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KATIEAnchor COURIC of the Pops

DR. VANESSA KERRY

Healing Globally

SWIM ACROSS AMERICA

Strokes for a Cure

Bestselling Author

CHARLES GRAEBER Nantucket’s

DEADLIEST CATCH Nantucket Magazine August 2013

T C JE O PR

T E w K e i C ev U T Pr N NA


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T’S ALL ABOUT THE WATER

TOWN | 30 Orange Street | 8 Bed, 8f/2h Bath | $20,000,000

POLPIS | 250 Polpis Road | 6 Bed, 6+ Bath | $14,750,000

SCONSET | 40 Low Beach Road | 4 Bed, 4.5 Bath | $6,995,000

MONOMOY | 47 Monomoy Road | 6 Bed, 8+ Bath | $14,995,000

POCOMO | 84 Pocomo Road | 4 Bed, 2 Bath | $7,200,000

Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069 37 Main Street Nantucket, MA 02554 maurypeople.com

Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated.

MADAKET | 13 Massahusetts Avenue | 3 Bed, 3 Bath | $3,300,000


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A house to come home to

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Dujardin Design transcends mere “design� enriching life for over 25 years through ingenuity and creativity.

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This immaculately constructed and very private four bedroom harbor front home on seven acres sits on a knoll overlooking the Harbor and Nantucket Sound offering views across tidal marshes to Town, sweeping all the way from Pocomo and Coatue and beyond. Sophisticated details include wood paneling, soaring arched post and beam framing, creating dramatic living spaces, and an elegant interior designed by Bunny Williams. There are approvals in place for a three car garage, guest house and pool. A walk way leads down to a secluded private beach and mooring site. $13,000,000

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Shimmo

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Dramatic setting with high elevations providing commanding views of the Harbor's entry out to Nantucket Sound. The property includes a classic five bedroom summer home that offers a bird's eye view of all the Harbor's activity. There is a private path to the Harbor with exceptional boat mooring access. There is a licensed bulkhead and the property can support substantial improvements including expansion of the main house and the possibilty of a guest house and pool. $9,950,000

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Art by renowned illustrator Julianna Brion.

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www.gauthierstacy.com

. Telephone: 617-422-0001 . Photography by Sam Gray


W A T E R J E W E L S GALLERY

14 Centre Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508 228 0825 14 St Albans Grove London W8 5BP 44 207 368 6367

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Editor & Publisher Bruce A. Percelay Managing Editor Robert Cocuzzo Art Director Paulette Chevalier Head Photographers Nathan Coe Kit Noble Operations Consultant Adrian Wilkins Contributors Kate Coe Tim Kelley Jen Laskey Marie-Claire Rochat Photographers Ben Baker Meghan Brosnan Beverly Hall Greg Hinson Robert Krivicich Gene Mahon Brian Sager Advertising Director Fifi Greenberg Advertising Sales Audrey Wagner Publisher N. LLC

ADDISON CRAIG

:RPHQV'HVLJQHU6KRHV +DQGEDJVDQG$FFHVVRULHV

Chairman: Bruce A. Percelay

Nantucket Times 17 North Beach Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508-228-1515

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ŠCopyright 2011 Nantucket Times. Nantucket Times (N Magazine) is published seven times annually from April through December. Reproduction of any part of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Editorial submissions may be sent to Editor, Nantucket Times, 17 North Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 02554. We are not responsible for unsolicited editorial or graphic material. Office (508) 228-1515 or fax (508) 228-8012. Signature Printing and Consulting 800 West Cummings Park Suite 2900 Woburn

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POPS CULTURE Nothing says summer in August like the Nantucket Cottage Hospital’s Boston Pops Concert. Six thousand people gather under the stars to enjoy the music and demonstrate their support for one of the island’s most vital institutions, which is in the process of launching a $75,000,000 campaign to build a new hospital for Nantucket’s next generation. In celebration of the Boston Pops Concert, our cover features this year’s host Katie Couric.

PREMIER HARBORSIDE DINING Breakfast Dinner

■ ■

Lunch ■ Bar Menu Sunday Brunch

Editor & Publisher

Moving from land to sea, this August issue of N Magazine also features Swim Across America, an event designed to raise money to support cancer patients on the island one swim stroke at a time. Like the Pops, Swim Across America is a wonderful expression of community support for those in need. On another medical front, N Magazine features an interview with Dr. Vanessa Bradford Kerry, daughter of Secretary of State John Kerry, who has forged her own path in creating a global medical training program in partnership with the Peace Corps and Massachusetts General Hospital that could ultimately have an enormous impact on global health. Dr. Kerry’s focus and determination comes through clearly in her interview during which she details how her program could create medical self-sufficiency in less developed parts of the world and, at the same time, have positive diplomatic implications for the United States. As co-sponsor of September’s Nantucket Project, N Magazine provides a preview to this year’s conference featuring an impressive array of visionaries and thinkers whose insights make it one of the most fascinating events of the year. In a departure from last year’s Nantucket Project, there will also be a separate Finance Forum, which has the potential to become a nationally recognized focal point for the exchange of information and could be a must attend for anyone curious about our economic future.

Enjoy our new menu featuring BPG Signature Items: Steaks, Chops, Lobster, Clambake for two and much more. Serving daily until 11pm

508.325.1320 • brantpointgrill.com OpenTable.com

NOTHING IS ORDINARY, NOT EVEN THE VIEW. Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Cocktails • Sunday Brunch

On the subject of creative thought, N Magazine covers the colorful existence of local and now nationally recognized author Charles Graeber, whose New York Times bestseller The Good Nurse has made him a hot commodity. Among the many stories that have made him a successful writer, Graeber’s own story might just be the most incredible. The long awaited warm weather has finally arrived, and, in combination with all the events going on around the island, August is the peak of the season. We hope you all enjoy the Pops and savor the high point of the summer. Sincerely,

Bruce A. Percelay Editor & Publisher

Free parking at The Wauwinet or take our complimentary van from the White Elephant.

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508.228.8768 • toppersrestaurant.com OpenTable.com Cruise the Nantucket Bay to TOPPER'S restaurant aboard The Wauwinet Lady.

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2013 34 NANTUCKET PROJECT PREVIEW

Get a sneak peek behind the scenes of the Nantucket Project and find out who’s coming to this year’s event.

41 POPS!

On August 10th, The Nantucket Cottage Hospital brings back the Boston Pops for a concert on Jetties Beach. Learn the history behind this annual event, and see what goes into orchestrating the biggest outdoor gathering on Nantucket.

NSPIRE 47 KNIT PICK

Local designer Charlotte Hess has been stitching together a successful career on Nantucket with her clothing line, Isobel & Cleo.

52 STROKE OF GENIUS

Take a lesson from master painter Sergio Roffo as he begins and finishes each of his paintings before lunchtime.

NVESTIGATE 58 THE NANTUCKET EXPRESS

Climb aboard the fastest alternative to driving or flying down to the ferry with the new train service CapeFlyer.

67 THE BONITO TRIANGLE

The best place to fish on Nantucket in August also happens to be the most dangerous.

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119 FASHION HAUS

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Photographer Nathan Coe captures a stunning fashion spread melding style and interior design.

BLACK HALTER SWIMSUIT – LISA MARIE FERNANDEZ @ GYPSY WHITE SKIRT – ALAIA @ GYPSY SHOES - ALAIA @ GYPSY


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The Corcoran Group I Lydia Sussek I 917.721.7853 I Lyd.Sussek@corcoran.com Senior Associate, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT LLC. All square feet is approximate. Photograph is Virtually Staged.

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• Winner 2011 REBNY Deal of the Year

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NDEPTH 74 WHEEL LOVE

Local Nantucketers Alison Van Fleet and Tyler Levine teach us what real love is all about.

84 ANCHOR OF THE POPS This year’s Boston Pops host Katie Couric speaks with N Magazine about her career, her advocacy work, and her love for Nantucket.

90 NATURAL BORN STORYTELLER

Bestselling author and award-winning journalist Charles Graeber takes us through his many adventures.

98 HEALING GLOBALLY

Dr. Vanessa Kerry is on a mission to improve health care in less developed countries through a nonprofit she cofounded called Seed Global Health.

134 ONE IF BY LAND, ONE IF BY SEA

N Magazine climbs aboard “Sealegs,” an amphibious vehicle that takes captain and crew from the road into the harbor then onto the beach for a cocktail at Galley.

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NECN meteorologist Tim Kelley explores the history and science behind Nantucket’s thunderstorms.


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NQUIRY 141 MEET THE PROPRIETORS

153 DOWN HOME DINING

Nantucket’s most hotly anticipated restaurant opens its doors on India Street, revealing a delectable dining experience.

146 SWIFT SERVICE

Despite a heartbreaking loss in the Stanley Cup Finals, there’s still some good news coming out of the Boston Bruins locker room thanks in part to a local glass designer.

Enjoy a sampling of the island’s casual dining scene and see why it’s possible to feast without the fuss.

170 SNAPSHOTS IN TIME

Take a look at some of the old outfits and activities of Nantucket yesteryear.

110 SWIM ACROSS AMERICA

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Ninety percent of the money raised by this August’s Swim Across America event will go directly to patients fighting cancer on Nantucket.

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178 NSCENE

Holly Finigan lets you in on what’s hip, hot and happening this August on Nantucket.


“FROM CUSTOM COUCHES TO CUSTOM CABINETS, MARINE LITERALLY DESIGNED OUR HOME.”

When we decided to redecorate the interior of our Nantucket house, Marine Home Center was our first stop. From top of the line Woodmode® kitchen cabinets, to made-to-order upholstered Highland House® couches and chairs, we discovered we needed to go no further than Marine’s Showrooms. Their “customer first” attitude made our experience efficient and enjoyable and we were delighted with the end result.

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Pamela Alexander, CEO Re/max Ontario Atlantic Canada

marinehomecenter.com - 134 Orange Street, Nantucket - (508) 228-0900

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GUESTCONTRIBUTORS TIM KELLEY Meteorologist Tim Kelley is a native Cape Codder, but he traces his roots back to Nantucket. Kelley’s maternal great-greatgrandparents were the Allens and the Starbucks of Nantucket Island. He is one of the few original news anchors still on the air at NECN TV, now in its 22nd year. Kelley’s daily weather journal includes details of every storm that has hit the island since 1992. For this August issue, Kelley offers his insight on the intense thunder and lightning storms that hit Nantucket in the NVESTIGATE piece, “Awe Struck” (page 62).

ROBERT KRIVICICH Boston-based photographer Robert Krivicich began his career as a designer and has gradually moved into photography over the last four years. Accordingly, Krivicich captures his images with a strong emphasis on composition, imagining how the photo could exist on the page as he lines up each shot. For this August issue, Krivicich photographed bestselling author and award-winning journalist Charlie Graeber in “Natural Born Storyteller” (page 90). “While I was taking pictures of Charlie in his study, I was able to listen to some of the stories he told, and all I could think of was what a full life he has had with his travels,” Krivicich says. “He reminded me of something my friend would say: ‘Leap and the net will appear.’”

DR. GREG HINSON Greg Hinson is a family physician, software design consultant, and award-winning landscape photographer. As a photographer, his work can be seen at the Joyce & Seward Johnson Gallery in Nantucket and at NantucketStock.com. His goal is to “capture the variety of light and colors that are unique to the island to enhance the familiar scenery.” For this August issue, Hinson shares photographs he has captured as an amateur storm chaser for “Awe Struck” (page 62). When asked if he uses any special equipment to catch a lightning strike, he said, “a Jeep, a weather radar app, and multiple N magazine

memory cards to store all of the misses that go with one

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lucky strike.”


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NBUZZ A LICENSE

TO GIVE A new way of showing your Nantucket pride is hitting the streets this summer. Introducing the Nantucket License Plate. Now along with your collection of beach stickers, the official Nantucket plate will have your bumper looking truly ACKcessorized. Even better, proceeds from the plate will go to the Nantucket Lighthouse School as well as a number of other local nonprofits. The future sales of these plates could prove to be a great source of financial support for many Nantucket nonprofits, as has been seen off island with the Cape and the Islands plate. But before the plates can be produced, MassDOT requires that three thousand plate applications be submitted and paid for in advance. You do not need to be a Massachusetts resident to purchase the plate, just as long as your car is registered in the state. So get in line to buy your plate before it gets bumper to bumper. Visit www.nantucketlicenseplate.org for more details.

CAPE AIR’S

DAN WOLF LANDS IN GOV RACE A NEW TAKE ON

ANTIQUES From August 1-5th, don’t miss the Nantucket Historical Association’s

investments to ensure that every kid has a chance to reach his or

Antiques & Design Show of Nantucket at Bartlett’s Farm. Now in its 36th

her full potential.” Wolf reached his potential as a businessman

year, this year’s Antiques & Design Show features world-class antiques

when he went from training as a mechanic and pilot to building

while highlighting more design elements than ever before. Innovative

Cape Air, a successful, employee-owned airline that now has over

additions include a series of designer showrooms created by local firms

a thousand employees. “That’s my American Dream,” Wolf

Dujardin Design, Nantucket House Interior Design Studio, and Kathleen

said. “Bootstrap a company, create hundreds of good jobs, build

Hay. The show’s highly anticipated Preview Party kicks off on Thursday,

a great life in Massachusetts, share that success with the people I

August 1st, underneath the grand white tent at Bartlett’s Farm. Then on

work with, and support the communities we’re proud to serve.”

Friday, August 2nd, there will be the 2013 Designer Panel, moderated by

We will wait and see how Dan Wolf’s campaign takes flight.

has assembled top international designers Alessandra Branca, Christopher Drake, Jamie Drake, Brian J. McCarthy, and Alex Papachristidis at N magazine

the Governor of Massachusetts this past July. “As a businessperson and an entrepreneur I know that government cannot solve

Nantucket and New York-based designer Susan Zises Green. Zises Green

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Cape Air founder and CEO Dan Wolf declared his candidacy for

this trendy breakfast discussion featuring a veritable who’s who of the design world. Visit www.nha.org or call 508-228-1894 for show times, tickets and details.

all our problems,” Wolf, a two-term State Senator from Cape Cod said, “but it can and should help define a vision for our future, a vision of economic and social justice, and then make


PAZZO THE VOLUME

PUMPS UP

Nantucket restaurateur Marco Coelho has made a lot of noise this summer with his wildly successful new eatery Lola Burger on the rotary. Just down the street at his other restaurant Pazzo, Coelho has his patrons dancing to a very different beat by bringing in Nantucket’s “Audio Architechs,” a group of talented local DJs. This summer’s headlining performance will come on August 17th with Common Ground, featuring Rob Garza of Thievery Corporation.

The Nantucket Land Council has been awarded the 2013 “Nantucket Clean Harbor Award,” a recognition sponsored annually by Nantucket Community Sailing. The award is intended to “heighten public awareness of the pressures on

TIMELESS

TRUNK

SHOW

harbor water quality, the importance of restoring the quality of the harbor’s waters, and to encourage appropriate stewardship of this resource.” The Nantucket Land Council was selected for its consistent concern for water quality in the island’s harbors and ponds. The award goes to show that even by sea the Land Council knows how to make a positive splash.

On August 22nd & 23rd, current Vintage on 4 Easy Street will be hosting a trunk

BREWING UP SOMETHING NEW

show for a unique line of vintage jewelry. Jewelry designer Meghan Coomes will be returning to the island

This past July, authors Michael Haft and Harrison Suarez launched an exciting new project

with handcrafted necklaces, rings,

at a gathering on Nantucket. Two former infantry officers in the United States Marine Corps,

and earrings that could be consid-

Haft and Suarez have created an e-book titled, Perfect Coffee at Home. During their service in

ered family heirlooms. “For the past

Afghanistan, coffee was a way for them to stay awake, but upon returning to the

two years, I have been making jew-

States, Haft and Suarez began a journey

elry using my grandparents’ WWII

into the nuanced world of specialty coffee.

love letters that they exchanged for

Perfect Coffee at Home distills down the

exactly three years, three months,

authors’ experience into an interactive

and four days while apart,” Coomes

multimedia format that foreshadows the

says. “Each piece contains a snippet

exciting future of books in the digital

of a letter along with unique stones

age. Perfect Coffee at Home is available

and glass fragments to complete the

for download on iTunes.

funky design.”

NANTUCKET STUDENT OFF TO heading off to Oman for a year abroad after winning a scholarship from the U.S. Department of State. The Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study Abroad Program

was created in the wake of the September 11th attacks to promote “understanding between the U.S. and countries with significant Muslim populations.” Daily was awarded one of only sixty-five scholarships, and will serve as a “youth ambassador” representing not only the United States as a whole, but also the Nantucket community.

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OMAN

Nantucket high school student Caillean Daily will be

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K ET C U T N A

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W E I V E R P C E J PRO

Returning this September, the Nantucket Project celebrates its third year with exciting new events and a remarkable lineup of the top minds in the world. Here’s an exclusive preview of the conference coming to the island next month.

The

MAINEVENT

Mikhail Gorbachev

He was the leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 to 1991, a Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1990, and was hugely instrumental in ending the Cold War. This September, Mikhail Gorbachev is coming to Nantucket to speak and to participate in The Nantucket Project. “I spent three years tracking him down and calling,” says TNP co-founder, Tom Scott. “When his people saw where the Project had come in two years and saw how passionate N magazine

we were, they called right after last year’s event and said that Mikhail

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Gorbachev was in for 2013.” Gorbachev, who’s never been to Nantucket before, will be reflecting on the state of global politics and revisiting some historic moments in his career. TNP will provide a rare opportunity to hear the person Time magazine named “Man of the Century” share his thoughts in a casual and intimate setting.


Nantucket Project panel at last year’s event

Photo by Meghan Brosnan

“The Finance Forum will attract the shrewdest brains in finance both on the stage and in the audience” —Bob Diamond

The

FINANCE

FORUM augural Finance Forum on September 26th. Led

Member, “both on the stage and in the audience.” Speakers

by Meredith Whitney and Andrew Ross Sorkin,

will include founder and CEO of Starwood Capital Group,

the event will feature some of the world’s most

Barry Sternlicht, co-founder of the Carlyle Group, David

astute and respected financial experts sharing

Rubenstein, and renowned hedge-fund manager, Eddie

their thoughts and perceptions on the interaction

Lampert. The Finance Forum promises to be stimulating

of finance and society. “The Finance Forum will

and enlightening, even to those who don’t know a deriva-

attract the shrewdest brains in finance,” says Bob

tive from a debenture.

RO

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Diamond, the former CEO of Barclays and TNP Circle

P

The Nantucket Project will kick off with its in-

PRE

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CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS

The Nantucket Project provides conference scholarships to qualified candidates, who will then participate in all aspects of the conference and are invited to share their experiences afterward. The Fellows Program is an important part of The Nantucket Project and has been spearheaded by TNP Founding Circle members Senator Bill Frist, Jill Karp, and Jennifer Diamond, along with Leslie Bresette. The intent of the program is to serve Nantucket, in part, by helping develop the island’s next generation of leaders. Past local recipients have included John Buckey, Melissa Murphy, Paula Korn, Randy Hudson, Janet Schulte, John Merson, Jamie Howarth, Gage Dobbins and Brent Tartamella. “Our TNP Fellows Program helps grow leaders on and off Nantucket,” says Senator Bill Frist. “It’s another way we’re having an impact.” Applications for this year’s scholarships are due August 15th.

THE

LINEUP

Every year, The Nantucket Project attracts a veritable who’s who of contemporary thinkers and leaders. The 2013 Project will be no different. “This year’s TNP lineup is filled with people who aspired to achieve big dreams, and achieved even bigger ones, inspiring many others to follow them,” says TNP Founding Circle member Wendy Schmidt. Speakers this September include Mikhail Gorbachev, David Rubenstein, Eve Ensler, Tom Glocer, Tim Armstrong, Tim Draper, Chris Matthews, Steve Case, Meredith Whitney, Andrew Ross Sorkin, Barry Sternlicht, Krista Tippet, Bob Diamond, Tim Ferris, Eddie Lampert, Greg LeMond and many others. Here’s a closer look at some of this year’s headliners.

MICHAELPOLLAN

For the past twenty years, Michael Pollan has been writing highly acclaimed books and articles about the places where the human and natural worlds intersect: food, agriculture, gardens, drugs and architecture. He is the author of the bestsellers In Defense of Food:

N magazine

An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural

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History of Four Meals. In 2009 he was named one of the top ten “New Thought Leaders” by Newsweek magazine and was chosen by Time magazine for the 2010 “Time 100” in the “Thinkers” category. Michael was educated at Bennington College, Oxford University and Columbia University, from which he received an MA in English.

P


N A NT U

C

KE

PRE VIE W R

TNP Finance Forum Speaker

David M. Rubenstein is a Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive

T

Officer of The Carlyle Group, a global private equity firm. Prior to forming the firm in 1987, David practiced law in Washington, D.C. From 1977 to 1981, he was Deputy Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy. From 1975 to 1976, he served as Chief Counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments. David is the Chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a Regent of the Smith-

P

OJ

DAVIDRUBENSTEIN

sonian Institution, and President of the Economic Club of

ECT

Washington. He is a graduate of Duke University and The University of Chicago Law School.

TIMDRAPER

As the founder and Managing Director of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Tim Draper is one of the world’s leading, most successful venture

TNP Finance Forum Speaker capitalists. His invention of “viral marketing” has revolutionized Internet marketing. As an advocate for entrepreneurs and free markets, Tim has been recognized as a leader through numerous awards and honors, and has frequent TV, radio, and headline appearances. Tim recently founded Draper University of Heroes, an immersive boarding school in San Mateo, California for students 18-24 years old, dedicated to encouraging proactive entrepreneurship. He has a BS in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

TIMARMSTRONG

Tim Armstrong has served as Chairman and CEO of AOL

EVEENSLER

The Nantucket Project Speaker

since 2009. In December of 2009, he took the company pub-

Eve Ensler is a highly acclaimed American playwright,

lic on the New York Stock Exchange. AOL currently serves

author, performer, feminist and activist who rose to fame

over 200 million people a month and is one of the world’s

with her play The Vagina Monologues. Written in 1996,

largest consumer brands. Prior to AOL, Tim was president

it has been translated into forty-eight languages and

of Google’s Americas Operations and served on the compa-

performed in over 140 countries. Ms. Ensler’s most recent

ny’s operating committee. Prior to Google, Tim was an ex-

book, In the Body of the World: A Memoir, has received

ecutive of numerous internet and media companies, including

wide critical praise. She is the founder of V-Day, the global

Snowball, Disney’s ABC/ESPN Internet Ventures, and Paul Allen’s Starwave Cor-

movement to end violence against women and girls. Ms. Ensler is the recipient of numerous

including

a

numerous companies. He’s a graduate

Tony Award, an Obie Award,

a

of Connecticut College, home of the

Guggenheim

Camels.

and an Amnesty International Media

honors,

Fellowship

Award,

Spotlight Award for leadership.

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poration. Tim has started or co-founded

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POPS! WRITTEN BY BRUCE A. PERCELAY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE

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eld on Jetties Beach, the Bos-

as an event sponsor since it first started, with

The next morning, Jon Rosbrook of Zema

ton Pops Concert provides

Jill and Stephen Karp of Nantucket Island Re-

Productions arrives followed on Friday by

funding assistance for the op-

sorts joining in as lead sponsor in the early

a chartered Steamship Authority freight

eration of Nantucket Cottage

years. Jon Rosbrook of Zema Productions has

boat with all the equipment, staging and

Hospital. The timing of this

always produced the event, with most of the

supplies for the event. The Nantucket

year’s event is particularly noteworthy since it

same crew and volunteers still involved year

Police escort the entourage of trucks off

comes at the very beginning of the hospital’s

after year.

the ferry and on to Bathing Beach Road.

ambitious $75 million campaign to build a new

One vehicle in the envoy is a specially

state of the art facility to serve Nantucket’s next

The concert has grown to become the largest

designed 18-wheel tractor-trailer that

generation. Although the money raised by the

event on the island, attracting over six thou-

will transform into the stage complete

Pops will not go toward the capital campaign,

sand people and netting over a million dollars

with speakers and lights. Early Saturday

it raises awareness of the vital importance of

for the Cottage Hospital. Since its inception,

morning, tents pop up on the beach and

the

Nantucket

Cottage Hospital and the need to improve upon

The concert has grown to become the largest event on the island, attracting over six thousand people and netting over a million dollars for the Cottage Hospital.

the aging facil-

hundreds of volunteers decorate tables, tents and set up to prepare for the six thou-

ity. According to Nantucket Cottage Hospital

the event has drawn a wide range of luminaries

sand attendees who will be arriving at

President and CEO Dr. Margot Hartmann, “We

including conductor and composer John Wil-

4:30 p.m. On Saturday afternoon, the

have assembled an extraordinary team to plan

liams, Joel Gray, Natalie Cole, Carly Simon,

Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra arrives

what we believe will be the hospital of the fu-

Doc Severinsen, Bernadette Peters, and Mi-

along with conductor Keith Lockhart by

ture in terms of both its ability to deliver high

chael Cavanaugh. There have been many no-

ferry and is escorted to the beach by po-

quality care and to maximize the economic ef-

table masters of ceremony over the years, in-

lice motorcade.

ficiency of running a large building.” While the

cluding Natalie Jacobson and Chet Curtis, the

existing building has become a familiar part of

late Tim Russert, Chris Matthews, John Kerry

Add fireworks and some visual spectacu-

the Nantucket landscape since its construction

and Katie Couric, who will return to emcee

lars, like the year an acrobat hung from

in 1957, it is clearly at the end of its useful life.

once again this year.

a wire high above the crowd, or when a jet soared over the audience after the Na-

The Pops Concert started as the brainchild of

Imagine hosting a wedding for six thousand of

tional Anthem, and you have an unforget-

Kathyrn Clauss and Margaretta Andrews in

your closest friends; that’s the logistical feat

table evening.

1997, who served as co-chairs for that inau-

that is the Pops. The grand production kicks

gural event. Charles Balas, the Nantucket Cot-

off Wednesday night with volunteers assem-

tage Hospital board chair at the time, was also

bling nearly a thousand silverware rolls and

hugely influential in raising funds to make the

gift bags at the hospital.

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event a reality. Fidelity Investments supported

42


“The Nantucket Cottage Hospital is grateful for all of the supporters who have attended all of the seventeen years,” says Dr. Margot Hartmann. “This is a remarkably generous island witnessed by the success of the Pops, and our most critical task is in front of us as we embark upon the biggest fundraising effort in the history of Nantucket to build the new hospital.” Building the new hospital will be vastly more complex than setting up for the Pops, nevertheless it will take the whole island to orchestrate.

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43


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N magazine

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SALES & VACATION RENTALS

Meet Laura Fletcher

A

fter graduating from the University of Vermont with a degree in education, she came for what was to be one last summer and instead was hired as the science teacher for the Nantucket New School. From there Laura was Director of Sales for the Jared Coffin House orchestrating corporate and social events. While very different positions, both careers had one common thread; determining the specific needs of the individual and creating a plan ˖ˑ˔ˇ˃˅ˊ˖ˊˇ˕ˇˉˑ˃ˎ˕ʎʶˊˋ˕˃˖˖ˇː˖ˋˑː˖ˑˆˇ˖˃ˋˎ˃ːˆˋː˘ˇ˕˖ˏˇː˖ˋː˅ˎˋˇː˖˕ˢˊ˃˕˄ˇˇːˏˇ˖ˋ˅˗ˎˑ˗˕ˎ˛˃˒˒ˎˋˇˆˆ˗˔ˋːˉˊˇ˔ːˋːˇ˛ˇ˃˔˕ with Great Point Properties. Having lived on the island for many years as a tenant and now a proud Nantucket homeowner, Laura understands the process through which both tenants and homeowners experience Nantucket real estate. Laura will ˉ˗ˋˆˇ˛ˑ˗˙ˋ˖ˊ˃ːˊˑːˇ˕˖˃ːˆˈˋ˔˕˖ˊ˃ːˆ˃˅˅ˑ˗ː˖ˑˈ˖ˊˇˏ˃ː˛ˈ˃˅ˇ˖˕ˑˈ˖ˊˇʰ˃ː˖˗˅ˍˇ˖˔ˇː˖ˋːˉ˃ːˆ˄˗˛ˋːˉ˒˔ˑ˅ˇ˕˕ʎˢ Laura is actively involved in our local community. This June, she was cochair of the annual Dreamcatcher Dinner and Auction to benefit Palliative And Supportive Care of Nantucket and is a member of their Executive Board. Laura is also on the Summer Groove committee for the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club's event in August. For fun, she enjoys being out on the water and when she does make it back on shore, is reminded why Nantucket defines every meaning of the word home.

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NSPIRE

Knit Pick LET THIS DESIGNER PULL THE WOOL OVER YOUR EYES

WRITTEN BY JEN LASKEY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE

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47


C

harlotte Hess is a bit of an enigma.

woven, layered and textured with silk, handmade

though I’ve lived in several cities, I think I’m

You’d expect to find a highly creative,

wool, mohair, organic cotton, alpaca, and even pa-

more of a rural country person at heart,” says

award-winning, bold, young designer

per yarn.

Charlotte.

ion-forward culture capital like New York,

Originally from Chicago, Charlotte began coming

Basing her business on Nantucket was not

London, Paris or Milan. Instead, the head designer

to Nantucket when she was in high school. She

initially part of the plan, but it became more

behind the luxury knit label isobel & cleo has

received her Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degree from

appealing as she began taking into account

like her to be climbing the ranks in some fash-

how hard it is for young

decided to set up shop here on this little island out in the Atlantic.

“Even though I’ve lived in several cities, I think I’m more of a rural country person at heart”

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in big fashion cities like New York and London. “I still think it’s hard on

She sources yarns and

48

designers to get noticed

materials from around the world, including on is-

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and lat-

Nantucket,” says Charlotte, “but there’s obvi-

land at fLoCk and occasionally weaves raw wool

er earned her Masters degree from The Glasgow

ously not as much competition for recogni-

from friends’ local sheep into her garments and

School of Art, and held positions at Free People,

tion here as there is in a place like New York

designs on Nantucket. The designs themselves

Karen Walker, Nom*D, Salaam, and Blake Stan-

City.” She also says she loves Nantucket “be-

are entirely innovative. Some are slinky and form-

dard. Two years ago, she decided she wanted to

cause of both its seclusion from, and acces-

fitting, while others are unabashedly oversized,

stop moving around and settle somewhere. “Even

sibility to, the larger cities.”


B

eing a Nantucket castaway certainly

For the first time, Charlotte is now designing

hasn’t held Charlotte back in her

her collections to follow the traditional fashion

career. In 2011, she won the Emerging

seasons. This is a shift from previous seasons, in

Designers Competition at Charleston Fashion

which Charlotte put her energy into creating cus-

Week, and at the end of 2012, she became a

tom work regardless of the time of year. She’ll be

finalist for the Ecco Domani Fashion Fund.

presenting two collections a year: spring/summer

“It was a huge honor to have made it that far,

and fall/winter.

as previous winners have included Proenza Schouler, Tom Scott, Rodarte and Alexander

The current collection was the first she’d

Wang,” says Charlotte. This year, she plans to

actively designed for warmer seasons. “Nor-

apply for the International Festival of Fashion

mally I do a lot of research, consume loads

and Photography’s renowned Hyères competition.

of fashion magazines, music, movies, social media, blogs, et cetera, searching for inspira-

Charlotte’s interest in art and fashion began at

tion. But this time around, I was more focused

an early age. Her mother had been a model and

on wearability and functionality of a season

photographer’s assistant and later pursued a

I hadn’t designed into before,” she explains.

career at the Art Institute of Chicago, so Charlotte was exposed to creative and fashionable

You can check out Charlotte’s creations at her

people throughout her childhood. She also

studio upstairs on 2 Union Street and Scrub Oak

credits her early Montessori education with

on Nantucket or online at isobelandcleo.etsy.com.

helping her establish the hands-on exploratory

Her garments are also sold at Tamara’s Vieux

style of learning that would lead to her passion

Carre in Laguna Beach, CA; Made in Auckland,

for “sculpting” clothing by hand. “I just really

New Zealand; and the Glasgow School of the Arts

love the tactile materiality of creating cloth from

Shop in Glasgow, Scotland.

scratch as opposed to going to a store and buying yardage of fabrics. Plus, I also think that knitwear is more forgiving and can look more professional using far less specialized machinery than, for example, wovens,” says Charlotte.

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49


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N magazine

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NSPIRE

Stroke OF GENIUS

WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE

Before the dawn spills out over Nantucket, master painter Sergio Roffo has already assembled his

easel, mounted his canvas and prepared his paints. He watches as the soft morning light ignites blades of sea grass and turns the sand into gold. His first strokes come from a pencil, a quick graphite sketch to establish composition and to lay in dynamic shadows that will soon disappear

in the rising sun. And with that, the race is on to finish the painting. “Every three or four hours the sun shifts and it’s a whole new painting,” Roffo says. “That’s why I try to really work fast before the light shifts.”

Sergio Roffo is a plein air purist,

beginning and finishing every one of his landscape paintings entirely in the field. While it takes him about four hours from start to finish, when you ask Roffo how long a specific work took to paint, he will say “thirty years.” The skills of painters like Roffo do not evolve overnight– they

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take decades to perfect.

52


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53


I

nterestingly enough, Roffo’s artistic calling came not from

entered competitions, learned other mediums, and painted, painted,

within a studio, but from an office in corporate America. After

painted. The tipping point finally came when he moved his family

graduating from Vesper George School of Art in Boston, he

to the South Shore of Massachusetts. There, Roffo met his muse.

worked as an audiovisual designer for Fidelity Investments. A cushy

“I love to paint the serenity and peacefulness of coastal scenes,” he

job complete with benefits and an office overlooking Boston Harbor,

says. “Something about the ocean and the water made me a marine

Roffo thought he had it made. But within months, the view from

painter. And I have a deep passion for that.”

the 38th floor on Devonshire Street started losing its luster. Every day during lunch, Roffo would watch a plein air painter in Copley

Roffo also has a deep passion for Nantucket. For thirty years, he

Square and dream of having that same artistic freedom. “So one day

has migrated from the mainland to set up his easel every summer.

I went back to the office and wrote a letter of resignation,” he says.

He searches out Nantucket’s hidden gems, capturing the essence of

“And that was it man, I was on my own: no health insurance, broke,

this place with his trademark palette and brushstroke. On the third

painting Boston Harbor islands.”

week of August, Roffo has a solo show at Quidley Gallery that regularly sells out. In the meantime, you can catch Sergio Roffo in the

Roffo began working in watercolors. He set up an easel on the banks

predawn hours around the island setting up his easel and preparing to

of Boston Harbor every day with a sign advertising $200 per paint-

capture Nantucket under the shifting sun. “Every day here is a gem,”

ing. Thus began his years of paying dues. He joined artists’ asso-

says Roffo. “Painting allows me to freeze time for others to enjoy.”

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ciations, trained under master painters like Robert Douglas Hunter,

54


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6+2:52206

7+286$1'6 2)

352'8&76 21($''5(66

1$178&.(7¶635(0,(5 +20('(6,*1&(17(5

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NVESTIGATE

THE

NANTUCKET

EXPRESS

N magazine

WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

58

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE


IS THE NEW CAPEFLYER TRAIN SERVICE AN EXPRESSWAY TO NANTUCKET OR JUST A TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE? N MAGAZINE CLIMBS ABOARD TO FIND OUT. Escaping to Nantucket on a Friday in August can be slow torture. By the time you’ve punched the clock, packed the car and grabbed the kids, I-93 south is backed up to the Zakim Bridge and Nantucket might as well be in the Pacific. Flight is always an option, but with limited seating, timeconsuming security and costly tickets, making the commute by air isn’t exactly a breeze. Enter CapeFlyer, the newest (old) way to travel from downtown Boston to Hyannis and on to Nantucket in under three hours. The train service has attracted national attention this summer, but many are still curious to know if this railroad revival will stay on track or eventually run out of steam. There is something timeless and charming about train travel. Not the subway per se, but long-distance locomotives crisscrossing the country to the slow methodical chant of its engine. The CapeFlyer possesses all this nostalgia while offering modern amenities, spacious seating and a concession car. After rattling out of South Station, the train snakes through the thickly treed outskirts of Braintree and Middleborough, then passes along the marshlands of Buzzards Bay where it creeps over the Cape Cod Canal Bridge, rolls through Sandwich and finally comes to a stop in Hyannis. There a shuttle waits to whisk you off to the ferry and on to Nantucket. The whole journey takes just over two hours and costs $35 round-trip. The CapeFlyer is not the first rail service to connect Boston and Cape Cod. During the late 1980s and early nineties, Amtrak’s Cape Codder ran a successful service until it lost federal subsidies. There was also the Cape Cod and Hyannis Railroad, a state-subsidized service owned by Nantucket Hotel’s Mark Snyder that connected the Cape with the MBTA’s Red Line via Braintree. It too was taken off the tracks when the Commonwealth CapeFlyer from also getting derailed?

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cut its subsidies. Considering this mixed track record, what’s to keep

59


I ‘ve always said I don’t want to have another rail service to Cape Cod if it has the potential to fail or not do well,” says Thomas Cahir, the head administrator of CapeFlyer. “I never bought into the argument that getting people from Cape Cod to Boston was the problem. But what we should do is try to get people from Boston down the Cape.” Cahir is the former Deputy Secretary of Rail, and he’s seen the train come and go over the years. Cahir’s campaign for CapeFlyer has been to entice passengers from Boston through improved bus services on the Cape, free bike transportation on the train and punctual travel time from Boston. The Old Colony Rail and Canal Bridge have also been improved in recent years, giving the CapeFlyer a smoother more efficient ride. Add rising gas prices driving passengers out of their cars and into trains, and CapeFlyer is on the fast track to success. Cahir says the service will easily exceed its operation cost of $162,000, and there is no limit on how the service will be expanded in the years to come. One might think that the bus and airline services from Boston to the Cape were not thrilled to see the train’s return. However, Cahir says the train’s competitors have actually been its biggest fans. “Cape Air’s CEO Dan Wolf has a big CapeFlyer sign in his office in the State House and he’s been very outspoken in support of our efforts,” says Cahir. “He sees the opportunity to coordinate and Cape Air has been incredibly supportive.” This collaboration extends to the ferry, bus and local South Shore trains, and schedules have been designed to make the passenger experience as smooth as possible down the line. “It’s really been amazing to me, the genuine enthusiasm expressed by everybody that’s been involved with it,” says Cahir. Capeflyer will run round-trip once a day from Friday to Sunday until Labor Day. Beyond beating the traffic, the service makes a weekend trip to the Cape and the Islands a more leisurely experience for families traveling with kids. Just ask the Contrerases of Dorchester, who were on a Sunday morning trip from Boston. With two children under the age of

might be more about the destination than the journey, you might as well

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enjoy the journey along the way.

61

four and a grandmother in tow, Mr. and Mrs. Contreras relaxed on the two hour journey south, playing board games with their daughters and having a picnic lunch. So while vacationing on the Cape and the Islands


STRUCK WRITTEN BY TIM KELLEY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG HINSON

ew England Cable News meteorologist Tim Kelley explores the history and science behind Nantucket’s thunderstorms. On October 1, 1987, a single lightning bolt exploded from the sky right over Sunset Hill, just up from Nantucket Harbor. The Boston Globe reported that the “bolt came out of nowhere,” hitting the chimney of the Jethro Coffin House, sending it clear across the street and causing severe damage to the Oldest House on the island. The heat from the

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strike was so intense that it melted the glass in the windows.

62


NVESTIGATE

hile Tampa, Florida is the lightning capital of the country, the storms that do hit Nantucket seem to intensify and last longer as they pass over the island. The meteorological reason for this is known as “the heat island effect.” Surrounded by cool ocean water, the warmth of the island serves as a refueling station for storms that would otherwise dissipate as they move off the mainland. Nevertheless, lightning is incredibly unpredictable, and it’s nearly impossible to pinpoint the time and place it strikes. Just ask the Boston Pops, which had to cancel their performance last August for the first time in sixteen years due to the threat of lightning. Photographer and island resident Larry Cronin happened to be driving by when the Jethro Coffin House was struck back in 1987. “I was there before the fire department,” he says. “The house was all closed up and it appeared the moist air inside expanded rapidly, breaking joints at the frame.” Lightning burns five times hotter than the sun, over 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit, so when it hit the house, the air molecules inside expanded instantly, setting off a bomb of pressure that blew out the studs. Fire fighters contained a small fire from the strike, but the house required extensive reconstruction to “build a new frame within the old skin,” as Cronin puts it. “But it was also an opportunity for historians to learn more about the original construction of 1686.” Dodging lightning for three hundred years seems like a miraculous feat for the Jethro Coffin House. One has to wonder about the frequency of house fires caused by thunderstorms on the island. Nantucket Fire Department chief Mark McDougall says the storms seem to come in waves. “Some years are very busy, others not so much,” says McDougall. “But when storms do only have so many resources to fight fires.”

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hit Nantucket, we get stretched out pretty thin; we

63


his was the case on August 5, 2010 when a cold front came across the sound and met a hot humid morning on Nantucket. At 12:45 p.m., lightning hit a home at 237 Polpis Road, leaving it heavily damaged, but not a total loss. Unfortunately, the same could not be said for the home in Monomoy, which was also struck by that storm. The home was completely destroyed. A similar direct hit rocked the UMass Boston Field Station not once, but three times on August 11th last year. “People driving on Polpis Road said it was the loudest and brightest hit that they had ever seen… they almost drove off the road,” says Dr. Sarah Oktay, the Field Station’s director. “[Resident naturalist and education coordinator] Len Germinara was there when it hit, and he said that he saw the flash and heard thunder immediately, then his laptop went poof.” Although there was no fire caused, the three strikes destroyed $20,000 of equipment. “Equipment that was screwed onto the wall was blown across the room and would have drilled me if I was there,” Dr. Oktay says. When the storm passed, the team went outside to find its “mast antenna” split down

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the middle like Robin Hood would another arrow.

64


quipment that was screwed onto the wall was blown across the room and would have drilled me if I was there” —Dr. Sarah Oktay

There are procedures for lightning storms. If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to get struck by lightning. As the saying goes, “When the thunder roars, go indoors.” Moments before lightning strikes, an ionized channel between the cloud and the ground forms what’s known as a “leader.” If you’re within that leader, your hair will stand on end and you are at high risk of getting struck. Retreat indoors immediately. However, even indoors it’s still possible to get struck. Lightning can travel through telephone and electrical cords, plumbing, and even the ground itself. There’s a legend on Nantucket of a man in ‘Sconset being struck and killed inside his bedroom because he was holding on to the metal frame of his bed when a bolt hit his home. Many more thunderstorms will light up Nantucket’s sky in the months and years to come. It’s one of the many meteorological phenomena that we scientists and curihope is that we can live to tell the story.

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osity seekers yearn to witness and learn from. Our only

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66

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NVESTIGATE

The

BONITO WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTO BY GEORGE RIETHOF/OVER NANTUCKET

triangle

In August, the best place to fish in Nantucketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waters can also to be the most dangerous. All at once, it is the most prolific and potentially dangerous fishing spot off Nantucket. Located just outside Madaket Harbor, a horseshoe shaped sandbar acts as the doorstep to the Atlantic Ocean, holding big fish, but also big waves. For those in the know, this stretch of water is the Bonito Bar. Every August, on the incoming tide, boats stream out of the harbor headed for this legendary spot. Before they can get there, however, they need to navigate through a breaker zone that can quickly put captain and crew at the mercy of the sea. Back in 2008, two fishermen were into the water. The boat was still in gear and left the men bobbing in the churning Atlantic. Thankfully, they were able to swim to shore with the incoming tide. As for the fate of their boat: Nearly four years later it washed up on the shores of Spain. Photo courtesy of Massachusetts Environmental Police

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on the Bonito Bar casting into the rip at sunset when a wave knocked them both

67


C

aptains call it “the opening,” “the cut,” the channel between Smith Point and Tuckernuck Island that serves as the western entrance to the Atlantic and the passageway to the Bonito Bar. Every captain in Madaket has a story about the opening. Mine first came when I was just a mate.

The captain and I were leaving Madaket Harbor with two clients, heading west for the bar. The sets were rolling in as they usually did, big thick swells encroaching from the depths offshore, and then standing up over the shallows and avalanching into white water. We idled just outside the opening and watched the sets roll through. Knowing the waves’ cadence is crucial; it tells you when to go, when to wait and when to pack it up and head back to the dock. The waves can be as tall as two-story buildings, but if the sets are rolling in predictably, a boat can pass through them reasonably unscathed. However, once a boat commits to going, there’s no turning back until it’s past the breaker zone. Turning around in the waves is a risky maneuver that can quickly flip a boat. The rule of thumb is to heave to, keep the bow to the waves and take the sea head on. With all hands on deck, we left the calm of Madaket Harbor, passing between the pinching fingers of Smith Point and Tuckernuck’s Whale Shoal, and began to bob and weave through the breaker zone. We charged up the walls of water one after another, the boat launching off the back of each wave and slamming violently into the trough. We were making pretty good headway when suddenly a massive wave rose up out of nowhere. It was twice the size of the rest and already breaking: a rogue wave. The captain threw down the throttle but it was too late. The wave collapsed on top of us, shattering an inch-thick Plexiglas windshield and filling the twenty-six-foot boat with kneedeep water. The clients were washed to the stern, flailing on their backs like helpless turtles. The captain suffered a deep gash across his fist. And just like that, the trip was over. We limped back to the dock, wet and bloody, but also feeling pretty lucky. As with everything on the ocean, the Bonito Bar demands respect. It’s a fickle stretch of water that can go from flat to furious with the turn of the tide. For years, only a handful of fishermen knew about the Bonito Bar phenomenon: In mid-August on the incoming tide, torpedo-like tuna called Atlantic bonito show up to feed. Eventually the local secret got out, and today the Bonito Bar looks more like downtown Nantucket in the height of summer, with tens of boats anchored just outside the breaker zone waiting for the tuna bite to turn on. Just to get out to the bar, captains become like matadors motoring around the charging waves. The ocean seems to know exactly when your guard is down because that’s the moment she lowers her horns and

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impales you.

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Even the island’s most experienced captains can get caught on the wrong side of a wave. Earlier this spring, seventeen-year veteran charter captain Jason Mleczko was headed out of the opening with four clients in five- to six-foot seas when three waves climbed higher than the rest. “It was a series of waves I’d never seen before,” Captain Mleczko says. “They were skyscrapers in a sea of houses.” Mleczko took the first two waves on the bow, knocking the boat to the left and then the right. The third wave came from entirely different angle, hitting the boat almost at its stern. “It was on top of me immediately, making turning into it impossible,” he says. Mleczko tried outrunning it, but the massive wave picked them up and flipped the boat upside down. Mleczko and a client were stuck under the boat, which was pinned on the Bonito Bar. They were able to swim to the surface and climb up on to the hull, but waves continued to crash and washed them back into the sea. When they finally gained purchase of the hull, Mleczko began searching for the other clients. Anxious minutes ticked by as he scanned the water and yelled unrelentingly. Finally they popped up about eighty feet away. Mleczko screamed for them to swim. And swim they did, driven past exhaustion by their will to survive. With everyone now clinging to the hull and without a radio or cell phone, they began the waiting game. The outgoing tide pulled them further and further away from Nantucket, and swimming to shore was absolutely not an option. Mleczko rallied morale by insisting that the Coast Guard was looking for them, but in the back of his mind he knew that it was too foggy for a helicopter to be deployed and it would take the Coast Guard cutter at least three hours to motor to them. Instead, Mleczko knew who was coming for them: his father. After three and a half hours clinging to the hull in the cold, a familiar sight motored across the horizon. Mleczko jumped to his feet, waving an orange life jacket. But the boat kept going. His shoulders sank and dread washed over him as he watched their only hope pass by. Then suddenly the boat made a hard turn, charging through a wave and bearing straight at them. Mleczko’s father, Captain Tom, was coming to their rescue.

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Captain Jason Mleczko with his father and Captain Tom Mleczko (Photo by Kit Noble).


“I

don’t want people to think of the Bonito Bar as an evil place. It is a spectacular place, but you have to respect it and I always have,” Mleczko says. “But in a matter of two seconds I went from full control to the mercy of the sea.” He continues, “Will I be more careful? I guess, but I’ve always been careful. I guess now I’ve seen a punch the sea can throw that I didn’t know it had.”

So what is it about the Bonito Bar that draws so many fishermen? When the tide is right, it can be the best fishing spot in the world. In August, on the incoming tide, the bar’s namesake, Atlantic bonito, come to feed. Despite their resemblance, Atlantic bonito are not to be confused with False albacore that migrate here in early fall, or skipjack that are caught in more tropical waters. Perfectly hydrodynamic and packed with meat, bonito cruise the Atlantic in schools in search of bait. Although there are striped bass and bluefish mixed in, there is no question when a bonito strikes. Line screams off the reel and becomes like piano wire slicing through the surface. The fight leaves biceps aching and voices hoarse from hoots and hollers. Once landed, the five- to ten-pound bonito flails stiffly. Its tiny scales make its body like velvet that beams blue, green and silver when the sun catches it right. Indeed, “bonito” means “beautiful” in Spanish. This beauty is only enhanced by its flavor. One charter captain is infamous for making his clients ritualistically eat the heart of the fish right there on the boat. Others filet it up and serve it dockside, raw with soy sauce. Not quite as savory as bluefin but equally delicious, raw dayboat bonito redefines “fresh” on Nantucket. There are many theories amongst captains on why the Bonito Bar fishes so well in August on the incoming tide, but they all boil down to bait. When the tide rushes towards Madaket in an easterly direction, it hits the Bonito Bar and creates what’s known as an upwelling. Nutrients are driven up from the sand, and then baitfish begin to congregate in thick groups that sizzle on the surface like French fries left in the greaser too long. The bonito run up and down the bar, devouring sand eels and bending fishing rods from one boat to the next like dominos. And so it is that the Bonito Bar lures more and more fishermen out from the safety of Madaket Harbor for a chance at hooking up with the bar’s namesake. It’s one of the many unique marine ecosystems that makes Nantucket a fishermen’s mecca. Even more so, it’s a section of water that produces some of the most skilled boatmen on the Atlantic, teaching them lessons with every furrow of its fury. In the end, however, there is only one lesson to learn: Respect the ocean, because while she can give you the time of

your

life,

she can take it away

just

as easily. N magazine

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WHEEL WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE

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THE INSPIRING STORY OF ALISON VAN FLEET & TYLER LEVINE

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LOVE

NDEPTH

T

he romance of Alison Van Fleet and Tyler Levine began like most any other. The two first met at a concert a decade ago, but it

wasn’t until six years later that they started dating on Nantucket. Once they got together they stayed together. Their love of sports, music, travel and adventure became the backdrop to their relationship, and they began cataloging the many memories that make up a shared life. But Alison and Tyler faced bigger obstacles than most couples, and their perseverance to this day brings sharp focus to the true meaning of love. “When we first started to date, I could still drive,” Alison says. “Now I’m not driving. I’m not really walking, and I’m in my wheelchair.” Alison suffers from a rare form of mitochondrial disease, a degenerative neuromuscular disease that attacks the “powerhouse of the cell” known as the mitochondria. She has gradually lost the ability to speak clearly and walk unassisted. Her eyelids droop slightly and she appears restless sitting next to Tyler. Before she started using a walker and then a wheelchair, many people who came across Alison thought she was intoxicated because of her slurred speech and lack of balance. Eventually she got tired of people staring and snickering and decided to hand out business cards explaining her condition.

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Alison lifts up her shirt just above her naval to reveal large scars across her abdomen from her liver transplant. A donor was found in the eleventh hour, and Alison has since made the long painful recovery out of the hospital. Sixteen years later, her life is largely dictated by mitochondrial disease, which was the root of her seizures from the beginning. “It is progressive, and there isn’t a cure,” Alison says. “I take vitamins to slow it down.” Between one thousand and four thousand children are diagnosed with mitochondrial disease each year, and Alison’s type, known as POLG, is exceptionally rare. “I have to eat, exercise and sleep. If I don’t have those things my body stops working,” she says. And that’s where Tyler comes in. “Tyler is constantly pushing me to exercise and he really wants me to keep my body moving,” Alison says. “And I really, really like that about him because I know for a fact that my disease needs it.” As the disease takes more and more away from Alison, Tyler doubles down his determination to keep them living an active life. “I remember one of the first things we did when we got together; we walked Tupancy Links and there was one section at

S

the end where she needed to hold my hand, ometimes things are not as they appear, the card reads. I am not drunk or on drugs. My

but other than that she was walking the

balance and coordination are not good and my speech is slurred because I suffer from

whole thing,” Tyler says. “When we went

a debilitating neuromuscular condition called mitochondrial disease. I am disabled

to Maui, I dragged her up a mountain to

because of this disease. I have lost the ability to walk straight and speak clearly, all things

go see a bamboo forest. We did a tandem

most people take for granted. I try very hard to live a full life, but it is filled with many challenges…

kayak trip in Belize. A lot of that stuff I am glad that we did when we did it, because

Alison’s challenges began in 1997 while she was a student at Ithaca College. She suffered

that would be a much different experience

from multiple seizures and doctors misdiagnosed her with epilepsy. They prescribed her an

now.” That’s not to say that the couple is

anti-seizure drug called Depakote, but the seizures continued. Then Alison became gravely

exactly taking it easy. Far from it.

ill. Her parents rushed her to the hospital only to find out that she had full-blown liver failure. The Depakote had destroyed her liver. Doctors waited to see if her liver would recover with

Brought up on Nantucket, Tyler worked at Young’s Bicycle Shop for many years

She ran a 107-degree temperature, her lungs filled up with fluid, her blood wouldn’t clot and she eventually went into a coma for ten days.

and he’s a lifelong cyclist. He’s since left Young’s to spend more time with Alison, but his passion for cycling remains. Over the course of their relationship, Tyler has found

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bikes for Alison to ride. She has a recumbent

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medicine, but Alison’s body continued to spiral out of control. She ran a 107-degree tem-

tricycle that she cruises around town, and

perature, her lungs filled up with fluid, her blood wouldn’t clot and she eventually went into

when Tyler is training for a triathlon, she

a coma for ten days. When she awoke, Alison was paralyzed. The doctors said her body was

rides behind him while he runs. Together

“metabolically deranged,” and she would need a liver transplant to survive. At the time there

they ride a specially designed tandem bike,

were over 17,000 people on the waiting list for a liver transplant. Alison was given Status 1,

with Alison pedaling recumbent in the front

indicating that if she didn’t receive a transplant in a matter of days she would die.

and Tyler pedaling from behind.


These two aren’t just cruising leisurely

two guys came in behind us all sweaty, and

sumed he would be with Alison, and they

down the bike path; they’re doing rides

they said between breaths: ‘My God we’ve

should be married. Their wedding is being held

that can humble even the strongest cyclists.

been chasing you guys this whole time!’”

this October for one very special reason: Alison wants to walk down the aisle. Every

This past winter, they road 113 miles down Highway 1 to Key West, braving traffic,

This fall, Alison and Tyler are embarking on a

year her ability to walk becomes more and

tight bike lanes and the Florida heat. The

very different kind of adventure together. Tyler

more impaired. So every day when Alison

summer before that, they pedaled from Hy-

proposed to her this spring and they will be mar-

and Tyler climb onto their bike, that’s what

annis to Provincetown with no assistance—

ried on Nantucket at the Unitarian Church in

they’re training for: to keep her legs strong

just them and the bike. When Tyler com-

October. The decision to get married was not an

enough to walk down the aisle.

…when life seems to be an uphill battle, Alison and Tyler prove that the best cure is to just keep pedaling. peted in the Iron Team Race this past July,

easy one. Tyler spent two weeks backpacking

“Live in the moment,” Alison says, when

Alison joined him for the bike leg. It was

alone in the Grand Canyon, meditating on mar-

asked what message she wants to get out

their second year in a row competing to-

riage and his relationship with Alison. “I wanted

to the world. Indeed, Alison and Tyler

gether. And she wasn’t just catching a free

to be able to stand up at the altar and have the

demonstrate that in the face of life’s inevi-

ride— Alison cranked the pedals. While

person say ‘in sickness and in health’ and be

tability, we only have the present to hold

the disease affects her fine muscle control,

able to say ‘I do’ and really mean it,” he says.

to. Whether in sickness or in health, love

her strength remains. Tyler recounts a ride

“Because things have certainly gotten challeng-

isn’t always easy, but it can be the force

down the Cape when a cyclist on a road bike

ing, and will probably continue to get challeng-

that brings hope and strength and focus to

pulled behind them and started drafting off

ing, and I needed to know that I could do that

what is truly important in life. And when

of them. Alison wasn’t having it. “All of a

and that I wasn’t going to freak out and run

life seems to be an uphill battle, Alison and

sudden I feel Alison pedaling a little faster

away.” At the end of his sojourn in the Grand

Tyler prove that the best cure is to just keep

and a little faster, and we dropped him,” he

Canyon, Tyler realized that he had always as-

pedaling.

says. “When we got to Woods Hole, these

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“There is such a nice feeling to the Pops event, with families and people coming together to enjoy each other with beautiful music and fireworks. It feels like it’s out of a Norman Rockwell painting.”

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— Katie Couric

84


ANCHOR INTERVIEW BY ROBERT COCUZZO & BRUCE A. PERCELAY

For decades, America has turned to Katie Couric for the news. She has interviewed the most influential people, covered the most significant events, all in the same trustworthy Katie Couric fashion that millions have come to love. This August, the Nantucket Cottage Hospital has turned to Katie to host this summer’s Boston Pops concert on Jetties Beach. In celebration of the event, N Magazine spoke to Katie about her love for Nantucket, her inspiring advocacy work for cancer research and awareness and about some of the highlights from her award-winning career.

N: You’ve hosted the Boston Pops on Nantucket several times. What do you love about this event? KATIE COURIC: It’s a fantastic night. The setting is beautiful. I love to support the Boston Pops because they really are an American institution. There is such a nice feeling to the event, with families and people coming together to enjoy each other with beautiful music and fireworks. It feels like it’s out of a Norman Rockwell painting. N: You originally co-hosted the event with beloved Nantucket summer resident Tim Russert. KATIE COURIC: I was very touched when Tim initially asked me to be the co-host with him. That was such a special night. I know how much he loved Nantucket and he loved the Pops and the whole occasion, so I think it’s just especially meaningful for me

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PHOTO BY BEN BAKER/ REDUX

to continue that tradition that was started with Tim.

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N: Have you made strides bridging that gap? KATIE COURIC: Stand Up to Cancer has been very gratifying for me because we have raised about $280 million. More importantly, we are trying to change the paradigm of cancer research by getting scientists to actually work together. That’s really our mandate: Scientists have to share their resources and wisdom to try to come up with more effective ways to battle this disease. They are starting to make significant strides and I think the idea of pooling our resources is really starting to bear fruit and lead to some very exciting new breakthroughs. N: Over the course of your career, you’ve interviewed some of the most influential people of our time. Who’s impressed you most? KATIE COURIC: There are a lot of incredibly admirable people I’ve had the opportunity to interview from all different walks of life. David McCullough is one, because he is such a prolific author and erudite, but also a gentleman. I’ve always loved Hugh Jackman because he is so kind and generous and fun. Sandra Day O’Connor, who I thought was highly intelliKatie Couric hosting the Boston Pops on Nantucket in 2012. Photo by Gene Mahon.

N: In terms of your time on Nantucket, can you share with us some of your favorite island activities? KATIE COURIC: Let’s see, I love biking there. I love the beaches, obviously. I love Aunt

Goldberg because she always speaks her mind in such an unabashed way. I really liked interviewing Lil Wayne, because it’s always interesting to interview somebody who is so

love Provisions and their “Turkey Terrific.” I love walking around the docks and looking

different than you and to learn from them

at the boats, and trying to get an invitation to come aboard for a cocktail. I love Main Street

and understand their experiences. And Hillary

just because it’s great for people watching. Oh, and I love going to the Summer House and

Clinton because I think she is so intelligent

getting to play the piano with Jamie [Howarth]. He’s so much fun and generous to let me

and has always had grace under pressure.

N: You are such an inspiring advocate for cancer research and awareness. Can you tell us more specifically about your efforts and where your inspiration comes from? KATIE COURIC: Nothing is as motivating as a profound personal loss. When my husband died, I felt so powerless during the course of his illness. Once we lost Jay, I wanted to try to help other people who I knew felt equally, if not even more, powerless than I did. I felt very strongly about trying to share what I had learned over the course of Jay’s illness, about the fact that colon cancer in particular is highly preventable. There are screenings and opportunities that I wanted people to take advantage of. Then I wanted to extend my advocacy to all kinds of cancer because of the shrinking federal budget for cancer research. I wanted to use whatever pull I had to increase awareness and hopefully motivate people N magazine

growing up on a ranch in Arizona. Whoopi

Leah’s Fudge Shop. My daughter Ellie and I go to Cisco Brewery and Bartlett’s Farm. I

sit next to him and play the upper keys.

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gent and had such an interesting background

to support cancer research. There are so many great ideas out there and so many incredibly talented scientists, but only one in ten meritorious research proposals is funded. We have a huge gap between exciting, potentially groundbreaking ideas and the money to support those ideas.


N: Your interview with Sarah Palin arguably changed the tides of her politiacal career. What was your philosophy going into that interview? KATIE COURIC: I think that was an important interview because people didn’t know much about Governor Palin at the time, and I felt that it was really important for voters to understand what made her tick, her political philosophy, how she would

“I wanted to use whatever pull I had to increase awareness and hopefully motivate people to support cancer research.”

govern and where she stood on a variety of issues. I know she feels I asked her “gotcha questions,” but honestly I was just trying to paint a portrait for the electorate of someone who was not that well known and who would be a heartbeat

away from the presidency. I felt that I asked questions that would show her accumulated knowledge, her political experience and her capacity to be a critical thinker. That’s basically what guided me in that interview. N: Media as a whole is experiencing something of a revolution, with print leading the charge toward going digital. How do you see television evolving in the next ten years? KATIE COURIC: I think that there will always be a place for quality television, but I do think increasingly you are seeing quality content migrate to digital platforms. People consume information how they want, where they want, when they want. Having information online provides an opportunity for people to consume it. People aren’t coming to the medium, the medium is coming to them, and as a result I think that more and more we’re going to see an expanding digital marketplace.

N: So many media personalities and executives have homes on Nantucket. Do you ever have any plans to have a little island cottage? KATIE COURIC: Well right now I have a house in East Hampton because it’s a little easier to get to for me from New York. If I do ever get a place in Nantucket, it will definitely be a place where I would like to spend more time. I definitely hope to at least make an

N: Katie thank you so much for taking the time with us. KATIE COURIC: Of course. I’m so happy to help. See you at the Pops!

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annual excursion every summer.

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NDEPTH

NATURAL

BORN STORYTELLER WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT KRIVICICH

The adventures of Nantucketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bestselling author and award-winning journalist, Charles Graeber Charles Graeber is drinking bourbon when we first meet at 12 Degrees East in downtown Nantucket. A stack of his overnight bestseller The Good Nurse, which he wrote in an attic just up the street from here, sits beside him on the bar. Signing the last copy, he throws back the bourbon and then motions to the bartender for another double. At forty-three years old, Graeber is in-demand, with editors of top magazines calling him up asking what he wants to write about next. And yet among the many stories that built his writing career, Charles Graeberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own might just be the most interesting.

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A

t six-feet-and-change with intense, arresting eyes, there is something rough-and-tumble about Charles Graeber that comes out in his writing. He doesn’t so much tell his

stories as heave them like flaming Molotov cocktails that set your worldview on fire. His literary currency is his voice, the sheer force of which conjures the likes of Hunter S. Thompson and Jack Kerouac. But twenty years ago, when he decided to go pro as a writer and poet, it was Graham Greene, the travel writer and MI6 spy of the 1930s that Graeber wanted to be most like. “I decided I was going to be this sort of literary cowboy capitalist involved in elicit snake milking and oil deals and wild characters,” Graeber tells me, the Kentucky bourbon wafting off his every word. “I’d make my fortune or at least see what’s happening and write something great about it.” Thus began his life off the grid, a time so unbelievable and so bizarre that perhaps the most amazing thing about it is he survived. His stories go on and on, clicking from one outrageous account to the next like rounds in a revolver. Joining the circus in East Berlin. Forging a Visa to get into Uzbekistan. Meeting the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala. Studying Tibetan medicine under a group of monks. Driving off a cliff during the Baja 2000. Living in Cambodia between the civil wars. Riding atop the Sihanoukville Express “Death Train” through the Elephant Mountains. Arriving at the Brandenburg Gate in time to help pull down

“I decided I was going to be this sort of literary cowboy capitalist involved in elicit snake milking and oil deals and wild characters” the Berlin Wall. Climbing a volcano during an eruption in Guatemala. Dragging a rowboat up the River Ganges in India. Betting his last $100 in a vodka-drinking contest in Phnom Penh. Crossing Haiti on horseback. Piranha fishing in the Pantanal. Falling in love, evading death, going mad and losing it all—over and over. Yet no matter where his adventures took him, no matter how many times he went for broke, Graeber always returned to the same place to collect himself and to write. “This is the place I come when the world kicks my ass,” he says, leading me up two flights of stairs in his family’s home on Ash Street. The attic is everything one might hope for in a writer’s study, complete with rustic exposed beams, old photographs and talismans from his many adventures. He reaches up to the windowsill and pulls down a dusty bottle of bourbon. “This bottle of Japanese Wild Turkey came out of a liquor store in the tsunami in the ruined city of Kamaishi where I was living,” he says. “Mr. Kenji Sano, who was eighty years old and who I spent a lot of time

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with gave this to me.”

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Graeber wasn’t always this in demand, however. In fact his rise has been anything but linear, taking him from the Beacon on Nantucket to the Budapest Sun in Hungary to the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia. The tipping point finally came after he narrowly escaped the civil war in Cambodia and returned once again to this attic on Nantucket. “I just sat down here and started to write out what I had seen,” Greaber says. “After seventy-five pages I thought

I

I had something and cold n 2011, Bloomberg Businessweek flew Graeber to Japan in the wake

called Harper’s Maga-

of the tsunami with instructions “to get as deep as you can into the

zine.” Harper’s bought

destruction zone and bear witness.” His resulting 10,000-word cover

the piece on the spot, his

story is a staggering piece of reporting that earned him the Overseas Press

first feature, and so be-

Club Award for “Best International Reporting.” This past spring, Graeber

gan Graeber’s career in

was nominated for a National Magazine Award for his profile of a swash-

magazines. “Nantucket

buckling Internet pirate named Kim Dotcom for Wired magazine. Again he

made it all possible,” he

deployed his dogged on-the-ground tactics to bring readers into the inner

says. “It’s the best place

workings of the most wanted cyber criminal in the world.

to support a writing habit.” Indeed, Graeber

recent

is now one of the most

success story is The Good

sought-after writers in

Nurse, a New York Times

the game today. “I think I can

bestseller about a deranged

change people’s minds,” he says.

serial killer responsible for

“I think I can make a weapon out

at least forty deaths on the

of words and use that weapon for

East Coast. The book is

good.”

Graeber’s

most

a horrifying page-turner Throughout my day with Charles

making. “The most prolific

Graeber, I continually heard the

serial killer in American

voice in my head saying, “Is this

history was talking only to

guy for real?” Sleeping on the

me, and I discovered there

streets of Budapest? Being blessed

was a cover up in hospi-

by the Dalai Lama in India? Writ-

tals over sixteen years,” he

ing a New York Times bestseller in

says. Graeber, who attended a year of medical school at Tulane between

an attic on Nantucket? It all sounds too phantasmal to be true, as if the

his adventures abroad, went from hospital to hospital dissecting the twisted

greatest story Charlie Graeber will write is his own. But it all checks

story of a nurse who killed patients indiscriminately for well over a decade.

out. Go online and there he is in a tuxedo accepting the “Best Interna-

The press coined the murderer, Charles Cullen, the “Angel of Death,” and he

tional Reporting” award in the same whiskey-tinged timbre he used

was sentenced to seventeen consecutive life sentences. Beyond the horror of

with me all day. The fact is that the adventures that defined Charlie

the murders, Graeber reveals the grave

Graeber’s formative years seem to have stripped him down to his es-

negligence of the hospitals that shuttled

sence. All the madness and chaos of a life off the grid yielded a writer

the killer from one facility to the next.

who doesn’t need to mince his words or stretch the truth. He tells his

N magazine

that was seven years in the

The Good Nurse has since been lauded

stories without compromise, and leaves it up to readers to buckle up

as our generation’s In Cold Blood, and

and take the ride. If they dare.

94

Show” to tell the story of how he gained

Graeber has appeared on programs like “60 Minutes” and “The Katie Couric exclusive access to the killer.


N magazine

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healing globally INTERVIEW BY BRUCE A. PERCELAY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL DISKIN

VANESSA KERRY HAS ALWAYS DONE IT HER WAY. Despite being the daughter of Secretary of State John Kerry, Vanessa Kerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drive comes from within. There is an unmistakable focus about Vanessa Kerry that suggests she is a person on a mission. The Harvard medical school honors graduate has taken a wider view of medicine that could someday dramatically impact world health. Kerry left Harvard medical school with not only a degree, but with a vision that has since become a growing nonprofit. Working in collaboration with the Peace Corps and Massachusetts General Hospital, Kerry is the CEO of Seed Global Health, an organization whose objective is to train doctors and nurses in resource-limited countries with the ultimate goal of making

N magazine

them self-sufficient. N Magazine interviewed Kerry at Mass General Hospital in Boston.

98


NDEPTH

N: You are remarkably focused. Were you this way when you were very young? DR. KERRY: I was that kid who always knew I wanted to be a doctor. There are pictures of me wearing glasses and carrying a microscope, because I thought that’s what you did to be a doctor and that’s how you got invested in that world. My family tells stories of me studying ants as they crawled across the pavement. They would argue that I am still overly focused—which is why I come back to the ocean here on Nantucket. It reminds me to lift my head up and enjoy my surroundings. N: What do you think influenced your early ambition? DR. KERRY: I grew up in a house of public servants, my father was in the Senate and my mother was very alone. I grew up with this great sense of being engaged with the world and people around you.

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focused on helping people that had experiences with depression and understanding that they were not

99


“We hope to create a new face of the United States in terms of health, and health diplomacy going forward.” — Vanessa Kerry

N: When you were in medical school, was it clear

to send doctors and nurses abroad to work

nurses abroad as medical and nursing educators

to you that you were going to be more than just

alongside local faculty in medical and nurs-

to help address gaps in access to quality health-

a doctor?

ing schools. These volunteers teach, train and

care that exist in so many countries. The World

DR. KERRY:

transfer skills to build a pipeline of health pro-

Health Organization estimates that in 57 coun-

I think of myself first and foremost as a doctor.

fessionals for resource limited countries. They

tries around the world, there is a critical shortage

What I am doing with my work and with Seed

actually go as Peace Corps volunteers to serve

of 2.4 million doctors, nurses and midwives. In

Global Health is about being a doctor and em-

in one-year posts as educators. Critically, Seed

Tanzania, for example, there are only 24 nurses

powering others like me to be able to both be

Global Health provides debt repayment sup-

and one doctor for every 100,000 people. In the

doctors and nurses but also train other doctors

port through private philanthropy, to ensure

US we have 35 times as many nurses and 240

and nurses in countries where there are critical

that financial debt such as educational loans

times as many doctors. We urgently need to ad-

shortages of health care providers. I have always

or mortgages are not a barrier to participating

dress this critical shortage through training and

gravitated to doing medical work outside the

among these committed individuals.

professional development.

beyond my personal interaction with a single pa-

N: You co-founded Seed Global Health, and

N: Explain your interaction with the Peace Corps.

tient in an ICU. It really goes back to a trip I

have two impressive partners: Massachusetts

DR. KERRY: We have a unique public/private

took when I was 14 to Vietnam, and I was really

General Hospital and the Peace Corps. Can

partnership with the Peace Corps, which for

shocked at the poverty that I saw. I had seen pov-

you elaborate?

more than 50 years has been incredibly ef-

erty in this country and was aware of the great

DR. KERRY:

fective at placing volunteers in the field. Our

hospital, where my medical work would extend

Mass General has been an out-

team helps select the volunteers and sites, pro-

disparities we have here at home, but I was just shocked at what I saw in Vietnam. It made me re-

“I grew up with this great sense of being engaged with the world and people around you.”

vides technical field support and evaluates the effectiveness of the program. Seed Global

alize that I didn’t want to

Health provides loan repay-

just do medicine but that

ment stipends for eligible vol-

I wanted to be involved in global health, and that

standing supporter, and they’re actually Seed

unteers to remove one of the greatest barriers to

has very much influenced my choices on where

Global Health’s flagship academic partner-

service in this country: professional, educational

I went to medical school, who I worked with in

ship to create this program. David Bangsberg,

loans, mortgages, independent loans. The Peace

medical school, and what I’ve done with my ca-

who is the Director of the Center for Global

Corps provides structure and support in the host

reer.

Health, Mass General Hospital’s President Pe-

countries.

N magazine

ter Slavin and Chief Nurse and Vice President

100

N: So how does Seed Global Health work?

for Patient Care Services Jeanette Ives Erick-

N: The Peace Corps was created in a benevo-

DR. KERRY: Seed Global Health is a private non-

son each encouraged me to think about ways

lent way, however, one of the motivators was to

profit committed to cultivating stronger, sustain-

to bring this idea to fruition. The program Seed

increase America’s influence on the world by of-

able health systems by training a new generation

Global Health has started is in fact a partner-

fering a helping hand. What do you see as the

of physicians and nurses. We partner with the

ship with the Peace Corps. We work closely

diplomatic impact of what you are doing?

Peace Corps to provide the technical support

with the Peace Corps to send doctors and


DR. KERRY:

I think there’s potentially a huge

diplomatic impact of what we are doing. We are working with the Peace Corps to create the first United States program for medical and nursing service which means for the first time there is a systematic way that the United States government is supporting clinical training in these countries. We hope to create a new face of the United States in terms of health, and health diplomacy going forward. But I also think that there’s diplomacy any time you are engaging with another culture and you are making their priorities your priorities. N: Can you give some specifics as to Seed Global Health’s goals? DR. KERRY:

We are launching in Tanzania,

Malawi and Uganda this summer. There are 31 volunteers deploying in the program this year. When we go to Malawi, for example, we will partner with the University of Malawi, the Malawian public sector, and US government collaborators to help strengthen the ability for leadership—the Ministries of Higher Education and Ministry of Health’s—to reach their training and human resource goals. Training new doctors and nurses from Malawi will allow those individuals to in turn train additional future doctors and nurses. Ideally, in ten years, Malawi will have an independent, and country-owned health system supported by faculty from their own country, staffed with trained doctors and nurses in the field who will serve their communities for years to come.

Vanessa Kerry on a home visit in Uganda

N magazine

101


Vanessa Kerry and a Rwandan colleague

N: How can young doctors and nurses afford to

father’s is this idea that the United States has a

be volunteers?

lot to give and we not only influence the world,

DR. KERRY: We realized that recently trained

but the world is influencing us and we can’t turn

physicians would not be able to participate in this

away from that. I truly believe that health under-

program if they did not have the additional sup-

lies everything we do in the world. If you have a

port to pay back the average of $150,000 worth

healthy population, a population that lives longer,

of medical school debt that they accrue. Many

then you have the potential for greater economic

nurses also carry significant educational debt.

growth. Investments in health care ultimately

This year we will help eliminate nearly $700,000

can make governments more stable. So health is

worth of debt for 27 of our volunteers who would

deeply tied to everything we do with diplomacy.

not be able to serve without our support. N: What are some ways people can support Seed

N: In ten years what will be your definition of suc-

N: It seems poetic that at the exact time your fa-

Global Health?

cess?

ther is practicing his global vision, you are prac-

DR. KERRY: Support is welcome in all forms. Fol-

DR. KERRY: I take things day to day, so my cur-

ticing yours.

low us and our first–year volunteers via Twitter,

rent definition of success is seeing these 31 vol-

DR. KERRY: I actually feel extraordinarily hon-

Facebook or our website www.seedglobalhealth.

unteers—having completed orientation in DC in

ored that my work would even be referenced

org. Some of the first year participants are blog-

July—established in their host countries to build

along with my father’s, as I am extremely proud

ging, sending photographs and videos of what

partnerships and to train doctors and nurses. We

of him. He is the one person who has always said

they are doing and seeing.

have set an initial goal of 180 volunteers in 15

to me, “You never turn your back on someone in

countries in five years but it could be more or

need,” and I hold on to those words every day.

fewer. Success is really about the fact that we’re

I actually never told him what I was doing as I

growing, and seeing results on the ground. It is

began planning with the Peace Corps because I

in quality as much as quantity. Success for me

never wanted to complicate the picture and didn’t

may ultimately mean that we are thinking about

want anyone to think that Seed Global Health

ways to expand to additional professions and to

got started with assistance from my father. It’s

establish our program here in the US, for exam-

amusing to me that when my father was asked

ple, placing needed obstetricians or psychiatrists

about Seed Global Health during his vetting for

in rural areas here at home. Global is local too,

Secretary of State, he genuinely knew almost

and there is a deep need here at home.

nothing about it.Where my work aligns with my

N: What is your limit to growth? DR. KERRY: One of our greatest limitations is financial support which can help in ways ranging tial operations that keep the cogs moving. A gift of

HOW TO SUPPORT SEED GLOBAL HEALTH:

$5,000 can pay an entire year of medical or nurs-

$5,000 lets a trainee stay in school, pay their living costs and support

ing education for a local doctor or nurse. In-kind

their education throughout the year so they can become a doctor or nurse.

from supporting the sites to the un-sexy but essen-

support is also powerful—equipment for medical and nursing training.

$10,000 will support a site and provide electronic resources, help build a library and provide the necessary teaching and training equipment on that site.

$30,000 supports a stipend year enabling a physician or nurse to serve

N magazine

despite the burden of debt, reaching hundreds of students.

102

Donations of any amount are encouraged and to support the program email info@seedglobalhealth.org http://seedglobalhealth.org/contact-us/donate-now


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104

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SWIM ACROSS AMERICA WRITTEN BY JEN LASKEY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BEVERLY HALL

FIGHTING CANCER ON NANTUCKET ONE STROKE AT A TIME Swim Across America (SAA) returns to Nantucket this August for its second year thanks to an enthusiastic group of islanders who are swimming hard for a cure for cancer. “What’s unique about this year is that every penny we raise after expenses is going to stay on island,” says Jill Roethke, the event’s co-director. Net proceeds will support the Nantucket Cottage Hospital’s new N magazine

cancer center and Palliative & Supportive Care of Nantucket (PASCON) services. “If the annual

110

swim is successful, we hope to eventually be able to fund the hospital’s whole cancer program.”


NDEPTH

N magazine

111


T

he Roethke family knows firsthand what it’s like to cope with a cancer diagnosis on Nantucket. Just before participating in last year’s SAA event,

Jill’s husband, Steve, was diagnosed with

malignant melanoma. “He’s clear now,” she says. “But it puts things into perspective and changes your life.” A year ago, there were limited services available to them. “We did use PASCON, and they were great about addressing how to talk to our kids about cancer and how to talk to each other. Obviously, we’d never been faced with that before,” she explains. But other than the dermatologist Steve initially saw on island, all of his subsequent treatment took place at Dana-

Steve Roethke, a life-long swimmer, cancer fighter and SAA participant.

Farber. “Knowing what we went through,”

thing. I want to beat cancer. I want to see my

travel to Boston or Providence.” SAA is dedi-

says Jill, “I feel that if there’s a way people

kids graduate and get married. I want to grow

cated to raising money and awareness for cancer

can do some of their appointments here, it

old with my wife at my side. I want to help

research, prevention and treatment across the

would help a lot. Doing that long trip is re-

others do this too. This is why I swim.”

country with over 120 swimming-related events with swimmers at all levels from recreational to

N magazine

ally hard on families.”

112

Photo by Kit Noble

Former Olympic swimmer, Janel Jorgensen

Olympic. More than $45 million has been con-

“Swimming has always been a part of who I

McArdle heads up the national SAA organi-

tributed to beneficiaries, such as the Dana-Farber

am, and it’s responsible for the best things

zation as its president and CEO. She says

Cancer Institute and Mass General Hospital for

in my life…Twenty months ago, cancer be-

that with SAA’s help, Nantucket Cottage

Children’s Cancer Center in Boston, Women &

came another part of who I am, ” says Steve

Hospital is going to be “leveraging a cancer

Infants Hospital in Providence, Memorial Sloan-

Roethke. “Swimming has taught me that

doctor from Mass General Hospital to come

Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and

if you want something really bad, and you

to the island and provide the highest quality

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Fran-

work hard to get it, you can achieve any-

of care for islanders, without them having to

cisco, among many others.


Photo by Kit Noble

Island resident Caitlin Marcoux can attest to the great need for additional services on Nantucket. Marcoux was diagnosed with breast cancer this spring, and has often had to travel back and forth to Boston to receive treatment. “It is a heartbreaking reality that Nantucket needs additional support for its growing population of cancer patients,” she says. “I have been lucky enough to receive most of my chemotherapy treatments here at home. I have seen with my own eyes how important it will be for us to expand our oncology program.” She continues, “People ask me on a daily basis how they can help me in my fight against cancer: SAA’s Open Water Challenge is an empowering way to get involved in supporting not just me, but all of us in need.”

Photo by Kit Noble

N magazine

Caitlin Marcoux was diagnosed with Stage 2 invasive breast cancer this past March.

113


“People ask me on a daily basis how they can help me in my fight against cancer: SAA’s Open Water Challenge is an empowering way to get involved in supporting not just me, but all of us in need.”

N magazine

— Caitlin Marcoux

114


T

he first SAA event took place in 1987

SAA Nantucket’s goal is to raise $150,000

with a relay swim from Nantucket to

this year for cancer initiatives at Cottage Hos-

Hyannis, but until 2012, SAA hadn’t

pital and PASCON, so whether you swim like

returned to the island for a swim event

a pro, paddle along with a snorkel and mask,

since the mid-nineties.“Last year’s swim was

kayak, volunteer, or just cheer people on, join

really a 25 anniversary celebration for the

friends, neighbors and former Olympic swim-

organization and a way for us to go back to

mers, like McCardle and Craig Beardsley, as

where it all began and celebrate our progress,”

they “make waves” to fight cancer at Jetties

explains McArdle. “It was intended to be an

Beach on Saturday, August 24th at 8 a.m.

th

anniversary event only, however, there were

“I am so thrilled and honored to be making an

a bunch of local islanders that wanted to keep

impact right here in my community, especial-

it going, which we were very excited about.”

ly knowing how much more difficult it is to live with cancer when resources are far away.”

Island resident Jenny Paradis was one of them. She’d been a former high school and college

Co-director and swim coach Jim Pignato was

All-American swimmer, but had to give it up

also involved when SAA was doing the Nan-

abruptly in college when her brother became

tucket swims back in the mid-nineties. “It’s

terminally ill with a rare spinal tumor. Paradis

nice to come full circle now and to be run-

began swimming again when she moved to

ning the event—and to use my passion for

Nantucket. She participated in the early years

swimming to help support a great on-island

of the SAA and is partially responsible for the

cause,” says Pignato, who is not only an SAA

SAA’s return this year. Paradis has watched

Nantucket event co-director and coach of the

three of her colleagues deal with breast cancer

Nantucket High School swim team, he’s also

in the last five years and knows the toll it takes

coach of The Dolphins club team. “Altogether,

to go through diagnosis, consultation, treat-

we have about fifteen teams already signed up

ment and follow-up, while having to deal with

this year, and the majority of them are island-

the inherent travel time, expense, and anxiety.

based,” he says.

N magazine

115


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Nantucket Dental Society Event

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Peter Cusson & Dr. Lisa Cusson

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Patty & Brian Trava, Brian & Jess Runals

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Dr. Fern Selesnick & Ilyse Frisch

Heather Sapia, Dr. Jose Sapia, Anthony Bova, Dr. George Vosgerichian & Dr. Joseph Mauriello


Dr. Michel Mouravieff, Linda Mouravieff & Carol Varallo

Kyle Rofelli, Michael Wingrove & Mike Varallo

Dr. John Gofwalt & Becky Gofwalt, Deb Fischer & Dr. Tom Fischer

Dr. Gino DeSimone, Dr. Michael Varallo & Dr. Robert Vogel

Dr. Robert Jeffan, Dr. Anthony Caputo & Virginia Yeterian

Dr. Daniel & Elizabeth Barabas PHOTOS BY BRIAN SAGER


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Lifestyle

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BOSTON / NEW YORK / NEWPORT / NANTUCKET

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O

NE IF BY LAND NE IF BY SEA

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WRITTEN BY BRUCE A. PERCELAY

134

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE


Imagine that your driveway is your dock and your garage is your slip. Thus the appeal of Sealegs, an amphibious boat designed to bring the water to those who do not have the benefit of direct waterfront property. Sealegs is built with technology created for rapid response from beach to water using two hydraulic wheel motors that come up like landing gear once the boat is submerged. Resembling a Zodiac with three legs, the vessel looks like a fish out of water when on terra firma, but the convenience of being able to drive your boat to the town pier at Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beach, go for a cruise and then drive home, would be for many a dream come true.

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136

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N

Magazine decided to take this craft

If ever you want to make a grand entrance

amphibian emerge from the water, drive

out for a spin and got behind the

at a restaurant, try driving your boat from

up the ramp and head toward town.

wheel of a boat that drew more attention

the surf onto the beach and up to a ban-

than a UFO landing on Surfside. Engaging

quette table. If you cannot get the wait

At $180,000 per copy, Sealegs can in no

the marinized wheel motors with stainless

staff’s attention doing this, then clearly

way be considered inexpensive, but with

steel hubs and aggressive rubber tires, the

you have picked the wrong restaurant.

the cost of waterfront property, never

boat will not break any land speed records

While drinking and boating is not advised,

mind a boat slip, a yacht club member-

at a paltry six miles per hour maximum,

there is something about a signature Gal-

ship or even winter storage fees, owning

but it was able to keep up with crawl-

ley Beach “Moscow Mule” cocktail being

Sealegs could be a remarkably economical

ing traffic on North Beach Street as we

brought to your seat, which happens to

alternative for the dedicated boater. You

headed toward the Children’s Beach boat

be your captain’s chair. With the atten-

will never see Sealegs at the Daytona 500.

ramp. Driving the vehicle into the water

tion afforded a rock star, we finished our

However, try driving a stock car to Tuck-

past a pick up truck precariously unload-

libations, signaled to unsuspecting din-

ernuck. If only the boat knew how to mix a

ing a boat from its trailer made the con-

ner patrons that we were setting sail, and

“Moscow Mule” it would be perfect.

venience of this craft self-evident. Shifting

drove back down to the shore powered by

the power source from the wheels to the

a twenty-four-horsepower, 4-stroke Honda

prop, we pressed the retraction switch,

motor stowed beneath the driver’s bench.

pulling up the three legs and transform-

One could spend $300,000 for a new

ing our erstwhile car into an extremely

Ferrari F12 Berlinetta and not get the kind

competent, ridged inflatable 23’ 5” boat.

of looks one generates by having your

With a self-bailing V-shaped hull, and a 150 horsepower Evinrude ETEC outboard motor, we powered our way out the mouth of the harbor, easily cutting through threefoot chop, and returning for après boating drinks at Galley Beach.

signature copper cup

N magazine

GALLEY BEACH’S “MOSCOW MULE” . Fresh lime juice . Ginger beer . Grey Goose Vodka . Served chilled in

137


2013

Saturday, August 17 UNDER THE TENT AT THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB 61 SPARKS AVENUE

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7:30 P. M .

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Robin & EJ Harvey

Jerry Bennett and the

TIM RUSSERT SPIRIT OF HOPE

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AWARD RECIPIENTS

Sultans of Swing

To purchase tickets call 508 228 0158

N magazine

OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE

138

Nantucket Boys & Girls Club

P.O. Box 269 Nantucket, Massachusetts 02554

nantucketboysandgirlsclub.org

a positive place

for kids


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Beautifully designed 4 Bedroom 5.5 Bath home, tucked in behind Lincoln Circle. Open floor plan with light & bright interior spaces and multiple living areas. Incredibly large landscaped back yard affords the perfect setting for a pool. Steps Beach, Nantucket Community Sailing & Jetties beach nearby! Contiguous vacant lot available –contact agent for details. A Windwalker Exclusive-Mary Taaffe

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5/30/13 2:11 PM


NQUIRY

MEET THE

PROPRIETORS WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN SAGER

THIS SUMMER’S MOST HOTLY ANTICIPATED RESTAURANT OPENS ITS DOORS ON INDIA STREET Just when you thought Nantucket’s restaurant scene had it all, The Proprietors on India Street has served up a completely unique island dining experience. The creation of American Seasons owners Michael and Orla LaScola and former Great Harbor Yacht Club chef Tom Berry, The Proprietors moved into the old space of DeMarco Restaurant and gave the building a complete overhaul, from its rustic exposed beams and bricks down to its industrial-inspired appliances and antique china. With a delectable menu to match, diners are flocking to The Proprietors nightly. N Magazine caught up with one of The Proprietors’ proprietors, Orla LaScola, to see what they have cooking on India Street.

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N: What is unique about this space? ORLA LASCOLA: The beauty of this

J

space is that it allows for a number of different experiences: upstairs is light and airy and more relaxed; the front room is intimate and cozy; the bar is very large and allows for a comfortable spot to enjoy a full meal or have snacks with friends; and the green room is bright and loud due to its proximity to the bar.

N: The space has been given a complete overhaul; what was the philosophy behind your design choices? ORLA LASCOLA: We knew early on that we wanted the space to maintain the integrity and feeling of the old building that it is. Both Michael and Tom wanted the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nantucket feelâ&#x20AC;? of the space to be evident. So I worked with local artists: Evita Caune from Riptide Designs made the walls in the bar to look and feel like brushed metal, while Audrey Sterk and I worked on the grey blue tones for the wallpaper. I wanted to have the color tones of the ocean before storms. Over the winter we salvaged an old tin ceiling, which we used on the bar front. I spent the winter collecting antique plates, which we used for table dressing and for decoration. I had lights made from antique mason jars.

N: For diners who have come to love American Seasons over the years, what can they expect to be similar and different at The Proprietors? ORLA LASCOLA: Where American Seasons is focused on flavors from Nantucket and America, The Proprietors takes inspiration from a well-traveled, international palate. Michael and Tom are both committed to sustainable practices in farming and food preparation, N magazine

so their ethos about food and cooking

142

is similar. Both chefs will give you food with a modern twist, where freshness is of optimum importance.


N: You now have one of the longer bars in town. What was the thinking behind the wine and cocktail lists? ORLA LASCOLA: The wine list was designed by our wine director, Brittany Casos. Our bar manager Jared Johnson has worked very hard to design a cocktail and liquor program that is unique to Nantucket; we chose not to name the drinks, but have guests call them by number. N: What can you get at The Proprietors that isn’t available anywhere else? ORLA LASCOLA: Like American Seasons, this restaurant feels like Nantucket, you could not be anywhere else in the world. N: Has the owner of the building supported your efforts towards getting Proprietors up and running? ORLA LASCOLA: Bernard Chiu and his team have been so supportive during this process.

N: What elements of Chef Tom Berry’s culinary expertise are coming to the forefront for the first time? ORLA LASCOLA: The idea of the menu is to encourage people to share and have multiple plates. It’s a more family style of eating. We also offer a more traditional way coursing a meal should you wish. N: Is there a level of collaboration between Chef Michael and Chef Tom in designing the menu? How has their history together yielded an amazing culinary opportunity here? ORLA LASCOLA: It was always important that this was Tom’s menu. They have bounced ideas off each other, and the idea behind the menu was a collaboration between the three of us.

N: The restaurant is named after Nantucket’s original proprietors. How do you see your restaurant connecting to those early Nantucketers? ORLA LASCOLA: We love the idea of travel and discovery. This space is an opportunity to try something that is new to you, whether it’s food, wine or drinks. It feels like an old building slightly lost in time; you could walk past it, it’s unassuming. That is what Nantucket is to us: somewhere that feels unpresumptuous and relaxing. We in that they came here from somewhere else. None of us, Tom, Michael or I, are from Nantucket originally, but love that it is our home.

N magazine

feel connected to the original proprietors

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NSPIRE

SWIFT SERVICE WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE

DESPITE A HEARTBREAKING LOSS IN THE STANLEY CUP FINALS, THERE’S STILL A POSITIVE STORY COMING OUT OF THE BRUINS LOCKER ROOM THANKS TO A LOCAL CRAFTSMAN.

For most professional hockey players who met former Bruins great Cam Neely “around the glass,” it usually meant being on the receiving end of a body-crushing check. But for Nantucket resident Stephen Swift, his relationship with Neely and a pane of glass has been far less painful. For the last sixteen years, Swift has been Neely’s “glass guy,” commissioned to do ornate glass carvings for the Boston Bruins as well as for Neely’s nonprofit, The Neely Foundation for Cancer Care. A lifelong Bruins fan, Swift guides us around the Bruins

strain borne by patients and their families during treat-

locker room where names like Thorton, Seguin, Lucic and

ment. Particularly, he recognized that many patients were

Chara are printed on placards below a massive piece of

commuting from afar and needed a place to stay. The re-

glass he hand carved. This is the inner sanctum of Bos-

sult was the Neely House, a bed and breakfast style living

ton’s beloved team and Swift proudly points out his vari-

quarters located within Tufts Medical Center.

ous glass pieces hung in the Bruins’ den. “That’s called the third logo,” he says, nodding to a bear carved into the

What began as eight apartments in 1997 is today eighteen

glass. “Cam had me do it last year.”

apartments with two kitchens and two living rooms. In addition to free lodgings, the Neely House offers a sup-

Beyond his passion for the Bruins, it’s the Neely Founda-

port system, a community of patients and families fighting

tion that really gets Swift charged up. He takes us to where

the same battle. As one patient put it, “The Neely House

it all started sixteen years ago, a wing of the Tufts Medi-

is critical to my treatment.” Over the last sixteen years,

cal Center called the Neely House. In the vestibule, three

the Neely House has grown into a foundation, raising mil-

slabs of glass stand upright, each hand-etched by Swift.

lions of dollars for cancer treatment and research and now

Some years ago, Cam Neely lost his mother and father

boasting four wings in Tufts Medical Center. And Steve

to cancer, and the hockey player witnessed firsthand the

Swift has been there every step of the way.


“My dad passed away from cancer just about the time Cam started his foundation,” Swift says. “Just being here, I have become friendly with many families. Once you get connected to this community, you are always connected.” Of all the glass Swift has carved for each new wing, a portrait of Neely’s father is perhaps most dear to him. Swift had never undertaken a portrait before, and with just days before the wing opened, he was still figuring out how to transfer a six-by-eight photo onto a huge slab of glass, which now greets those entering the Michael Neely Neuroscience Center. “The work that Steve has done for the Cam Neely Foundation for Cancer Care has given us the opportunity to properly recognize all the people involved in supporting the various projects in a very classy, elegant and timely manner,” says Cam Neely, who is also president of the Boston Bruins. The Neely Foundation raised $1.5 million dollars to open yet another wing at Tufts, The Marlene Neely Endoscopy Suite. The wing is in memory of Neely’s mother who passed away from colon cancer, and pictures of her have already been selected for Swift to transfer onto glass. And he is happy to be of service, having found his own unique way to contribute to the fight against cancer.


HEIDI WEDDENDORF Nantucket Knot Bracelet with Pearl Bangles, Leather Wraps and Gold Wave Bracelet Professional Pearl Restringing

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Washington,  DC 202.333.0039

Nantucket,  MA 508.257.5136

N magazine

www.elizabethhagueinteriors.com

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Experience Bartlett’s Farm

Farm to Table Food...Farm-Grown Flowers...Freshly Picked Produce...Farm Dinners Our Own Organic Greens...Gourmet Groceries...Divine Desserts...Special Events

Image: DanielSutherlandPhotography.com

Open  Every  Day   33  Bartlett  Farm  Road www.bartlettsfarm.com

V IEW OF NO RWOOD FARM F ROM ALTAR R O CK

8,989 ACRES AND COUNTING Last December, on the eve of our 50th Anniversary, the Foundation announced the purchase of Norwood Farm — 131 acres — our largest land acquisition in over 25 years! Our mission of protecting Nantucket’s fragile natural habitats is far from over. In many ways, we’ve just begun.

Please make a donation to help us complete the purchase of Norwood Farm

To make a contribution visit our website at

www.nantucketconservation.org

Nantucket Conservation Foundation 50 YEARS OF LAND CONSERVATION EXCELLENCE


Dream Bed Nantucket

32

508-228-4678 117 Orange Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 www.dreambednantucket.com Worldwide Delivery Available

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N magazine

VI SPRING Life-Changing

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Underwriters EATON VANCE INVESTMENT COUNSEL BNY MELLON WEALTH MANAGEMENT NEW ENGLAND BROKERAGE CORPORATION FIREMAN’S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY ATLANTIC EAST NANTUCKET REAL ESTATE CONGDON & COLEMAN INSURANCE FLATHER & PERKINS, INC. NINA MCLEMORE THE NANTUCKET HOTEL & RESORT WATER JEWELS ANTIQUES & FINE ART MAGAZINE

Antiques & Design Show OF N ANT U C K E T TO BENEFIT THE NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

August 1 5 bartlett’s farm Preview

Designer

Antiques

Thursday, August 1

Friday, August 2, 9 A.M.

SPONSORED BY EATON VANCE INVESTMENT COUNSEL

PANELISTS: ALESSANDRA BRANCA CHRISTOPHER DRAKE • JAMIE DRAKE BRIAN J. MCCARTHY • ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS

Fri., Sat. & Sun., Aug. 2, 3 & 4

Party

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6:30 – 9 P.M.

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33 bartlett farm road

Panel

By Susan Zises Green

air-conditioned venue

Show 10 A.M. – 5 P.M.

Mon., August 5 10 A.M. – 3 P.M

free shuttle from whaling museum

INFORMATION & TICKETS AT nha.org

(508) 228–1894


down-home WRITTEN BY MARIE-CLAIRE ROCHAT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN COE

A TASTE OF NANTUCKET’S NO-NONSENSE RESTAURANT SCENE Foodies love Nantucket. No doubt the island boasts the highest number of fine dining establishments per square mile of most anywhere else. However, there comes a time when even the most discerning diner is simply not in the mood for flickering candlelight, intricate plate presentation and the eye-popping check that goes with it all. Thankfully, Nantucket also serves up several scrumptious options for home-style cooking in casual, laid-back atmospheres where great food is paired with fair prices and generous portions. Here’s just a taste of six local eateries where you can feast without the fuss.


fusaro’s

Fusaro’s Homemade Italian on Old South Road is Nantucket’s version of a North End landmark. Think Italian auntie in the kitchen kneading batches of pasta dough, a copper cauldron of bubbling marinara sauce on the stove, oversized plates heaped with linguine and topped with grandma’s famous meatballs or chicken parm. Baskets of buttery garlic bread and crispy eggplant fries are

among the favorites of the loyal regulars, as is the delicate ricotta-filled, chocolate-drizzled cannoli. Husband and wife owners Tom and Stacy Fusaro greet patrons nightly at their family-run eatery with Tom’s niece Karen Thureson donning the chef’s hat in the kitchen. The ambiance is down-home and comfortable. Black and white prints of Tom’s ancestors, who emigrated from Calabria in the late 1800s, hang on the walls, and a lively buzz emanates from the bar. Red and white

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checked vinyl tablecloths cover the

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tables welcoming couples and families alike with simple place settings. In the summer, there is outdoor dining on the patio with nary an empty table in sight.


millie’s

Named after legendary Coast Guardswoman “Madaket” Millie Jewett, Millie’s opened in 2010 in the former Westender location at the end of Madaket Road. Millie’s owners wisely kept in place two of the old haunt’s claims to fame: unobstructed views of the spectacular sunsets and the “Madaket Mystery,” a powerful rum-based cocktail. With a strong emphasis on south-of-the-boarder and Creole specialties, notable dishes include the spicy fish tacos and the Cajun po-boys, French bread subs filled with tangy fried shrimp, crawfish and Louisiana hot sausage or catfish. From June till September, Millie’s is packed with flip-flops and bathing suits as their clientele comes directly off the beach or peddles in on bikes or takes the restaurant’s complimentary shuttle from town. The food is freshly prepared, reasonably priced and tasty. The atmosphere is laid-back, easy and fun. Walking off the beach, there is no better place to toast the sunset than on Millie’s second floor.

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the thai house

If your taste buds are steering you towards the east, the Far East that is, then The Thai House at the end of Old South Road is a good place to land. A universal truth about ordering Asian food is the tendency to over order. If this proves true for you, your order for two might include appetizers of zesty drunken noodle soup, coconut-flavored Tom Kha Kai, plump pork dumplings and lightly fried shrimp rolls. Entrees include curry dishes of mango or pineapple with chicken or beef, Pad Thai (a must), and an order of ginger scallion shrimp (plump shrimp stir-fried with plenty of freshly grated ginger, onions, baby corn, shiitake mushrooms and peppers). Finish it all off with some palate cooling green tea ice cream, and, for the truly peckish, a fried banana. While the decor may be rather uninspired, the cuisine more than makes up for it with dishes as spicy and aromatic as any youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d find in Boston or New York. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve fallen into the company of those without

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a taste for Thai, no problem: The Thai House also serves Chinese and Japanese-inspired cuisine, including sushi.

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kitty murtagh’s Walking into Kitty Murtagh’s on West Creek Street is to walk into old country Ireland, complete with a boisterous Irish pub atmosphere, flowing Guinness, soccer on the telly, and even a wait staff that takes your order in a distinctly Celtic brogue. Kitty’s serves up hearty Irish pub fare at its best: shepherd’s pie, bangers and mashed, beer-battered fish-n-chips and an Irish fry-up served with a generous side of black and white pudding, prepared as so much the Irish cuisine, there is a fine selection of American food dishes, from a chef salad to a ten-ounce center cut sirloin to shrimp scampi. Portions are generous and the pricing is just about as good as it gets on Nantucket.

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only natives from the Emerald Isle can. If you like the atmosphere but not

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the miacomet golf course Teeing up dinner or lunch at Miacomet Golf Course’s clubhouse is a long-kept local secret. The Miacoment Golf Course is considered one of New England’s best public golf courses, and the clubhouse restaurant offers delicious fare that will meet the appetite of any man, woman or caddy. The lunch menu features a well-balanced sampling of salads and sandwiches—including time-honored favorites such as a classic BLT and grilled hot dogs—at prices that will keep you out of the rough. There is always a hearty soup special and the robust, juicy burgers can be stacked as high as you can handle. For dinner, there is a standard country club menu: prime rib, baked haddock and chicken Parmesan. And with Cisco Brewery and Triple 8 Distillery just across the fairway, the bar is stocked with freshly brewed, local beers, ales and spirits to complement your order. While you may not be wowed by the décor inside—it is clean but sparse—views of the well-manicured greens, distant

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pond and coastline make this an idyllic Nantucket escape.

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siam to go Located at the concession stand of the Nantucket Ice Community Rink on Backus Lane, Siam To Go brings the heat with a Thai menu that will put your appetite in check. Start off with the chicken satay and miso soup, then move on to a chef specialty of Nam Sod (spicy pork with fresh ginger salad), and finish it off with a couple entrĂŠe staples like Siamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pad thai or drunken noodles. The meal is nicely capped off with some fried ice cream or banana spring roll. Just as its name suggests, Siam To Go is mostly for pick up, but there are picnic tables in the rink where you can eat your dinner and maybe catch a hockey game or figure skating performance. Best of all, the prices will keep N magazine

you out of the penalty box.

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GKFO, LLC was founded as a private family office and asset management firm by Christopher Geczy, Ph.D., Stephen Kitching and a team of skilled professionals trained in multi-generational wealth management. Along with his work at GKFO, Dr. Geczy is Academic Director of the Wharton Wealth Management Institute and Adjunct Associate Professor of Finance at The Wharton School. If it is time for you to take money management to a higher level, contact us for references and a description of our services.

Redefining Wealth Management

N magazine

For further information email: info@gkfo.net or call us at 888-797-4090.

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Beauty and the Beach Fashion Show Benefiting Nantucket New School

FOGGYSHEET nantucket

Amy & Peter England

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Holly Finigan & David Handy

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Gene Mahon, Kit Noble & Scott Capizzo

Alyson Lanagan & Tyler Herick


Sarah Fraunfelder

Matt Liddle

Frances Hickey

Jennifer Shalley

Jessica Mayerjack

Monika Rudniska PHOTOS BY BRIAN SAGER


Nantucket Real Estate

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508.228.3202 www.jpfco.com

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Beauty and The Beach Fashion Show Benefiting Nantucket New School

FOGGYSHEET nantucket

Monika Rudniska & daughter Layla

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Marjan Shirzad

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Sarah Fraunfelder

Matt Liddle


Jason Bridges

Jessica Mayerjack

Alyson Lanagan

Tim Ehrenberg PHOTOS BY BRIAN SAGER


 

 



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www.nantucketautorental.com

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Nantucket  Restaurant  week

Fall Join  us

September  30th Through

October  6th

Enjoy  Your  Favorite  Restaurants Thank  you  to  our  Sponsors,  The  Inquirer  &  Mirror,  N  Magazine The  NCAF,  Bartletts  Farm,  American  Seasons

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STYLES

 OF  NANTUCKET  SUMMER

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CONTRIBUTED BY THE NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

TIMELESS


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antucket is known as a destination in which its visitors, upon stepping off the dock onto its cobblestone streets, are immediately transported into another time.

While fashion is an ever-evolving representation of personality and lifestyle, island style today at its core remains true to the original flair of island residents through the decades. A peek at styles from recreational pursuits of years gone by illustrates evolving hemlines, silhouettes and details indicative of a particular time and era. However, many elements of Nantucket style are still recognizable today. Breezy fabrics reign, perfect for volleying serves at the yacht club or hopping aboard a friend’s vessel for an impromptu soiree on the open seas. Seaside essentials, from a fabulously fitted swim-

Connie Greene with a bluefish, on the beach at Tom Nevers, ca. 1930s

suit to a pretty patterned umbrella, will always have a place on any island visitor’s packing list. Whether your idea of summer recreation includes a bike ride in Codfish Park, or sashaying across a ‘Sconset tennis court, classic silhouettes and bright whites remain timeless style signatures for Nantucketers of all ages. Florence Carter Johnston Smith at the beach, holding a patterned parasol, ca. 1930s

Bob and Adele Epple aboard Lee Sherburne’s sailboat Pursuit, ca. 1960s

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Hilda O. Gibbs and her grandson, Robert E. Ruley, posed with an Indian motorcycle and a toy sailboat, ca. 1930

Clinton Macy, Ruth Gilbertson, and an unidentified woman playing croquet, ca. 1930s

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NUPTIALS Featured Wedding

B&G: JULIAN SCHICKEL & CAROLYN MINOR DRESS: VALENTINO SUIT: DIOR HAIR/ MAKE UP (FOR CAROLYN): RJ MILLER MUSIC: JAMIE HOWARTH / COQ AU VIN FLOWERS: FLOWERS ON CHESTNUT CAKE: JODI LEVESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY: NATHAN COE, COECREATE CEREMONY: SIASCONSET CHAPEL

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RECEPTION: CHANTICLEER

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Our experience and knowledge of the local market is the big difference with our Jumbo mortgages.  At Cape Cod Five, we have a deep understanding of the local real estate market and the nuances that often trip up other lenders. We work personally with each and every customer to help them find the best loan and terms that fit with their overall financial plan. Our local decision making and processing means prompt commitments and closings. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, all Jumbo loan servicing remains in-house, meaning we are here for you from application, through closing and the entire term of your loan. We think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big deal.

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5 Bayberry Court, Nantucket 02554 t 508-228-1255 www.capecodfive.com/jumbomortgage

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NSCENE

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NANTUCKET BLACKBOOK PRESENTS

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIA CAREY


A DOZEN DO’S TWELVE WAYS TO GET ACKTIVE THIS AUGUST

WRITTEN BY HOLLY FINIGAN

Summer is in full swing, the weather is gorgeous, and town is packed. Although I know you probably adore the comforts of your Nantucket retreat, I say get out and get ACKtive on our gorgeous Grey Lady! Here are a dozen hip and fresh ways to enjoy all the island has to offer.

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Head down to the Nantucket Boat Basin and get an ice cream from Nantucket Ice Cream and Juice Guys while you people watch and daydream about what it’d be like to own a yacht.

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Get out on the water with personal trainer Jami Lower as she teaches small groups what’s up with SUP! Stand up paddle is a great workout and an awesome way to get some Vitamin D while you’re at it!

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Head out to the sleepy village of ‘Sconset and take a Bluff Walk along Baxter Road. It is all at once beautiful and sad to see the way erosion has taken over sections of the cliff, especially after this past winter.

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Jump up and down to the awesome live music that comes to the legendary Chicken Box on a nightly basis. A blACKbook can’t miss? Galactic on August 13 is sure to sell out, so get ‘em while you can!

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See the island on two wheels with Jason Bridges of Nantucket Bike Tours: not only a super fun and informative tour, but also a great way to view all the hidden gems you miss in a car.

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Become a member of Annye’s Whole Foods “cooler club” where they pack all you need for a beach picnic. Rent a Jeep and drive out to Great Point for a day feeling a world away.

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Get your dance on with the Audio Architects DJs at Pazzo every Saturday night in the summer. A blACKbook can’t miss: Rob Garza of Thievery Corporation on August 17th.

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Stroll around Old South Wharf and browse the fabulous new boutiques this season. blACKbook favorites? For girls it’s Space and for guys it’s ONE ORANGE.

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Start your day with a great stretch from yogi Jess Jenkins and her Sunrise Yoga class on Mondays and Fridays at The Yoga Room. Sixty minutes of vinyasa, pranayama, and meditation. Get ready to say ommmm.

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Catch some sun while you catch some blues; that’s what you can expect when you take a fishing charter out with the hilarious and oh-so-knowledgeable Brian Borgeson of Absolute Sports Fishing.

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Speaking of boat tours, a new blACKbook must is joining the Barton & Gray Mariners Club, the ultimate in day boating on the island! And getting the chance to swim around Tuckernuck in a stunning Hinckley? That’s perfection in my blACKbook.

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Everyone knows that Cisco Brewers is a hotspot for an afternoon libation, but take an hour to really drink it all in with a Brewery Tour.

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World-class cancer care has never been closer.

Through our clinical collaboration with the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Nantucket Cottage Hospital is bringing a world-renowned team of cancer specialists right here to our island. For you and your family, access to this kind of respected expertise means enhanced convenience and confidence in your care. Leading cancer care has never been closer, and our commitment to your health has never been stronger.

For more information call 855- 508-5275, or visit us at nantuckethospital.org

Nantucket Cottage Hospital is an affiliate of Massachusetts General Hospital and a member of Partners HealthCare.

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Mass General Hematology / Oncology Service at Nantucket Cottage Hospital

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N Magazine ADVERTISING DIRECTORY

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76 Main ACK Eye ACK FM Addison Craig Anchored Artists Angel Frazier Anne Becker Design Atlantic Landscaping Bartlett’s Farm Beachcraft Beacon RE Ben Larrabee Photography Bodega Boston Realty Advisors BPC Architecture Brant Point Grill Cape Air Cape Cod Five Carolyn Thayer Interiors Cheney Brothers Building Chip Webster Architecture Christine Lee Pilates Christopher’s Home Furnishings Cold Noses Congdon & Coleman RE Corcoran Group Current Vintage Daily & Schuster Daily Construction Dreambed Nantucket Dreamland Dujardin Design Elizabeth Hague Interiors Emeritus Epernay Evans Sculpture Fair Isle Ferretti Group First Republic Bank Gallery at 4 India Garden Design Company Gauthier-Stacy Geronimo’s GKFO Glyn’s Marine Gray Lady Marine Great Point Properties Hanley Development Heidi Weddendorf Henley & Sloan Her Sail Loft Hingham Savings Housefitters & Tile Gallery Humphrey Construction Co Illya Kagan Island Properties RE J. Mclaughlin J. Pepper Frazier RE Jessica Hicks John’s Island RE Johnston’s Cashmere Jordan William Raveis RE Justin Quinn Custom Homes Kathleen Hay Designs KMS Designs Lee Real Estate Letarte Swimwear Lockhart Collection Marine Home Center Maury People - Brian Sullivan Maury People - Craig Hawkins Maury People - Gary Winn Maury People - Kathy Gallaher Milly & Grace Nantucket Airlines Nantucket Architecture Group Nantucket Boating Club Nantucket Boys & Girls Club Nantucket Clambake Nantucket Conservation Fnd Nantucket Cottage Hospital Nantucket Gourmet Nantucket Historical Assoc. Nantucket Insurance Agency Nantucket Learning Group Nantucket Lightshop Nantucket Media Systems Nantucket Preservation Trust Nantucket Project Nantucket Restaurant Week Nantucket Windmill Auto Next Step Realty Nicole Bousquet RE Nina McLemore Nobby Shop Ocean Wings Pageo Peter England Pumpkin Pond Farm Quidley & Co. Sconset Gardener Sealegs Seaman Schepps Sentient Jet Serenella Shreve, Crump & Low Skinner Construction Stephens & Co Susan Lister Locke Jewelry Susan Warner Catering Thomas Henry Gallery Tile Room Time & Place Tonkin of Nantucket Topper’s at the Wauwinet Vanderbilt Gallery Victoria Greenhood

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August Issue 2013