat Company for a sunset booze cruise.

DRESS: SHARI’S PLACE RING & EARRINGS: THE VAULT


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NBUZZ

NVESTIGATE

78

94 COME HELI OR HIGH WATER

All the news, tidbits, and scuttlebutt that’s fit to print.

N NEED TO READ 82

Nantucket’s beloved bookworm Tim Ehrenberg gives his required reading for July.

NTERIORS 86

Interior designer Kathleen Hay shares her tips for creating a luxurious living room.

NOSH NEWS

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54

Met on Main’s secret patio is serving up something delightfully Saltie this season.

Boston Med Flight serves as Nantucket’s lifeline of emergency medical care in Boston.

100 NANTUCKET COUNTS

Alan Worden proves that big data can tell us a lot about our small island community.

106 LASER FOCUS

How laser technology is helping protect historic Nantucket in the face of sea level rise.


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NSPIRE 112 BODY BUILDER FROM BARBADOS

Island resident Jason Small is making it big on the professional body building circuit.

118 FISHEYE LENS

How Nantucket hooked the island’s only full-time, year-round eye doctor.

NQUIRY 126 JOE KENNEDY III

Massachusetts Representative Joe Kennedy shares his thoughts on the country, his family, and the question everybody keeps asking him.

136 ROCKET MAN

An out-of-this-world interview with NASA astronaut Drew Feustel.

144 SUMMER LOVIN’

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The Boston Globe’s advice columnist Meredith Goldstein answers love and relationship questions.

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NDEPTH

NVOGUE

150 FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH

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158 LACROSSE THE GLOBE

NHA

How Dr. Rocco Monto discovered how sixty can be the new thirty.

Nantucket’s Jamaican lacrosse players take the field on the world stage this July.

166 DREAM ON

The (new) Nantucket Dreamland marks its ten-year anniversary this July.

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NUPTIALS 200

July 2018

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DR. ROCCO MONTO

Secrets to Longevity

Massachusetts Representative

JOE KENNEDY III

Boston Globe Advice Columnist

MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN JAMAICAN Lacrosse Stars

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Nantucket Magazine

N magazine

The Local Magazine Read Worldwide

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Exclusive Interview from Space

MURRAY'S TOGGERY SHOP 62 MAIN STREET 508-228-0437

A look back at the many sports played on Nantucket over the years.

Ashley and Kim Villandry tied the knot on Nantucket.

NOT SO FAST

DREW FEUSTEL

VINEYARD VINES 2 STRAIGHT WHARF 508-325-9600

Summer fashion takes a staycation at the Harborview Nantucket.

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Nantucket Magazine July 2018

Joe Kennedy III was photographed by Photographerat-Large Kit Noble and interviewed by Publisher Bruce Percelay aboard the Valiant in Boston Harbor.

The Herrick brothers of Cisco Brewers make last call.


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John’s Island Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Bruce A. Percelay

f l o r i d a’ s n a n t u c k e t

Editor Robert Cocuzzo Art Director Paulette Chevalier Managing Editor Emme Duncan Chief Photographer Brian Sager Photographer-At-Large Kit Noble Assistant Editor Leise Trueblood Contributors Patrick Berger Tim Ehernberg Emily Denny Sarah Fraunfelder Josh Gray Zornitsa Yovcheva Dr. Rocco Monto Rebecca Nimerfroh Leise Trueblood Sinead Yelle

Three Championship Golf Courses : 17 Har-Tru Tennis Courts : Pickleball : Squash Oceanfront Beach Club : Watersports : Equity Memberships : Renovated Clubhouses 772.231.0900 : JohnsIslandFL.com

Exclusively John’s Island XXXX-XX-NMag_JIREadOPTIONS_NewSize.indd 2

5/10/17 11:43 AM

Photographers Barbara Clarke Fred Clow Bill Hoenk Leise Trueblood Advertising Director Fifi Greenberg Advertising Sales Emme Duncan Publisher N. LLC Chairman: Bruce A. Percelay

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Nantucket Times 17 North Beach Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508-228-1515

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©Copyright 2011 Nantucket Times. Nantucket Times (N Magazine) is published seven times annually from April through December. Reproduction of any part of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Editorial submissions may be sent to Editor, Nantucket Times, 17 North Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 02554. We are not responsible for unsolicited editorial or graphic material. Office (508) 228-1515 or fax (508) 228-8012. Signature Printing and Consulting 800 West Cummings Park Suite 2900 Woburn

Taste the Difference Handmade Baked Goods | Soups - Salads - Sandwiches Picnic Baskets for the beach or ferry | Dine in or take out 35 Centre Street | 508-228-3700 | petticoatrowbakery.com Open Monday through Saturday 8am - 5:00pm | Sundays 8am - 2:00pm


7521 Topp BPG NMag July.pdf

&STRIPES

STARS

July is a month to celebrate America and Americans, and this

1

5/2/18

11:14 AM

DRINK IN THE VIEW JOIN THE SCENE drinks | dining | indoors | outdoors day | night

issue sets out to do just that. Blasting things off, we proudly feature an exclusive interview with astronaut Drew Feustel, which was conducted while he was orbiting the Earth aboard the International Space Station. The risks astronauts take to their health and safety are very real and Drew Feustel is clearly an American hero. Feustel was married on Nantucket and is a frequent visitor to the island with his wife Indi and their children Ari and Aden. There is something indescribable about receiving a call on your cell phone from an astronaut as he flies some 250 miles above the Earth. In fact, while answering questions to our first intergalactic interview, Feustel was looking down on Nantucket from space. Our cover story features Congressman Joe Kennedy III, a young man on whom many democrats have pinned their hopes for the future. A bright, personable yet measured politician, Kennedy mirrors his famous forbearers in many ways while also charting his own course. Kennedy sat down with N Magazine for a broad-rang-

Overlooking the magnificent harbor

ing interview about Washington, his family and the persistent questions regarding

Serving daily until 11pm

his future aspirations. We jokingly asked Kennedy if he would consider trading up

At White Elephant

from Hyannis Port to Nantucket, which, of course, generated a politically appropri-

508.325.1320 BrantPointGrill.com OpenTable.com

ate answer followed by a wide grin. No matter what your political persuasion, Kennedy is indeed impressive and is devoting his career to public service. On a more local front, there are those who work behind the scenes to improve life on the island. One great example is Dr. Rocco Monto who is the resident orthopedic surgeon at the Nantucket Cottage Hospital. Dr. Monto chose to be on the island because he viewed it as a place where he could make the most impact. In this issue, Dr. Monto shares the story behind his latest book The Fountain in which he claims to have discovered the secrets to making sixty the new thirty. Another person who has his eye on the health of Nantucket is ophthalmologist Dr. Mike Ruby of ACK Eye. Although most see his practice while driving on Old

Five-star views. Five-diamond cuisine. TOPPER’S AT THE WAUWINET AAA FIVE DIAMOND AWARD WINNER

South Road everyday, few people know that Dr. Ruby is a serious fly fisherman. When not focusing on his patients, he can be found on the flats fishing for stripers. One of the biggest curiosities about Nantucket is who actually lives here. How many people actually live here and how many people visit? In collaboration with ReMain Nantucket, Alan Worden set out to find an answer. Using sophisticated data collection, Worden can tell you how many people are on the island on an hourly basis, where they are from, which beach they like to go to, and a wide range of statistics that are almost mind-boggling. Worden will be presenting his initial findings at a ticketed event at the Dreamland Theater this month. As we celebrate our nation’s birthday, we salute all of those who make our island and our country a better place. From astronauts in space to doctors here at home to those in public service and everyone in between, have a happy Fourth of July!

AT T H E WAU W I N E T

Bruce A. Percelay Editor-in-Chief & Publisher

508.228.8768 • ToppersRestaurant.com Breakfast • Lunch • Cocktails Dinner • Saturday & Sunday Brunch

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Sincerely,

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$4,000

NUMBERS

NUMBERS NANTUCKET BY THE

44

Restaurants on Nantucket offer outdoor seating for either lunch or dinner.

65°

Funds raised by Cumberland Farms for the Sean Gannon Memorial Fund.

715 , 40 000 Participants raced in the 2017 Nantucket Triathlon.

People were on Nantucket last year on July 3rd, the most all year.

Average water temperature in July.

608 lbs

2,800

300

Patients are flown off the island each year by Boston MedFlight.

Weight of dry dog food that Offshore Animal Hospital went through last summer.

Bikes are available to rent on island, the most coming from Young’s with 1,100.

$772,058

Number of Win Wagers placed on Monomoy Girl, the filly that won the Longines Kentucky Oaks Race, owned by Nantucket summer resident Sol Kumin.

1,900

$77.6 Million Total volume in real estate transactions last July.

Square footage of the JFK bunker built in Tom Nevers.

64.97

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Total acreage of Swains Neck Estate currently on sale for $35 million.

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$195

Cost of a 24 karat gold facial offered at Darya Salon this summer.

70.10% The percentage by which Joe Kennedy III won his 3rd term election in 2016.


Summer in New York From Nantucket to New York, luxury service at every price. Providing a level of service unique in today’s world, Lydia Sussek can help you navigate any sized transaction with personal care that extends way beyond the closing.

• Full-service real estate advisory sales, foreign investment, rentals, commercial and residential property purchasing and negotiation. • Relocation expertise - Cartus certified broker qualified to work with Fortune-500 executives and top relocation firms from around the world • Winner 2011 REBNY Deal of the Year

• Market expertise - with experience and referrals, Lydia ranks in the top 1% out of 48,000 NRT brokers nationwide • Recognized for top achievement – active member of the Real Estate Board of New York, member of corcoran’s Multi-Million Dollar Club & Platinum Council • Member of Corcoran Cares – Lydia supports charities in New York, Nantucket & worldwide

L i c e n s e d Re a l E s t a te S a l e s p e r s o n m 917.721.78 5 3 l yd . s u s s e k @ c o rc o r a n.c o m Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker located at 660 Madison Ave, NY, NY 10065. Real estate agents affiliated with The Corcoran Group are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of The Corcoran Group.

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Lydia Sussek Associati Team at the Corcoran Group

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TRENDING N

WHAT’S HAPPENING ON

#NANTUCKET?

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WRITTEN BY LEISE TRUEBLOOD

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JAW-DROPPING

TEEING OFF

WHOA PRO

Fisherman Elliot Sudal of @acksharks is hooking more than just sharks on Nantucket. Recently, photos of his beach bod caught the attention of People magazine who declared the viral fishing sensation the “World’s Sexiest Shark Wrangler.” However, the national attention did land Sudal in a little bit of hot water due to his claims to be tagging sharks for scientific research on behalf of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In the wake of the People magazine attention, NOAA released a statement saying that they have concerns over his shark wrangling practices. Luckily for Sudal, his popular photos and attention-grabbing physique may be all he needs to continue landing clients on the beach.

A story in The Boston Globe triggered a flood of comments online last month after the paper reported on a legal dispute between The Nantucket Land Bank and summer resident David Long, the CEO of Liberty Mutual, who is protesting the proposed construction of a dormitory on Miacomet Golf Course for its seasonal employees. The story introduced Nantucket’s complex housing crisis to readers on the mainland. Many were outraged by some of the living conditions the article described and found Long’s position a classic case of NIMBYism. We’ll have to just wait and see when this matter tees off in court.

Sometimes all you need is a second pair of eyes (and an expertly trained wilderness guide) to find what you’re looking for. Recently, local surf guru Gary Kohner of @nantucketsurfing lost his GoPro at Cisco Beach. In a surprising (and happy) turn of events, Peter Brace from @nantucketwalkabout recovered the lost camera fortyeight hours later, all the way down at Smith’s Point. @NantucketSurfing thanked Peter on their Instagram, saying they were “stoked” to have the camera back. Sounds like a pretty swell example of Nantucket’s close community. 


photo: Wendy Mills

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Welcome Home

65 BPC Architecture

2 Broad Street

Nantucket, MA 02554

p 508.228.2722

bpc-architecture.com


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N TOP TEN

DADDY LONG LEGS:

A MUSICAL OPENING NIGHT

JULY 6TH @ 7:30 P.M.

WHITE HERON THEATRE

This Drama Desk nominated story of an orphan girl who goes to college in 1908 financed by an unexpected benefactor is perfect for the whole family. Combining enthralling music and witty dialogue, this show is not to be missed this summer. Purchase tickets at www.whiteherontheatre.org  

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NANTUCKET YOGA FESTIVAL JULY 6TH–8TH

BARTLETT’S OCEAN VIEW FARM

Stretch the mind, body and soul at the Nantucket Yoga Festival, featuring classes taught by centenarian yoga legend Tao Porchon Lynch, guided meditations, and innovative companies devoted to movement and mindfulness. Learn more and purchase tickets for the festival at www.nantucketyogafestival.com 

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PAGE TO STAGE: LESLEY STAHL

NANTUCKET GARDEN FESTIVAL

JULY 10TH @ 5 P.M.

THE NANTUCKET LIGHTHOUSE SCHOOL

INTERVIEWED BY DAVID GREGORY THE DREAMLAND

As part of its Page to Stage series, The Dreamland Theater proudly presents award-winning journalist and author Lesley Stahl, who will be interviewed by fellow journalist and Nantucket resident David Gregory. Purchase tickets to this newsworthy event at www.nantucketdreamland.org

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NANTUCKET COMEDY FESTIVAL JULY 11TH–14TH

THE DREAMLAND

Featuring famous names, such as comedian Stephen Wright, The Nantucket Comedy Festival is known for being a laugh factory. There’s something to tickle everyone’s funny bone, including the Comedy SmACKdown: Boston vs. New York, the Ladies Who Lunch & Laugh Event, and the Stand Up & Learn Kids Comedy Performance. Purchase passes and find out more information at www.nantucketcomedyfestival.org 

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3 NANTUCKET RED TIE SOIRÉE TO BENEFIT THE MARIA MITCHELL ASSOCIATION

JULY 8TH @ 7–10 P.M.

SANKATY HEAD GOLF CLUB

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Dress to impress in your Nantucket Red best and get ready for a fun-filled evening. Enjoy an open bar, delicious food, oysters from Spanky’s Raw Bar and tunes from the Perry Rossi Band. Tie down a ticket to this fabulous event at www. mariamitchell.org 

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FOOTLOOSE OPENING NIGHT BENEFIT PERFORMANCE & PARTY

JULY 15TH @ 4 P.M. & 7 P.M. Broadway meets Beaumont, Texas, thirty miles out to sea! Get out your fancy duds and dancing boots to cut-loose and celebrate the opening night of Footloose. The evening will include Broadway performances, good ole Texas BBQ, line dancing, signature libations and an exclusive New York theater auction. For more information and tickets visit www.theatrenantucket.org 

JULY 17TH–19TH

Put your green thumb to the test at the Nantucket Garden Festival. Participate in educational workshops, exquisite garden tours, and creative family activities all to benefit the Nantucket Lighthouse School. Find out more at www.ackgardenfestival.org

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NANTUCKET ART & ARTISAN SHOW JULY 19TH–22ND

BARTLETT’S FARM

Make your world a more beautiful place with a piece from the twentyseventh annual Nantucket Art & Artisan Show. Featuring more than forty local artists selling wares from textiles to furniture, this three-day festival benefits Small Friends.  Find out more information at  www.nantucketartandartisanshow.org 

9 NANTUCKET ATHENEUM DANCE FESTIVAL JULY 23RD–28TH

THE DREAMLAND

Dance your heart out at the eleventh annual Nantucket Atheneum Dance Festival. Benefitting the beloved island library, this festival comprises five days of free events and culminates in two featured performances from professional dance companies. Tickets go on sale July 1st and can be purchased at  www.www.nantucketatheneum.com

10 MATISYAHU CONCERT JULY 24TH–25TH @ 10:30 P.M. THE CHICKEN BOX

Tickets are selling quickly for this Jewish reggae phenomenon’s first concert on the rock, so grab them while you can! Known for his smash hit “One Day” featured in NBC advertising for the Olympic Games, this one-of-a-kind rock star’s show is sure to be the talk of the town. Purchase tickets at www.thechickenbox.com 

DO YOU HAVE AN EVENT FOR THE N TOP TEN? CONTACT US AT EDITOR@N-MAGAZINE.COM


for mid-afternoon naps in the sun. We used rustic materials like beadboard and old pine to create a home as comfortable as a well-worn flannel shirt. Now it’s where I go to unwind. v For 20 years we’ve been designing some of the finest

homes in the country, helping our clients realize their dreams. What’s your word? N magazine

IS THERE A WORD that you want your home to reflect? When we designed my lake house, my word was “relax.” That word inspired cozy nooks for reading, a kitchen table for long pancake breakfasts, and hammocks

heatherwells.com

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New Listing Surfside

Daffodil Lane 7 BR, 6 Full & 2 Half BA

$1,795,000 Jack Bulger

New Listing Surfside

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Washington Avenue 3 BR, 1.5 BA

$1,395,000 Roberta White

Return to Market Weweeder Road 1.38 Acres Land

$2,250,000 Roberta White & Lee Saunders Gaw

Under Agreement Polpis

Madaket

Polpis Road 1.22 Acres Land

Tom Nevers

Devon Street 3.70 Acres Land

$1,495,000 John Arena

Skyline Drive

$3,095,000

Sold $935,000 John McGarr

Surfside

11 BR, 7 Full & 2 Half BA

WINDWALKERREALESTATE.COM 508-228-9117 | 12 OAK STREET | NANTUCKET | MA 02554

Ty Costa


Rafael Osona Auctions

Schedule June 30 July 7

Furnishings ✴ Décor ✴ Nantucket Art ✴

July 14, 21 August 4

Americana, Fine Art Marine Auction

August 11, 18, 25 Sept. 1 ✴ Oct. 6 Dec. 1 2-Day Advance Previews 10-5pm Auctions begin 9:30am at the American Legion Hall 21 Washington St. RafaelOsonaAuctions.com

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You have specialized insurance needs. Our premier clients are offered comprehensive

an unwavering focus on everything that’s most important to you.

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risk programs and a range of elite services. We’re committed to exceptional service and

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HEALTHNWELLNESS N

ENERGY WAVES WRITTEN BY ALEXANDRA CATCHPOLE

ALEXANDRA CATCHPOLE GIVES HER TOP FIVE TIPS FOR LIVING HAPPY & HEALTHY THIS SUMMER

A

t the core, everything is made of energy. When we are in tune with the world of energy around and

1

2

within us, we become aware of the internal and external shifts we can make to live a healthy, balanced life and honor our body, mind, and soul so they will work in unity. Here are some tips I use to keep my energy healthy.

GET GROUNDED Grounding down to the earth is my go-to if I’m feeling stressed,

KEEP YOUR CHAKRAS BALANCED The chakras are seven main centers of power that lie within

anxious, or just generally having a hard time getting through

your energetic body and extend from the bottom of your

my day. Grounding puts our body, mind and soul back in sync

spine to the top of your head. Each one assists in regulat-

and helps us become more present, calm, focused and able to

ing your body, from the immune system to organ function

accomplish anything we set our mind to. Grounding yourself

to your emotions. When your chakras are balanced you will

doesn’t take long, and its benefits can transform your life. To

feel balanced, your life will flow much more effortlessly,

ground yourself, visualize roots coming out of your feet and

and you will find that responsibilities and stressors are eas-

anchoring you to the earth, jump up and down, bury your feet

ier to handle. Some techniques you can use to balance them

in the sand, practice yoga, walk barefoot, or do whatever you

include guided meditation, visualizations, healing crystals,

feel like anchors you to the earth.

yoga, color therapy or a pendulum.

SMUDGE YOURSELF The art of smudging has been around for thousands of years.

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4

5

HONOR YOUR FEELINGS—ALL OF THEM We live in a time when feelings are not always welcomed

The purpose is to assist in removing negative energy from

into the minds and hearts of those around us. We have a

yourself or a space by changing the molecular structure of

hard time confronting how we may want to act if it goes

the air and energy. To smudge yourself or your space, you

against the norms of society. I believe it is of the utmost im-

burn sacred plants—white sage and palo santo are the most

portance that we honor every single feeling that comes up.

popular—or spray a purifying smudge spray around you or

It is known that when we disown or suppress our emotions

your space. The smoke/spray clears away any unwanted en-

they can manifest as an illness within our body or negativity

ergy and leaves you feeling clear, lighter, revitalized, more

in our life. When we give ourselves the space to honor and

positive, relaxed and cleansed.

express what we are feeling at all times, we allow ourselves

SPEND TIME IN NATURE

to exist within a state of continued healing.

Nature is the best natural healer and reset button. Whether

N magazine

it is from the fresh air or the sunshine, we bloom from the

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inside out when connecting to the natural elements. The natural world’s energy vibrates at such a high level that it only makes sense that when we step away from our devices, responsibilities and other people—whether it’s on a hike, a bike ride, or a walk on the beach—we can find an inner sense of peace, tranquility and gratitude.

The owner of Nantucket Healing Arts, Alexandra Catchpole is a Shamanic practitioner, Reiki Master Teacher, Intuitive, Meditation Teacher, and a Lightworker. To learn more, visit www.alexandracatchpole.com


T H E U LT I M AT E C OL L E C T ION By Jonat han P. R a d ford

BROOKLINE | PRICE UPON REQUEST Five miles from central Boston and located between two golf courses, the 14± acres at Woodland Manor provide ultimate privacy, city accessibility and a breathtaking tapestry of rolling lawns, ponds and specimen plantings. The curving façade of Indiana limestone, inspiring architecture, sophisticated engineering and generations of the finest craftsmen have created a home of singular distinction with 26,000sf of luxurious living space.

NANTUCKET | $35,000,000 The international island destination of Nantucket offers a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire “Swain’s Neck”, the crown jewel of New England. On a peninsula with 63 acres and spectacular unobstructed views over Polpis Harbor, this estate is potentially the island’s most private family retreat. The main residence is complemented by a guest cottage, studio and gate house. 25 minutes flight time from Boston and 40 from New York.

CONCORD | $12,500,000 This Georgian Revival masterpiece offers privacy and tranquility 3 miles from the center of Concord. The 23.5acre setting features manicured gardens with specimen plantings, lawns, waterfall, koi pond, and private woodlands with extensive trails and access to conservation land. Constructed by master craftsmen, using the finest materials, the 10,395sf home fully integrates smart-house technology and is in new construction condition.

BOSTON | $7,400,000 In the heart of Back Bay, this Art Deco boutique condominium building offers 12 luxury residences with concierge services 24/7. The 8th floor residence comprises 3,319sf with 22 windows providing unparalleled panoramic views of the Public Garden and the city skyline. The home provides formal and informal spaces, 4 bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, a 1,000+ bottle wine cellar, two balconies and an exterior valet parking space.

N magazine

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM | MOVIE PRESENTATIONS AT JONATHANRADFORD.COM Jonathan P. Radford | 617.335.1010 | Jonathan@JonathanRadford.com Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage | 137 Newbury Street | Boston, MA 02116

71 The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Res dential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. ©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 314945NE_3/18


NEW TO THE SCENE

Sipping into

Sunset PHOTOGRAPHY BY BILL HOENK

Nantucket Tug Company hits the high seas for cocktail hour this summer. While there’s certainly no shortage of idyllic places to enjoy drinks and light bites on Nantucket, few get away from it all quite like the newly launched Nantucket Tug Company. Dreamt up by Slip 14’s Jonas Baker and Way Point Marine Service’s Captain Tim Feeney, Nantucket Tug Company is a fully-licensed, one-of-kind charter boat offering private luncheons and sunset tours around Nantucket Harbor. Climbing

N magazine

aboard their classic Crosby tugboat named Gertrude, Nantucket Tug

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Company’s guests enjoy a leisurely, two-hour tour of the harbor while enjoying beers from Cisco, sparkling wine from Champy, local oysters and charcuterie. With only two sailings each day—one for lunch and one for sunset—for up to six guests, this tug boat tour might be your best bet for beating the crowds come the high season.


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12 Gingy Lane • $2,995,000

9 North Point • $1,775,000

53 Main Street • $6,295,000

2 White Street• $1,585,000

6 The Grove • $1,325,000

KERI KALMAN, BROKER | C: 508.325.2585 | keri@congdonandcoleman.com

6 Old Westmoor Farm Road • $6,995,000 STEPHEN MAURY, PRINCIPAL | C: 508.451.0191 & SUZI SPRING, SALES & RENTALS AGENT | C: 508.228.8217

23 Main Street• $5,850,000

0 Valley View Drive • $425,000 STEPHEN MAURY, PRINCIPAL | C: 508.451.0191 & LARA HANSON, SALES & RENTALS AGENT | C: 508.221.0883

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STEPHEN MAURY, PRINCIPAL | C: 508.451.0191

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57 Main Street, Nantucket, MA 02554

|

508.325.5000

|

nantucketbrokers.com


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Artistry

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ORGANIC SPRAY TANNING by Professional Onsite Artist EMILY DENNY

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LIVE WATERFRONT P O CO M O WATE R FRO N T CO MPOUND $ 32 ,75 0,0 00 | 7 BE DS | 9 BAT HS Entirely unique waterfront compound with 300 degree dramatic views, privacy, direct access to a gorgeous sandy beach, boat moorings and multiple dwellings. Includes a 4 bedroom house, pool house, 2 bedroom cottage, 6-car garage, 4 bedroom guest house, pool, hot tub, tennis court, and an entertainment pavilion with a commercial kitchen, world class 3,500 bottle wine cellar and tasting room and 1 bedroom and 1 bathroom. Private beach stairs complete this elevated, waterfront compound with first floor water views of Nantucket Harbor, Medouie Creek, Town, Coatue, and Great Point Light House situated on almost 7 acres.

Gary Winn, Broker

gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069

Craig Hawkins, Broker craig@maurypeople.com 508.228.1881 x119

bernadette@maurypeople.com 508.680.4748

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Bernadette Meyer, Broker

37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554 www.maurypeople.com

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NBUZZ HISTORY BY

DESIGN

Next month, the Nantucket Historical Association will kick off the high-season in style with the annual Nantucket by Design. Beginning on August 1st, the NHA will offer riveting lectures, panel discussions, and intimate gatherings that will explore the unique influences on American design. One of those influences is David Kleinberg of David Kleinberg Design Associates who will serve as this year’s keynote speaker. During a champagne reception on August 2nd at the White Elephant, Kleinberg will be breaking down his design philosophy in a discussion moderated by editor-in-chief of House Beautiful, Sophie Donelson. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit NHA.org.

TICK TICK BOOM

A recent Boston Globe article confirmed what Nantucket residents already knew to be true: tick-borne diseases are becoming an increasingly large problem on the island. In fact, the Globe stated that “federal figures compiled over a five-year period show that the highest average annual per capita rate for Lyme disease in the United States was in Nantucket County, with 501 confirmed and probable cases for each 100,000 residents from 2010 to 2015.” Luckily for island outdoor-lovers, Dr. Tim Lepore of Nantucket Cottage Hospital is one of the foremost experts in the field of tick-borne disease research, and provides extensive tick information on the hospital’s website. He warns that Lyme disease is not the only disease for hikers to be aware of; Babesia, Anaplasmosis, and Borrelia Miyamotoi should also be concerns. However, he says that a tick has to be on you for “24-30 hours to transmit one of these diseases,” and recommends regular tick checks as a means of disease prevention. As we head into the thick of summer, remember to cover up, use bug spray, and avoid those pesky pests for happy hiking.

LIVING LEGEND

Feeling old is not something that resonates with Tao Porchon-Lynch. The ninety-nine-year-old yoga master is coming to the Nantucket Yoga Festival this July 6 - 8 to impart her many years of spiritual wisdom, and perhaps divulge her secrets to the fountain

N magazine

of youth. Porchon-Lynch first learned yoga during her childhood in India, eventually studying under

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Swami Prabhavananda, B.K.S. Iyengar, and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, famed guru to the Beatles. The Guinness World Record holder for being the oldest living yoga teacher (and the oldest competitive ballroom dancer), Porchon-Lynch still teaches six to eight classes a week in New York and will be teaching “The Eternal Energy of Yoga: A Master Yoga Class” at the festival this year. With her 100th birthday approaching on August 13th, this living legend is proof that every inch of life can be stretched beyond your years. 


FAMOUS L O W E R S

This year, the Nantucket Garden Festival is offering anything but the

DIAMOND

garden variety. The tenth annual

DUO

festival will host its first-ever celebrity floral design workshop with famed floral designer Jenny Love of Love N’ Fresh Flowers. Love comes to the Garden Festival from a long career of flower arranging, and was recently named one of the top wedding florists in the nation by Martha Stewart Weddings. Using blooms she will grow herself on her urban, organic farm in Philadelphia, Love will guide a hands-on, half-day workshop on July 18th at the Nantucket Yacht Club demonstrating the intricacies of flower arranging. Participants will cre-

ate their own beautiful floral

centerpieces and can expect to

leave with a professionally shot photo of their bouquets as well as a blossoming knowledge of seasonally-inspired floral design. 

The Vault’s Katherine Jetter has put together a gem of a speaker series this summer. On Saturday, July 15th, famed designers Stephen Webster, Jeff Feero of Alex Sepkus and Hutton Wilkinson of Tony Duquette will make an in-store appearance at The Vault to discuss their trailblazing jewelry. Jetter suggests scheduling a private appointment to get up close and personal with the designers, or inquiring in-store

DELIVERED HOT N’ FRESH

for

details

about

their exclusive panel discussion on Friday, July 14th. She will also be hosting events with jewel-

Now there’s an easier way to enjoy roast

ers throughout the

beef while roasting on the beach. As if last

summer, including

year’s top-to-bottom makeover of Fresh

with Jade Trau, Margot McKinney, Viktor Velyan,

Nantucket was not enough, the boys of

and William Goldberg. Although the locations for a

5 Salem Street are outdoing themselves

few of the events are still to be announced, one thing

this season with the introduction of their

is crystal clear: with so many designers rocking the

own delivery van. Customers will now

island, jewelry lovers will be lining up to frost them-

be able to order online and choose a slot

selves all summer long.

between 9:00am and 5:15pm to have their Fresh sandwiches delivered to the beach.

KOSHER REGGAE

SEEING

STARFISH

On July 6th, Nantucket author Cherie Burns

dience with new and exciting artists, and this

will be taking the podium at the Atheneum to

year is no exception. This July 25th, the

discuss her hit book, Diving for

Box will welcome the reggae performer

Starfish. Burns’s fourth book,

Matisyahu and his band. The New York

Diving for Starfish received rave

based artist famous for blending Orthodox

reviews by the likes of The Wall

Jewish themes with reggae recently released

Street Journal and takes read-

his latest album, “Undercurrent.” Matisyahu’s most

ers on a page-turning thriller

popular hits include One Day, King Without a Crown, and Sunshine. The Chicken

that fuses high-fashion and

Box show is part of his national “Strength to Strength” tour. Tickets are available at

mystery. Learn more at

the Chicken Box website and fans can expect tour merchandise to be available for

Nantucketatheneum.org.

purchase the night of the show.

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Every summer the Chicken Box surprises its au-

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SUMMER

Radiance SUSAN LISTER L OCKE

G A L L E RY

N magazine

28 Easy Street, Nantucket ON THE WATERFRONT 508.228.2132 1stdibs.com susanlisterlocke.com

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PHO T O BY R O N LYN C H

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NTERTAINMENT

NEED TO READ NANTUCKET’S BELOVED BOOKWORM TIM EHRENBERG SHARES HIS TOP SIX PICKS FOR SUMMER

Summer Reading. Let’s face it. A Nantucket summer is busy, and we are all searching for entertaining reads that keep our attention at the beach, at the pool, or on our work breaks. Here are six titles for July that will make you skip the beach to stay in bed, call into work and keep you Ntertained!

THE WORD IS MURDER BY ANTHONY HOROWITZ Anthony Horowitz has perfectly reinvented the British mystery. Think Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, or Sherlock Holmes, but with a contemporary style. With twists and turns, it even stars a fictional version of the author himself. It’s a classic crime story for the modern reader. Every time I thought I knew where this story was going, I was wrong. Spread the word and The Word is Murder!

US AGAINST YOU BY FREDRIK BACKMAN When I heard there was to be a sequel to Beartown, I begged for an advanced copy from the publisher. I am not surprised to say that Backman scores another winning goal with Us Against You. Most everyone will be able to relate to one of the flawed characters or the real-life situations in its pages. Backman’s sentences engage and passionately make you a key player in this affecting story. The book is about EVERYTHING! It’s about politics, marriage, parenthood, growing up, growing old, identity, sports, friendship, crime, illness, intolerance, abuse, love, hate and community. It’s a metaphor for America today and that “us vs. you” mentality rampant in our states. It is about things that make life worth living, people worth loving and books worth reading. This story entertains, teaches and changes you. It’s rare for a sequel to surpass the original, but I think we might have that here. 

SIRIOUSLY DELICIOUS: 100 NUTRITIOUS (AND NOT SO NUTRITIOUS) SIMPLE RECIPES FOR THE REAL HOME COOK BY SIRI DALY N magazine

Popular food blogger and Today food contributor Siri Daly shares her delicious recipes in this brand-new cookbook. This collection of dishes is the perfect companion for a

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deliver a belly laugh along the way.”

busy Nantucket summer of entertaining, beach picnics, kid’s parties, and family dinners! Siri is anything but serious as you will see by her wit, humor, and charm. “Siriously Delicious,” she writes “will not only feed your family’s bellies, but hopefully


THE HIGH SEASON BY JUDY BLUNDEL I love first lines in novels. Author Judy Blundell begins her highly anticipated beach read with, “Every summer Ruthie gave away her house by the sea.” That simple sentence holds so much intrigue that I could barely wait to keep reading. Filled with human drama that is insightful, humorous and very real, this should be in everybody’s beach bag and beach house this season.

CALYPSO BY DAVID SEDARIS David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book. Described on the back cover as “beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk, and possibly his very best book yet.” We all need a good laugh now and then and we all should take ourselves a little less seriously. A David Sedaris book is just the ticket. Speaking of tickets, David Sedaris will be back on Nantucket August 7th at 8 p.m. with all new readings at the Mary P. Walker Auditorium.

THE PERFECT COUPLE BY ELIN HILDERBRAND Elin Hilderbrand, our “Queen of the Beach Read,” returns with an island murder mystery at a Nantucket summer wedding. Elin’s style perfectly fits with a mystery type of story. Her sense of place, her characters and her love of Nantucket Island are all in attendance at these Nantucket nuptials turned crime scene. Call it a beach read, call it a summer on Nantucket.

All books available at Mitchell’s Book Corner or Nantucket Bookworks. Photography by Tim Ehrenberg

N magazine

guilty pleasure, call it whatever you want, but it’s fun, and it epitomizes all the best of

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H E A L T H , V I T A L I T Y, BALANCE & WELLNESS A holistic approach to personalized healthcare. DR. SARAH WILLIAMS DC, MS, CCH 508.221.5012 10 Shimmo Pond Road www.drsarahwilliams.com

By Land By Sea &

Discover Nantucket with Egan Maritime Nantucket Nantucket Shipwreck & Lifesaving Museum Shipwreck & Lifesaving Museum

To learn more and purchase tickets visit www.eganmaritime.org

Day sails Day sails aboard aboard the Tall Shipthe Lynx Tall Ship Lynx

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Leigh Ernst Friestedt © Equity IX – SportsOgram

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4 EASY STREET I 508.228.5073 WWW.CURRENTVINTAGE.COM


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NTERIORS SPONSORED CONTENT

SEA MYST A LIVING ROOM DESIGNED BY KATHLEEN HAY DESIGN

Sophisticated. Organic. Fresh. Hip. Sea Myst lives up to its design mandate: Create a house with an open plan in which a blended family can gather in luxurious comfort. The house is a subtle ode to its nautical setting. The interior is a symphony of neutrals whose luscious textures excite the senses. Added unexpected elements, like the champagne cork stools, bring a sense of whimsy and visual interest. The ample indoor and outdoor living areas allow for seamless entertaining of groups large and small with a living room that opens onto the adjacent terrace and pool beyond. We divided the large space into three distinct areas to allow for entertaining on different scales, and filled it with furnishings and objects that give nod to the beachy location. On any given summer evening, the house is abuzz with guests sharing food, wine and stories while admiring the view of the sea beyond.

8 6 7

4

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5

86

2

1


1 2

CHAMPAGNE CORK STOOLS

that double as seats or footrests.

PAIR OF CHAIRS AND LOW TABLE

for comfortable gathering in the bar area. Table is constructed of metal and concrete, an unexpected material pairing.

Chip Webster Architecture was the architect on the project.

3

3

FULL BAR for high-style entertaining complete

4

DRIFTWOOD CENTER TABLE plays many roles, in-

5 6 7

with porthole mirrors and thickly-textured wall covering that speaks to the beachy setting.

cluding entry table, buffet table when entertaining large groups, or a place to have an intimate dinner with a smaller group.

ROPE STOOLS add texture to the neutral space and give a sense of place in this summer house. METAL CHANDELIER was chosen for its sculptural

quality. It sheds light without being an obtrusive visual stop to the view beyond.

Far end of the room is a destination with a generous FIREPLACE AND TV, a cozy place to gather on cooler evenings or when the weather is inclement. and a coffered ceiling were added to enhance the interior architecture.

N magazine

8 SQUARE GRID WALL PANELING

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WHITE HERON THEATRE’S SUMMER SEASON July 5 - Aug 10

July 19- Aug 18

Directed By Michael Kopko

Directed By Mark Shanahan

A delightful musical set in turn-of-the-century New England. Fun for the whole family!

A comedic masterpiece featuring 3 Tony-Nominated actors, with a Gala Benefit Grand Opening July 20th.

Aug 22 - Aug 25

Aug 30 - Sept 15

Directed By Leonard Foglia

Directed By Dustin Wills

Don’t miss this world premiere preview! The humorous & poignant story of Calvin Trillin & his wife.

Heartbreakingly funny, a grown-up story of love, hope, climate...and change.

DADDY LONG LEGS

NOEL COWARD’S PRIVATE LIVES

EVANSTON SALT COSTS CLIMBING

N magazine

ABOUT ALICE

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WHITE HERON Theatre Company

Get Tickets at WhiteHeronTheatre.org Or call 508-825-5268 White Heron Theatre 5 N Water St (Behind the Whaling Museum)


LIVE NANTUCKET

CLIFF | $10,975,000

TOWN | $7,495,000 N magazine

Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com | 508.330.3069 37 Main Street, Nantucket MA, 02554

89 Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


NOSH NEWS SPONSORED CONTENT

Sweet

&Salty

WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

Met on Main is serving up something delightfully Saltie this summer

S

ipping a crisp glass of rosé on Met on Main’s intimate back patio, owner Kathy Sidell feels right at home. She’s owned this

restaurant on 38 Main Street for six years now, but her history in this space stretches much farther back than that. “This is actually where I got my first job,” N magazine

says Sidell, who has summered on Nantucket her

90

whole life. “Back then, it was the Sweet Shop and I used to work the ice cream window.” From that ice cream window, Kathy Sidell went on to launch a number of smash hit restaurants. Now she’s reinventing her recipe once more here at Met on Main.

Met on Main owner Kathy Sidell enjoying her intimate back patio.


From now until Labor Day at Met on Main, Sidell is offering the wildly popular seafood menu that she and Chef Kyle McClelland crafted in her small Back Bay restaurant, Saltie Girl. “It’s a concept within a concept,” says Sidell. “Breakfast and lunch is the Met menu and then at dinner the restaurant transforms into Bar Saltie—the sister to Saltie Girl in Boston.” Bar Saltie boasts one of the island’s most robust seafood selections. The raw bar display is packed to the gills with live Jonah crabs, king crab claws, head-on prawns, mahogany clams from Maine, live razor clams from Ipswich, poached lobster, live sea scallops, littlenecks, oysters, and even scorpion fish from New Zealand. “We want to set ourselves out a little bit different from everyone else,” says Chef McClelland. “When in season, anything I can get from the island I will— mussels from Tuckernuck, oysters from Wauwinet, local black

a traditional New

bass—but we also want to bring

England seafood

in fish that you wouldn’t usually

experience or get

find on island like king crab legs

something totally

and live scallops.”

modern and inter-

And it’s not just raw seafood.

national,” Sidell

Bar Saltie’s fish dishes are prepared

says. “It’s the best

in every other way imaginable:

of both worlds.”

tinned, smoked, sautéed, grilled and

On the tradi-

sushi-style. “You can come in for

tional front, Met’s lobster roll is piled high with succulent hunks of claw meat drizzled in butter. And for those not in the mood for seafood, there’s also perfectly executed steak tartar and steak frites as well as some vegetarian options. “The objective is to make sure every dish is as good as the seafood, which is perfect,” Sidell says. Whereas diners wait for hours to score a spot at Saltie Girl in Boston, Met’s long bar, restaurant and gorgeous patio are making this highly-curated Saltie Girl menu far more accessible. Beyond the menu, when the sun sets, Met on Main slips into a sexy, hip vibe that goes well with Bar Saltie’s signature caviar martini. The rest of the drink list is ingredient-driven—orange, apricot, rhubarb, grapefruit, pineapple and prickly pear—served with top-shelf spirits in fun vessels, with some available for sharing. Come the following morning, Met on Main’s patio offers one of the cushiest brunch destinations on Nantucket. Guests lounge and sip mimosas and bloody marys over orders of French rolled omelets and fried lobster over waffles. Meanwhile, inside, the 20 seat bar featuring four flat screens is an ideal spot to catch a midday Red Sox game over homerun lunch options like the legendary Back Bay chopped salad or brick chicken. same passion that Kathy Sidell first found working the ice cream window here all those years ago. She’s driven by a love of the island and wants to see to it that this space on Main Street works its way into the fond memories of her guests.

N magazine

While the menu has evolved at Met on Main, the restaurant is still rooted in the

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“THE EVENT UNDER THE TENT” JULY 19-22, 2018 AT BARTLETT’S FARM

FEATURING OVER 50 CELEBRATED ARTISANS + CRAFTSMEN JEWELRY H FOLK ART H GLASS H POTTERY H FURNITURE TEXTILES H DECORATIVE ARTS

Friday + Saturday 10 am - 6 pm, Sunday 10 am - 3 pm 3 day pass $15 H Children under 12 FREE!

preview party

July 19th, 6-9 pm - Meet the artists & shop early! Tickets $100 Includes: Libations by Cisco Brewers, Artisanal fare and live music.

All proceeds benefit Small Friends on Nantucket

EA

CH

PLUM VILL A

Joelle Bouchard 508.221.0134 joelleb@jordanre.com

G

E

B

FOR MORE INFORMATION & TICKETS CALL 508.228.6769 OR VISIT NANTUCKETARTANDARTISANSHOW.ORG

NAN

TUCKET

The Final Phase is Here! Exclusive to Community

N magazine

Infinity-Edge Community Pool • Har-Tru Tennis Court Fitness Center • Children’s Play Area and Beautiful Park with Bocce Court

92

Call for appointment to see all that Beach Plum has to offer!

J

Prices starting at $1,695,000 Photos depict completed homes.


N magazine

ADDRESS

Anderson Building at Nantucket Cottage Hospital 57 Prospect Street Nantucket, MA 02554 (508) 825-1066 | nantuckethospital.org 93


NVESTIGATE

COME HELI OR HIGH WATER WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEROME DEULIN / AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

Boston MedFlight remains Nantucket’s lifeline to emergency care on the mainland

“Boston MedFlight transports over 4,100 patients a year, including around three hundred from Nantucket alone.”

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— Tom Hurder

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L

ater this year, the Nantucket Cottage Hospital will open the doors to a brand new, cutting-edge medical facility that will dramatically enhance

patient care on the island and be tailor made to meeting the complex challenges of delivering treatment thirty miles out to sea. While the hospital and its caregivers are equipped to treat nearly all medical emergencies on the island, there are still extreme situations that require calling in reinforcements. For that, the Nantucket Cottage Hospital radios in Boston MedFlight (BMF). Just about anyone who lives on Nantucket knows the ominous womp womp womp of the MedFlight helicopter pounding overhead as it comes in for a landing on the helipad on 57 Prospect Street. That thudding of helicopter blades usually indicates that a member of the Nantucket community is in a dire situation. During the summer months, an average of one patient per day is flown off the island by MedFlight. Despite this critical role, most people might be unaware that this emergency transport service is actually an independent nonprofit that depends on the generosity of donors to stay soaring. “Boston MedFlight transports over 4,100 patients

a year, including around three hundred from Nantucket alone,” indicates BMF’s Tom Hurder. “And because we never deny service to patients in need due to a lack of insurance or inability to pay, we provide over $500,000 a year in free and unreimbursed care just to Nantucket patients.” Two years ago, only 13% of patients from Nantucket Cottage Hospital had to pay for this vital transport, which costs around $2,000 a flight. Of course, the care MedFlight’s veteran critical-care nurses and EMTs keep patients stable on the hour-long flight to the life-saving care of Massachusetts General Hospital.

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that is delivered is priceless. Inside the helicopter’s berth,

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“A

96

s one who has benefitted person-

Based primarily in Hanscom Field in

tage Hospital’s spokesman Jason Graziadei.

ally from the speed and skill of

Bedford, Massachusetts, MedFlight re-

“We’re proud that more than 97 percent of

Boston MedFlight and has shep-

cently opened a new base of operations in

the patients who come to the NCH emer-

herded many friends through the excellent

Mansfield, which along with another satel-

gency department are able to be treated and

emergency services at Nantucket Cottage

lite location in Plymouth, will provide more

released on the island. But in cases when a

Hospital and into the care of the fine BMF

direct service to Nantucket. They’ve also

transport is in the best interest of the patient

pilots and critical care nurses and para-

expanded their fleet, adding three new Air-

and a higher level of care is necessary, it

medics, I want to remind my neighbors

bus 415s that pack more power and are 50%

gives us confidence to work with the men

that Boston MedFlight is truly committed

quieter than their predecessor. So while the

and women of Boston MedFlight who are

to the health and safety of this community

sound of the helicopter overhead may not

true professionals.”

and to southern New England,” wrote Dr.

be as loud as before, folks on Nantucket can

Part of the beauty of living or visiting

David Nathan in an op-ed in the Inquirer

rest assured that MedFlight is continuing to

Nantucket is being removed from the main-

& Mirror last July. Nathan is the president

serve as a vital lifeline to the mainland.

land, miles away from the “real world.” But

emeritus of Dana Farber and a longtime

“Even after we complete the new hospi-

as any Nantucketer can attest, few experienc-

Nantucket summer resident who needed

tal and expand the NCH emergency depart-

es are more infuriating than getting stuck on

to be flown off the island for emergency

ment, Boston MedFlight will remain a criti-

the island when you just need to get off. When

care. “We are all in this isolated position

cal resource for island patients who require

your life depends on reaching the mainland,

together. We need Boston MedFlight…and

services that are beyond the scope of a com-

though, Boston MedFlight provides the peace

they need our support.”

munity hospital,” says the Nantucket Cot-

of mind of being only a call away.


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N magazine

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NANTUCKET BY AIR DISCOVER THE TRADEWIND SHUTTLE CONVENIENCE FROM TETERBORO AND WHITE PLAINS

Commuter schedules | Private terminals | Two pilots and turbine safety | Ticket book discounts

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N magazine

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B R A N D E D CO N T E N T

ENDLESS SUMMER

A DAY I N THE LIFE Kerry describes a perfect day on Nantucket

C L OT H E S TO L I V E I N

7AM

Wake up to crying kiddos and head to Handlebar Cafe for an iced coffee

MIKE

Creative Director 8AM

Drive to Cisco Beach to check out the surf, and if it’s good, catch some waves for an hour 10AM

Co-founders Alex (left) & Mike Faherty

Faherty Nantucket is open for the season — and they’ve got all your summer styles.

Eat brunch at Downyflake — best donuts on the island

"My summer uniform: our boardshorts made from sustainable fabric and a classic vintage surf stripe tee."

12PM

Women's - Faherty Nantucket

B AC K O N THE ISLAND

Swing by Faherty Nantucket to say hi to the team and the regulars passing through

KERRY

Brand President

3PM

with the Fahertys

Take the fam to Ladies Beach for some R&R

Now that summer’s here, the Faherty shop on Candle Street is open for the season. Known for crafting the highest quality casual clothes, their men's and women's collection perfectly outfit your time on the island, from days on the beach to nights on the town. Cofounders Mike, Alex and Kerry Faherty will be escaping to ACK after a long cold winter (with Alex and Kerry’s kids, Ava and Riggs, in tow). Here’s where they'll be soaking up the sun and enjoying life's great moments.

6PM

Sit at the bar for dinner at Straight Wharf, where our childhood friend Tim Farley mans the bar

"I'm obsessed with my reversible cactus one-piece and live in my Key Largo Sweater Poncho on chilly nights. "

8PM

Scoop up some ice cream from Juice Bar

ALEX

9PM

CEO

Call it a night SWING BY THE SHOP F O R A N AC K M A P

N magazine

Men's - Faherty Nantucket

"I wear my All Day Shorts well, all day — to the beach, to the bar, to the store. Our linen shirts are also a go-to, super airy and comfortable."

99 FAHERTY NANTUCKET - 0 CANDLE STREET

|

FAHERTYBRAND.COM

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@FAHERTYBRAND


NVESTIGATE

NANTUCKET

COUNTS WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

WHAT BIG DATA CAN TELL US ABOUT OUR SMALL ISLAND

Alan Worden can tell you how many people were on Nantucket at any given hour last year. He knows which summer visitors tend to go to Madaket Beach and which prefer ‘Sconset. He knows how much trash the island produces, how the traffic flows, and where visitors come from throughout the year. Above all, Alan Worden might just have an answer to the most confounding question that has long

N magazine

plagued Nantucketers: How many people actually live on the island?

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many other public and private organizations, Worden and his team have created the Nantucket Data Platform (NDP) to help nonprofits, small businesses and town government operate more effectively. “We want to help them make smarter decisions,” Worden says. “We think evidence-based decision making can make everyone more successful. The tools just haven’t been available until now.” The idea for the Nantucket Data Platform first took root during a retreat with ReMain Nantucket, of which Worden

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“N

102

is an advisor. ReMain’s antucket is like Disney World,”

founder Wendy Schmidt posed a very basic question

Worden says. “The gates open at

to the group: Who are we as a community? Wor-

8 o’clock and somebody is sitting

den set out to answer that question. He assembled a

there with a clicker. When some-

team to vacuum up data and distill it down to hard

one comes into Disney World, they

numbers. “We’re figuring out how many year-round

get a click. Similarly, if you’re coming to Nan-

commuters there are. How many summer people.

tucket, you’re coming by boat or by plane—

How many visitors. How many permanent residents.

that’s pretty much a click.”

And how many summer workers,” he says. In the

For the last year, Worden and his grow-

process, Worden began developing a database that

ing team of data collectors have been count-

he saw could answer many more questions beyond

ing those clicks to create the clearest statistical

Schmidt’s.

“NANTUCKET IS LIKE DISNEY WORLD...THE GATES OPEN AT 8 O’CLOCK AND SOMEBODY IS SITTING THERE WITH A CLICKER. WHEN SOMEONE COMES IN, THEY GET A CLICK. IF YOU’RE COMING TO NANTUCKET, YOU’RE COMING BY BOAT OR BY PLANE—WHICH IS PRETTY MUCH A CLICK.” — Alan Worden

model of the island ever created. Aggregating,

“It changes the way you think,” Worden says.

cleaning, organizing and finally analyzing data

“You’ll walk down Main Street and wonder if there’s

from town government, the airport, the ferries,

data on this or that. How often do they pick up the garbage cans? How many bicycles get

nonprofits, local businesses, the census and

stolen? You can go around and collect all this data, but to what end?”


The end Worden envisions extends to putting data behind pressing questions. For instance, he has provided data to Nantucket Memorial Airport indicating which new flight routes would be most successful. He believes the data could be used to staff local businesses more strategically and make ordering retail inventory more economical. On the municipal level, just having an accurate population census would prove critical in redeveloping the sewer plan. Given that his Nantucket Data Platform is still in its infancy, Worden believes he’s only scratched the surface of what’s possible with this resource. “According to some people, data deliver to Wendy Schmidt and ReMain the first version of a paper that begins to answer the question of who we are as a community. The ticketed event will be open to the public. Until that time, Warden is playing his numbers close to the vest. At press time, his data collectors were still feverishly cleaning and categorizing their findings and were cagey about revealing specifics until they were finalized. Instead, Warden shared some trends reflected by the numbers. For instance, analytics is the sexiest job in America,” Wor-

ics, visualizations, and technical support to a

the busiest weekend during the summer?

den says with a chuckle. But as one might

variety of organizations hungry for data but

The weekend of the Boston Pops concert

imagine, the realities of gathering, organiz-

lacking the team needed to execute. The NDP

in August, which edges out the Fourth of

ing, cleaning and storing data are incredibly

team includes a board

painstaking. Just analyzing the census data,

of eight advisers and a

for instance, requires going through the lists

growing group of trust-

and eliminating duplicate names that might

ees who have commit-

have occurred through a myriad of subtle des-

ted to providing phil-

ignations (Jr. versus Junior, for example) that

anthropic support of

a data cleaner needs to sniff out. In addition

$5,000 a year for the

to his six-person team, Worden sends his raw

next three years. For

data sets out to data scientists in Eastern Eu-

the ReMain population

“MY VISION FOR THIS IS WITHIN TEN YEARS, PEOPLE WILL SAY, ‘NANTUCKET IS KNOWN FOR BIKE PATHS AND LAND CONSERVATION, HISTORIC DISTRICT, RACIAL INTEGRATION IN THE 1800S, AND FOR THE COMMUNITY DATA PLATFORM.”

rope or India that can clean and organize it.

work, he has recruited

— Alan Worden

What began as a hobby occupying five

July by about four hun-

a team of five leading

dred people. Memorial Day weekend has also shown the most dramatic change, with a population increase of some 7,000 people. And when comparing the summer months, August is ten percent busier than July. Beyond that, Warden

hours of Worden’s week has morphed into a

demographers. From there, this model of

says folks will have to wait to read their of-

full-time obsession. “This can be an invalu-

crunching numbers to develop insights in a

ficial findings this month.

able community initiative. Right now, we’re

small community could be brought to other

learning every single day and it’s a break-

towns similar to Nantucket.

“My vision for this is within ten years,

even initiative,” he says. “The challenge now

In the more immediate future, however,

paths and land conservation, its historic dis-

is to make it economically sustainable.” His

Worden and his team will be presenting their

trict, racial integration in the 1800s, and for

wife Victoria has since come on board to

findings to the original question that inspired

the Nantucket Data Platform.” Looking at

manage the technology side of the Nantucket

the Nantucket Data Platform in the first place.

Worden’s track record thus far, this vision

Data Platform, which will sell data, analyt-

On July 17th at the Dreamland, Worden will

seems like one he can count on.

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people will say, ‘Nantucket is known for bike

103


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N magazine

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104

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N magazine

Jeff Lee • Bruce Beni • Chloe Bruning • Dan Dunlap • Shellie Dunlap • Carolyn Durand • Peter Engen Hal Herrick • Sam Herrick • Jeanne Hicks • Mimi Huber • Maya Kearns • Jane King • Denise LaBombard Bob Lang • Joe Lloyd • Lindsley Matthews • Liza Ottani • Jonathan Raith

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NVESTIGATE

LASER

FOCUS WRITTEN BY DEBORAH HALBER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

HOW CUTTING-EDGE LASER TECHNOLOGY IS PRESERVING NANTUCKET HISTORY You’ve probably seen them around town. They comb the island in Florida Gators caps and T-shirts, wielding high-tech devices on tripods, ghost-white spheres and drones worthy of the starship Enterprise. These curious bands of students are affiliated with the University of Florida and are using the latest laser-scanning technology to build a virtual model of Nantucket that could have a big impact on the future of the island. Through UF’s research- and teachingfocused Preservation Institute Nantucket (PIN), every summer for forty-six years, aspiring preservationists from around the globe have used Nantucket as a living laboratory, measuring, photographing, and drawing historic architecture and heritage sites. “The island has become a global case study,” says Morris Hylton III, who directs the University of Florida’s Historic Preservation Program in Gainesville. At an international conference in India last December, attendees were abuzz about ied sites on the planet.

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Nantucket, possibly one of the most-stud-

107


F

ive years ago, the UF program acquired laser scanners, drones and other digital technology for a new initiative called Envision Nantucket. Using white

spheres as targets, the scanners capture and map millions of

tiny points on the surfaces of objects, creating a matrix of data in space. Computers then render a digital model, accurate to within millimeters, in a fraction of the time of traditional methods. Natural disasters, war and other perils are sending pres-

“Nantucket is not just historic; it’s of national significance... Each time we lose one of these buildings, it’s becoming less and less valuable.” — Michael May, Executive Director of the Nantucket Preservation Trust

ervationists scrambling to laser-scan ancient buddhas and Roman-era temples before they’re destroyed. Hylton and UF have documented sites from Myanmar to Miami. But the core of the program has always been Nantucket. A digital model of the waterfront, for instance, enables 3-D visualization of flooding, storm surge and sea-level rise. In light of recent winter floods, these models are invaluable tools for vulnerability assessments and adaptation strategies, says Hylton. A video animation of the virtual recreation of the Greek Revival mansion built by whaling merchant William Hadwen, for instance, floats the viewer through rooms with visible details as precise as delicately patterned wallpaper, gold-filigree picture frames and carved swirls within the crown molding.

N magazine

Using sophisticated laser-imaging technology, Envision Nantucket not only records historical structures and streets down to the millimeter, but also creates simulations for rising sea level, as seen above.

108


“We’re trying to convince people that if you retain these historic elements— original plaster, wonderful woodwork, old floors—you actually are increasing the value of your building. It’s not just generic. It’s a special place.” — Michael May, Executive Director of the Nantucket Preservation Trust

Morris Hylton III directs the University of Florida’s Histor­ic Preservation Program in Gainesville.

The notion of capturing elements of Nantucket’s charm like a beetle in amber originated with businessman and philanthropist Walter Beinecke Jr. In 1969, Beinecke, who would be credited with reviving Nantucket’s then-decaying waterfront, met F. Blair Reeves, a UF architecture professor working with a federal historic preservation program. At Beinecke’s urging, Reeves returned to the island with students, launching what would become the nation’s oldest continuously operating field school for historic preservation. More recently, a $60,000 grant

Now owned by the Nantucket Historical Association, the Hadwen House on up-

from Beinecke’s family foundation, the Osceola Foun-

per Main Street will be safely frozen in 1849, but Michael May, executive director of

dation, funded Envision Nantucket.

the Nantucket Preservation Trust, says other historical residential interiors are at risk.

More than seven hundred students represent-

In 2000, Nantucket was placed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s short

ing 120 institutions worldwide have cycled through the

list of most endangered historic places, says May, noting that every year, ten to twenty

Preservation Institute since 1972. The result of their la-

interiors of the island’s 800 pre-Civil War structures are lost as developers and owners

bor is stored on University of Florida servers and at the

replace original details with modern elements. May is heartened by the fact that a dozen historic residence interiors have been

is contributing funding for additional laser scanning. To

scanned as part of Envision Nantucket. If a residence goes on the market, the laser

date, in addition to Hadwen House, the African Meeting

scan will provide a template for a historically accurate renovation, if a future owner

House, Boston Higginbotham House, Cottage Hospital,

so chooses. “Nantucket is not just historic; it’s of national significance,” May says.

the Macy-Christian House, the Maria Mitchell Associa-

“Each time we lose one of these buildings, it’s becoming less and less valuable. We’re

tion, the Pacific Club and the Unitarian Church have been

trying to convince people that if you retain these historic elements—original plaster,

scanned, as well as exterior views of ‘Sconset and lower

wonderful woodwork, old floors—you actually are increasing the value of your build-

and upper Main Street.

ing. It’s not just generic. It’s a special place.”

N magazine

Library of Congress. This year, the town of Nantucket

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a benefit for

NANTUCKET BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

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N magazine

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NSPIRE

112


BODYBUILDER from

BARBADOS WRITTEN BY JOSH GRAY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

NANTUCKET RESIDENT JASON SMALL IS HEADED FOR THE BIG TIME ONE BICEP CURL AT A TIME Summers were always a lonely time for

fomercials. Instead, Small learned to use

Jason Small while growing up in Bar-

the simplest of tools—free weights, core

bados. When school let out, his friends

training, bench press—to build his world-

would leave the Caribbean island with

class physique. “At the end of the day, it

their parents to travel or find work, leav-

all comes down to hard work,” he says.

ing Small behind with no one to play with

But Small’s journey to bodybuild-

and little to do. That’s when he discov-

ing’s professional stage was not a straight

ered weight lifting. “I started working

shot. After graduating high school in Bar-

out with my father at the age of thirteen

bados, he went on to culinary school where

in a tiny back yard gym,” Small remem-

he was eventually recruited to work in the

bers. “Within a few weeks I started to see

kitchen at the White Elephant for the sum-

the physical changes to my body.” Fast-

mer in 2008. “I returned to work on Nan-

forward and Jason Small is now a profes-

tucket for three summers after that,” he

sional bodybuilder and trainer honing his

says. “It was then that I met my future wife,

physique here on Nantucket.

although we didn’t know it at the time.”

When it came to his training routine

While working his way up the lad-

growing up, Small listened to his father’s

der in the White Elephant’s kitchen, Small

advice chapter and verse. And he had good

met Anita Elahi. What began as innocent

reason to do so. “Lifting weights is what

flirting turned into a strong friendship

saved my father’s life,” Small says. “He

and then a romantic relationship. The two

was in a serious bicycle accident when I

continued to date when Small returned to

was a child and the amount of muscle mass

Barbados at the end of each summer. Then

he had cushioned the impact and prevent-

in 2012, changes to the H2B Work Visa

ed him from being killed.” Their workouts

program prevented him from returning to

were free of the bells and whistles found

Nantucket. Heartbroken, he continued to

in many of today’s gyms or the gimmicky

stay close with Anita while starting a new

fitness products hawked on late-night in-

career back in Barbados.

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113


S

mall joined the national police force in Barbados, and after only a year was promoted to an elite anti-gang and organized crime unit. “Police training took my physical training to

a whole new level,” he says. “I started getting really into fitness and nutrition, and after being promoted to Special Forces, I started leading my squad’s training sessions.” Although he enjoyed his budding police career, Small desperately missed his girlfriend on Nantucket. Then came a phone call that would change everything. Elahi’s mother phoned Small to tell him that she was in the hospital with brain inflammation that doctors thought could be cancer. Small dropped everything and told his commanding officer that he had to go be by her side. “It wasn’t even a conscious decision to go to her—I just went,” Small remembers. “I flew out, got to her and said ‘I’m never leaving you again.’” True to his word, Small proposed to Elahi after she made a full recovery. The two were married in 2015 at

N magazine

Jason Small with his wife and manager Anita at Jetties Beach (above). Small learned to hone his physique with little resources and a whole lot of hard work (below and right page).

114

The Wauwinet, where they had met seven years earlier.


It was through Anita’s strong encouragement that Small signed up for his first bodybuilding competition. Without any formal training, he came in fifth. “I did pretty well, but I knew I could do better,” he says. He trained and trained, then in his next competition he came in third. Still he knew he could do better. “I ate a clean and carefully prepared diet while completing a variety of intensive workouts over the course of the next several months,” he says. “I signed up for an OCB pro-qualifier competition held this spring.” Small won three of his classes amidst the strong competition, officially propelling him to the pro level.

“I am looking forward to competing in professional shows later this year as I begin my journey as a pro athlete while also representing Nantucket,” Small says. Firmly in his corner is his wife Anita, who has taken on the role of his manager, pushing his training and helping him organize his competition schedule. To supplement his career, Small trains clients at the Great Harbor Yacht Club and Nantucket Community School. “I’m motivated by bringing my clients to the next level,” he says. “My mantra is that I’m limitless—and so are you.” So while Jason Small might be a world away from that backyard gym where he lifted his first weights, the same core lessons he learned from his fa­ther are being passed on to his clients here sional stage.

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on Nantucket and put on display on the profes-

115


Building a better lifestyle starts with your home... let it be one of New England’s finest.

N magazine

Quincy | Falmouth dellbrookjks.com

116


Historic Architecture… Originally built in the 1830s by the famed whaling Captain Charles Grant, 54 Orange Street is the epitome of timeless Nantucket style and one of the best examples of Greek revival architecture on Nantucket. The 1800’s was a time of great prosperity on the island and the center of international trade in a cosmopolitan community. Oil from sperm whales was the gold of the time and after 56 years at sea, Captain Charles Grant brought home more barrels than any other Nantucket whaling captain, and his home is proof of that. Many distinctive and original details are still intact today, making this home truly unique. From the fireplaces carved with New Zealand marble, ionic columns, pediment entry, rose corners and an ivory mortgage button on the stairs’ newel, this home is a historic memento to the 19th century. Today, the six-bedroom, five bath home boasts grand living spaces, large sun-drenched windows, gorgeous wide plank floors and exquisite trim details. From three spacious porches perched over the lush backyard, enjoy stunning Harbor and Town views. Travel back in time and own a piece of Nantucket history with this rare, generational home in a prime Downtown location.

…vs. Contemporary Architecture on Nantucket The ultimate west end escape, Madaket is the perfect location for those who love life on the water. This laid-back area is known for its unforgettable sunsets, pristine beaches and top of the line fishing. Approximately six miles from Town, Madaket offers sandy trails, flowering moors and miles of coastline. There’s no better way to experience life in Madaket than at 39 Tennessee Avenue, the quintessential island getaway. This spectacular six-bedroom property offers sweeping creek and ocean views, seamless indoor and outdoor spaces and a private dock. If you’re a boater or a fisherman you’ll love cruising through Hither Creek, where some of the first stripers of the season can be found, or making your way around Jackson Point towards the Bonito Bar, a must for experienced anglers. If the beach is more your speed, you are just a short distance from Madaket Beach and Smith’s Point, or enjoy a quick boat ride to Tuckernuck Island. This remarkable home has something for everyone. With three floors of living spaces, an expansive yard, a separate studio and a fire pit, this is a unique Nantucket experience that is not easy to replicate.

GINA O’CALLAGHAN

508.332.9149 cam@fishernantucket.com

508.633.4757 gina@fishernantucket.com

N magazine

CAM GAMMILL

(508) 228–4407 21 Main Street, Nantucket, MA 117 #fishernantucket @fishernantucket


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NSPIRE

FISHEYE

LENS WRITTEN BY REBECCA NIMERFROH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

HOW THE ISLAND’S ONLY FULL-TIME, YEAR-ROUND EYE DOCTOR GOT HOOKED ON NANTUCKET

T

wenty years ago, Dr. Mike Ruby was juggling a demanding career as an eye doctor in Boston, when a friend invited him on a weekend

fishing trip on Nantucket. Originally from upstate New York, Ruby had never been to the island and welcomed the trip as a rare respite from the rigors of seeing up to sixty patients a day, six days a week in the city. Catching bluefish off the South Shore that weekend, Dr. Ruby got hooked on Nantucket for life.

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119


The sunny and inviting space has a full optical boutique as well as examination rooms where state-of-the-art technology allows him to treat patients with all levels of nonsurgical eye care. “I would love to make more time for fishing,” says Ruby, who originally intended on having a dual career as an eye doctor and fishing guide on the island, “but in the last eight years I have put everything into the growth of this practice.” He pulls a framed photograph off his credenza. In it, he’s standing over a four-hundred-pound tuna that he fought for hours to bring to the boat. Ruby

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T

120

looks at the photo hree years later, he took a six-

with a grin identical

week leave from his practice to

to the one smeared

work as a fishing mate for Cap-

on his face that day

tain Tom Mleczko. When the fishing season

seventeen years ago.

came to an end, Dr. Ruby still couldn’t cut

“As hard as it is for

ties with the island and began commuting

me to step away from

back and forth to Boston. He got his cap-

the office, there’s no

tain’s license and started treating patients on

question I am a bet-

the island. “I did seven years back and forth

ter doctor when I am

between here and Boston,” he says. “A little

actively creating bal-

fishing, a little eye doctoring…made me real-

ance in my life,” he

ize this community needed an eye doctor.”

says. And for Ruby—balance means fishing.

Today, Dr. Ruby is the island’s only full-

Although he no longer guides charter fish-

time, year-round optometrist. Sitting at his

ing trips, Ruby is part owner of the legend-

airy ACK Eye office on 13 Old South Road,

ary Bill Fisher Tackle, which he purchased

employees buzz around him. “I never ever

along with friends Nat Reeder and brothers

thought I’d be as busy as I am on-island,”

Corey and Cam Gammill in 2005. “Our tag

he says. “I’m a classic example of be care-

line for the first few years was ‘Keeping the

ful what you wish for.” Dr. Ruby moved to

Tradition Alive,”’ says Ruby. “Bill Fisher

Nantucket full-time in 2009 and eventually

Tackle is just one of those historic spots that

purchased this office space, above which he

people come to every summer. There’s some

and his wife Amy live with their dog, Olive.

great emotional history to that business.”

Dr. Ruby spent three years treating patients with aid organizations around the world, including in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala and Nepal (seen below).


“I did seven years back and forth between here and Boston... A little fishing, a little eye doctoring…made me realize this community needed an eye doctor.”

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121


“You don’t need to travel halfway around the world to help, there is need everywhere. As fortunate as we are here, there are still many opportunities for service here at home.”

Dr. Ruby found a way to balance his passion for Nantucket with his passion for helping others.

O

ff the water, Ruby’s true call-

exhausted,” he says, “but you knew without

on Nantucket. “You don’t need to travel

ing has always been caring

question that you contributed that day.” In ad-

halfway around the world to help, there is

for others. Before beginning

dition to his humanitarian eye care, he also

need everywhere,” he says. “As fortunate as

his career in Boston, he traveled around the

taught ophthalmology in Norway, Germany,

we are here, there are still many opportuni-

world for three years with aid organizations,

ties for service here at home.” With his cell

providing humanitarian eye care in places

phone number listed on the office answering

like Nepal, Thailand, El Salvador, Nicaragua,

machine, there’s a country-doctor mentality

Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, Egypt,

to his practice. If he bumps into someone

Greece, Jordan, and Malaysia. “Most of the

experiencing eye trouble at, say, the super

medical trips I was working as one of a team

market, he’ll very often have them follow

of doctors seeing several hundred patients a

him right back to his office down the street.

day,” Ruby says. “We were dispensing thou-

“The emotional feedback is there, and

sands of pairs of donated spectacles, and try-

I never had that in Boston,” he says. “The

ing to filter out the patients that needed higher

positive side of this community is so much

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level medical or surgical care.”

122

Austria, Switzerland, Holland, France, Italy,

bigger than the negative.” And when the

Dr. Ruby recalls doing eye exams by gen-

Israel, Colombia and Singapore. “The list is

time is right, and the tide is running strong,

erator at a makeshift medical tent in the foot-

never as long as I would like it to be,” he says.

Dr. Ruby can still make his way out to sea

hills of the Himalayas, where patients may

Although these days he might not be

where he remembers exactly what brought

have walked a full day to be seen. “At the end

venturing far off the grid, Dr. Ruby gets

him here in the first place. Indeed, Ruby’s

of the day, you were mentally and physically

equal satisfaction out of treating patients

love of fishing is always in eyeshot.


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N magazine

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123


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FURNITURE. DECOR. LIFESTYLE.

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NQUIRY

JOE KENNEDY III INTERVIEW BY BRUCE A. PERCELAY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE

Massachusetts Representative JOE KENNEDY III shares his thoughts on the country, his family and the question everybody keeps asking him

J

oseph P. Kennedy III is the son of former Congressman Joe Kennedy and grandson to the late Robert Kennedy. Grounded, approachable, yet measured, Kennedy lacks the airs one might

expect from the product of arguably America’s most famous political dynasty. Despite his uncanny physical resemblance to his forbearers, Kennedy appears to be his own man, charting his own course. Time will tell where his future will lead, but he is clearly one of the brightest lights in the Democratic party and a person to watch. N Magazine sat down with Kennedy who shared with us

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his thoughts on Washington, his family and the future of the country.

126


N magazine Joe Kennedy III was photographed and interviewed aboard the Valiant, a classic, ninety-seven-foot yacht that offers private charters for corporate outings, weddings and other social events in Boston Harbor and throughout New England.

127


“We’re supposed to disagree. That’s democracy. It’s a messy process. But we’re also supposed to find a way to make that process work.”

Kennedy inside the Valiant’s salon area.

N MAGAZINE: You’re a Hyannis Port guy, but

N MAGAZINE: Given where you’re from and

sive left to the folks in the middle, our

would you ever consider trading-up to

with your family history, one would assume

responsibility is to stand for the values

Nantucket? Kidding aside, what’s your re-

you are liberal, but you also seem very

for which we believe, but also to build

lationship with the island?

pragmatic. Would you define yourself as a

consensus. We’re supposed to disagree.

pure liberal or a hybrid?

That’s democracy. It’s a messy process.

ing to Nantucket ever since I was a little

KENNEDY: I would define myself as a prag-

But we’re also supposed to find a way to

kid. Once a year, we’d go off fishing off

matic progressive. Particularly at these

make that process work.

Sankaty for blues and for striped bass with

times in Congress, I don’t hide the fact

different fishermen from the island. Every

that I obviously have pretty progressive

N MAGAZINE: Is there anything that’s actually

now and again, we’d make day trips over

views, whether that’s on health care,

fun about being in Congress?

KENNEDY:

[Laughs] We’ve been com-

and get sandwiches from Provisions. My family’s roots in Hyannis Port will stay strong, but it’s really nice to be able to escape to the island. It’s a pretty special place.

KENNEDY: The job is an hon-

“It becomes next to impossible for a legislative body to try to keep its eye on the ball of long-term goals when you just get sucked into the vortex of the latest chaos coming out of the White House.”

N magazine

certainly enjoyable. But if you wanted to go have a whole lot of fun, being a member of Congress in Washington these days is probably not the place

N MAGAZINE: Were you always interested in

on immigration, on the economy. And I

I would recommend. The job is hard. The

going into politics?

think those views and policies actually

environment is demanding, and it should

have made our country become a stron-

be. There are serious issues that come

something that I was obviously familiar

ger, more inclusive, fair and better place.

across our desks, like trying to understand

with from a very young age with my dad

I also recognize that some of my closest

the risks of a military intervention in Syria

being in Congress. I was interested in

friends in Congress are Republicans. If I

or how to address the concerns that we’re

it, but it’s certainly not something that I

want to get a bill out of Congress, I need

seeing in Iraq and Afghanistan. How you

thought I’d be doing when I was in my

Republicans not just to sign onto it, but to

solve some economic challenges with the

early thirties when I had come out of the

champion it. Across the spectrum, from

latest crisis coming out of the latest Trump

Peace Corps of all places.

the conservative right to the progres-

tweet. I don’t find necessarily a whole lot of

KENNEDY: I grew up around politics. It was

128

or. There’s times that are


fun in that. Given the challenges we’re up

N MAGAZINE: Is there anything the president

N MAGAZINE: Part of how President Trump

against in the environment that we’re in, if

is doing or that he is done that is positive?

got elected was his ability to sway a

you’re not taking it all that seriously, you’re

KENNEDY: There are undeniably things that

working-class voter base who had voted

missing the point.

are positive. I think the question that I still

Democrat in the past. How do you re-

have with that is at what cost, and does

claim the faith of that voting base mov-

N MAGAZINE: The atmosphere in Washington

this link to a larger strategy? You’ve got

ing forward?

is unlike anything we’ve ever seen. Can you

Kim Jong-un, the dictator of North Korea,

KENNEDY: The biggest issue comes down

synthesize what life is like right now under

that has indicated he’s willing to discuss

to credibility, right? There’s no short-

the Trump regime?

KENNEDY: On the one hand, the daily routine is still the daily routine. On the other hand, it’s undeniably far more chaotic. The reality now is different. In the morning, people take their cell phones and find

“The worst mistake I think Democrats could do at the moment is have some perceived set of a king- or queen-makers— of which there are none…”

out what the president happened to tweet for the day. Oftentimes, those tweets set the daily narrative and the news agenda.

denuclearization. That is undeniably a

cuts here. Democrats have to understand

Even in the best of times, government is a

positive. The question is going to be: At

their constituents and say, “I understand

slow, grind-it-out process. It was not de-

what cost? What’s the ramifications of the

the economic realities and the chal-

signed to move quickly. It was supposed

removal of United States security forces

lenges that we face as a community, as a

to be deliberative. For the most power-

from the Korean Peninsula and potentially

region, as a country. I can give voice to

ful nation in the world, you weren’t sup-

their move of the US nuclear umbrella

those in our state capitals and in Wash-

posed to change policy on a whim. You

from at the very least South Korea? That’s

ington DC.” The constituents need to

were supposed to sit there and push hard

not a cost that I think United States can ac-

believe that when those elected officials

to try to get major policy enacted. It be-

cept. Could it result in a consequence that

go to Washington, those concerns are

comes next to impossible for a legislative

has dramatic ramifications for peace and

going to be heard and that they’re not

body to try to keep its eye on the ball of

prosperity in the region and around the

going bargained away. They’re going to

long-term goals when you just get sucked

world? Yes. And if it does, the president

have a seat at the table.

into the vortex of the latest chaos coming

and the international community will de-

out of the White House.

serve an awful lot of credit for it.

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Kennedy standing on the Valiant’s extended bow.

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“I don’t share the same anxiety at this point that there’s no clear front runner for the Democratic nomination. There shouldn’t be... We’ve got a long way to go...”

N MAGAZINE: You’ve been very deliberate about your career and have been paying your dues. Then all of a sudden you were thrust in the national limelight by getting tapped to give the response to the State of the Union address this year. Explain that experience.

KENNEDY: All of that came as a surprise to me. I immediately said yes but also immediately swallowed a bit hard because I recognized that it is a difficult speech to give. The speech is a difficult forum. You’re never going to match the environment of the House Chamber with the House, the Senate, the Supreme Court, the diplomatic corps and all that. Rather than give a speech from an office in Washington, we were able to do it at a regional vocational school in Massachusetts. It’s been surprising to see the speech seems to have resonated, after you can get over my overly zealous Chapstick application. [Laughs] In my defense, it was winter, and it was

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cold, but no one seems to care.

130


N MAGAZINE: You’ve said that you

don’t read any of them. I keep that away.

are not interested in the presi-

Because without question, as balanced as

dency, but have you felt pres-

the writers or producers might be, undoubt-

sured in that direction?

edly they’re going to focus on the histori-

KENNEDY: No. I mean, not re-

cal aspect of some of my family members.

ally. I’m so honored that people

They don’t focus on the parts that matter

would even throw my name out

most to me. They focus on the Kennedy

there for consideration. But it’s

part and not on the family part. What were

not on my horizon, not on my agenda, not in my plan.

N MAGAZINE: Are you tired of being Photo by Fred Clow

asked that question?

KENNEDY: It’s not tiring. I’m hon-

“I’m in this bizarre job that the moment you have it everybody wants to know when you’re trying to find another one.”

N MAGAZINE: The big question within the

ored that people think there’s opportunities

Democratic Party is who’s going to take up

out there for me. I’m in this bizarre job that

the torch for this next presidential election.

the moment you have it everybody wants to

Are there conversations happening behind

know when you’re trying to find another one.

they like as a mom and a dad, as a brother

closed doors about this?

More than anything else, I just don’t feel that

and a sister, as a husband, a daughter? That

KENNEDY: No, and there shouldn’t be. The

pressure and that rush. I’ve got an incredible

matters most to me—the family part.

worst mistake I think Democrats could

and really young family. I spend a lot of time

Yes, I’m very proud of the contribu-

do at the moment is have some perceived

away from them as it is. The job itself is de-

tion my family has made. Yes, I hold dear

set of a king- or queen-makers—of which

manding already, so I don’t feel the need to

that they were able to make a contribution to the country in

there are none—and say these are going to be

Photo by Sarah Grayson

the course of our

the five people who we

history. But none

want for whatever posi-

of those television

tion. If you believe that

specials ever focus

the greatest challenge

on who they are

you’ve got is credibil-

as people. We’re a

ity, then the way you

family like every-

get that is you earn it,

one else. And like

right? That’s not some-

every other family

thing that any set of

out there, we’ve

policy makers can be-

had our successes,

stow. That’s something

and we’ve had our

that somebody’s going

challenges. For us,

to have to go out there, rolling up their

find something else to do at the moment. If

the successes and the challenges end up be-

sleeves and proving that they can un-

other opportunities come up, I will evaluate

coming more well known, but it doesn’t take

derstand the communities they seek to

them as they do and try to see if it’s the right

away from the fact that we are a family—and

represent and actually bring the country

fit for my family and me at that moment. But

that’s the part I focus on.

together. I don’t share the same anxiety

I’m not in a rush.

at this point that there’s no clear front

N MAGAZINE: Your family history has

There shouldn’t be. This is something

been the subject of so many films

that’s going take place over the course

and books. What role does that pub-

of the next nearly three years. We’ve

lic fascination play in your daily life

got a long way to go, but there’s time.

and in your political life?

Candidates out there need some time

KENNEDY: There’s been a lot written

to prove that they can do it. If there’s

and said about my family. A lot of

nobody two-and-a-half years from now,

specials, a lot of movies. I essen-

then, yeah, I’ll be worried.

tially don’t watch any of them. I

N magazine

runner for the Democratic nomination.

131


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135


NQUIRY

ROCKET

MAN INTERVIEW BY BRUCE A. PERCELAY

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF NASA & DREW FEUSTEL

An out-of-this-world interview with NASA astronaut DREW FEUSTEL

Drew Feustel is currently orbiting the earth as a part of a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Best known for fixing the Hubble telescope nine years ago, Feustel is chief mechanic on this mission. His work is both incredibly complex and potentially hazardous to his health. Astronauts are bombarded with high levels of radiation over long periods of time, often suffer from vision changes resulting from the effect of weightlessness on the retina, and experience significant risk during takeoff, re-entry and space walks. Despite these perils, Feustel considers his work an enormous opportunity and joins an elite club of those who explore space. When he’s not in space, Feustel also loves being on Nantucket. He and his wife Indi were married on the island and have been frequent visitors ever since. They will be returning to the island for some rest and relaxation at some point after Feustel returns to Earth. But until then,

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Feustel provided N Magazine with its first Earth to space interview.

136


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137


N MAGAZINE: You took off on March 21, 2018. Can you describe the physical sensation as you took off from the launch pad?

FEUSTEL: We launched from the Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a Russian Soyuz rocket. Same launch pad used when Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, blasted off in 1961. The sensation is incredible and also unnerving. You realize you have left the planet in a hurry and you hope the spacecraft knows the direction to space. There is considerable pressure on your chest and you can feel your face stretching a bit as you try to keep your mouth from hanging open from the g-loads. After several minutes of these launch forces, our breathing becomes labored. The entire process lasts just about nine minutes from blast off to floating in space. By the time we reach orbit we are traveling about 17,500 mph.

N MAGAZINE: How difficult is the docking process with the space station? FEUSTEL: Docking is a complex process, and we are trained to perform that task by hand if we experience any system problems. Fortunately, the spacecraft has the capability to dock automatically, as it did for our mission. So our only role is to closely monitor the systems and be ready for any off-nominal situations that may require manual overrides in order to complete the process. We rely on relative navigation (knowledge of position) between the two docking spacecraft (ISS and the capsule) to allow for perfect alignment for rendezvous and docking.

N magazine

“Next to launch and re-entry, space walks are the highest risk activity that we do while on orbit.�

138


N MAGAZINE: Is the launch or the re-

ever have serious political discus-

FEUSTEL: We do try to stay in touch

entry the most dangerous part of this

sions with them, or is this a source

though our media coverage is typi-

mission? Or is there another aspect

of amusement?

cally a few days delayed from what

that presents high risks?

FEUSTEL: In general we keep it pretty

is actually happening. For more seri-

FEUSTEL: Really any aspect of space

light when it comes to politics. We

ous events we receive emails and can

travel carries risk. I would say that

all recognize the political chal-

place phone calls to get up to date

reentry probably carries the greatest

lenges of the world theater, but up

information. At times, it is nice to be

risk because we do not really have a

here, those things are not important

a bit disconnected from some of the

second chance when it comes to at-

to us. What is important is that we

tragedies that unfold every day down

mospheric reentry. We only get one

work well together and take care of

on our home planet.

“There is so much to see on the planet that you never tire of looking at it. It truly is a beautiful sight to see from 250 miles overhead.” shot at targeting our landing site.

one another. Each of us relies on

N MAGAZINE:

That is not to say that we don’t have

the other to save our lives in the

tasks to perform during the day, but does

any downmode options. We always

event of an emergency every single

boredom ever set in or claustrophobia?

try to ensure that a backup system is

minute of every day in space.

FEUSTEL: Claustrophobia no. Boredom

I’m sure you have many

not really. There is so much to see on

in place in the event of any failures. Next to launch and reentry, space

N MAGAZINE: As you may be aware,

the planet that you never tire of looking

walks are the highest-risk activity

the news is pretty wild on earth,

at it. It truly is a beautiful sight to see

that we do while on orbit.

do you stay in touch with what is

from 250 miles overhead. When we are

happening here, and do you some-

not taking pictures of the Earth, we can

N MAGAZINE: You are onboard with a

how feel relieved that you are up

keep ourselves busy with email, phone

group of Russian cosmonauts, do you

in space?

calls, movies, and music.

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139


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“I find it amazing that humans have developed the capability to live off of our planet so effectively and efficiently. Granted we are reliant on Earth for our survival, this space station is really a marvel of human ingenuity.”

140

N MAGAZINE: Given how small the space is in which

N MAGAZINE: What is the most awe-inspiring aspect of

you are living, getting along with everyone else is

this voyage?

key, are there ever moments of tension among you?

FEUSTEL: Living in space. My previous trips were short,

FEUSTEL: Sometimes, but those are short lived. We

two-week visits. This is really living, and I find it

have a great crew right now, and we all enjoy each

amazing that humans have developed the capability

other’s company. Maybe not all the time, but that

to live off of our planet so effectively and efficiently.

is just part of living with other human beings,

Granted we are reliant on Earth for our survival, this

that’s life.

space station is really a marvel of human ingenuity.


“I also really miss just being on Earth. Up here the weather inside the ISS is always the same. No wind, no rain, no sunshine, you miss those things.”

N MAGAZINE: What is the most difficult part of this mission either physically or emotionally?

FEUSTEL: Separation from family. Watching them roll underneath at three hundred miles per minute. Recognizing the uniqueness of the opportunity helps to fix your mind on the task at hand but it is challenging to know you are away from so many things for so long. I also really miss just being on Earth. Up here the weather inside the ISS is always the same. No wind, no rain, no sunshine, you miss those things. Physically I think the most challenging part of space exploration is the space walking. Those events are grueling and are always totally exhausting to perform.

N MAGAZINE: Who are some of the most famous people you have spoken to while you are up in space?

FEUSTEL: Well, I’ve spoken to President Obama and also recently to Vice President Pence. Those gentlemen are somewhat famous.

N MAGAZINE: Last, are you able to see NanPhoto of Nantucket taken from Feustel from space.

*Go to N-Magazine.com to hear an exclusive voice message sent to publisher Bruce A. Percelay from Drew Feustel from space.

tucket out your window, and could you describe to us what it looks like?

FEUSTEL: We can easily see Nantucket from space. It looks like a great place to visit! A nice little slice of heaven off the eastern coast.


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143


SUMMER

LOVIN’

The Boston Globe’s Love Letters advice columnist MEREDITH GOLDSTEIN answers love and relationship questions before appearing at the Dreamland on July 19th

A

decade ago, Meredith Goldstein pitched her editors at The Boston Globe about writing a local advice column that would focus on love and romantic

relationships in the city. Love Letters debuted on the Globe’s website and quickly drew a devoted flock of readers who shared their own pieces of advice to the questions that came in to Goldstein. Today, Love Letters is one of the most widely read columns in the Globe and has recently given way to a wildly popular podcast. This spring, Goldstein reflected on her career as an advice columnist in her memoir, Can’t Help Myself. On July 19th, she will appear on Nantucket as part of the Dreamland Theater’s Page-to-Stage series to talk about her journey and to answer whatever

N magazine

questions your heart desires.

144


NQUIRY

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145


N MAGAZINE: You’ve spent time on Nantucket.

GOLDSTEIN: One of my favorite letters was

about each other. So many couples tell

What do you think are some of the pitfalls

from a woman who got physically intimate

me that they read the letter together, and

of dating on an island?

with a guy at his apartment and was upset

then come up with an answer as a team.

GOLDSTEIN: Once, when visiting Nantucket, I

that he didn’t call her an Uber so she could

It’s a fun game, to see whether their ad-

ran into the same person three times. Hav-

get home that night. She called her own

vice matches mine. In the end, they’re

ing an ex on an island—or a one-night

Uber, but she felt that if he had been chiv-

learning about their partners and prac-

stand on an island—must be an interest-

alrous, he would have called the car on her

ticing empathy, which I love.

ing challenge. I suppose you just have to know that no matter who you pursue, things might get awkward—unless you’ve already booked your ticket to the mainland. I imagine that dating as a weekend tourist on the island is a lot of fun.

N MAGAZINE: What’s one of the wildest ques-

“People still expect their significant others to read their minds. Sometimes I want to say to a letter writer, “How about we just send this letter to your partner?” So much can be accomplished by a good, honest conversation.”

tions you’ve received through your Love Letters column? behalf. For me, it suggested that there were

N MAGAZINE: What are some of the best rem-

new codes of conduct for dating, based on

edies you’ve come across in nursing a

technology. And I loved that so many com-

broken heart?

menters on the column said, “Hey, lady, call

GOLDSTEIN: Music. I think music cures

your own car.”

so much. And television. I always recommend a watch (or re-watch) of Buffy

N MAGAZINE: What prepared you to answer

the Vampire Slayer. And taco salad. With

people’s relationship questions?

guacamole.

GOLDSTEIN: I grew up with a single mom

who was dating in the suburbs and an

N MAGAZINE: What are three of the most pro-

older sister who was very confident when

ductive things you can do when dealing

it came to putting herself out there. Lis-

with a breakup and moving on?

tening to them—and counseling them on

GOLDSTEIN:

their dating woes—taught me so much

a great time to take a class, find a new

about what it means to advise and support

workout routine, or start anything you’ve

without too much judgment. They trained

been putting off for a long time. Two: See

me well.

friends. Call people and tell them you

One: Projects are good. It’s

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need company. There’s nothing wrong

146

N MAGAZINE: Is it true that most of your read-

with connecting with people you may

ers are married or in relationships? If so,

have ignored while in the relationship.

what’s behind people’s fascination with

Three: It is a loss, so give yourself time to

single life?

grieve. Sadness is OK. Some people want

GOLDSTEIN: Most Love Letters readers are

to outrun the pain, but the only way be-

in relationships (based on past surveys).

yond it is through it.

I think they’re interested in the column

because one, so many letters come from

N MAGAZINE: What’s one mistake you think is

couples who are mid-relationship, and

most common in relationships?

two, because in reading and talking

GOLDSTEIN: People still expect their signifi-

about the problems, they learn more

cant others to read their minds. Some-


times I want to say to a letter writer, “How

able to admit to readers that I wasn’t al-

about we just send this letter to your partner?”

ways following my own advice. It was also

So much can be accomplished by a good,

time to tell them how the advice column

honest conversation. N MAGAZINE: What are two ways of keeping a relationship exciting and fulfilling?

GOLDSTEIN: Spending free time alone is nice. If the only time you’ve spent with a partner is exhausted at home or running errands, it’s no good. At the very least, take a walk when you can. I also like the idea of sharing media, reading the same book or bonding over the same TV show. I love watching couples get animated when they tell me how they watch “Game of Thrones” or “The Crown” together. It’s a nice bonding thing.

helped my family. My mom and I would

N MAGAZINE: Are men and women really from

read their letters and comments in the hos-

different planets?

pital. We learned so much from everyone

GOLDSTEIN: No. We’re all from Earth. It’s on us

who contributed to Love Letters during

Earthlings to communicate well and to treat the

those years, and I’ve always been grateful.

people we love with respect.

Now they know.

“I love that online dating is no longer some embarrassing thing. Websites and apps make it so much easier to meet people, and that’s great.”

Meredith Goldstein will appear at the Dreamland

N MAGAZINE: What’s your take on dating apps, and

N MAGAZINE: You’ve recently launched Love Let-

Theater on July 19th

how do you think the search for love has changed

ters into the airwaves in what’s becoming a

as part of the

in the digital age?

wildly popular podcast. How has the medium

Page-to-Stage

GOLDSTEIN: I love that online dating is no longer

changed the way you give advice, if at all?

some embarrassing thing. Websites and apps

GOLDSTEIN:

make it so much easier to meet people, and that’s

voices, and to laugh and cry with them—in per-

visit Nantucket-

great. I do think those apps have made people

son. I also love the traditional letters, of course,

Dreamland.org.

lazier in person. I challenge all single people to

but to sit next to someone as they tell me their

look up from their phones and say hi.

relationship story? It’s an honor, and it’s so cool.

I love being able to hear people’s

series. For more information,

N MAGAZINE: Do you ever get tired of answering

you share your own personal relationships and

relationship questions?

experiences, including the loss of your mother.

GOLDSTEIN: No. And luckily people keep dating,

Was that process cathartic or unnerving?

falling in love and breaking up. It’s a pretty

GOLDSTEIN: Mostly cathartic. It was lovely to be

consistent business to be in.

N magazine

N MAGAZINE: In your latest book Can’t Help Myself,

147


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NDEPTH

150


FOUNTAIN

YOUTH WRITTEN BY DR. ROCCO MONTO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE

HOW NANTUCKET COTTAGE HOSPITAL’S DR. ROCCO MONTO DISCOVERED THAT SIXTY CAN BE THE NEW THIRTY

I

am afraid of dying. It’s not the end that concerns me, it’s what hap-

pens before. You see, getting older is a relatively new thing, and we really aren’t that good at it. To be sure, modern medicine has done a great job helping us all live longer. Clean water, antibiotics and modern surgery have postponed the ultimate checkout time for most of us. The problem is that while lifespan has increased, our healthspan hasn’t kept pace.

Our parents, who worked their whole lives for a retirement they thought would be filled with joy and fulfillment, wither away while their frail bodies and minds disintegrate. They linger on while heart disease, hypertension, strokes, renal disease, diabetes, dementia and depression are more common than ever. Aging has become a disease. But it doesn’t have to be like this. We can turn the tide. N magazine

How do I know? Because I’ve done it.

151


W

e all reach tipping points in

neck and arm pain, I became alarmed. In

I unbuttoned my shirt and laid down on

life. Mine came at the hands of

true doctor fashion, I called my insurance

my crinkling table paper while this big,

a surly, meaty-handed male nurse. Wait. I

agent to check on my disability coverage

sweaty, male nurse did an EKG on me.

probably should explain. A few years ago,

rather than see a physician. My agent lives

He casually asked me how tall I was. Five

I thought I was doing great—I had a busy

in Philadelphia, and I hadn’t seen him in

feet, ten inches, I told him. He raised an

surgery practice, two

eyebrow and asked

freshly minted children

how much I weighed.

and a beautiful wife. But there were cracks in my foundation. I was having

N magazine

trouble keeping up with

152

“Aging has become a disease. But it doesn’t have to be like this. We can turn the tide. How do I know? Because I’ve done it.”

I told him what I always said when checking in to Cape Air: 185 pounds. He laughed

work, my energy was

and told me that may

low, my joints ached and

have been what I used

my wife was getting tired of my constant

twenty years. He thought I needed more

complaining. I felt terrible, but I blamed

disability insurance (of course) after a

everybody else for my condition. I never

routine checkup.

thought that I was the architect behind everything. When I started having some weird

to weigh. I persisted. No, I’m 185; I’m what I’ve always been. He tipped his smudged

A few days later, a nurse from the

glasses down his nose and challenged me

insurance company made landfall and

to use my scale or his. I shrewdly chose

came by the office to do a physical exam.

the home-field advantage scale. Two hun-


dred ten pounds. Shocked, I think I must have

Rock? When did you get old and fat?

jiggled a little as I slowly sat down. I guess my

Look, I’ve been an athlete all my life, and

wife wasn’t shrinking my pants in the dryer. The

I’m a surgeon. Vain, self-centered and more than

nurse, who was easily twice my jumbo size, drew

a little egotistical. No argument there. Old and fat,

some blood from my fluffy veins and packed up

however, was not acceptable. So, I started doing

his gear. You’ll be hearing from us, he said as he

everything I had always been taught in medicine

left. Great.

about living healthy. I went on a low fat, high pro-

My insurance guy called me a couple of days

tein diet, started playing a little soccer and cut out

later. He wanted to know what the hell had hap-

the snacks. I even ate apples. Apples! Six weeks

pened to me. He asked me when I got old and

later, still feeling cruddy, but a little leaner, I got

fat. Nice. Then he tried to make me feel better

on the scale for my triumphant exoneration. The

and told me that he might be able to get me some

scale spun like a roulette wheel. 208. I rubbed my

insurance but that it was going to cost me. I had

chubby little eyes as I double-checked the number.

already stopped listening. What happened to you,

Two hundred eight. Really? My wife, who is ridiculously fit, told me I was doing everything wrong. Shocking. I started over, researching everything on diet, exercise, vitamins and supplements that I could get my hands on. I worked out every day. I ate less and slept more. I even started taking a few targeted supplements. Good things started happening fast. The weight started coming off. After two weeks, I lost eight pounds. By one month, I had lost fifteen. By six months, I was down to 180 pounds and felt energized. I even gave my wife permission to start throwing my pants in the dryer again. I had the proof of concept I needed and put it in a book. The Fountain is the result of years spent canvassing the world and curating the finest scientific research on aging. It’s like an owner’s manual for your body. Our DNA is constantly changing as it reacts and adapts to environment and chemical stress. This remarkable effervescence is reflected in the proteins we make and determines how we age. deep within our cells. They have their own DNA, consume most of the oxygen we breathe and produce all our energy. Like tiny hydroelectric plants,

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Mysterious symbiotes called mitochondria live

153


“Heart disease is driven by obesity and inflammation. Is sugar lethal? Nope. Overeating is going to kill you, not glucose.”

they use nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide (NAD+) mole-

Salt is misunderstood. It

cules as rechargeable battery packs. Every time our cells divide

does not cause high blood pres-

our DNA unzips to be copied. This chaotic process leads to

sure. Avoid loading up your diet

thousands of coding errors. Repairing these mistakes is an

with salt, because high levels can

expensive endeavor that drains our limited NAD+ energy

still hurt you by thinning bones or

reservoirs. This crisis of energy and error is compounded

inciting cancer. Think protein is

by the need to recycle damaged cells and proteins. It is why

awesome? Think again. Protein

we age.

itself is not evil, but most Ameri-

Fasting is one popular way to ramp up metabolism. The

cans eat twice the optimal daily

problem is you get hungry. Really hungry. Time-restricted

amount. High protein diets do

feeding, eating all your meals in less than twelve hours, is a

very bad things. They can damage your kidneys and spike your levels of insulin growth factor, like catnip for cancer. What about a plantbased diet? Vegans reap tangible health benefits beyond identity and politics, but also battle iron deficiency and anemia. There is no diet, pill, or procedure that is as powerful as exercise. It improves brain function and replenishes energy reserves. Exercise of all types alters the shape of your chromosomes and helps them behave years younger. It is also sweaty and difficult. A drier route to longevity is a strong sense of purpose. Never retire. Ever. Our minds have evolved to crave the stimulation and creativity of emotional connections. The Fountain is a story of a relationship—the most profound and

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complex relationship of all, the dia-

154

more practical way to get the same metabolic benefits. Do

logue between your body and the

saturated fats cause high cholesterol and high cholesterol

environment. Like all affairs, it is

causes heart disease? Nonsense. Heart disease is driven by

defined by choices and sacrifice.

obesity and inflammation. Is sugar lethal? Nope. Overeating

The time has come for all of us to

is going to kill you, not glucose. Most extra sugar is bur-

recalibrate our approach to health

rowed deep within processed food, waiting for a chance to

and write our own stories. Will it be

punch an express ticket straight to your bliss point.

easy? No, but it will be worth it.

Raymond Rocco Monto, MD, is an award-winning orthopedic surgeon & sports medicine specialist, keynote speaker and author of The Fountain:  A Doctor’s Prescription to Make to Make 60 the New 30, which is available now at Mitchell’s Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks.


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LACROSSE GLOBE WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PORTRAITS BY KIT NOBLE

NANTUCKET’S JAMAICAN LACROSSE PLAYERS STEP ONTO THE WORLD STAGE THIS SUMMER. This July, the first-ever Jamaican national lacrosse team will compete in the World Championships held in Israel. While the team is made up primarily of players from around the United States with Jamaican heritage, six of the athletes actually started their lacrosse careers playing for the Nantucket Whalers. In fact, one of the six players is widely regarded as

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the greatest Jamaican lacrosse player to have ever touched the field.

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NDEPTH

N magazine Mark Dwyer learned to play lacrosse on Nantucket and now hopes to play on the world stage for his native Jamaica.

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H

akeem Lecky was born and raised in Jamaica until the age of eight when his mother moved him to Nantucket. He’d never heard of

lacrosse and played football and basketball for the Whalers. Running back punts for touchdowns, Lecky’s astounding athleticism caught the attention of Nantucket high school’s lacrosse coach, Kevin Martin. That spring, Coach Martin put a lacrosse stick in Lecky’s hands. In his very first game, he scored four goals and racked up a handful of assists. So it was that a lacrosse prodigy was born. But as his fledgling lacrosse career was taking off, Lecky’s home life hit some rough patches. His mother left the island, leaving him to live with one of his high school friends. When that friend’s family decided to move back to their native Brazil, Lecky’s life was hurled back in limbo. That’s when Coach Kevin Martin, then only twenty-five years old, decided to take Lecky in and beBorn in Jamaica and raised on Nantucket, Hakeem Lecky (seen above and far left) played for Syracuse University, where he earned a masters before playing professionally for the Long Island Lizards. He was instrumental in bringing together the Jamaican national team headed to Israel this month.

come his legal guardian.

Eating, sleeping and breathing

lacrosse, Hakeem Lecky became one of the most dominating high school players in the country. He received a full scholarship to

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Syracuse University—arguably the top la-

160

line to his list of conquests.

crosse school in the world. There he became

“Words can’t really describe the feeling I get when I think about repre-

an All-American and one of the only play-

senting my country—it sends chills down my spine,” says Lecky, who now

ers to ever serve as a two-time captain of the

works in commercial real estate in Manhattan. “It’s the first year that Jamaican

Syracuse Orange. After earning his master’s

lacrosse will be in the world games. The fact that we have the opportunity to

at Syracuse, Lecky went on to play profes-

represent our country is pretty special.”

sional lacrosse for the Long Island Lizards.

Two of the five players joining Lecky from Nantucket are Mark

Now this summer he’s looking to add another

Dwyer and Delroy Lawrence, who both still live and work on the island.


“WORDS CAN’T REALLY DESCRIBE THE FEELING I GET WHEN I THINK ABOUT REPRESENTING MY COUNTRY— IT SENDS CHILLS DOWN MY SPINE.” — Hakeem Lecky

(Top) Delroy Lawrence and Mark Dwyer practicing on Nantucket. (Bottom) Matthew Meritt playing for District Colombia Firebirds.

Both played at elite collegiate lacrosse programs after high school and are now relishing in the opportunity to get back on the field and represent their native Jamaica. “I think this team coming together is opening the opportunities for Jamaicans to learn from the creators of the game,” says thirty-year-old Mark Dwyer, who helps coach youth lacrosse on the island. “It’s adding another sporting outlet for Jamaica to compete worldwide, which will help spread the culture and also continue to grow the game.”

Rounding out Jamaica’s squad from Nantucket is Bryan Depass, a twenty-two-old midfielder who currently plays for

Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina as well as Matthew Marrett, a thirty-year-old who was the captain of the University of the District of Columbia Firebirds and today coaches at MadLax Sports in Washington D.C. “Lacrosse has given me so many opportunities to better myself,” Marrett says. “Lacrosse has given me the opportunity to go to college, receive my degree, play the sport that I love, meet amazing people along the way, and has given me a chance to play with the Jamaican National Lacrosse team…I feel grateful to even play this sport.” Appropriately enough, this Nantucket contingent will be led on to the world stage by the man who first put a lacrosse stick in their hands—Coach Kevin Martin. “It’s not like some ragtag group,” says Martin, who now lives in the Florida Keys where he runs an elite club lacrosse program called Sweet Lax. “There are some great players on the team. They have an All-American from guy who played at Michigan. So it’s a pretty good team, if they come together.”

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the University of Maryland, a guy who played at Ohio State and a

161


A

lthough he doesn’t say as much, Martin must be most excited to see his Nantucket players take the field. Back when he started coaching them, no one believed these Jamaican

players would pick up the sport and run with it as they have. No one, except Kevin Martin, of course. “When I gave a stick to Mark, Delroy, Hakeem, Matthew, and some of the other African American kids that weren’t Jamaican, the big thing people were saying to them was ‘black guys don’t play lacrosse,’” remembers the coach. “They told them, ‘You’ll never make it playing lacrosse. You have no future in lacrosse…’ Now, we’re getting the last laugh.”

Beginning on July 11th, the Jamaican La-

crosse Team will arrive in Netanya, Israel along with forty-eight other teams from around the world. Their first game is against the host nation on July 12th. “If Canada doesn’t go, Jamaica should be in a fight for

“I THINK THIS TEAM COMING TOGETHER IS OPENING THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR JAMAICANS TO LEARN FROM THE CREATORS OF THE GAME.” — Mark Dwyer

a medal,” says Coach Martin, who will lead the team alongside head coach Errol Wilson and associate head coach Dale Walker. “If Canada goes, it will be them, USA, and Iroquois Nation as the top three medalist, then probably England, Israel and hopefully Jamaica battling for fourth. If one of those big guys doesn’t go, they’ll battle for the bronze, for sure.”

Beyond this year’s World Lacrosse Champi-

onships, some lacrosse writers are looking to the 2028 Summer Games in Los Angeles as setting up to be the debut of the sport in the Olympics. As the game continues to grow in Jamaica, chances are good that they’ll have an especially strong squad to wave the black, green and gold. “What makes me most happy is seeing the game of lacrosse spread across Jamaica,” says Hakeem Lecky. “My personal goal, beyond obviously representing team Jamaica the best that I can, is to see another

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Hakeem Lecky come out of Jamaica and represent them-

162

selves even better than I did at a top division one lacrosse school. Something like that is pretty powerful.”


“LACROSSE HAS GIVEN ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO GO TO COLLEGE, RECEIVE MY DEGREE, PLAY THE SPORT THAT I LOVE, MEET AMAZING PEOPLE ALONG THE WAY, AND HAS GIVEN ME A CHANCE TO PLAY WITH THE JAMAICAN NATIONAL LACROSSE TEAM…I FEEL GRATEFUL TO EVEN PLAY THIS SPORT.” — Matthew Marrett

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Long-stick defender Delroy Lawrence lives on Nantucket.

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Dream On WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE

N magazine

Marking its ten year anniversary this July, the (new) Dreamland continues to offer much more than meets the eye

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NDEPTH

I

n the not so distant past, Nantucket’s youngest residents only knew The Dreamland as a shuttered, spooky building downtown that had played movies once upon a time. The family business,

which once thrived at its South Water Street location, struggled in the 1990s and eventually closed. The property had survived for more than one hundred years in various locations around downtown as a meeting house, a church, a roller skating rink, a hotel and more. By the early 2000s, the theater seemed destined to become yet another restaurant or high-priced condominium. But then, a group of civic-minded, well-heeled summer residents decided they wanted to prevent that from happening. They formed a nonprofit dedicated to rebuilding the Dreamland and making it the cultural arts cornerstone that it is today. On Sunday, July 22nd, The Dreamland will host a 10th anniversary celebration of this new chapter in

paign, The Dreamland recently received an extraordinary

the theater’s history. It was a decade ago that the 501c3

gift that will match any donation contributed this summer

nonprofit entity was formed, plans for construction be-

dollar for dollar up to $250,000.

gan, and the new Dreamland was born. The “Dream

“The Dreamland is finally becoming one of those special anchor institutions on Nantucket, bringing people of all ages and backgrounds to

together

share

dreams,

their visions,

and passions,” said Wendy

Schmidt,

founder of ReMain Nantucket and The Dreamland’s president emeritus. Today, the Dreamland is open 364 days a year and operates at a fevered pace. Each year, the theater

“THE DREAMLAND IS FINALLY BECOMING ONE OF THOSE SPECIAL ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS ON NANTUCKET, BRINGING PEOPLE OF ALL AGES AND BACKGROUNDS TOGETHER TO SHARE THEIR DREAMS, VISIONS, AND PASSIONS.”

screens more than 1,400 first run and independent films, more than thirty comedy shows, and a variety of concerts including well known acts like the Weight

— Wendy Schmidt, founder of REMAIN Nantucket and The Dreamland’s president emeritus

Band. The Dreamland also hosts a variety of dance performances, live broadcasts, and author events featuring some of the most compelling writers and journalists alive today, including Lesley Stahl of 60 Minutes, Chris Matthews of MSNBC, and CNN’s David Grego-

power, live music and dancing. The event will kick off

ry, who also serves on the theater’s board of directors. Last

The Dreamland’s plan to raise a fund that will secure

year, the Dreamland even got a call from Vice President Joe

the future of the organization. To help begin this cam-

Biden who wanted to present his latest book from its stage.

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Believers” celebration will offer an evening full of star

167


“M

y original expectation for The Dreamland was to

Under the leadership of the Dreamland’s executive director

sell movies and be open year-round. Really every-

Joe Hale, the Dreamland’s programming has expanded far beyond

thing else that has happened since then has been

the original scope and in turn produced the income and fundraising

gravy and icing on the cake,” says Kathy Penske,

required to keep the organization alive and open to the Nantucket

one of the Dreamland founding board members and current sec-

community 364 days a year. “When I had the opportunity to get

retary of the board. “I’m especially thrilled that the full-time

involved and help establish the Dreamland as a cultural hub on

community has em-

Nantucket, I jumped at

braced

the chance,” says Hale,

everything is

now a year-round resi-

doing. It’s so much

dent of the island with

more than I origi-

his wife Linda. “These

nally thought it was

last couple of years

going to be. All the

have been an incredibly

programs, everything

rewarding

they are doing, it’s all

The senior team that we

brilliant and it’s only

are fortunate to have as-

going to get better.”

sembled all deeply care

the

Dreamland

challenge.

But all this was

about the Dreamland

built over time. In its

and what it means to

early years, the Dream-

our community.”

land struggled to stay in the black financially. For the same reasons

This past winter, using grant monies awarded by the state,

that the old Dreamland closed two decades ago, diminishing returns

generous anonymous donors, and a small surplus in the budget,

from first run movies in the age of the Internet and a theatre program

Hale’s team renovated the facility’s second floor studio theater,

that, while providing an immense amount of education and value to

adding all new, comfortable seating as well as improvements to the

island youth and the local theatre scene, operated at a loss.

sound system. Most recently, they converted the building’s beauti-

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Vice President Joe Biden participated in the Dreamland’s Page to Stage series last November in a special program held at Nantucket High School.

168


The Dreamland’s executive director Joe Hale.

ful Harborview Room overlooking Nantucket’s waterfront to a third screening room, which will allow a much wider variety of film presentations moving forward. “We are non-stop all summer long,” says Hale, “but the Dreamland has also become a winter refuge for the year-round community offering not only movies, but unique, native programming.” Ten years since the formation of the Dreamland nonprofit, the board has grown from less than ten members to more than twenty-five, half of whom

“WE ALL THINK THE FUTURE LOOKS PRETTY BRIGHT HERE ON NANTUCKET. AND I FOR ONE AM JUST SO GRATEFUL AND GLAD THE DREAMLAND GETS TO PLAY A ROLE IN THAT.”

work on Nantucket and call the island home year-round. Now local restaurant owners, bankers, teachers and hoteliers have joined the original “Dream Believers” in furthering the Dreamland’s mission as the cultural heart of the community. “We all think the future looks pretty bright here on Nantucket,” says Joe Hale. “And I for one am just so grateful and glad the Dreamland gets to play a role in that.”

— Joe Hale, Dreamland executive director

N magazine

Dreamland director of education Laura Gallagher Byrne (top) and board members Annie Bissinger and Orla Murphy Lascola represent the next generation of “Dream Believers.”

169


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NVOGUE

SUITE STYLE

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SUMMER FASHION TAKES A STAYCATION AT THE HARBORVIEW NANTUCKET

Photography by Brian Sager Production by Emme Duncan Assisted by Leise Trueblood Styling by Sarah Fraunfelder Hair & Makeup by Emily Denny of Emily Nantucket 172 Location Harborview Nantucket


ON HER DRESS: PERCH EARRINGS: MILLY & GRACE SHOES: NANTUCKET SOLE SUNGLASSES: ACK EYE BRACELET: JEWEL IN THE SEA ON HIM SHIRT: FAHERTY SHORTS: GREY SALT SUNGLASSES: ACK EYE WATCH: JEWEL IN THE SEA

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ON HIM SHIRT & PANTS: THE SKINNY DIP BRACELET: JEWEL IN THE SEA TOWEL: NANTUCKET LOOMS LOCATION: CROW’S NEST


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ON HER BATHING SUIT: THE SKINNY DIP BRACELETS & RING: JEWEL IN THE SEA EARRINGS: MILLY & GRACE LOCATION: MAIN SAIL


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183


The way Maine weddings should be. Charming and frugal or lavish and elegant, the newly reimagined Whitehall is your Coastal Maine setting for modern, BRIDE AND GROUP PHOTOS BY LEAH FISHER PHOTOGRAPHY

outside-of-the-box events. Plan your intimate wedding ceremony, reception or rehearsal dinner—or ask about booking the entire inn, and enjoy the best of Midcoast Maine all weekend long.

N magazine

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184


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N magazine

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Wine Festival Harbor Gala

FOGGYSHEET nantucket

ADAM SODOVSKY & DEREK THAMES

ALAN VIADER & IAN DOOLEY

MARY WALSH & ALLAN LAFRANCE

BOB FORMAN & JAY HARMON

CAROLYN, CC & MADDIE

CHARLES & DIANA KARREN

CHEF PEDRO OF NANTUCKET HOTEL, KATIA DEL RIO & CHEF GURMINDER GIDDA

CHRIS DONELAN, JOHN & JOAN GOODMAN

DANIEL HARPER & EMILY FOLEY

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AARON SHOCKET & JOHN DERZON

186


DAVID HANDY, SANTI SCHEURELL, EMME DUNCAN, TIM EHRENBERG & DONALD DALLAIRE

ELIN HILDERBRAND & WENDY ROUILLARD

ERIC SAVETSKY & ANN FITZGERALD

EMILY & ERIC SOLZER

DAVID LIU, TJ DOUGLAS & REBECCA PRIEBE

FOUR STAR BRASS BAND

FRED & BETH LANE

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GIOVANNA LUCY & BERNADETTE MEYER

JAKE WILDSTEIN, HUNTER SENNING, GABRIELLE GOULD & HENRY COBBS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARBARA CLARKE

187


Wine Festival Harbor Gala

FOGGYSHEET nantucket

JAMIE LOWER & PAUL CRONIN

JASON & TANA WEISSMAN, JASON GOLDE, ANGEL CONRAD & ALEXANDER LEVENTHAL

PAMELA & DAVID BLESSING

JOHN HENSON, AJ WILLIAMS, JOY MCCUNE & VINNY PIZZI

LAURA FLETCHER & RICH BELAIR

JENS HANAUER, DIANE ASH & LAURA HOMAN

KELLY & MIKE HOFFMAN

KATHRYN NAGEL, JERRY SIEGEL & NIESHA GRIFFITH

LIZ HARTNETT & SHANNON LEARY

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KATIE NEILSON, RACHEL LARSON, JESSICA HICKS & LINDSAY WALSH

188


MARK GOLDWEITZ, JULIE LANCIA & ROBERT COCUZZO

NICK BOURKE & DAVE FASULO

DONALD DALLAIRE, BETTINA & ERIC LANDT

TRACY THE MOFSENS CHRISOPHE, AMY FINSILVER & HAYLEY MCGHEE

DR. BILL MARASCO, JACQUELINE ANTICO & BRIAN TURPITT

SEAN WESOKY & DAVID BLESSING

PHIL ROBINSON, HEIDI & DREW WILLIAMS & JOHN ARENA

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PJ O’CLAIR & FREDDY CICERCHIA

SAADIA LEWIS & ANDY MINIHAN

SCOTT WIDMEYER, TIM EHRENBURG & ALAN YOUNT PHOTOGRAPHY BY BARBARA CLARKE

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THE WITCHES ARE BACK

CABARET • JULY 30

OPENING NIGHT BENE FIT• JULY 15 PERFORMANCES JU LY 13–AUG 25

AY LATTER D

T ART E CARB OF THE ING THE CAS

FEATU T 20 MON• AUGUS BOOK OF MOR

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS

Max and Pamela Berry Stephen and Jill Karp George and Maria Roach Susan and Bob Wright

PRODUCER

David and Anna Karin-Dillard ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS

Charles and Jane Forman Judy Seinfeld Shelia Hoerle Foundation Les Silverman and Patty Abramson

STAGE ADAPTATION BY

DEAN PITCHFORD AND WALTER BOBBIE MUSIC BY TOM SNOW LYRICS BY DEAN PITCHFORD BASED ON THE ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY BY

DEAN PITCHFORD

JULY 13 TO AUGUST 25

ADDITIONAL MUSIC BY

ERIC CARMEN, SAMMY HAGAR, KENNY LOGGINS AND JIM STEINMAN

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BENNETT HALL

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Theatre Workshop

@TheatreAck

@theatrenantucket

DIRECTED BY

JUSTIN CERNE CHOREOGRAPHY

MOLLY CERNE MUSICAL DIRECTION

NICK WILDERS


TO M H A N LO N GA R DE N DE SI GN • L A ND SC A P E C O NST RUC T IO N C ONTAI N E R GA RD ENS • L AW N & HE D G E 508.325.0949 • office@tomhanlonlandscaping.com • www.tomhanlonlandscaping.com

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PHOTO BY CARY HAZLEGROVE

LANDS CAP I NG

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Wine Festival Grand Tasting

FOGGYSHEET nantucket

EMILY MURPHY, BEA GILLUM & DIANA PUODZIUKYNAITE

CHRISTIAN MOREAU

DON SMITH, TERYL PARKER & DEREK SMITH

COREY BUNNEWITH & YUNA ASRIYAN

RANDI ALBERRY, SAM HERRICK & DANNO LYNCH

JULIE FOX, ARLENE WEBB, & TEETER SEXTON

MARVIN CHAMBERS & JACKIE O’BRIEN

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JAY WITTES, JOSH STONE, JODI LAWRENCE, NATHAN SKERRITT, COREY MONTI

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MELANIE SABELHAUS

POLKA DOT FRIENDS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEISE TRUEBLOOD


Dreamcatcher 2018

MEG BROWERS, ROB MORGENSTERN & SAM PARSONS

KIM WENTWORTH, MARGOT HARTMANN & RITA CHARAPPA

DR. MIKE RUBY & AMY RUBY

CHARLENE THURSTON, LAURA FLETCHER, GINNY FARIA, & CARRIE RIDEN

NICOLE MARKS, COURTNEY MCKECKNIE, MEGHAN TURNER & CHRISS TROAST

MARY ADAMS & JANETTE TOPHAM

URSALA WADE & JOSH TROUT

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AMY RUBY, JENNY HANLON, TOM HANLON & GRACE HULL

TONI MCKERROW & HERB MITTENTHAL

ANNA JAY & CHAD HUDNUT PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAURIE RICHARDS

193


NSPIRE NHA

OLD SPORT IMAGES COURTESY OF THE NHA

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SIFT THROUGH THE ISLAND’S FAVORITE PASTIMES COURTESY OF THE NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS IMAGE ARCHIVES.

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Nantucket High School football team of 1952


4

2

5

3 2: Two gentlemen playing golf at the Sconset Golf Course. One man is wearing knickers, the other a pith helmet and a kilt. 3: Connie Greene holding a baseball bat in Codfish Park. 4: Two boys playing a game of ping pong on a table outdoors at the Sankaty Head Golf Club caddy camp. 5: A large crowd watches a baseball game on the field between Cliff Road and Sunset Hill Lane.

6: Holdgate family in Nantucket.

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1: A baseball game in progress, with a large crowd in attendance. Houses on Cliff Road, and the Sea Cliff Inn are in the background. 2: Caddies of 1941 practicing golf shots in a line at the Sankaty Head Golf Club. 3: Man swinging a golf club with Mr. Ralph (Dadoo) Bowen watching. 4: Nantucket Boys Club football team (1962). 5: Actor Digby Bell, teeing off at hole number seven of the ‘Sconset Golf Club, with two young boys watching.

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196 3

4

5


7

6

8

9

6: Knights of Columbus baseball team. 7: Boys at Camp Sankaty practicing golf shots. 8: Members of the Boys Industry & Improvement Association in front of a porch, one in a baseball catcher’s outfit.

10: New Bedford Football team.

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9: A young caddy at Sankaty Head Golf Club, with a bag of golf clubs.

197 10


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h i g h v a l u e h o m e o w n e r s | a u t o m o b i l e | w a t e r c r a f t | j e w e l r y, a r t & c o l l e c t i o n s | p e r s o n a l e x c e s s l i a b i l i t y | f l o o d | f r a u d & c y b e r

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PURE® refers to Privilege Underwriters Reciprocal Exchange, a Florida-domiciled reciprocal insurer and member of the PURE Group of Insurance Companies. PURE Risk Management, LLC (PRM), a for-profit entity, serves as PURE’s Attorney-In-Fact for a fee. PURE membership requires an executed Subscriber’s Agreement & Power of Attorney. Visit pureinsurance.com for details. Trademarks are property of PRM and used with permission. ©2018 PRM. All Rights Reserved. 44 South Broadway, Suite 301, White Plains, New York 10601. PURE HNW Insurance Services, CA Lic. 0I78980. 199


NUPTIALS Featured Wedding

BRIDE & BRIDE: ASHLEY & KIM VILLANDRY VENUE: THE NANTUCKET HOTEL & RESORT FLOWERS: FLOWERS ON CHESTNUT CAKE: THE ARTISAN BAKE SHOP CATERER: THE NANTUCKET HOTEL & RESORT HAIR: ROSALIE GIARDINA OF WAVELENGTHS SALON & SPA MAKEUP: EMILY NANTUCKET VIDEOGRAPHER: TOGETHER FOREVER FILMS INVITATIONS: THE INVITING COMPANY

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WEDDING PLANNER: DAVID M. HANDY EVENTS

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NOT SO FAST

Last Call

INTERVIEW BY LEISE TRUEBLOOD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

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A QUICK CHAT WITH CISCO’S BREWERY BROTHERS SAM AND TYLER HERRICK

202


N MAGAZINE: What’s Brewery life like? THE HERRICKS: Brewery life is fantastic!  There’s

N MAGAZINE: What are your favorite Cisco

the full experience, come in between 11am

Beers and 888 Cocktails?

and 3pm, do a beer or wine tasting, take a tour, and grab a bite to eat from one of our

a reason Men’s Health said, “The happiest place in the world isn’t Disney World,

THE HERRICKS: This is probably one of the most

but a brewery in Nantucket.” There’s such

difficult questions we get asked working at

a melting pot of clientele whether they’re

Cisco. It really depends on our mood, but we

N MAGAZINE: If you could have anyone in the

regulars, or just visiting for the first time. It

have to say right now that we would either

world get behind the bar to serve up a good

really does have something for everybody.

go for our newest beer addition “GRIPAH”

time at Cisco Brewers, who would it be?

Our staff really hasn’t changed at all since

Grapefruit IPA or a nice pint of Sankaty

THE HERRICKS: Tom Brady. After watching him

we started bartending, and that speaks vol-

Light Lager. We never stray far from the

chug a beer on Stephen Colbert’s “The Late

umes about how good life at Cisco really is.

“Madaket Mule” cocktail, which consists of

Show,” there’s no doubt he could serve up a

888 cranberry vodka, soda water, and our

good time.

N MAGAZINE: Tell us about when Gronk and

many local food trucks or the raw bar.

homemade ginger puree.

N MAGAZINE: What’s your favorite thing about

Edelman took over.

THE HERRICKS: Being a die-hard New England

N MAGAZINE: We know it can get pretty

living on Nantucket?

sports fan, that was probably one of our all

slammed during the summer. Any tips for

THE HERRICKS: Nantucket is such a unique

time favorite days at Cisco. Those guys

beating the lines? What’s the protocol for

place, so it is hard to pick just one favor-

came in on one of our busiest days ever over

managing that many people?

ite thing about living here. Being on an

Figawi weekend in 2016. They both knew

THE HERRICKS: Summer time is busy pretty

island, we love that we can spend most

that Coach Belichick calls Nantucket his

much anywhere you go on Nantucket. For

of our free time on the water in the sum-

second home, so they were on their some-

us, you can always count on weekends in

mer, whether it’s surfing, fishing, or host-

what best behavior in case coach decided to

particular bringing the most foot traffic.

ing beach cookouts. Above all though, we

show up! Both Gronk and Edelman could

The busiest times of the day are usually the

love how tight knit the community is and

not have been nicer or more accommodat-

post-beach crowds coming in for a cold pint

how willing people are to lend a helping

ing to all of their fans that day. High fives,

and to catch one of our daily live music acts.

hand to those in need!

autographs, photo ops, dancing— you name

Best time to beat the crowd? I’d say to get

it. They really are the life of

N MAGAZINE: Anything new

the party wherever they go.

in the works for Cisco?

(Go Pats!)

THE HERRICKS: The company is always looking

N MAGAZINE: What’s your fa-

to expand to make room

vorite moment at the Brew-

and keep up with the de-

ery from the past year?

mand of our ever-grow-

THE HERRICKS: Going back to

ing client base. We add-

the sports theme, one mo-

ed ten bathrooms to the

ment that sticks out from

courtyard this year, built

last summer was when for-

a new stage for all the

mer Red Sox catcher Jason

bands that come through

Varitek came in and bought

over the summer, retail

thirty-three (his jersey num-

continues to expand and

ber) beers for the next thirty-

add great apparel, and

three people that came into

we’ve added a few more

the brewery. Always special

wines,

to see a local sports hero

beers on tap!

cocktails,

and

showing love for his fans. N magazine

203


JO I N U S A F T E R DAR K FO R

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 2018

7 P.M.

6:30 P.M. VIP ENTRY

Nantucket By Design’s fabulous closing party at the Nantucket Whaling Museum. Come enjoy food, drink, music and dancing all to benefit the Nantucket Historical Association.

2018 EVENTS AUGUST 1

WELCOME COCKTAIL PARTY

AUGUST 2

DESIGN LUNCHEON

AUGUST 3

ALL-STAR PRIVATE DINNERS

AUGUST 3

DESIGN PANEL

At the height of Nantucket’s summer season, the NHA celebrates the very best in creative and inspirational design with engaging lectures, lively panel discussions, and both intimate and grand gatherings.

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TICKETS ONLINE AT

204

@ackhistory

nha.org


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205


HEIDI

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N Magazine ADVERTISING DIRECTORY

206

124,125 28 Centre Pointe 33 ACK Eye 59 ACKceptional Rental 148 ACKtiques 44 Advisors Living Archer Residences 43 Arrowhead 97 Atlantic Landscaping 39 Audrey Sterk Design 170,171 Beauty Counter 65 BPC Architecture 61 Brant Point Grill 28 Cabot & Co 45 Calista West Fine Jewelry 25 Carolyn Thayer Interiors 15 Casterline Goodman Gallery 22,23 Chateau d’Esclans 29 Cheney Brothers 20 Chip Webster 149 Coldwell Banker Deborah Gordon, Jayne Friedberg 71 Coldwell Banker Jonathan Radford 71 Colony Rug 206 Commonwealth 30,74,75 Congdon & Coleman RE 63 Corcoran Lydia Sussek 40 Cross Rip Builders 84 Current Vintage 116 Dellbrook | JKS 21 Douglas Elliman RE 11 Dujardin Design 13 Echelon Seaport 84 Egan Maritime 48 Emeritus 76 Emily Nantucket 99 Faherty 3 First Republic Bank 14 Fisher RE Brian Sullivan 117 Fisher RE Cam Gammill, Gina O’Callahan 134,135 Fisher Real Estate 191 Follain 76 Forme 59 Glyn’s Marine 24 Great Point Properties 12 Gypsy 67 Heather Wells 206 Heidi Weddendorf 205 Island Kitchen 185 Island Properties Berkshire Hathaway 71 J. Graham Goldsmith Architects 8,27,57,198 J. Pepper Frazier RE 34 Jewel in the Sea 60 John’s Island Real Estate 156 Johnston’s of Elgin 41 Jordan RE 92 Jordan RE Joelle Bouchard 47 Joseph Olsen Interiors 5 Kathleen Hay Designs 165 Kellyboat 111 KMS Designs Kristin Paton Interiors 55 50,51,104,105 Lee Real Estate 10 Liv Nantucket Chandra Miller, Spencer Heydt 77,207 Maury People Craig Hawkins, Bernadette Meyer 157 Maury People Donna Barnett Maury People Gary Winn 2,46,77,89 18,19 Maury People Kathy Gallaher 49 Maury People Lisa Winn 32 Maury People Mary Taaffe 155 Maury People Susan Chambers Milly & Grace 165 92 Murray’s Toggery Shop 31 Nantucket Architecture Group 92 Nantucket Art & Artisan Show 208 Nantucket Atheneum Dance Festival Nantucket Boys & Girls Summer Groove 110 93 Nantucket Cottage Hospital 204 Nantucket Historical Association 26 Nantucket Hotel 9 Nantucket Learning Group Nantucket Looms 16 133 Nantucket Property Watch 85 Nantucket Realty Advisor 206 Nantucket Supper Club 156 Nantucket Wine Fest Nina Liddle Design 81 97 Perch/Grey Salt 76 Peter Beaton 185 Peter England 60 Petticoat Row Bakery Pier 4 35 7 Pollacks 199 Pure Insurance 69 Rafael Osona Auctions 142,143 Reelhouse/Pier 6 69 Rogers & Gray Insurance 84 Sarah Williams 4 Seaman Schepps 36 Shari’s Place 53 St. Barth’s Properties Susan Lister Locke Gallery 80 132 The Dreamland Page to Stage 38 The Skinny Dip 132 The Vault 190 Theatre Workshop of Nantucket 191 Tom Hanlon Landscaping 80 Tonkin of Nantucket 61 Topper’s at the Wauwinet 98 Tradewind Aviation 208 Vineyard Vines 88 White Heron Theatre Company 184 Whitehall 6,37,68,164 Windwalker William Raveis 123 Windwalker William Raveis John Arena 42 Woodmeister Master Builders 17 Workshop/APD 148 Yankee Barn Homes

WEDDENDORF Available at

Erica Wilson • The Artists Association heidiweddendorf.com

774-236-9064

Heidiweddendorf@yahoo.com Follow me on

Tyler Angle

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

TWO PERFORMANCES | TICKETS $45-85

FRIDAY, JULY 27 6 P.M. SATURDAY, JULY 28 6 P.M.

F R EE C OMMUNIT Y E VENT S ALL W EEK

TICKETS & INFORMATION AT nantucketatheneum.org (508) 228–1110, ext. 107

The Dance Festival is the Atheneum’s primary fundraising event of the year. We thank you for your support. Tyler Angle and Sara Mearns photographed by Kris Kinsley Hancock


LIVE LUXURY

TOWN | $3,495,000

TOWN | $6,995,000

’SCONSET | $5,850,000

5 Bedrooms 3 Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms 4+ Bathrooms

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3 Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms

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SHAWKEMO | $7,995,000

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TOWN | $2,695,000

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5 Bedrooms 6+ Bathrooms

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Craig Hawkins, Broker

Bernadette Meyer, Broker

508-228-1881, ext. 119 craig@maurypeople.com

37 Main Street, Nantucket MA 02554

C: 508-680-4748 bernadette@maurypeople.com

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


VINEYARD VINES 2 STRAIGHT WHARF 508-325-9600 MURRAY'S TOGGERY SHOP 62 MAIN STREET 508-228-0437

Profile for Nantucket Magazine

N MAGAZINE July 2018  

N MAGAZINE July 2018