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J.M.W. TURNER WATERCOLORS FROM TATE

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MAGAZINE • FALL / WINTER • 2019


TOGETHER SUPPORT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM, WHERE WE ASPIRE EVERY DAY TO CREATE A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND TO RE-IMAGINE THE INTERCHANGE BETWEEN MARITIME HERITAGE AND BROADER CONTEMPORARY CULTURE. Just as a captain relies on his crew, the Museum depends on your Annual Fund gift. By making a donation, you stimulate wonder, excite curiosity and learning, build community, and inspire an enduring connection to America’s maritime heritage for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. We greatly appreciate your support! Please make your donation by December 31, 2019. To make your gift today, please call 860.572.5365 or visit www.mysticseaport.org/support

Mystic Seaport Museum Annual Fund 75 Greenmanville Ave • P.O. Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 860.572.5365 • www.mysticseaport.org


CONTENTS

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MAGAZINE is a publication of Mystic Seaport Museum PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. WHITE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT SUSAN FUNK CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DAVID PATTEN

9

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR CURATORIAL AFFAIRS NICHOLAS BELL SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT LAURA HOPKINS EDITOR GÖRAN R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

FALL / WINTER

PRODUCTION SUSAN HEATH DESIGN KAREN WARD DESIGN CONTRIBUTORS JESSICA FEDIN CHRIS FREEMAN LAURA HOPKINS AMANDA KEENAN

BECCA McBEE DAN McFADDEN PAUL O’PECKO SHERRI RAMELLA

12

ANDY PRICE

ANTELO DEVEREUX, JR.

TATE, LONDON, UK

IN THIS ISSUE

SEASCAPES .............................................................. 4

PHOTOGRAPHY JESSICA FEDIN

2019 ADVANCEMENT NEWS ........................................... 5-7 MUSEUM BRIEFS .................................................. 8-11

CHRIS GASIOREK JOE MICHAEL

NEW EXHIBITION: J.M.W. TURNER ...................... 12-13

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVES

MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM AT 90 ........................ 14-17 SEA LEVEL RISE ................................................. 18-19 ON THE COVER: Detail, Tate: Whitby, c. 1824, J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851) © Tate, London 2018.

ON BOOKS ....................................................... 20-21 FROM THE COLLECTIONS ........................................ 22 EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM ..................... 23

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315

14

ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 ADVANCEMENT: 860.572.5365 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5331 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 PLEASE GO TO THE MUSEUM’S WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION ON FALL AND WINTER SCHEDULES. ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355-0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

xx

FALL / WINTER 2019

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

3


SEASCAPES

As we approach Mystic Seaport Muse-

It is ironic, then, that as central to our

um’s 90th anniversary on December 25,

identity as this waterway is, the river itself

2019, it is natural to reflect on the institu-

is prompting staff to thoughtfully consider

tion’s past as we prepare for the decade

the Museum’s next stage of evolution.

leading up to our centennial celebration

The effects of sea-level rise threaten the

in 2029. We have come quite far since

visitor experience and the collection of

our three founders, Carl Cutler, Edward

historic buildings that are so aligned with

Bradley, and Charles Stillman, conceived

our identity. The very real challenges that

the then Marine Historical Association on the banks of the Mystic River. It’s hard to know just what they envisioned for the future, but I think it’s safe to assume that they would be proud of what we have built upon their foundation. From the earliest days, as they collected manuscripts, saved models and half hulls, and acquired watercraft and buildings, all three knew that the Museum had to tell the story of America’s

SEASCAPES

2029 AND BEYOND!

relationship with the sea. They felt that the Museum should be educational in

we face will require a significant shift for the Museum over the next 35 years so we may celebrate our 125th anniversary on dry ground, while still honoring the river and its legacy. As you will see in this issue of the Magazine, we established several working groups to study the issue and Mystic Seaport Museum will, as it has always done, meet these challenges head-on with care and wisdom. As the Museum enters its 90th year and the decade beyond, we will see partnerships with new organizations that will

purpose, national in scope (sometimes beyond!), and an in-

not only help maximize the use of our property and assets, but

spirational force for the future. That’s as close to the original

also provide new, 21st-century opportunities for our visitors

mission statement as one can find, and I think it’s safe to say

and for school children. We will see, I trust, the long standing

that we haven’t waivered from the original intent and have built

dream of a watercraft hall finally realized; we will see the Mu-

upon it to address the needs of a growing institution and the

seum grow its endowment in celebration of the first 100 years

changing views and values of our members and visiting public.

so that the next 100 are guaranteed regardless of financial

The transition from a small exhibiting historical association

or physical challenges that might come the Museum’s way;

to a vibrant history museum showcasing the Charles W. Mor-

we will see the Museum continue in its role as a conveyor of

gan and the Seaport Village addressed the growing need for a

exhibitions, symposia, learning experiences, and community

participatory educational program that would respond well to

forums; we will see the Museum’s continued dedication to a

some three million school children who would carry forward

place that helps define southeastern Connecticut and Mys-

with them the distinctive Mystic Seaport Museum experience.

tic, specifically. The next 10 years should be memorable and

The Museum evolved to become an exemplar for the principles

significant as the Museum defines its role in a new century as

of public history and then broadened its range, once again, to

we reimagine the interchange between maritime heritage and

showcase nationally and internationally noteworthy exhibitions.

broader contemporary culture.

Throughout these transformations, there were two significant and interrelated constants: the Museum staff and the Mystic

Carl, Edward, and Charles would have been proud to see how far the Museum has come.

River. Without these two components, the Museum would likely be nothing more than an archive. Instead, the combination of human spirit, knowledge, and the profound sense of place along the river makes Mystic Seaport Museum stand out among all maritime museums worldwide.

4

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2019

STEPHEN C. WHITE, President


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

Alden Alexander

Lyndon Haviland

Peter McCracken

Christopher J. McMahon

Chief Mutáwi Mutáhash

Russell A. Potter

Dawn Riley

WHO IS NEW ON THE PRESIDENT’S ADVISORY COUNCIL? Mystic Seaport Museum

Alden Alexander is opera-

Christopher J. McMahon,

has written extensively about

President Steve White an-

tions manager and associate

Rear Admiral, USMS has been

the 19th-century fascination

at Mallard Creek Capital Part-

on the Naval War College fac-

with the Arctic and his books

ners and a member of Mystic

ulty since 2014 as the Emory

include Arctic Spectacles: The

Seaport Museum’s Facilities

S. Land Chair for Merchant

Frozen North in Visual Culture

Committee. Previously, she

Marine Affairs where he also

1818-1875 (2007) and Find-

was a professional competi-

serves as a professor of Joint

ing Franklin: The Untold Story

tive sailor racing on the inter-

Military Operations. He has

of a 165-Year Search (2016).

national circuit. She holds a

been a member of the Federal

He holds a Ph.D. from Brown

USCG 100-ton Master license.

Senior Executive Service (SES)

University and is an Honor-

Lyndon Haviland holds a

since 2004 and was founding

ary Lifetime Member of Mystic

doctorate in public health

director of the Global Maritime

from Columbia University and

and Transportation School

Seaport Museum.

The 30 PAC members have experience and expertise in

has more than 25 years of ex-

(GMATS). He is a member of

perience in domestic and in-

the Facilities Committee at

ternational public health. She

Mystic Seaport Museum.

nounced recently that the Museum has seven new President’s Advisory Council (PAC) members. PAC is a special volunteer advisory council appointed by the president together with the board chairman.

all areas of the Museum’s work and bring valuable skills to the table. They serve three-year terms. Here is a little bit about each of the new members.

is a passionate advocate for

Chief Mutáwi Mutáhash

human rights and is dedi-

(Many Hearts) Marilynn “Lynn”

cated to bringing individuals

Malerba is the 18th Chief of

and organizations together to

the Mohegan Tribe and is the

achieve lasting social change.

first female Chief in the tribe’s

Peter McCracken is elec-

modern history. The position

tronic resources librarian at

is a lifetime appointment

Cornell University Library and

made by the Tribe’s Coun-

co-founder and publisher

cil of Elders. Preceding her

of ShipIndex.org. He holds

work for the Mohegan Tribe,

a Master in Library Science

she worked as the director

and a Master in Maritime His-

of Cardiology and Pulmonary

tory and previously worked as

Services at Lawrence & Me-

a reference librarian at East

morial Hospital. She holds a

Carolina University and the

doctor of Nursing Practice

University of Washington. In

from Yale University and was

2000, he co-founded Serials

named a Jonas Scholar.

Solutions with his brothers

Russell A. Potter is profes-

and a high school friend; the

sor of English and Media Stud-

company was acquired by

ies at Rhode Island College in

ProQuest in 2004.

Providence, Rhode Island. He

Dawn Riley, the 2018 America and the Sea Award honoree, is the executive director at Oakcliff Sailing, a non-profit, coaching and training center in Oyster Bay, New York. She is one of the best-known sailors in the world with four America’s Cups and two Whitbread Round the World Races as well as a handful of World Championships to her name. She is still the only woman and youngest CEO of an America’s Cup Team. You will find the full list of the President’s Advisory Council on the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org/ about/the-presidentsadvisory-council/ Laura Hopkins is senior vice president for Advancement & Becca McBee is executive assistant to President Steve White.

FALL / WINTER 2019

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

5


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

2019 America and the Sea Award – Wendy Schmidt, October 30, 2019 Mystic Seaport Museum is delighted to award American businesswoman and

We sincerely thank the following sponsors (as of September 5, 2019):

Platinum:

Bronze:

black tie gala on October 30 at the Met-

Eric and Wendy Schmidt (x2)

ropolitan Club in New York City.

Gold:

Maarten de Jong and Kendra Matthew

philanthropist Wendy Schmidt with the 2019 America and the Sea Award at a

Betsy and Hunt Lawrence

Peggy and Grant Cambridge

Glenmede Endowment and Foundation Management

begin with a cocktail reception with

J. Barclay Collins, II

Renate and Peter Gleysteen

the honoree, followed by dinner, award

Travelers

Michael S. Hudner

presentation, auction, and paddle raise.

Silver:

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley D. Johnson

The celebratory annual event will

Sponsorships range from $10,000$50,000; single tickets are $1,000. Tables are nearly sold out! Please

Gowrie Group Irene and Charles Hamm KPMG

contact the Advancement Department

Joanne and Michael Masin

at advancement@mysticseaport.org or

Cayre and Alexis Michas

860.572.5365 for more information.

Wendy Schmidt is the 2019 America and the Sea Award recipient.

Cece and Richard Armstrong

Cynthia and Robert Martin Sheila McCurdy and David Brown Carol and Robert Musetti Laurie Olson and Maria Fasulo Susan and Martin Wayne Betsy and George White

Sherri Ramella is Advancement events manager.

FUND CREATED TO HONOR STAN HUGILL This June, Mystic Seaport

Museum, and it is thanks to

Museum celebrated the Sea

his efforts that audiences can

Music Festival’s 40th Anniver-

enjoy this music today.

sary. Performers from around

the

festival,

Geoff

Kaufman announced he is

across the Museum grounds.

stepping down as the director

For four nights and three

of the festival after 35 years

days, the Museum was filled

as a chanteyman at the Muse-

with folk music and hands-on

um. He will continue to serve

shipboard experiences. The

as the Museum’s liaison with

roster featured performanc-

the Friends of the Festival do-

es by John Conolly, the Swiss

nor group, working to ensure

Mariners, and Ron and Natalie

this important event is en-

Daise, along with a wonderful

joyed by future generations.

lineup of old friends.

6

At

the world graced the stages

Performer John Roberts

In honor of more than four

recently spoke about the

decades of exhilarating mu-

impact this festival has had

sic programming, the Museum

in his life: “They [the songs]

began a campaign for the

show something about the

Stan Hugill Memorial Endow-

nature of humanity. They

ment for Live Performance.

show something about the

Stan Hugill (1906-1992) was

way culture was, the way life

tion of this endowment. So far

Amanda Keenan at amanda.

the last sailor to work as a

was. The ships are still here.

more than $22,000 has been

keenan@mysticseaport.org

chanteyman under sail. After

If we teach about the ships,

raised toward the Museum’s

retiring to dry land, Stan con-

we can teach about the music

goal of $100,000. However,

Chris Freeman is director of

tinued to perform sea music

that went with them.”

more is needed to establish

After 35 years as a chanteyman at the Museum, Geoff Kaufman retired. New Chantey Foreman Anayis (A.J.) Wright (pictured here) and Bonnie Milner will co-direct the festival in 2020.

and wrote books that are the

The Museum was thrilled

an endowment fund to honor

cornerstone to this maritime

to host Stan’s sons, Philip

Stan’s legacy. We invite you

tradition. He spent many

and Martin Hugill, for the an-

to participate in this effort.

years visiting Mystic Seaport

nouncement of the founda-

To learn more, please contact

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2019

Development and Legacy Giving & Amanda Keenan is Advancement officer.


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S February 21 Presentation by Nicholas Bell at American Yacht Club March 21 Cruising Club of America at Mystic Seaport Museum for lunch and private tour of collections March 25 America and the Sea Society behind-the-scenes tour of collections March 29 New York Yacht Club at Mystic Seaport Museum for lunch and private tour of collections May 17 Chairman J. Barclay Collins II appreciation dinner

2019 ADVANCEMENT EVENTS

Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous Parade.

May 22 Lunch and private tour of the of the Metropolitan Museum of Art June 5 Presentation by Nicholas Bell at New York Yacht Club June 14 America and the Sea Society private viewing of Streamlined: From Hull to Home June 22 Carl Cutler Society appreciation dinner July 12 Our Life in Six Boats presentation by Barbara and Steve Watson for our America and the Sea Society donors

America and the Sea Society Private Tour of our Collections. Carl Cutler Society Appreciation Dinner.

July 28 Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous Parade September 7 Mayflower II Launch October 4 Private formal opening celebration of J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate

Our Life in Six Boats presentation by Barbara and Steve Watson.

America and the Sea Society Private Viewing of Streamlined: From Hull to Home.

October 5 America and the Sea Society private viewing of J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate

TAKING TURNER ON THE ROAD In the six months leading up to the

Nicholas captivated

show realizes the Museum’s aspirational

October 5 opening of J.M.W. Turner: Wa-

his audiences with

goal for the new exhibition building. Shar-

tercolors from Tate, Nicholas Bell, senior

the back story on

ing images of paintings that will be on

vice president for Curatorial Affairs, gave

how he brought this

view at the Museum beginning October

presentations to more than a dozen

internationally trav-

5 has inspired enthusiasm not only for

yacht clubs, museums, and alumni clubs

eling exhibition of 90

the Turner exhibition, but for the entire

along the East Coast, including:

watercolor paintings

Era of Exhibitions. As a direct result of

to

Seaport

these presentations, we believe people

Museum

who have never been to the Museum,

trustees and leaders built the Thomp-

or who have not been here in decades,

son Exhibition Building to have state-of-

now plan to return and visit the Turner

the-art systems and security capable of

exhibition. The Museum thanks each of

presenting an exhibition of the caliber of

these organizations for their welcome

J.M.W. Turner. Through Nicholas’s pre-

and hospitality, and we deeply appre-

sentation, audiences learned about the

ciate the wonderfully generous donors

historic significance of becoming the only

whose support makes the Era of Ex-

North American venue for this interna-

hibitions, and the Turner exhibition in

tionally touring exhibition and that the

particular, possible.

American Yacht Club, Rye, NY Essex Yacht Club, Essex, CT Ferguson Museum, Fishers Island, NY John’s Island Club, Vero Beach, FL Madison Beach Club, Madison, CT Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC New York Yacht Club, 44th Street, NYC Seawanhaka Yacht Club, Oyster Bay, NY Shelter Island Yacht Club, Shelter Island, NY Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, CT Yale Club, NYC

Mystic

Museum.

FALL / WINTER 2019

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

7


MUSEUM BRIEFS

REMEMBERING WILLITS D. ANSEL Mystic Seaport Museum was saddened to learn of

He was back in the Shipyard from 1985 to 1989.

the passing of master boat

Will did research and built

builder, author, and artist Wil-

replica whaleboats to out-

lits “Will” Dyer Ansel on April 12,

fit the Museum’s whaleship,

2019, at the age of 90.

the Charles W. Morgan. Out of

Will Ansel was born on

this work came the wonderful

March 1, 1929, into a Navy

book The Whaleboat: A Study

family in Long Beach, Cali-

of Design, Construction and

fornia. Will spent a few child-

Use From 1850-1970 (1978;

hood years in exotic places

2nd ed. 1983; 3rd and extend-

like China and the Philippines

ed ed. 2014, with additional

before his family had to flee

chapters by Will’s son, Walter,

Japanese forces during World

and his granddaughter, Ev-

War II. He graduated from

elyn). Will wrote a handful of

Stanford University and then

books and many articles for

served onboard a U.S. Navy

The Log of Mystic Seaport and

destroyer during the Korean

WoodenBoat Magazine – and

War before he joined the sub-

I’m happy to say, one article

marine service. Later, Will

for this publication in 2014.

was employed by the Foreign

During his boatbuilding ca-

Service, and afterwards he

reer, Will built about 50 his-

taught at the Sidwell Friends

toric small craft. He continued

his son Walter, who is a senior

daunting task to put down on

School in Washington, D.C. At

to build boats after his retire-

shipwright at the Shipyard. It

paper. I could only imagine. I

that time, Will was a teacher

ment. He built these boats

was during this time I came

really don’t know how far he

on weekdays and an amateur

“out in the woods,” which was

to know Will. We both loved

got with this book.

boat builder on weekends.

the backyard of the rustic,

books and boats and contin-

Will, a true Renaissance

In 1970, Will moved his

self-built, wooden cabin in

ued to meet on and off when

man who always had a twin-

family to Mystic where he

Maine where he stayed when

he came down from Maine.

kle in his eyes, will be greatly

took a job as a shipwright at

he was not living in Old Mystic.

Will’s final book project was

missed. The Museum extends

Mystic Seaport Museum. He

Though Will had officially

about “the oar.” I would see

our heartfelt condolences to

stayed in the Museum’s Henry

retired from the Museum, he

him at the Museum’s research

his wife, Hanneli, and family.

B. duPont Preservation Ship-

came back to teach some

library, behind a pile of books,

yard until 1982 when he took a

shipwrights how to build

making notes. He told me that

Göran R Buckhorn is editor of

brief break from the Museum.

whaleboats in 2002, including

the history of the oar was a

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine.

THE MUSEUM PLANS FOR NEW RESTAURANT AND HOTEL

8

On June 13, as Mystic Sea-

The new hotel and res-

new building will continue

and restaurant building will be

port Museum announced the

taurant building is being de-

the Museum’s role as a su-

set closer to the Mystic River.

construction of an underwa-

veloped in partnership with

perior venue for weddings,

The present restaurant

ter research and education

Greenwich Hospitality Group

corporate meetings, and

building, formerly called the

center in partnership with the

and will be built on the site

group events in the Mystic

Seamen’s Inne, was pur-

Global Foundation for Ocean

of Latitude 41° Restaurant &

area and the restaurant will

pose-built by the Museum in

Exploration (GFOE), the Muse-

Tavern. Plans call for the de-

provide a fine-dining destina-

1964 to be a restaurant and

um also revealed a proposed

molition of Latitude 41° and

tion for Museum visitors and

event space.

plan to build a new restaurant

the construction of a 20-25

the public.

and hotel at the north end of

room hotel with a restau-

While Latitude 41° is close

its campus.

rant and event space. The

to Route 27, the new hotel

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2019


MUSEUM BRIEFS

MAYFLOWER II LAUNCHED

This partnership is an example of how two museums can successfully collaborate

Plimoth Plantation’s May-

executive director of the

flower II, which arrived at

Massachusetts Bible Society,

Mystic Seaport Museum in

and Kerri Helme, of Plimoth

November 2016 to undergo a

Plantation’s leadership team

multi-year restoration, was

and the Mashpee Wampanoag

launched into the Mystic River

nation. Keynote speaker was

at the Henry B. duPont Pres-

Nathaniel Philbrick, bestselling

ervation Shipyard at a grand

author of, among many books,

bow. The event was hosted by

Seaport Museum preparing

public celebration on Sep-

Mayflower: A Story of Courage,

Jared Bowen, WGBH Boston’s

for her spring 2020 depar-

tember 7.

Community, and War (2006).

Executive Arts Editor.

ture. She will make her way

to achieve a complex project within tight time constraints,” said Steve White, president of Mystic Seaport Museum. Mayflower II will stay over the winter at Mystic

At the launch were Pli-

A ceremonial christening of

“We are very proud to have

to a maritime festival at the

moth Plantation and Mystic

Mayflower II was performed

contributed our knowledge

Charlestown Navy Yard in

by Harriet Cross, British Con-

and expertise of the resto-

Boston in May 2020 and then

sul General to New England,

ration of this historic vessel

sail back to Plimoth Planta-

who broke a bottle with wa-

to enable the ship to partici-

tion for the 400th anniver-

ter from all 50 states as well

pate in the commemoration

sary of the Pilgrims’ arrival in

as Plymouth, UK, and Leiden,

of the 400th anniversary of

1620. For more details, visit

the Netherlands, on the ship’s

the Pilgrims’ arrival in 1620.

www.mayflowersails2020.com

Seaport Museum dignitaries, special invited guests, the ship’s restoration team, and members from both Plimoth Plantation and Mystic Seaport Museum. The event featured a program with the U.S. Coast Guard Band and singers Gilly Assunção and Justin Gigiello. An invocation was held by Reverend Anne Robertson,

“The Mayflower II is much more than a replica of a famous ship. She is a

famous ship in her own right. She is also a symbol, a source of inspiration to those in search of new beginnings and the possibility of multi-cultural cooperation in this nation of immigrants. She also speaks to the dark truths

underlying the settlement of New England and America.

­— Nathaniel Philbrick at the launch of Mayflower II.

FALL / WINTER 2019

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

9


MUSEUM BRIEFS

DARK HARBOR 20 CLASS RECEIVES THE 2019 WILLIAM A. BAKER AWARD signers Olin Stephens II and

“The owners of the Dark

Drake Sparkman in response

Harbor 20s are to be com-

to a request from members of the Tarratine Club for a new sloop for club racing. The resulting boat is a narrow, fin-keel hull with long overhangs and a Bermuda rig. The first batch of 16 boats was built by George Lawley in Neponset, Massachusetts, during 1934-35. Dark Harbor 20s running under spinnakers. Photo by Antelo (Dev) Devereaux

sailing is a remarkable accomplishment and yet there is room for a next generation to continue the class for the future,” said Steve White, Museum. “We are proud to

maritime historian, and de-

honor the Dark Harbor 20

liam A. Baker Award was

the Tarratine Club. Nineteen

vessels — including Mayflower

presented to the Dark Har-

of the original 21 Dark Harbor

II. It is intended to promote

bor 20 Class at the Tarratine

20s are still actively sailed.

the awareness and appre-

Club of Dark Harbor, Maine,

This is why Mystic Seaport

ciation of fine examples of

on July 31.

Museum proudly recognized

one-design classes or boats

For 83 years, the families

the Dark Harbor 20 Class and

of like kind, foster faithful

of Islesboro, Maine, have

owners with the William A.

preservation and restoration,

kept their fleet of Dark Harbor

Baker Award for 2019.

encourage more people to do

designed in 1934 by yacht de-

the inaugural fleet are still

Bill Baker, a naval architect, signer of replicas of historic

nobscott Bay and contesting

of the class. That so many of

president of Mystic Seaport

for victory at races held by

The Dark Harbor 20 was

to authenticity and active use

The award is named after

The Museum’s 2019 Wil-

20s sailing the waters of Pe-

mended for their dedication

owners for their continued effort to allow future generations to sail and enjoy these fine boats.” The William A. Baker Award was established by Mystic Seaport Museum in 1989, and over the past 29 years, the

it, and keep vessels afloat and

award has been presented

actively sailing.

to 15 boat classes.

BENJAMIN MENDLOWITZ RECEIVES THE 2019 WILLIAM P. STEPHENS AWARD

10

The 2019 William P. Ste-

Mendlowitz’s photographs

Rosenfeld family chronicled

portant vessels from our gen-

phens Award was presented

have appeared on the covers

American yachting in the

eration. His work helped drive

on July 31 to the renowned

of or been featured in many

early- and mid-20th century

the renaissance of wooden

maritime photographer Benja-

of the most respected boating

with their iconic black-and-

boats in America over the last

min Mendlowitz, who has trav-

magazines all over the world.

white photographs, Mend-

40 years.”

eled the world to photograph

He has also been published

lowitz applies his talented

wooden boats.

in non-boating magazines

eye and intuitive

award has been

This is the 18th time the

The William P. Stephens

including Esquire, Atlantic

sense of light and

handed out since

Award, established by Mystic

Monthly, Yankee Magazine,

curve to portray

it was established

Seaport Museum and named

Sports Illustrated, The London

the classic boats

in 1988.

for the man known to many as

Times Magazine, The New York

that remain from

the “Dean of American Yachts-

Times Magazine, and Archi-

the past and to

men” and “The Grand Old Man

tectural Digest.

document the im-

of American Yachting,” is given

“We are deeply honored to

by Mystic Seaport Museum in

present this award to Benja-

recognition of a significant and

min Mendlowitz to recognize

enduring contribution to the

his life’s work capturing the

history, preservation, prog-

beauty and craftsmanship of

ress, understanding, or appre-

wooden boats,” said Mystic

ciation of American yachting

Seaport Museum President

and boating.

Steve White. “Much like the

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2019

Courtesy of Benjamin Menlowitz


MUSEUM BRIEFS

THE 2019 CELEBRATION OF VOLUNTEERS EveAnne Stouch, associate

time Achievement Award to

director of Volunteer Services,

Rebecca “Becky” Jackson,

welcomed around 170 Mystic

who has volunteered at the

Seaport Museum volunteers,

Museum for 36 years, most

staff, and guests, including the

recently in the Membership

new Chairman of the Museum

lounge. She and her husband,

Board, Michael Hudner, to the

Harry Jackson, were found-

2019 Celebration of Volunteers

ing members of the Museum’s

Awards, held in the River Room

PILOTS program.

at Latitude 41° Restaurant &

Four more volunteer awards

Tavern on July 17. This annual

were presented that evening.

event honors the around 650

The Volunteer Special Recogni-

volunteers at the Museum.

tion Award had two recipients,

The 2019 William C. Noyes

Martha Murphy, who volunteers

Volunteer of the Year Award

in the Rosenfeld Collection, and

was presented to RJ Lavallee,

Andy Strode, who volunteers

a member of the Watercraft

in the Boathouse. The Junior

Gung Ho Squad, who received

Volunteer Special Recognition

the award from Susan Noyes,

Award went to Molly Kulick of

daughter of William and Bettye

the Museum’s Sailing Center.

Noyes. According to his co-

Chris Freeman, director of De-

workers: “He’s always cheer-

velopment and Legacy Giving,

ful, a team-player, and truly

received the Special Staff Rec-

unique,” Susan Noyes said.

ognition Award for successfully

Thereafter, Steve White, president of the Museum,

running the PILOTS program for the last 10 years.

presented the 2019 Rudolph J. Schaefer III Volunteer LifeRight top: RJ Lavallee received the William C. Noyes Volunteer of the Year Award. Seen here with Susan Noyes. Right: Steve White presented the Rudolph J. Schaefer III Volunteer Lifetime Achievement Award to Becky Jackson.

THE MUSEUM PLANS FOR AN UNDERWATER RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER On June 13, Mystic Seaport

campus. The organization de-

behind the south parking lot.

of the cutting-edge technolo-

Museum announced a part-

signs, builds, and operates

The first phase of this fa-

gies that GFOE uses in ocean

nership with the Global Foun-

some of the most advanced

cility will house a work area

exploration. Plans for the sec-

dation for Ocean Exploration

underwater

technologies

for the research and devel-

ond phase will include a pool

(GFOE), which has plans to

used for scientific exploration.

opment of underwater tech-

for testing underwater robots

construct an underwater re-

GFOE proposes to create an

nologies. In addition, GFOE will

and other technologies, while

search and education center

Underwater Research and Ed-

provide interactive, hands-

providing a space for hands-

at the Museum.

ucation Center on land to be

on displays in the Museum’s

on activities for students and the public.

The GFOE is a nonprofit

leased from the Museum next

Clift Block building, which will

organization currently head-

to the James T. Carlton Ma-

demonstrate to Museum visi-

quartered on the Museum’s

rine Science Center, located

tors and school groups some

FALL / WINTER 2019

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11


NEW EXHIBITION: J.M.W. TURNER

Tate: A Mountainous Coast with a Stranded Vessel, or Whale, Possibly at Penmaenmawr or in North-East England, c. 1825-38, J .M. W. Turner (1775–1851) © Tate, London 2018.

TURNER’S BOLD BRUSH WITH MODERNITY BY JESSICA FEDIN How does an early 19thcentury British artist continue to captivate 21st-century contemporaries? The secret lies in J.M.W. Turner’s more abstract and­— some may say­ — “unfinished” works, many of which are his watercolors, 92 of which will be on display in J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors

Academy, a small red buoy in a

ebrates Turner’s increasing

were more in vogue. Turner

matter of minutes at the same

relevance. Exhibitions such

changed that. Much to the

time as Constable meticu-

as Katie Paterson’s A place

chagrin of other contempo-

lously labored over his sub-

that exists only in moonlight

raries and even Queen Victo-

mission. Constable remarked

intentionally choose to engage

ria, who referred to one of his

afterwards “He [Turner] has

in sublime conversations with

paintings as “a dirty, yellow

been here and fired a gun.” He

Turner’s work. Interspersed

mess,” Turner set painting free

even shunned the fashionable

among 20 “haikus” and mod-

from its conventions, going as

and aristocratic accent of the

ern–day meditations on time,

far as adding curry powder

times in favor of retaining his

space, and the universe’s light

and spit to his boldly ambigu-

London Cockney accent.

sat Turner’s watercolors­— his

In spite of his rollercoast-

most abstract and deft por-

Turner didn’t want to fit in

er professional brand during

trayal of light. Water coloring

­— he was an artistic rebel. For

his lifetime, Turner’s more

as a medium is perfect for ex-

better or worse, he ignored his

abstract pieces continue to

pressing mood and revealing

critics and quarreled with col-

hold their relevance today and

light’s subtle poetry: the way

land-

leagues, such as when Turner

inspire cutting-edge, present-

light illuminates our world. The

scapes may be all too familiar

upstaged Constable with a few

day artists. Turner Contem-

Watercolors from Tate exhibi-

to us today, in Turner’s day

quick brushstrokes by paint-

porary, a gallery founded in

tion is therefore an ideal forum

and age, grand-scale por-

ing, on the spot at the Royal

2001 in Margate, England, cel-

through which to experience

from Tate, opening October 5 in the Collins Gallery of the Thompson Exhibition Building at Mystic Seaport Museum. While

12

traits and historical depictions

traditional

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ous brush strokes.

FALL / WINTER 2019


NEW EXHIBITION: J.M.W. TURNER [American abstract artist Mark] Rothko famously quipped at an exhibition of Turner’s at the MoMA in New York in 1966, “This guy Turner, he learnt a lot from me.”

Tate: Venice: Looking across the Lagoon at Sunset, 1840, J.M.W. Turner (1775 – 1851) © Tate, London 2018.

Turner in his bolder and more

Manhattan, who commissioned

abstract form.

the works, to be the only view-

Many decades after Turner

ers). Rothko famously quipped

passed, one of the most fa-

at an exhibition of Turner’s at

mous and celebrated artistic

the MoMA in New York in 1966,

cohorts ever, the Impression-

“This guy Turner, he learnt a lot

ists, were delighted and in-

from me.”

spired by Turner’s mastery of

More recently, artist Sean

atmosphere and mood. They

Scully’s

were trying to achieve what

National Gallery in London

Turner had started; their art

featured a singular outside

celebrated the feeling, the

piece: Turner’s breathtaking

impression, and stirred emo-

beachscape The Evening Star.

tion rather than creating strict

Why was this work from 1830

realism. French artists such

chosen to be placed among

as Claude Monet and Camille

a dozen modern-day Scully

Pissarro came to London dur-

abstractions? Scully feels an

ing the Franco-Prussian War

affinity and kinship with Turner

of 1870-1871 and chose to

for precisely the reason Turn-

pursue similar patterns and

er’s contemporary critics often

themes to that of Turner’s

scoffed; by refusing to paint

work — experimenting with in-

scenes that neatly settle into

novative and unconventional

precise objects, Turner was an

painting techniques and fo-

early adopter of abstraction.

cusing on the hazy effects of

He was ahead of his time.

light and weather.

exhibition

Watercolors

at

from

the

Tate

Sea Star: Sean Scully at the National Gallery.

marina can be seen. How

tinue to this day to draw in-

does an artist capture a mo-

spiration from Turner’s work

ment as ephemeral as a sun-

points to his lasting relevance

set over water? Which colors

then and now. The beauty of

are more or less vivid in your own mind if you were to recall one? Less peaceful and moodier is Turner’s A Mountainous Coast with a Stranded Vessel, or Whale, where two circular pencil marks (can you spot them in the painting on the opposite page?) stir passionate artistic debate about whether a stranded whale or vessel is depicted. It’s up to

Popular American abstract

has a number of scenes dis-

artist Mark Rothko donated his

solving toward abstraction,

Seagram Murals to the Tate in

most notably Venice, Looking

London in part because of his

across the Lagoon at Sunset.

vast admiration for Turner (and

The warm, vibrant yellow and

evoke a feeling of danger

because he secretly didn’t

orange sunset blends into the

and turbulence.

want the rich milieu of the

horizon and the slightest im-

The fact that artists of

most expensive restaurant in

pression of a small boat and

varying backgrounds con-

viewers to decide! The jagged mountainside and the grey stormy brushstrokes

abstraction is that anyone can find a connection, feel a sense of mood, or admire the way the light falls on the sea, and not need to “get it.” From architecture to calming landscapes to churning seascapes, there is something in Turner’s work for each individual to discover. J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate will be shown between October 5 and February 23, 2020. Jessica Fedin is a marketing strategist from Capital Group Companies, currently on fourmonth non-profit assignment with Mystic Seaport Museum.

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Mystic Seaport Museum at 90

1940

Clifford D. Mallory Sr. presents the sardine carrier Regina M. (b. around 1900) to the Museum.

On Christmas Day, Mystic Seaport Museum turns 90 years old. This timeline shows some of the highlights during the Museum’s history from its beginning as a local maritime association to its current status as the leading maritime museum in the USA.

1941

1949

(Nov. 8): Whaleship Charles W. Morgan (b. 1841) arrives at the Museum.

Stillman House (now Administration Building), built by Clark Greenman, is presented by Harriet G. Stillman. Marine training program begins aboard the Conrad. Actor Buster Keaton visits the Museum (pic. onboard the Conrad). Attendance 36,505; admission 50¢ adults, 25¢ children. Membership 1,926.

1942

1950

The Morgan opens to the public.

Volunteer Office opens. First Dyer Dhow Derby.

1951

1943

Plan to build a seafaring village takes form. Attendance 7,050. Membership 384. Buckingham House arrives on a barge from Saybrook, CT (pic. below by the Morgan). Mallory Sailing Loft is donated to the Museum and is moved on a barge from downtown Mystic (pic. above). Greenmanville Seventh Day Baptist Meeting House (Church) is purchased Staff: 27 full-time, 14 part-time. Volunteer corps: 250.

1929

1944

(Dec. 25): Three Mystic residents, (l.t.r.) Carl C. Cutler, Edward E. Bradley, and Dr. Charles K. Stillman, meet to incorporate the Marine Historical Association, later called Mystic Seaport Museum.

1929

1930

1931 1932 1933 1934

1935

Driggs-Peters Shipsmith Shop is presented to the Museum by Whaling Enshrined, Inc., former owner of the Morgan (seen here at a later date).

1936 1937 1938 1939

1930

First Annual Meeting: nine members present (out of 27).

1940

1941 1942 1943 1944

Thomas Greenman House is presented by Mrs. E.S. Harkness.

Education Department is established by Marion Dickerman (pic.). Shipyard Point is presented by Harriet Greenman Stillman. Lecture Series (now Adventure Series) begins.

Dr. Stillman donates the first vessel to the Museum’s collection, sandbagger Annie (b. 1880), seen above on the Anchor Circle. The Museum’s first exhibit opens in the Wendell Building; pic. below from 1951.

1946 1947 1948 1949

1947

Full-rigged ship Joseph Conrad (b. 1882) donated to the Museum by Act of Congress (seen here in a more recent photo).

1953

The Museum offers guided tours led by college students.

1954

Cora Mallory Munson endows the Frank C. Munson Memorial Institute of American History. A building is moved from Pawcatuck, CT, to house George H. Stone collection (now General Store). Marion Dickerman’s friend Eleanor Roosevelt (pic.) visits the Museum.

Schaefer Spouter Tavern opens.

1935

Mystic Bank is dismantled at Old Mystic; reconstruction begins at the Museum. “Mystic Seaport” first used to describe the Museum. First issue of The Log of Mystic Seaport is published.

Summer attendance 184; admission 25¢.

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1951

Schooner Brilliant is presented by Briggs Cunningham (cruises begin in 1953).

1956

1948

1950

1952

1945

1946

1931

1945


1965

Mildred C. Mallory Memorial Membership Building opens. Dedication of G.W. Blunt White Library.

Mid-1960s

With interstate highways, automobiles, and requisite family vacations, historical tourism becomes a growing industry; here is the Museum’s parking lot.

1957

1972

Open-hearth cooking demonstrations begin in Buckingham House. Newly formed Demonstration Squad and a chanteyman begin live demonstrations of maritime skills. Museum Board votes to purchase Rossie Mill property.

1973

Steamboat Sabino (b. 1908) arrives for one-year trial charter (the Museum buys her in 1974). First PILOTS weekend. The Morgan floats free for the first time in 32 years.

Author, sailor, and former owner of the Conrad, Alan Villiers, gives a speech at the celebration of the ship’s 75th Anniversary. The Museum has 45 buildings on its campus.

1966

The Morgan is designated a National Historic Landmark. Volunteer corps 300.

1968

1958

New exhibits arrive: New Shoreham Life-Saving Station from Block Island and Half-way House from Cape Cod; the latter was air-lifted by a Marine Corps helicopter to a waiting trailer. Attendance 548,139. Membership 12,556.

Carol Sing by the Morgan.

1960

Planetarium opens.

1952 1953 1954

1955

1956 1957 1958 1959

1962

Opening of new exhibits: Doctor’s Office, Hoop Shop, Print Shop, and Weave Shop.

1960

1961 1962 1963 1964

1965

1966 1967 1968 1969

1969 Noank smack sloop Emma C. Berry (b. 1866) is presented by F. Slade Dale (restoration begins later that year; relaunches in 1971). Ames Fish House arrives from Lincolnville, ME.

1970

1971 1972 1973 1974

1975

1974

Museum officially called Mystic Seaport, Inc. Construction of new wharf for the Morgan.

1975

Dedication of R.J. Schaefer Building. French Oceanographer Jacques Cousteau tours the Museum.

1963

Fishing schooner L.A. Dunton (b. 1921) is purchased in Grand Bank, Newfoundland (arrives at the Museum in 1964). Library has 10,646 books, 1,628 periodicals, and 68,614 manuscripts.

1964

3,000 visiting vessels tie up at the Museum during the summer. Seamen’s Inne opens. Benny Goodman Orchestra performs at the Museum.

1970

The Museum purchases George Greenman House from Mrs. Eleanor Walker, great-granddaughter of George Greenman. The Museum starts building a shipyard with a liftdock as a memorial to trustee Henry B. duPont; it’s built almost entirely by Museum staff between 1970 and 1974 in preparation to restore the Morgan (pic. bottom right). Thomas Oyster House arrives by barge from New Haven, CT. John Gardner offers boatbuilding classes for the first time (pic. below).

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M Y S T I C S E A P O R T M U S E U M AT 9 0

1984

1996

1985

1997

The Museum purchases the Rosenfeld Collection of maritime photography.

1976

The Maritime Gallery opens.

Challenge of Independence exhibit opens in the Stillman Building. First Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous is held at the Museum. Record high attendance 577,978.

Museum officially called Mystic Seaport – The Museum of America and the Sea.

The Museum serves as a movie set for Steven Spielberg’s Amistad; pic. shows Director R. Carr (l.) and S. Spielberg (r.).

1977

Figurehead exhibit opens in Wendell Building. Williams College-Mystic Seaport Maritime Studies Program for undergraduate students begins.

1978

Curator since 1970, J. Revell Carr becomes Museum Director. Lantern Light Tours are held for the first time. Membership 16,645.

1986

After a 25-year break, volunteers start to work on the Mystic River Scale Model (pic. above at a later date, 2010).

The Museum’s south entrance. The Sanger Visitor Reception Center is under construction in the background.

Tugboat Kingston II (b. 1937) is presented to the Museum by Electric Boat in Groton, CT. Official name change to Mystic Seaport Museum, Inc. The Museum celebrates 50 years. Volunteers give 24,274 hours.

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1998

1987

1979

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988 1989

1990

The Museum begins a program renting out wooden craft to sail, row, and paddle from the Boathouse. The William C. Noyes Volunteer of the Year Award is presented for the first time.

2000

Museum Director and President Revell Carr retires; Jimmy English becomes interim director and president. Freedom Schooner Amistad (pic. below) is launched in the Museum’s Shipyard with 10,000 people present. Brilliant makes her first transatlantic crossing since 1933, winning BostonHalifax & Halifax-England sail-training races.

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1992

The Sabino is designated a National Historic Landmark.

1993

The L.A. Dunton is designated a National Historic Landmark.

1980

Roleplayer Program begins. The first Sea Music Festival (then called Chantey Weekend) is held; here with chanteyman Stan Hugill (above), arm raised.

2001

Douglas H. Teeson becomes new Museum President and Director.

2004

After restoration, Annie (pic. below) is relaunched. Museum staff sails her the following year. Eastern-rig dragger Roann (b. 1947) is hauled out to undergo restoration.

1983

George Moffett becomes the third captain of Brilliant. Moffett (m.) with former captains Biff Bowker (l.; Capt. 1962-1983) and Adrian Lane (r.; Capt. 1953-1961).

16

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1994

The Emma C. Berry is designated a National Historic Landmark.

1996

1997

1998


2005

The Museum receives live oak trees from areas hit by Hurricane Katrina to use in the upcoming restoration work on the Morgan.

2006

Olin J. Stephens II becomes the first recipient of the Museum’s America and the Sea Award.

2013

The Morgan is launched in the Shipyard after five years of restoration.

The Museum gets a new logo and adds “Museum” to its name; it is again called Mystic Seaport Museum. In spring, two new popular exhibits open: The Vikings Begin in the Thompson Building and The Vinland Map Saga in the R.J. Schaefer Building. In fall, the exhibit Death in the Ice opens in the Thompson Building. Attendance 257,447. Membership 12,423. 625 volunteers work 55,347 hours.

2007

2014

The doors open for the new Carlton Marine Science Center. The Museum becomes the location for the annual WoodenBoat Show (pic. below).

1999

2000

2018

2001 2002

2003

2004

2005

The Morgan goes on her 38th Voyage, with Capt. Kip Files at the helm. Her voyage lasts for 81 days. 64,297 people visit her during her six port-stops.

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016 2017 2018 2019

2020

2008

The Morgan is hauled out from the Mystic River to undergo restoration. The following year, the Museum decides to make her seaworthy for her 38th Voyage.

2009

Stephen C. White becomes President and Director of Mystic Seaport, following the retirement of Douglas H. Teeson. Planetarium is renamed Treworgy Planetarium after its director, Don Treworgy (well-recognized in his red suspenders), retires after 48 years at the Museum.

2016

The Thompson Exhibition Building, named after Museum trustee Wade Thompson and located in the new McGraw Gallery Quadrangle, opens. The inaugural exhibit is called Sea Change. Plimoth Plantation’s Mayflower II (b. 1957) arrives at the Shipyard to undergo a restoration for 2020, the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ arrival in 1620.

2017

After an extensive two-year restoration, Sabino is launched into the Mystic River.

2012

For the first time, the Museum hosts a Naturalization Ceremony for 75 people from 33 countries.

2019

New exhibits open: Streamlined in the Thompson Building and Mary Mattingly’s Open Ocean in R.J. Schaefer Building. Mayflower II is launched. The Museum is getting ready to open a J.M.W. Turner exhibit from Tate, London, in the Thompson Building in October. The Timeline was compiled by Göran R Buckhorn, editor of Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine. The photographs are from the Museum’s photography archives.

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17


SEA LEVEL RISE

man business enterprises

BY DAN MCFADDEN

in the 1800s and later by the

The evening did not go as

Museum. This accelerated in

planned. As staff prepared for

the 1950s as the concept of

the Lantern Light Tour perfor-

the village was developed. One

mance one day last Decem-

consequence of building on

ber, water started to pool

so-called reclaimed land is

in front of the Sanger Visitor

that rising water in the river

Reception Center. This would

percolates up from below. Add

happen periodically over the course of a year, but in this instance, driven by a full moon and high tide, the water level kept rising until the entire roadway and part of the Village Green were inundated, making it impassable for the hundreds of people who would

some rain to the mix and there

HIGH WATER: THE MUSEUM FACES A FUTURE OF SEA LEVEL RISE

need to cross it during their tour. The evening’s perfor-

does that look like?

but I don’t think it dawned on

Recognizing that the larg-

us just how much a threat this

est threat to the Museum to-

will be over time.”

day may not be financial, but

That flood was not the only

environmental, three working

one that year. A month later,

groups were formed to drill

the Cruising Club of America

down into the issue. The first,

Dock on the north end of cam-

the Coastal Resilience Ad-

pus was underwater. Chris

has risen nearly a foot since 1980. The number of tides 5

aptation Committee, examTop: An example of the scale of flooding near the south entrance from last winter. Above: An aerial view of the Museum circa 1950. At center right one can see the filled-in areas where the village and green are beginning to take shape. (MSM 1976.3.37)

ines the science and policy of

ing forecasts compiled by the

um faces today are the re-

Connecticut Institute for Re-

sult of some faulty assump-

tions are addressing it. The

silience & Climate Adaptation.

tions made in the past. All

Selecting a middle-of-the-road

of Mystic Seaport Museum,

model, the prediction was for

with the exception of the

60 flood events in 2050.

Greenman houses on Rte.

sea level rise and how other communities and institusecond, Campus Infrastructure, is doing an inventory of all the physical assets of the Museum and assessing the value, risk, and possible

“That would be more than

27, lies in a flood zone. The

(the threshold for flooding on

one a week, or in some cases

entire center of campus –

the grounds) was one in the

perhaps two or three in one

the village, the green, and

year 1980, two in 1990, and

week, and that is just not

the road to the Shipyard –

nine in 2018. Gasiorek then

workable for an outdoor his-

were marshland that was

of the center campus, which

projected the frequency of

tory museum,” says Gasiorek.

filled in as space was need-

will be most impacted by sea

flood events out to 2050 us-

The problems the Muse-

ed, originally by the Green-

level rise.

feet above mean low water

18

present,” says White.

And if the last option, what

more of an impact on campus,

highest tides in any given year

“We can no longer assume the future will resemble the

rise and the consequences?

more water and it was having

concern. The average of the 30

wants to reclaim its marshes.

Or does it embrace sea level

knew that there was more and

he discovered was cause for

it seems as if the Mystic River

it build to keep the water out?

President Steve White. “We

data back to 1980 and what

the accompanying flooding,

move to higher ground? Does

up call for us,” says Museum

Programs, researched tide

Today, with sea level rise and

Does the Museum retreat and

“That event was a wake-

Watercraft Preservation and

and it simply creates a pond.

So what can be done?

mance was canceled.

Gasiorek, vice president of

is no way for the water to drain

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

FALL / WINTER 2019

options for each. The third working group, Interactive Public Programs, is looking at the highest and best use


Construction of the bulkhead near Middle Wharf in 1949. The building at right is now the Children’s Museum. (MSM 1949.4.7.P)

“The threat of sea level change requires us to re-examine our assumptions and go through the same process the Museum leadership did when they decided an historic village was the best visitor experience, the best use for that space,” says Susan Funk, executive

So what can be done? Does the Museum retreat and move to higher ground? Does it build to keep the water out? Or does it embrace

building elaborate sea walls, or moving it to a higher location

of that city’s historic prop-

that make them special. As

erties, founded Keeping His-

a result, architects, planners

tory Above Water in 2016 (see

and engineers are developing new techniques to enable historic structures to cope with flooding. Water could be

sea level rise and the

are shaping the vision of a 21st-

consequences? And if

building; basements could be

grounded in the principles of

the last option, what

to be pumped out later; and

public history, we are exploring

does that look like?

what that would look like. How

allowed to pass through the used as temporary cisterns some are experimenting with flotation systems to enable an

do we do that and keep our

entire structure to rise and fall

historic buildings and not lose

with the flood.

them to water?” Historic

structures

for the preservation of many

– may ruin the very qualities

vice president and COO. “As we century experiential museum,

the organization responsible

The Museum is not alone can

in this dilemma. Many historic

present a unique challenge as

sites and communities face

some of the usual tactics – el-

the same challenge. The New-

evating the structure on stilts,

port Restoration Foundation,

historyabovewater.org). The organization sponsors conferences on the issue and is encouraging the historic preservation community to share information and call attention to the looming crisis. The only certain course of action for the Museum at this stage is that inaction is out of the question. “We have no choice but to confront this issue. Sea level rise is happening, and, in fact, it may be happening faster than we think,” says White. Dan McFadden is director of Communications.

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19


ON BOOKS

Conversations with Turner: The Watercolors EDITED BY NICHOLAS BELL

Nicholas Bell, senior vice president for Curatorial Affairs at Mystic Seaport Museum, has edited the book Conversations with Turner: The Watercolors, which will accompany the Museum’s upcoming exhibition J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate, which opens on October 5 in the Collins Gallery in the Thompson Exhibition Building. The book’s format is inspired by this introduction of Britain’s seminal visual artist to new audiences. Following an introductory essay on J.M.W. Turner’s lifelong pursuit of excellence in watercolor by David Blayney Brown, an international cadre of established and rising scholars and artists meet in dialogue in a series of thematic “conversations” in print. Addressing such areas as the evolution of Turner’s art in watercolor, evidence of rapid changes to England’s industry and culture in the early 19th century, his treatment of time and memory, and the question of how his works influence contemporary artists working today, these conversations are intended to offer the reader accessible entry points into the Pre-order your copy online or by calling the Museum’s Bookstore at 860.572.5386 prior to September 23 to get a copy signed by Nicholas Bell.

medium central to Turner’s development as an artist. Ranging from precocious landscapes of the 1790s to the impatient yet critical color experiments of the 1840s, more than 100 watercolors illustrate the genius that led Turner to tower over Western painting in his day, and, arguably, in ours. For the volume, 16 scholars and artists participate in conversations about Turner’s painting and its continued relevance today, including David Blayney Brown; filmmaker John Akomfrah, CBE; Olivier Meslay of The Clark Art Institute; Timothy Barringer of Yale University; Susan Grace Galassi of The Frick Collection; Alexander Nemerov of Stanford University; and Sam Smiles of the University of Exeter. The book is copublished by Mystic Seaport Museum and Skira Editore.

3 QUESTIONS ABOUT THE ART LOFT

This summer, Mystic Seaport Museum

Seaport Museum, many of which were

opened the Art Loft on the second floor of

taken by the Museum’s photographers.

the Museum’s Gift Shop. Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine sat down with Monique Foster, director of The Maritime Galley, to ask her a few questions about this new retail space. Q: What is the Art Loft? A: In this space, located between the Maritime Bookstore and the Maritime Gallery, visitors can enjoy a wide array of options that have not previously been available in this retail building. Visitors can browse and purchase Fine Art prints, decorative Ships Plans, and photographs of various scenes and boats at Mystic

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Q: Will the customers find photographs from the Museum’s Rosenfeld Collection at the Art Loft? A: Yes, visitors can custom order photographs from the esteemed Rosenfeld Collection, as well as plans of all types of craft from the Museum’s collection of Ships Plans. Q: When is the Art Loft open? A: The Art Loft is open daily between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Questions? Contact us at phone 860.572.5302 #4709 or by email at artloft@mysticseaport.org. And remember, members get a discount.


ON BOOKS

Ahab’s Rolling Sea

The Listeners: U-boat Hunters During the Great War

BY RICHARD J. KING

In Ahab’s Rolling Sea: A Natural History of Moby-Dick, scholar Richard J. King, former teacher at The Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport Museum, writes about his

BY ROY R. MANSTAN

journey through the natural history of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick.

In The Listeners: U-boat

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Annie Dillard states that Moby-

Hunters During the Great War,

Dick is the “best book ever written about nature,” and nearly

Roy R. Manstan documents the

the entirety of the story is set on the water, with barely a hint of

struggle the Allies first had with

land. And Melville knew what he was writing about. He had spent

the superior German U-boats during the First World War. However, working tirelessly, civilian scientists and engineers as well as naval personnel of the Naval Experimental Station in New London, Connecticut, played an important role by constructing a system to detect objects under water, the listening devices that would lead to SONAR. This new innovation made it possible for the Allies to track, hunt, and destroy U-boats and get the upper hand in the naval battle against the German Imperial fleet. Roy Manstan, a retired naval engineer and author of Cold Warriors: The Navy’s Engineering and Diving Support Unit (2014) and co-author of Turtle: David Bushnell’s Revolutionary Vessel (2010; together with Frederic Frese), has done a tremendous job researching memoirs, journals, and other first-hand accounts and documents from the time.

a few years at sea before his masterpiece novel was published in 1851. King examines what Melville knew from his own experiences and the sources available to a reader in the mid-1800s when it came to white whales, whale intelligence, giant squids, barnacles, albatross, and sharks. The author compares Captain Ahab’s and the novel’s narrator Ishmael’s worldviews to how we see the ocean today: an expanse still immortal and sublime, but also in crisis. King argues

Richard King will do a book signing at the Museum’s Bookstore on December 7 at 2-5 p.m.

that Ishmael reveals his own tendencies toward what we would now call environmentalism. Featuring a treasure chest of illustrations and an array of interviews with contemporary scientists, fishers, and whale watch operators, Ahab’s Rolling Sea offers new understanding not only into Moby-Dick and its author, but also into our evolving relationship with the sea.

Manstan has produced a well-written and fascinating account of a little-known chapter of the First World War. The Listeners is generously illustrated and many of the photographs come from a family archive. The book has detailed notes, a bibliography, and an index — a book for the military-interested lay man and historians alike.

RE-READ

The Old Man and the Sea BY ERNEST HEMINGWAY

On July 21, Ernest Hemingway fans celebrated the 120th an-

Black Flags, Blue Waters: The Epic History of America’s Most Notorious Pirates BY ERIC JAY DOLIN

In his brief but informative history of piracy in America’s waters, Eric Jay Dolin kills some pirate myths. Pirates did not bury their treasures on a remote island; instead, they spent it right away. Famous Captain William Kidd did not bury a treasure on Gardiner’s Island, New York. And, no, the pirates did not force a captured ship’s captain and his crew to walk the plank. However, there are enough good and true stories to keep readers interested throughout Black Flags, Blue Waters. To order these or other books, please call 860.572.5386 or email msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com. Don’t forget your 10 percent members’ discount! Remember, we ship anywhere. Go to www.mysticseaport.org for upcoming book signings.

niversary of the author’s birth. One of his most famous works is the short novel The Old Man and the Sea, written in 1951 and published the year after. The novel was an immediate success and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1953. When Hemingway was presented with the Nobel Prize for Literature the following year, the Nobel Committee especially cited The Old Man and the Sea as a contributing factor in awarding the prize to the author. The novel tells the story of the aging Cuban fisherman Santiago, who for 84 days has not caught a fish. His apprentice, the young boy Manolin, has been forbidden by his father to fish with Santiago and is told to go out with fishermen with better luck. Manolin visits Santiago each night, preparing food, organizing the old fisherman’s gear, and talking about baseball. On the 85th day, Santiago goes out alone in his boat to head far off into the Gulf Stream in the Straits of Florida, north of Cuba, to try his luck. Santiago catches a giant marlin and after being pulled by the great fish for two days and nights, he manages to kill it and ties it to the boat’s side. But the fisherman’s struggle is not over. Attracted by the marlin’s blood, sharks attack the dead fish. Although Santiago kills several of the sharks, there are too many, so he has to give in. Soon the only thing left of the marlin is its skeleton. Before dawn the next day, Santiago is back home, falling deep asleep in his shack. There, Manolin finds him and cries of relief that he is alive. In the meantime, on the shore, the other fishermen admire the 18-foot skeleton and feel sorry for the old fisherman who lost his great catch. Many literary critics have pointed out the symbols that are in The Old Man and the Sea and its religious overtones. The novel revived Hemingway’s literary reputation and made him a world celebrity. It is truly an American classic well worth a re-read. FALL / WINTER 2019

| Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine |

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FROM THE COLLECTIONS

WHALINGHISTORY.ORG EXPANDS BY PAUL O ’ P E CK O With the help from an Arthur Vining Davis Foundation grant over a decade ago, Mystic Seaport Museum developed a website called the National Maritime Digital Library. It consists of a number of elements including databases, digitized material, and a portal to a new maritime studies journal called CORIOLIS. The core of the site, though, was the American Offshore Whaling Voyage database. Judith Lund, former curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, had created a database of more than 16,000 whaling voyages and teamed up with Mystic Seaport Museum to put it online in a format that would be useful to researchers around the world. Fast forward to 2017 and the AOWV database took on a life of its own to become Whalinghistory.org, an extraordinary collection of information and digital objects that has far surpassed our original dreams for the material. Over the last two years, Mystic Seaport Museum and the New Bedford Whaling Museum cobbled together funding to expand the website with the guidance of web developer David Caldwell. Dave’s ability to organize the data and digital material that we have compiled over the years has been a Herculean effort that is paying dividends by way of all the scholarly work done by users tapping into the site. In addition to the original database, other participants from around the world have begun sharing their data with us. This includes databases for the British Southern Whale Fishery (1775-1859), the British North American Whale Fishery (1779-1845), and the French Whaling Voyages (1784-1866). Add a collection of new crew lists, links to hundreds of scanned

Page showing a link from the record for the Charles W. Morgan to an online logbook at the Museum.

Judith Lund, former curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, had created a database of more than 16,000 whaling voyages and teamed up with Mystic Seaport Museum to put it online in a format that would be useful to researchers around the world. pollination of whaleships and masters be-

Maury, Townsend, and Census of Marine

tween the different databases, especially

Life logbook projects spanning 150 years

among the Nantucketers who occasionally

of data collecting. One of the most gratify-

registered their voyages in both America and France, for example. Other additions to the site include a new EXPLORE menu that offers new ways to dig into the Whaling History databases and features aspects of the data that might not otherwise be discovered. One of the first EXPLORE topics is “Women Who Went Whaling,” an opportunity to find voyages on which the master’s wife sailed. The EXPLORE menu also assists users in finding all 1,300 voyage maps that are included on the site. These maps display voyage location information from the American Whaling Logbook database that combines logbook data from the

ing elements of the site for researchers is the ability to download any or all data to be manipulated for their own purposes, rather than having to construct tables from data that they would otherwise need to type out or cut and paste. Goals yet to be achieved include linking art and objects to individual voyages and bringing in additional institutions to add their records and logbooks to the collection. Fundraising for this will start soon, so feel free to participate! Paul O’Pecko is vice president of Research Collections and director of the G.W. Blunt White Library.

logbooks, and a new search function that links all the material together, and you have a virtual smorgasbord of whaling history at your fingertips. Quite interesting is the cross -

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FALL / WINTER 2019

To get more information about the Collections Research Center of Mystic Seaport Museum and online resources, please visit research.mysticseaport.org


EVENTS AT MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM MYSTIC RIVER OYSTER FESTIVAL September 28

AMERICA AND THE SEA AWARD GALA October 30

ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MARINE ART SHOW September 28-December 31 The Maritime Gallery

HALLOWEEN: TRICK-OR-TREAT October 31

MEMBER TRIP: INTREPID SEA, AIR & SPACE MUSEUM October 2 MEMBER PREVIEW: J.M.W. TURNER: WATERCOLORS FROM TATE October 5 NEW EXHIBITION: J.M.W. TURNER: WATERCOLORS FROM TATE October 5-February 23, 2020 Collins Gallery NAUTICAL NIGHTMARES October 11, 12, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27 MEMBER TOUR: COLLECTIONS VAULT TOUR WITH SENIOR CURATOR FRED CALABRETTA October 12 CHOWDER DAYS October 12-14 EDUCATORS’ APPRECIATION DAY October 19 PILOTS WEEKEND October 19-20

SEAPORT AFTER SEVEN: TURNER November 1 MEMBER EVENING: SPOTLIGHT ON TURNER November 15 MINIATURES BY MARITIME MASTERS November 16-January 31, 2020 The Maritime Gallery FIELD DAYS November 29-30 MEMBERS’ DOUBLE DISCOUNT DAYS November 29-December 8 LANTERN LIGHT TOURS November 29, 30, December 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22 (23, snow day) COMMUNITY CAROL SING December 22 HOLIDAY MAGIC December 26-31 CHANTEY BLAST & PUB SING January 4, 2020

2019-2020 ADVENTURE SERIES 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m The River Room, Latitude 41° or StoneRidge Senior Living Community StoneRidge is the exclusive community sponsor of the 2019-2020 Adventure Series. Thursdays, November 21, December 19, January 16, 2020, February 20, 2020, March 19, 2020, April 16, 2020

ART GALLERY SPRING SHOW Opens April 25, 2020 The Maritime Gallery PILOTS WEEKEND May 9-10, 2020 MEMBERS’ ANNUAL MEETING & RECOGNITION DAY May 30, 2020 For additional programs, classes, and courses, but also for changes or cancellations, please visit the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org

ICE FESTIVAL February 15-17, 2020

For hours of operation during fall, winter, and spring 2020, open and closed exhibits, shopping, and dining, please check the Museum’s website: www.mysticseaport.org

PIRATE DAYS April 14-15, 2020

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BUY A GIFT MEMBERSHIP BEFORE DECEMBER 11 AND WE’LL INCLUDE A 2020 MYSTIC SEAPORT MUSEUM CALENDAR FOR FREE!

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Profile for Mystic Seaport Museum

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine, Fall/Winter 2019  

Featured articles: “J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate,” The President’s Advisory Council; “Mayflower II” launched; The 2019 Celebration o...

Mystic Seaport Museum Magazine, Fall/Winter 2019  

Featured articles: “J.M.W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate,” The President’s Advisory Council; “Mayflower II” launched; The 2019 Celebration o...

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