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a new momentum...

SINDA ANNUAL REPORT 2012


SINDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES & EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

CONTENTS 01 02 04 06 12 21 24 27 30 36 39 43 46 54

BOARD OF TRUSTEES & EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

PATRON

2012 @ A GLANCE

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong

SNAPSHOTS FROM 2012 EDUCATION DIVISION

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

PARENTS DIVISION

CHAIRMAN AND LIFE TRUSTEE Mr Tharman Shanmugaratnam

CHILDREN DIVISION YOUTH DIVISION SINDA FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE CORPORATE & MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT DIVISION CORPORATE SERVICES DIVISION

LIFE TRUSTEES Mr Sat Pal Khattar Prof S Jayakumar Mr J Y Pillay Mr K Shanmugam Mr S Dhanabalan Mr S Chandra Das Dr N Varaprasad

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Ms Indranee Rajah

Mission Vision To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together

TERM TRUSTEES ADVISORS Ms Indranee Rajah Dr Vivian Balakrishnan Mr V Shankar Mr Hri Kumar Nair Mr Girija Pande Mr S Iswaran Mr Inderjit Singh Mr R Jayachandran Mr M Rajaram Mr Ravi Menon Justice Judith Prakash Mr K Kesavapany Mr Hsieh Fu Hua MG (NS) Ravinder Singh Mr Gautam Banerjee Mr Bobby Chin Yoke Choong ( Until April 2012) Mr Haider M Sithawalla (Until April 2012)

To build a well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore

Values Respect, our Culture Integrity, our Foundation Service, our Promise Excellence, our Pursuit

VICE PRESIDENTS Mr Viswa Sadasivan Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai SECRETARY Mr Sarjit Singh TREASURER Mr R Subramaniam Iyer

COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mr V P Jothi Mr R Rajaram Dr Joshua V M Kuma Mr Aaron Maniam Mr Puvan Ariaratnam Mr P Thirunal Karasu Mr Naseer Ghani RESOURCE PANEL MEMBERS Mr P B Desai Mr K V Rao Ms M Nirmala Mr Sajen G Aswani Dr Sivasankaran Subramaniam Mr Mohamed Abdul Jaleel Ms Sabanitha Shanmugasundram

AUDIT REVIEW COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mr Gautam Banerjee Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai Mr K V Rao Mr Sarjit Singh Mr Mohan Pillay AUDITORS KPMG LLP

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Dear Friends, Many events have shaped the world and Singapore in 2012. The future of our community, and indeed of our nation, hinges on the development and education of our young people to meet the challenges that lie ahead. SINDA too, has taken steps to be able to deal with the challenges that will face the Singaporean Indian community.

In 2012, SINDA transformed itself to tackle the challenges that face Singaporean Indians and to implement the recommendations in the SINDA 2020 Review. As a result, SINDA has: • formed a Children Division that looks into areas such as pre-school education, child welfare and care. Its role extends beyond the education arena and concentrates on children from ages 2 to 6 years of age. • focused on engaging Indian parents. Over the past year the new Parents Division reached out to over 3,000 Indian parents to encourage them to be more engaged and involved in their children’s education. • instituted improvements to the STEP and Teach tuition programmes in terms of quality, curriculum, and enhancements such as E-learning and tutor training. This was in tandem with a focus on mastering Mathematics. These together with a slew of new initiatives and current programmes have enabled SINDA to make a significant impact on the upliftment of the community. There were several “firsts” like the Conference for Indian Fathers and the Father-Child Bonding Camp. Mathematics is still the subject that underperforming students have the most difficulty with. To help these students master the fundamentals of Mathematics, new ways of making the subject interesting were introduced. Programmes like Fun with Maths and Mathemagic help children who find Maths difficult to overcome their fear of it, and develop their confidence and interest in the subject. Youths are our future. SINDA has revamped its mentorship programme and introduced GAME, a group-based mentoring programme aimed at supporting the development of Indian youths between 13 to 16 years who are at risk of being disengaged from school and have self-esteem issues. The SINDA Youth Leaders Seminar is another initiative to develop Indian youth leaders.

A NEW MOMENTUM

But SINDA did not do this alone. This is a mutual effort by all members of the Singapore Indian community. It is a result of genuine partnerships across society with shared aspiration, mutual respect, joint responsibility and values. The upliftment of the community and fulfillment of the potential of our young students is a task for all of us – to encourage and support each other, to continue to promote education as a means of social mobility and to recognise that there are many paths to success. I would like to conclude by thanking all those who have helped SINDA in the past years, especially the Board of Trustees, the EXCO and the executive and management teams, as well as our volunteers, partners and donors. Your unwavering support, service and dedication have made - and continue to make - a big difference in the lives of many Indians. In conclusion, I would say that our work is not yet done. We have made positive strides and are moving in the right direction. But we must keep the momentum going. We need to involve more people, forge new partnerships and strengthen existing ones. We are in this for the long run and we need everyone in the Singapore Indian community to do their part, step up and make the change that will lift our community to greater heights. Our future is what we make of it.

Indranee T. Rajah President


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2012 @ A GLANCE

A NEW MOMENTUM

Studen ts in STEP T uition

3,688

DA SIN ctions d ne con tribute dis

000

70,

Family Service Centre cases

410

Total a mount raised throug h Projec t Give

$630,8

60

nts in e d u St each T t c e Proj

4 1,25

ve Festi cks a Gift P uted b distri

0

Total n o volun . of teers

1,20

Youths in programmes and activities

1,080

2,332 Parents in workshops, seminars and camps

Bursaries awarded to students

in nts l e d Stu ationa s c edu ramme g pro

1,092 Children in pre-school programmes

1,394

0

0 7,0

3,043

SPM

F, S IND sch A and pre bur ool s a disb ries urs ed

$89

4,0

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SNAPSHOTS FROM 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

07 APR

MOE-SINDA PARENTS SEMINAR

28 JAN

PROJECT GUIDE – TAKE FLIGHT!

22 APR

NARPANI - SINDA FAMILY DAY

15 MAR

MUSIC FOR LIFE CAMP

30 MAR

EAGLE’S EYE PROGRAMME

05 FEB

WINNING STRATEGIES PSLE MATHS SEMINAR

31 MAR

MATHS EXCELLENCE WORKSHOP


A NEW MOMENTUM

SNAPSHOTS FROM 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

01 MAY

FATHER-CHILD BONDING EXPERIENTIAL CAMP

07 JUL

VOLUNTEERS’ TEA

14 AUG

JOINT SELF-HELP GROUPS NATIONAL DAY CELEBRATION

01 – 03 JUN

SINDA YOUTH LEADERS SEMINAR

13 JUL

ITE FORUM

07 – 09 JUN CAMP ARISE

22 JUN

CAMP JUMANJI

25 AUG

JOINT TUITION AWARDS


A NEW MOMENTUM

SNAPSHOTS FROM 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

22 SEPT

SINDA- MOE PARTNERSHIP APPRECIATION CEREMONY

11 NOV

RIDERS AID

01 DEC

BACK TO SCHOOL FESTIVAL

03 SEPT

SINDA EXCELLENCE AWARDS CEREMONY

06 OCT

CHILDREN’S DAY CARNIVAL

29 SEPT

CONFERENCE FOR INDIAN FATHERS

02 DEC

17 NOV

SINDA PROJECT GIVE CHARITY SHOW

08 OCT

IBR DIALOGUE WITH MR RAVI MENON

18 OCT

SINGAPORE CONVERSATIONS WITH NATIONAL YOUTH COUNCIL

08 DEC

PROJECT ASPIRE

FAMILY BONDING CAMP


STEP PROGRAMME

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Driving education excellence among Singaporean Indian students is SINDA’s mandate. In line with this, SINDA runs tuition programmes which support and supplement the academic pursuit of students. SINDA Tutorials for Enhanced Performance, more commonly known as STEP, is SINDA’s flagship tuition programme. It was launched in 1992 to help primary and secondary students to achieve substantial results in English, Maths and Science. Since its launch, STEP has been enhanced on all fronts, making it financially affordable, conveniently located at 20 centres and offering quality pedagogical methods to improve results. In 2012, 3,688 students benefited from the programme of whom 806 received full or partial waiver of fees. Based on the SINDA 2020 Review Report, the key strategies of the programme were to enhance focus on Mathematics and expand SINDA’s tuition reach. A more student-centric model was adopted in 2012 to promote a more holistic form of learning.

Key features of the programme include: • Small class size • Qualified and experienced tutors • Holiday programmes at centre – (Enrichment / Academic / Motivational)

EDUCATION DIVISION

• Additional subjects (subject to minimum numbers at the centre) • Flexible choice of subjects • SINDA tests conducted regularly • Curriculum materials • E-learning • Refreshments • T-shirts

MAJOR HIGHLIGHTS 2X MATHS (previously known as Double Maths) 2x Maths saw a gain in momentum where 95% of the STEP Centres conducted these extra Maths classes in 2012. Centre Principals and tutors proactively identified and encouraged weaker students to take-up 2x Maths. A total of 836 students benefited from this option in 2012. 2x Maths enabled students to take 2 Maths lessons a week instead of the usual 1 lesson.


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PROJECT TEACH

STEP PROGRAMME

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Project Teach is a school-based tutorial programme that aims to improve the academic performance of Indian students through intensive small group tuition. In 2012, Project Teach’s focus was anchored on strategies proposed in the SINDA 2020 review. The programme was remodeled to enhance focus on Maths and to expand its reach to more students and schools. In 2012, Project Teach reached out to 1,129 students across 53 primary schools, the highest enrolment since the programme was piloted in 2001. More than 80 tutors were engaged in the programme. Project Teach Secondary, a tutorial programme focused purely on Maths, was also successfully piloted in 7 schools reaching out to 125 students. SINDA Liaison officers (SLOs) are instrumental to the success of Project Teach. SLOs, who are day school teachers, assist to identify students for the programme, evaluate Project Teach tutors, provide feedback to improve Project Teach and provide all required administrative support. SLOs also ensure that Project Teach students benefit from SINDA wide events apart from Project Teach. In 2012, Project Teach engaged with about 60 SLOs from primary and secondary schools.

KEY FEATURES

INTENSIVE HOLIDAY CLASSES These classes were generally designed to be intensive revision sessions for subjects students were weak in, particularly Mathematics. 75% (15 out of 20) of the STEP Centres conducted these sessions during the June and September holidays. It provided students an opportunity to revise and prepare for the upcoming final year and landmark examinations (PSLE, ‘O’ level etc) and keep students engaged in academic programmes during the holidays.

2012 STEP CENTRES Bowen Secondary School

East View Secondary School

First Toa Payoh Primary School

Pasir Ris Primary School

Marsiling Primary School

Ping Yi Secondary School

Mayflower Secondary School

Chua Chu Kang Secondary School

North View Secondary School

Clementi Primary School

Woodlands Ring Secondary School

Fajar Secondary School

Seng Kang Secondary School

Jurong West Secondary School

Yishun Primary School

Pioneer Secondary School

Global Indian International School, Balestier Campus

Shuqun Primary School

Henderson Secondary School

Shuqun Secondary School

• Intensive small group tuition • Customised to the school’s needs • Conducted within the school premises before or after curriculum time • Flexible choice of subjects • Increased contact time for Maths • Qualified teachers • Holiday Maths classes • Workshops and seminars for parents • Curriculum materials • Primary 1 Maths customised curriculum • Target setting book • Assessments • E-learning/E-Resources

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

Increased contact time with Maths Project Teach schools were encouraged to increase their students’ contact time with Maths from 2 hours to up to 4 hours per week. This gave students additional time to learn and revise concepts under the Project Teach tutor’s guidance. 16 schools took up this option for their students. Holiday classes in June and November Project Teach promoted June as a ‘Maths Month’ for primary school students. Tutors were encouraged to conduct additional Maths classes especially for Primary 5 and 6 students, during the June school holidays. The objective was to revise and reinforce key Maths concepts as well as provide students additional Maths practice. Tutors of Primary 1 to 4 classes also

carried out Maths enrichment activities during the holidays to inspire more interest in the subject. 696 students from 34 Teach schools benefited from the June Maths programme. 6 Project Teach schools also extended the programme till November 2012, to prepare students for 2013 and give them a head start for the coming year. 118 students benefited from the additional sessions. Flexible Programme Models Day schools were offered 3 programme models to choose from, based on their students’ needs and the school timetable: A) An English, Maths and/or Science year long programme B) A Maths/Double Maths-only programme from January to October C) A 12-weeks exam preparation Maths programme The objective was to allow greater flexibility to meet the needs of students. 11 schools opted for the Maths/Double Maths only programme and 39 schools opted for the English, Maths and/or Science programme. 2 schools took up the exam preparatory programme. Engagement of Project Teach Tutors Project Teach tutors are engaged through regular meetings and school visits. In October, an inaugural retreat was organised for tutors at the Raffles Marina. The objective of this half day retreat was to appreciate tutors for

their dedication. It also provided an opportunity for tutors to bond with each other, and the Project Teach team, through team building activities. 54 tutors attended the retreat. Launch of Project Teach Secondary The SINDA 2020 Review revealed that Indian students are underperforming at national examinations, particularly in Mathematics. The Review recommended expanding Project Teach to secondary schools, amongst other strategies to raise the academic standards of Indian students in the next decade. In line with this, Project Teach Secondary was launched in secondary schools to reach more Indian students. The programme aims to improve the performance of Indian students, especially in Mathematics, through intensive small group tuition. Project Teach Secondary is conducted after school hours at school premises with qualified and experienced tutors. The curriculum is aligned to the MOE syllabus and regular assessments are conducted to cater to students’ specific needs. The programme is targeted at Indian Singaporean / Permanent Resident students from Secondary 1 to 5, with a focus on upper secondary students sitting for the ‘N’ level and ‘O’ level examinations.


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CONTENT & RESOURCE UNIT

PROJECT TEACH

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CONTENT AND RESOURCE UNIT In 2012, the Content and Resource Unit implemented several classroom and tutor development initiatives. Some key initiatives are highlighted below.

PROJECT TEACH SCHOOLS (PRIMARY) Ahmad Ibrahim Primary School Anderson Primary School Balestier Hill Primary School Beacon Primary School Bendemeer Primary School Blangah Rise Primary School Boon Lay Garden Primary School Bukit Panjang Primary School Bukit Timah Primary School Canossa Convent Primary School Cedar Primary School Changkat Primary School CHIJ Our Lady of Good Counsel CHIJ Our Lady of the Nativity Chua Chu Kang Primary School Concord Primary School Edgefield Primary School Farrer Park Primary School First Toa Payoh Primary School Gan Eng Seng Primary School Greenridge Primary School Greenwood Primary School Haig Girls’ School Huamin Primary School Lakeside Primary School Marsiling Primary School Meridian Primary School

PROJECT TEACH SCHOOLS (SECONDARY)

Montfort Junior School New Town Primary School Ngee Ann Primary School North View Primary School Pei Tong Primary School Peiying Primary School Pioneer Primary School Qifa Primary School Qihua Primary School Rivervale Primary School Sembawang Primary School Shuqun Primary School Si Ling Primary School St Anthony’s Primary School Tampines North Primary School Tanjong Katong Primary School Teck Ghee Primary School Teck Whye Primary School Townsville Primary School West Grove Primary School Woodgrove Primary School Woodlands Ring Primary School Xingnan Primary School Yishun Primary School Yuhua Primary School Zhangde Primary School

Bartley Secondary School

Bendemeer Secondary School

Chong Boon Secondary School

East View Secondary School

Punggol Secondary School

Queenstown Secondary School

Riverside Secondary School

Before Project Teach English - 46% scored B grade or better - 24% failed Maths - 28.7 % scored C grade or better - 71.3% failed Science - 58.9% scored C grade or better - 41.1% failed

PSLE

PRIMARY 5 EXAMS

IMPACT OF PROJECT TEACH PRIMARY (2011)*

*The official 2012 school and national examination results will be available at a later date

After Project Teach English - 58% scored B grade or better - 6.2% failed Maths - 60.5% scored C grade or better - 39.5% failed Science - 77.5% scored C grade or better - 22.5% failed

CLASSROOM INITIATIVES Primary 1 Maths Customised Curriculum This pilot initiative was implemented to enhance Mathematics pedagogy for tutors and to provide a customised curriculum for STEP & Project Teach students. The 25-week programme aimed to:  enable tutors to teach Maths in creative ways to help Primary 1 students master Maths concepts  make Maths more interesting through hands-on activities  increase interest in Maths at foundational level among Primary 1 students. Structured tutor training was also conducted to enable tutors to deliver the curriculum effectively in the classroom. 370 students and 37 tutors benefited from this initiative.


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CONTENT & RESOURCE UNIT

Upper Secondary Customised Curriculum A customized curriculum was written for Maths and Combined Science (Physics and Chemistry) to support Upper Secondary tutors in their classroom teaching. To ensure that students were equipped with the necessary Maths practice skills, an addendum that consisted of ‘Higher Order Thinking Questions’ was provided for Secondary 4E/5NA Math classes. This initiative was rolled out in 18 STEP centres. E-Learning E-learning interactive pedagogy was introduced to enhance teaching and learning in STEP and Project Teach schools. It comprises 3 main components, namely Litespeed portal, Dynamice and E-resources. Litespeed is an online learning management system targeted at self-directed learning. Key features include assessment builder, homework dispatch and lessons with pictorial explanations. Dynamice is another interactive tool that allows for greater tutor-student engagement. This tool, which allows students to interact using their computer mouse, provides standardised templates for more interesting lessons. In 2012, E-learning was successfully implemented at all 20 STEP Centres. All the STEP centres were issued with the Learning Management System (Lite speed) accounts for both tutors’ and students’ usage. Each STEP centre was also provided with a laptop and supporting peripherals to facilitate the E-learning initiative. E-learning for Project Teach was piloted for Primary 4 and Primary 5 tutors in the second half of the year. For the first time, each STEP centre had nominated an E-learning champion to lead the E-learning initiative at their respective centres. At least 457 tutors and 3,688 students have benefited from E-Learning. E-Resource: SINDA School Page The E-resource website is a one–stop resource guide for primary school students. It contains a repository of resources, such as worksheets, articles, Youtube videos and interesting games on a wide variety of topics. Various resources from the web were compiled for students, tutors and parents in STEP and Project Teach and made available to the general community as well. This initiative has reached at least 4,817 students and 457 tutors in STEP and Project Teach.

TUTOR DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES Structured Training SINDA implemented a structured tutors’ training programme, to facilitate continuous education and upgrading of skills and exposure to new training methods. 9 training sessions were conducted on teaching pedagogies for each subject, with additional focus on Maths. Tutors gave positive feedback that the training sessions were relevant and useful. Primary 1 Maths Customised Curriculum Training 2 structured training sessions were conducted for Primary 1 tutors, to ensure the effective delivery of the customised curriculum in the classroom. The training focused on concept teaching, enquiry-based learning and the use of manipulatives to conduct more interesting lessons. E-Learning Training 8 E-learning training sessions were conducted to ensure that STEP and Project Teach tutors were adequately equipped with skills to use the features in the Learning Management System portal. Ico-lab, an online hands-on portal, was introduced to promote more interaction amongst students and training was provided to tutors to enable them to facilitate the session. Tutors’ Forum The Tutors’ Forum is one of several initiatives to strengthen SINDA’s relationship with its auxiliary staff. Organised for STEP and Project Teach tutors, this Forum aimed to provide a platform for tutors to understand SINDA’s 2020 Review, mission, vision and key values better. It was also a good opportunity to engage tutors and promote discussion and interaction among them. The highlight of the Forum was the sharing by two credible speakers, Prof. Berinderjeet Kaur, Head of Centre for International Comparative Studies at National Institute of Education and Dr. Charles Chew, Senior Lecturer (Seconded) at NIE and a current Principal Master Teacher (Physics) with the Academy of Singapore Teachers, who came on board to share their experience and expertise with the tutors. A total of 20 training sessions were conducted for at least 450 tutors in STEP and Project Teach.

EDUCATION PROGRAMMES UNIT

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OTHER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES In addition to SINDA’s flagship tuition programmes, the Education Programmes Unit also conducts other educational programmes to help students excel in their examinations. Seminars & Workshops A series of seminars and workshops were conducted for students in both the primary and secondary levels. The objective was to improve the students’ understanding of concepts and hone their skills in key subjects such as English, Maths and Science by infusing elements of motivation and creativity. In total, 1,683 students were reached through these seminars and workshops.

STU-STAR Programme The Singapore Teachers Union (STU) conducts the Special Tutorial and Revision (STAR) programme for students from Primary 4 to Primary 6. There are 4 centres located islandwide which offer English, Maths and Science classes. SINDA provides subsidies of up to 50 % of the total tuition fees for students enrolled in this programme. In 2012, a total of 29 students benefited from this programme.

Collaborative Tuition Programme (CTP) In order to make tuition centres more accessible to students, SINDA collaborated with the other three Self-Help Groups, namely CDAC, Yayasan MENDAKI and Eurasian Association (EA) to run 56 CTP STEP centres island-wide. In 2012, 171 students benefited from this joint effort.

Private Tuition Programme To make tuition more accessible to students and increase outreach, SINDA worked directly with tuition centres to provide funding base on the stipulated criteria to Indian students in Primary 5, Primary 6, Secondary 4 Express and Secondary 5 Normal Academic who are enrolled into the Maths tuition programme. In 2012, about 14 students benefited from this effort.

NUSTLS ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme SINDA, in collaboration with the Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) and People’s Association Narpani Pearavai, supports the Saadhana ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme conducted by the National University of Singapore Tamil Language Society (NUSTLS). The aim of this programme is to provide quality tuition in core GCE ‘A’ Level subjects at affordable rates. A total of 84 students enrolled in this programme in 2012. Students who were not able to afford the fees were given subsidies based on their household income.

Community Outreach Support Scheme The Community Tuition Fee Subsidy Scheme is a collaboration of the four self-help groups (SHGs), CDAC, EA, SINDA and Yayasan MENDAKI with the North West Community Development Council (CDC). The fee subsidy is co-funded by the respective SHGs and the North West CDC. In 2012, three RC / CC continued with this programme and a total of 15 students benefited from this programme.


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EDUCATION PROGRAMMES UNIT

Scholarships SINDA offers a range of scholarships in collaboration with well-known institutions and organisations. These scholaships for diploma and certificate courses offer Indian students more opportunities to pursue their higher studies. In 2012, SINDA signed an Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with PSB Academy, Kaplan Singapore and the Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS), three prestigious private educational institutions, to provide several fully sponsored and partially sponsored tertiary scholarships that will lead to Diploma and Degree qualifications. The Diploma courses, which are fully accredited by these institutions, lead to Degree courses conducted by these institutions together with overseas Universities. Students who are not able to afford their portion of fees when they are given the partial scholarships may apply for interest-free loans through the SINDA-SIET Tertiary Educational Loan scheme. In 2012, SINDA offered a total of 20 scholarships through the following: • Ng Lao Chik-SINDA Secondary Study (NLC SSS) Awards • SINDA-SIA Scholarship • SINDA-SIMM Scholarship • SINDA-MDIS Scholarship Eagle’s Eye Programme SINDA together with Raffles Institution (RI), embarked on the Eagle’s Eye Programme which is aimed at identifying and grooming potential students in Primary 5 to achieve excellent results in PSLE and to subsequently gain entry into the Institution through mentorship by current RI students. In 2012, 5 students were selected to be part of the Eagle’s Eye Programme which was officially launched on 30 Mar 2012.

PARENTS DIVISION


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PARENTS DIVISION

A NEW MOMENTUM

The Parents Division was formed in 2012 to build family resilience, and to equip and empower parents to more effectively support their children’s holistic growth. The Parents Division conducts programmes to engage Singaporean Indian parents, and more specifically fathers, to play a more active role in their children’s lives.

PARENTS DIVISION PROGRAMMES

PARENTING TALKS AND WORKSHOPS • Shared-Parenting Talks • Parenting Talks • Maths Workshop 1 and 2 • Modular Parenting Workshops

Parenting talks and workshops were held at STEP centres, Project Teach schools and community centres. The objective was to equip parents with basic parenting skills, and enhance focus on Maths and family resilience. In 2012, 20 Shared Parenting Talks, 40 Parenting Talks and 24 Maths Workshops were conducted. A total of 2,094 participants attended these talks and workshops. Modular Parenting Workshops The Modular Parenting Workshops were tailored for parents of Project Teach students who were underperforming in school and parents from low-income families. This 4-module workshops were conducted by Fei Yue Community Services. Modules were tailored according to the needs of the parents attending the workshops. The workshops were held on 14, 21, and 28 July and 4 August 2012 at Huamin Primary School. 12 parents attended the workshops over the 4 sessions. PROGRAMMES FOR FATHERS Conference for Indian Fathers 2012 The Conference for Indian Fathers was held in collaboration with Dads for Life and the Ministry of Community Development Youth & Sports (MCYS) to engage Indian fathers to play a bigger role in their children’s lives, in line with building family resilience. The objective was to emphasise the importance of the father’s involvement in the educational and holistic development of the child. 88 fathers benefited from this conference.

iCAN Workshop for Fathers and Father-Child Bonding Experiential Camp The objective of these programmes was to reach out to Indian fathers in SINDA’s database and educate them on the importance of their role in the family. 4 workshops conducted over 2 sessions and 2 camps were held, reaching out to 49 fathers and 30 father-child pairs respectively. EVENTS FOR PARENTS MOE-SINDA Parents Seminar The MOE-SINDA Parents Seminar was held on 7 April 2012 with the aim of educating parents of kindergarten children on preparing their children for primary school education. The seminar was held in collaboration with the Ministry of Education (MOE). Parents heard from MOE’s educational experts on how to better prepare their children for primary school education. While the parents were attending the seminar, the children were engaged in mini Science experiential workshops. 286 parents and 200 children attended the seminar. Family Bonding Camp A Family Bonding Camp was held at Umar Pulavar Tamil Language Centre and Fort Canning Park in December 2012. This camp, based on an adventure-format focused on providing a fun platform to build family resilience in an outdoor setting. This inaugural camp was fully funded by Dads for Life, Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF) and supported by the Health Promotion Board (HPB). 72 families participated in the camp.


CHILDREN DIVISION

CHILDREN DIVISION

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CHILDREN DIVISION

Also formed in 2012, the Children Division raises awareness on the importance of pre-school education to increase pre-school enrolment. The division also runs motivational programmes and Holiday Enrichment programmes to engage Primary school students, and support their holistic development.

CHILDREN DIVISION PROGRAMMES CHILDREN’S DAY CARNIVAL The Children’s Day Carnival was held on 6 October 2012 in conjunction with Children’s Day. The underpinning theme of the event was Occupations. A total of 271 children and 143 parents attended the carnival. The highlight of the carnival was the finale activity where the children penned their ambitions on ‘leaves’ attached to the ‘Dream Tree’. F1 EXPERIENCE WORKSHOP The workshop was held from 19 to 22 November 2012 for 78 Primary 4 to 6 students. Conducted in collaboration with the Education Programmes Unit, the workshop aimed to create a positive attitude towards Science and Maths, and enabled students to develop an informed view about careers in Engineering, Formula One, Science and Technology. Students also got the opportunity to design and test out their very own Formula 1 race cars. ‘PRESCHOOL IS FUN’ CARNIVALS Pre-school carnivals were held in March, May and November, to engage pre-school students and their parents. The intent was to increase awareness on the importance of pre-school education. A total of 200 children and 180 parents participated in these carnivals.

SINDA JUNIOR CHALLENGE The SINDA Junior Challenge was held on 3 September 2012, involving 110 students from 11 STEP centres. Primary 1 and Primary 2 students took part in a Spelling Bee while Primary 3 and Primary 4 students were involved in Maths and Science competitions. The key objective was to productively engage students during the school holidays. Tutors and parents were also involved to assist and support the students. STAR LEADERSHIP This motivational programme was conducted in collaboration with the National Junior College (NJC) dance troupe, comprising both Indian and non-Indian students. From March to July 2012, 45 NJC students designed the course, and mentored 27 Primary 5 students from the STEP centres. The programme was conducted over 5 sessions, covering themes such as self-confidence, perseverance, team work, leadership and time management.

YOUTH DIVISION


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YOUTH DIVISION

A NEW MOMENTUM

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT

The Youth Development Department engages Indian youths in a range of meaningful enrichment activities that provides them access to networks of mentors, role models and other sources of positive reinforcement.

SINDA YOUTH CLUB

The SINDA Youth Club (SYC) engages Indian youths through creating diverse learning and leadership opportunities, inspiring the youths to become confident, active and passionate leaders.

CAMP ARISE

SINDA YOUNG LEADERS PROGRAMME 2012

Camp Arise is an experiential learning and outdoor training camp to encourage participants to learn through outdoor activities such as Flying fox, Challenge Rope Course, Rockwall Climbing, Catapult, Bridge Building, and Cycling Expedition. The key objective of the camp is to develop resilient and confident youths who stay in school to complete their studies. In line with the directives for Youth Division, the camp leverages on sports and team activities and to promote SINDA as a youth hub.

The SINDA Young Leaders Programme (SYLP) aims to empower inspiring Indian youths to excel in community building, service and leadership. The 6-month intensive programme comprises local community projects and an overseas expedition. Participants gain insights into social issues and are given the freedom to develop their project and to execute meaningful programmes.

In 2012, Camp Arise involved a 3-days/2-nights residential camp with a structured values based programme as well as 3 half day booster sessions to follow up. This camp targeted 185 Secondary 1 and Secondary 2 NA/NT students.

IT’S YOUR MOVE – GUIDE TO SECONDARY SCHOOL The objective of this programme was to prepare students and their parents for the transition from Primary school to Secondary school. There were activities on values such as resilience, handling peer pressure and managing stress to better prepare students for secondary school. Parents attended informative talks to prepare them for their children’s transition from Primary 6 to Secondary 1. 280 parents and children benefited from this programme.

GUIDANCE AND MENTORSHIP PROGRAMME (GAME) The GAME Programme is a 4-month intensive structured programme aimed at supporting the positive development of Indian youths aged between 14 to 16 years old, to realise their fullest potential. GAME has successfully completed 2 runs since its inception in 2010. Indian youths are matched to suitable trained mentors who guide them through a series of structured recreational and group activities. The activities seek to encourage youths to demonstrate teamwork, resilience and leadership. A CIP component is also included where participants coordinate a community project to contribute to society.

In 2012, SYLP was held from December 2011 to May 2012. 18 participants went to Galle and Colombo in Sri Lanka to hone their leadership skills, and contribute back to the community.

SINDA YOUTH LEADERS SEMINAR 2012 The SINDA Youth Leaders Seminar 2012 was held from June 1 to 3 at the Singapore Sports School. It provided an added platform for SYC to reach out, cultivate and engage Indian student leaders. 171 participants attended this seminar, which aimed to raise awareness on the aspirations of the Indian community as well its challenges. Students from various institutions came together to meet, interact and discuss critical issues facing the community. Participants also examined concerns facing the nation as a whole, and reflected on how they could contribute to society.

SOCIAL NARRATIVES 2012: BUILDING A HOME WITH HOPE AND HEART – THE ROLE OF YOUNG CHANGE AGENTS This ministerial dialogue session was held on 18 October 2012, with Mr Lawrence Wong, then Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Communications and Information. 57 participants attended this dialogue session. The ‘Social Narratives’ is one of National Youth Council’s engagement platforms that provide young Singaporeans the opportunity to share their views and concerns in a dynamic, creative and youth-centric environment.The session was a collaborative effort between various community groups (SINDA Youth Club, Mendaki Club, Young Sikh Association, Eurasian Association and the Chinese Development Assistance Council) and supported by NYC, to engage youths on their role as agents of change in society.


FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE

SINDA FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE

31

A NEW MOMENTUM


32

A NEW MOMENTUM

33

FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE

A NEW MOMENTUM

BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CARE (BASC)

SINDA FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE The SINDA Family Service Centre (SFSC) has a team of professional staff to provide social work and counselling services to those experiencing difficulties in their personal, work, marital and family lives. Experienced and trained officers assess problems, conduct home visits, and provide help where needed. Families and individuals are also welcome to contact the SFSC if they require information or assistance regarding national resources available to them. Referrals to such appropriate agencies are made when and where necessary. SFSC received around 1400 walk-ins and enquiries in 2012. SFSC handled a total of 410 cases in 2012. Of these, 307 (75%) involved female clients, and 103 (25%) males. The remaining cases were referred to appropriate national programmes and resources. Details on the profile of cases seen in 2012 are outlined in the following tables:

MARITAL STATUS:

HOUSEHOLD INCOME: Household Income

Numbers

%

Below $1,000

194

47.32

$1,000 – $1,499

91

$1,500 – $1,999

In 2012, 62 children benefited from the BASC subsidy amounting to $25,688.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME: Household Income

STRAITS TIMES SCHOOL POCKET MONEY FUND (SPMF) SFSC is one of the 39 national FSCs which disburses SPMF to Primary and Secondary school students. It is a community project initiated by The Straits Times in October 2000, with the aim of providing children from low-income families with pocket money to attend school. The fund is to be used as pocket money for students to buy food in school, pay for bus fares, books and stationery. In 2012, SINDA disbursed 181 SPMF worth $92,320.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME: Numbers

%

$1,000 and below

41

66.13%

$1,001 – $1,500

14

$1,501 – $2,000

Household Income

Numbers

%

$1,000 and below

79

43.7

22.58%

$1,001 – $1,500

53

29.3

5

8.06%

$1,501 – $2,000

36

19.9

$2,001 – $2,500

2

3.23%

$2,001 – $2,500

9

4.90

$2,501 and above

0

0

$2,501 and above

4

2.20

Total

62

100

181

100

Numbers

%

Married

234

57.07

22.20

Single

48

11.71

68

16.58

Divorced

63

15.37

$2,000 – $2,499

23

5.61

Separated

31

7.56

$2,500 and above

34

8.29

PRE-SCHOOL BURSARY

SINDA BURSARY

Widowed

34

8.29

410

100

Total

410

100

Numbers

%

SINDA gives out Pre-school Bursaries to help Indian children from low-income families build a strong foundation in basic learning skills before entering Primary One. This bursary is in addition to the subsidies provided by the Ministry of Social and Family Development and Centre Based Financial Assistance Scheme for childcare.

SINDA provides bursaries for needy full-time students enrolled in government schools/educational institutions and independent schools, for levels ranging from primary to tertiary. The bursaries complement the other financial schemes that are already available, such as the Kindergarten Financial Assistance Scheme and school bursaries.

Financial

344

84.0

Youth

14

3.42

Employment

10

2.44

9

2.20

Total

EDUCATION LEVEL: Education Level of the Parents No Formal Education

Marital Status of Clients

SINDA provides financial assistance to parents who enrol their children in BASC centres. The BASC subsidy, provided to low-income families with children aged 7 to 14, is in addition to the subsidies provided by the Ministry of Social and Family Development , Community Development Councils and student care centres. The children have to be enrolled in a non-profit student care centre to be eligible.

PRESENTING PROBLEM: Numbers 24

% 5.85

Presenting Problem

Primary

133

32.44

Family Violence Marital

7

1.71

Secondary

167

40.73

Housing

6

1.46

Parenting

4

0.98

Intrapersonal

5

1.22

Mental Health

2

0.49

Education

2

0.49

Interpersonal

7

1.71

410

100

Post-Secondary / Tertiary Others Total

82

20.00

4

0.98

410

100

Total

Low-income families with children aged 18 months to six years enrolled in a non-profit childcare centre are eligible for the Pre-school Bursary. To qualify, the mothers have to be willing to seek employment to supplement the family income. In 2012, 104 children benefited from the Pre-school Bursary. In all, the bursaries amounted to $109,563.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME:

Total

Recipients of SINDA bursary and SPMF benefit from subsidised tuition at our STEP classes. Social workers also assess if the family of the bursary recipients require other assistance such as Neu PC, financial assistance and job placement or skills upgrading. In 2012, SINDA disbursed 807 SINDA bursaries worth $692,145 for Primary and Secondary school students.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME: Numbers

%

Numbers

%

$1,000 and below

42

40.38

$1,000 and below

289

35.81

$1,001 – $1,500

9

8.65

$1,001 – $1,500

222

27.51

$1,501 – $2,000

13

12.50

$1,501 – $2,000

137

16.98

$2,001 – $2,500

19

18.27

$2,001 – $2,500

93

11.52

$2,501 and above

21

20.20

$2,501 and above

66

8.18

104

100

Total

807

100

Household Income

Total

Household Income


34

A NEW MOMENTUM

35

FAMILY SERVICE CENTRE

A NEW MOMENTUM

SIET- SINDA BURSARY

SINDA SERVICE CENTRE @ JURONG POINT

In 2012, a total of 157 bursaries worth $200,000 were disbursed to tertiary students.

The SINDA Service Centre (SSC) served as a convenient location for clients and the general public living on the western region to avail SINDA’s programmes and services.

NEU PC Since 1998, SINDA has collaborated with the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore to get Indian students and their families to own personal computers bundled with affordable Internet connection. SINDA’s objective is to get a computer into every low-income Indian home.

In 2012, SSC served 443 people seeking financial or general assistance such as referrals to nearest FSC, registration of programmes, submission of bursary or SPMF applications, payment for programmes or fee arrears and queries on SINDA STEP tuition or SINDA’s programmes.

The families involved are encouraged to attend basic IT training, thus making the entire family computer literate. This empowers and enriches their lives as they are given access to knowledge and information through the Internet. Since the start of the programme, more than 4,711 new PCs have been placed in homes. In 2012, 226 families benefited from the programme.

The Children Division rolled out a 16-week programme called ‘Fun with Maths’ from June to October 2012 at SSC, catering to pre-schoolers. About 25 pre-schoolers benefited and showed great enthusiasm in attending the programme weekly.

PROJECT ATHENA Introduced in 2009, Project Athena focuses on single mothers and their children. The project aims to empower these mothers to be confident individuals. Besides helping the mothers learn skills that increase their employability, the project provides a support network to the participants. Through the programme, SINDA aims to help them build stronger bonds with their children who can then grow up to be confident and vibrant youths. Project Athena offers programmes for the single mothers and their children such as Women Empowerment Programme, Value Based Parenting, Group Work and Creative Writing, Speech & Drama, Experiential Learning through Art Therapy, Taekwondo and Swimming courses. In 2012, 53 mothers and 49 children benefited from the programme.

PROJECT SPARK Project SPARK (Successful Parents and Resilient Kids) aims to provide a more holistic and integrated intervention programme to help single parents rebuild their lives, overcome their disadvantage and make a life for themselves and their families. Through this project, Temasek Cares will be providing funding support for a period of 2 years. In 2012, 40 single parent families participated in the programme.

LEGAL CLINIC The Legal Clinic is an initiative where volunteer lawyers offer free legal advice to low-income Indian families. These free sessions are held once a month at SINDA. Lawyers help to explain to clients the legal procedures and terms and also highlight legal costs that may be incurred in resolving issues. In 2012, 19 families attended and sought the services of the Legal Clinic.

The SSC was also a convenient location for Project Teach tutors to conduct tuition on weekdays and weekends during the school holidays. This initiative has benefited about 15 to 20 students. Besides these, the premises were also utilised for staff retreats, meetings and trainings.

CAREER UNIT SINDA’s Career Unit serves as a one-stop information and referral service for skills upgrading and low-skilled adult Indian workers. In 2012, there were a total of 128 referrals received for employment. Of these, 30 clients were successfully placed in jobs. 77 referrals were received for skills upgrading and they were sent for the relevant courses.

PARTNERS Career Unit’s partners include: 1. Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) 2. Community Development Councils (CDCs) 3. The People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committee (PA/IAEC) Coordinating Council 4. Self-Help Groups (SHGs) 5. National Environment Agency (NEA) 6. Ministry of Manpower (MOM) 7. Security Industry Institute (SII) 8. Advent Links – SAUC Education Centre 9. CerealTech School of Baking 10. Lithan Hall Academy 11. Service Connections 12. E2i


CORPORATE & MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

37

A NEW MOMENTUM

Project Give Charity Show 2012

Year on year, the media plays a significant role in promoting SINDA’s programmes and services. In 2012, SINDA received more than 300 media mentions.

CORPORATE & MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

PRINT MEDIA SINDA connections 2012 saw a revamp of the SINDA connections magazine. The new design comprised of an interview section, where successful Indians such as LTC Gaurav Keerthi who was a member of the SINDA 2020 Review Committee and Sonya Madeira Stamp, CEO of Rice Communications were featured, and a page of info-graphics for children. Features on students who have benefited from SINDA and others who have given back to community were also highlighted. Advertorials In 2012, the division published 6 advertorials on the SINDA 2020 recommendations as well as Project Give in the India Se magazine. These advertorials raised awareness of SINDA’s initiatives and complemented SINDA’s marketing and communications plans across the other media channels. BROADCAST MEDIA Radio Programme & Publicity SINDA ran radio advertisements on Radio Masti 96.3FM and Oli 96.8FM to promote SINDA’s programmes and activities. In addition to this, Oli also ran 52 weeks of SINDA tips that carried themes aligned with the SINDA 2020 recommendations such as pre-school education, youth empowerment, educational aspirations and positive parenting.

Television Programme & Publicity Advertisements were broadcast throughout the year on Vasantham, Zee TV, Vijay TV and Vannathirai to promote SINDA’s programmes and services. For the first time, SINDA commissioned Zee TV to produce a Project Give advertisement in Hindi to reach out to the Hindi speaking community in Singapore. SINDA’s infotainment programme ‘Neenga Sollunga’ also ran a third season on Vannathirai Channel. The programme featured different segments of the Indian community including parents, children and youth who discussed community interests topics. Another first for 2012 were the SINDA exam tips that were screened on Vasantham Channel. Targeted at students, the tips were broadcast just before their mid-year and final-year examination and encouraged students to stay focused on their goals. SINDA also sponsored Vasantham’s communityrelated programme ‘Anjathey’. The programme aimed to empower youths and featured inspiring young individuals who shared their journey of attaining success despite facing challenges and struggles. The programme was well-received by the public. ONLINE MEDIA The SINDA website has served 42,439 unique visitors in 2012. About 65% of them were new visitors and 35% were returning visitors. On average, visitors spent about 3 minutes on the site. SINDA’s Facebook page’s fan-count hit 3,704 fans in 2012.


38

A NEW MOMENTUM

CORPORATE & MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

The Facebook page also served as a useful platform for SINDA’s Facebook followers to stay connected with latest updates and activities organised by SINDA. Furthermore, many SINDA programmes were promoted through Facebook advertisements, targeting about 40,000 Singaporean Indians on average. e-Newsletter The e-Newsletter which was started in 2010 and revamped in 2011, saw a surge in the circulation to about more than 6,000 subscribers.

MARKETING The marketing arm of the division was involved in the marketing of SINDA’s programmes, services, and the seminars and workshops conducted by the respective divisions. Noteworthy were the marketing efforts on SINDA’s flagship tuition programme STEP and the annual donation drive Project Give. SINDA Excellence Awards Ceremony 2012 The division also steered the SINDA Excellence Awards ceremony on 8 September 2012. The team managed selection, administration and registration of award recipients, invitations, stage management, programme and the media. More than 420 students received their awards during the ceremony.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT DIVISION


40

A NEW MOMENTUM

41

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT DIVISION

A NEW MOMENTUM

“SINDA will, on its part, engage in sustained community partnerships with like-minded organisations and individuals. It will align itself with the recommendations, and thus also re-organize to build capacity to optimise quality resources so as to focus on issues more intently and address them more effectively.”

- SINDA 2020 : A New Momentum (Strategic Review 2011)

In 2012 Community Engagement (CE) gained momentum, deepened engagement and boosted targeted outreach by embarking on two key models to overcome the challenges of outreach and finite Source: SINDA 2020resources: A new Momentum, Strategic Review 2011. Page ix.

Indian Community Network (ICN)

Cultivating Ecosystems

Socio-Educational Upliftment

SLOS / Tamil Teachers IAEC Chairperson

SINDA

FSC / CDC

Address Socio-Educational Issues

Medical Institutions

MPS

Singapore Police Force

STEP Centre PrincipalS

FAS/ S. League Clubs

Grassroots Organisations

Religious Organisations

Ecosystem Model The central idea of the ‘Ecosystem’ is to harness existing community resources at the constituency level to address social needs and enhance outreach through the socialisation of key entities.

ICN Partner

Value Proposition • Outreach • Provide Volunteers • Conduct SINDA programmes • Recommend New Ideas for Programmes & Services

Social Innovation

SINDA

Value Proposition • Branding • Funding(CDA and SCDA) • Access to Resources • Expertise

Indian Community Network (ICN) Framework The objective of the ICN model is to blend the value propositions of both SINDA and partners through social innovation, so as to address socio-economic issues and enable the upliftment of the community. This partnership framework allows SINDA to leverage on the strengths and competencies of various partners, to meet the community’s needs.


42

A NEW MOMENTUM

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT DIVISION

The CEVM division has embarked on collaborative projects with religious, social and grassroots organisations, schools and corporates. These include the Ministry of Education, Sikh Advisory Board, Football Association of Singapore and the Singapore Police Force. Some key projects and programmes in 2012 were: COLLABORATIONS WITH SIKH COMMUNITY Booths were set up at Naam Ras 2012 to raise awareness among the Sikh community, on SINDA’s objectives and programmes. SINDA’s youth members also actively participated in Project Khwaish XII, an event organized by Young Sikhs Association, which provided an opportunity for Singaporean youths to experience international civic engagement and social responsibility in a village near Amritsar, India. SINDA-MOE PARTNERSHIP APPRECIATION CEREMONY 2012 This inaugural event was held in September 2012, with Mr. Hawazi Daipi, the Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Manpower as Guest of Honour. The objective was to build sustainable relationships with the schools (MOE), who have supported SINDA’s programmes such as STEP, Project Teach and Project Victory. 182 school educators attended this ceremony. NARPANI-SINDA FAMILY DAY SINDA together with Narpani participated in two Family Day events in April and September 2012, targeting to reach out to lower to middle income families. Through this platform, SINDA was able to reach out to more than 1000 potential clients & beneficiaries and who were not in its database. PROJECT GIVE 2012 This annual fund-raising campaign provided an opportunity for CEVM to engage partners and individuals to contribute toward the educational needs of school going children from low-income families. This heart-warming cause has brought the community together since 2001. $630,860 was raised in 2012. SINGAPORE POLICE FORCE - SINDA COLLABORATION Singapore Police Force’s (SPF) initiative of Community Policing revolves around the concept of engaging the community at the precinct level and this initiative

synergizes with SINDA’s ecosystem. On that note, in October 2012, SPF began collaborating as a SINDA partner by attending IAEC - SINDA meetings and referring Indian Singaporeans who need assistance or counselling, to our FSC. Through this partnership, both SINDA and SPF are able to leverage on each other’s resources so as to extend their reach in the Indian community. FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION OF SINGAPORE (FAS) SINDA COLLABORATION In 2012, as part of collaboration with the SINDA, FAS approved the display of SINDA posters that highlighted our programmes and services at the stadiums where S. League games where held. In addition to these posters, FAS also made announcements during games on SINDA’s upcoming programmes for the benefit of spectators who may require assistance. The FAS – SINDA Soccer Nite at Jalan Besar Stadium was another initiative held in August 2012 as part of our collaboration, and was attended by 100 parents and children. Eight students from SINDA’s tuition programmes had the opportunity to get on to the field at half-time and take penalty shots. S. League would also be running soccer clinics for students in SINDA’s tuition programmes in 2013. INDIAN BUSINESS LEADERS’ ROUNDTABLE (IBR) INITIATIVES Informative and enriching IBR dialogue sessions with Mr Ravi Menon and Minister S. Iswaran were organised and well attended by Senior Leaders at the top echelons of the industry. A total of 63 members attended these dialogues. CSR initiatives with IBR members’ corporates, such as Essilor’s Vision Care programme for SINDA beneficiaries and fundraising at ANZ Bank’s Tech Expo 2012, were carried out. Staff from Standard Chartered Bank volunteered at SINDA’s Back To School Festival (BTSF 2012). They were involved in the packing and distribution of BTSF backpacks, and also set up an Art Jamming stall at the carnival. VOLUNTEERS’ TEA 2012 Volunteers ‘ Tea was held on 7 July 2012 at Nanyang Polytechnic. DPM Teo Chee Hean was the Guest of Honour. A total of 77 Awards were given out to volunteers, comprising Platinum, Gold, Silver Awards for long-term volunteers, as well as Reading Circle and Friends of SINDA Awards. In 2012, a total of 1,080 volunteers (including corporate volunteers) contributed their time to SINDA. 315 (29%) were long-term volunteers and 765 (71%) were episodic volunteers.

CORPORATE SERVICES DIVISION


44

A NEW MOMENTUM

45

CORPORATE SERVICES DIVISION

A NEW MOMENTUM

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) Client Relationship Management (CRM) The aim of implementing CRM project in SINDA is to integrate the currently isolated pockets of information together thereby providing holistic information to staff to provide a well packaged programme to our clients and beneficiaries. The two phases of CRM project have been completed in 2012 with the capability to track clients, beneficiaries and programmes of all departments. Phase 3 will be completed by April 2013. Volunteer Management System (VMS) A revamped Volunteer Management System was launched in November 2012 for the Volunteer Management Department. The online system will provide volunteers the

The Corporate Services Division (CSD) comprises the Human Resource (HR), Finance, Admin/Logistics and Management Information Systems (MIS) departments. CSD’s key initiatives in 2012 are as follows: HR DEPARTMENT Singapore Quality Class (SQC) & People Developer (PD) Certifications In 2012, SINDA embarked on journey of excellence, to ensure a well-rounded and holistic approach to business excellence with proper management systems, processes and people management skills. SINDA is proud to have obtained both the SQC and PD certifications in 2012. Training and Development Programmes To help staff achieve their development goals, the Human Resource Department facilitated a wide range of training programmes (in-house and vendor driven) covering the general competency areas. Majority of the courses were selected from the Social Service Training Institute (SSTI) as the course fee is subsidized by the Voluntary Welfare Organizations funding scheme. Staff was also sent for Professional Development courses such as Certificate in Logistics and Distribution Management and Diploma in Social Service. SINDA also supported one of its staff to participate in an overseas

community service project, Project Khawaish, where like-minded youths came together to help underprivileged school children in Punjab. Community Attachment and Internship Programmes As part of SINDA’s Community Engagement initiative, SINDA partnered The Institute of Policy Development (IPD) of the Civil Service College and The Public Service Commission (PSC) Secretariat to host the Community Attachment Programme (CAP). In 2012, SINDA also collaborated with Polytechnics and ITE to support their Work Attachment programmes. 2 interns from Singapore Polytechnic’s School of Communication, Arts & Social Sciences were attached to Children’s Division for 3 months. An intern from Temasek Polytechnic’s School of Informatics & IT was attached to SINDA’s Corporate and Marketing Communications Division (CMC) for 3 months. For the first time, SINDA collaborated with Bishan ITE for their Industrial Attachment Programme. 3 interns from the Higher Nitec in Community Sport and Recreation Management program were attached to various divisions in SINDA.

means to register and choose the programmes that they would like to volunteer with. The VMS will also provide the means to the Volunteer Department to track the volunteers and beneficiaries’ progress and it is integrated with the CRM. Tuition Management System (TMS) The TMS software was launched in January 2012, to keep track of student and tutor information for STEP and Project Teach. The online version of TMS was launched in August 2012 and provides information and administrative access to STEP centres. The Centre Administrators can now submit the tutors’ attendance and reimbursements through this system. Remaining modules for the TMS online use will be implemented by mid-2013.


EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS WHO PASSED PSLE 100 93.2

96.3

95.0

97.2

95.5

97.4

96.1 97.8

95.9

97.7

96.2 97.7

95.5

97.1

95.0

97.1

95.3

96.1 97.4

97.3

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

1. The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2. Percentages are based on all students.

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A*-C IN STANDARD ENGLISH LANGUAGE

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS

100

98.7 97.9

97.5 97.5

98.0 97.5

98.5 97.5

98.3 97.5

98.6 97.9

98.2 97.5

98.0 97.5

97.2 97.6

97.3 97.7

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

1. The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2. Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation English Language (2009 onwards)

Indian

Overall

47

A NEW MOMENTUM


48

49

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS

A NEW MOMENTUM

A NEW MOMENTUM

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A*-C IN STANDARD MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE 100 97.0

97.0 98.1

98.3

96.4 98.0

96.6 97.9

96.8

97.1 98.0

98.0

96.7

98.1

97.1 97.6

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A*-C IN STANDARD SCIENCE 100

97.6 97.5

96.4 97.5

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

0

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2. Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Mother Tongue Language (2009 onwards).

86.2

2002

100

90

90

70

83.3

69.6

72.4

73.7

84.1

83.9

83.2 73.2

74.7

83.2 74.0

72.9

76.3

84.2

84.1

83.8

83.1

76.3

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2. Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Mathematics (2009 onwards)

Indian

Overall

2005

2006

90.9

90.3

2007

2008

91.5

90.8 86.6

85.8

84.4

86.5

2009

90.5 86.3

2010

2011

90.1

94.2

91.8

94.7

91.3

95.0

92.6

95.4

92.9

95.2 91.3

94.7

91.3

94.8

91.8

95.1

91.7

95.2

92.0

95.3

70 60

2002

2004

90.5 84.8

80

77.2

60

0

2003

90.7 85.5

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 3 ‘O’ LEVEL PASSES

100 83.0

90.9 85.5

1. The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2. Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Science (2010 onwards).

PERCENTAGE OF PSLE STUDENTS WHO SCORED A*-C IN STANDARD MATHEMATICS

80

91.3

91.4 85.4

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

1. Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2. Figures include all school candidates but exclude students who took O-level subjects not in their graduating year.

Indian

Overall


50

51

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS

A NEW MOMENTUM

A NEW MOMENTUM

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 5 ‘O’ LEVEL PASSES

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED ENGLISH LANGUAGE

100

100

90

90

80 70

71.3

82.7

81.6

80.0 73.5

73.7

82.0

81.1 72.9

75.0

72.6

73.0

82.1

81.9

81.3

80.8

73.0

72.3

81.6

80

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2. Figures include all school candidates but exclude students who took O-level subjects not in their graduating year.

2002

96.7 96.5

97.1 97.4

96.0 95.5

96.1 96.0

96.5 98.1

96.8 97.6

96.3 97.5

96.7 97.1

95.7 96.5

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2. Figures include all school candidates but exclude students who took O-level subjects not in their graduating year.

Indian

Overall

91.1 86.9

86.8

91.1

89.5

87.6

86.6

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

100

96.5 96.9

90

2002

90.2

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MATHEMATICS

90

0

86.1

1. Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2. Figures include all school candidates but exclude students who took O-level subjects not in their graduating year.

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘O’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE 100

90.3

70 60

2002

86.5

73.8

60

0

92.4 86.0

85.0

84.1

81.4

92.2

89.9

88.5

86.1

75.6

2002

76.1

2003

88.3

89.0

87.7

87.5

77.3

2004

76.8

2005

88.4 79.0

2006

75.9

2007

77.6

2008

89.0

88.9

87.8

87.0

89.0 79.1

77.7

2009

78.2

2010

2011

1. Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2. Figures include all school candidates but exclude students who took O-level subjects not in their graduating year

Indian

Overall


52

53

EDUCATIONAL INDICATORS

A NEW MOMENTUM

A NEW MOMENTUM

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘A’ LEVEL STUDENTS WITH AT LEAST 3 ‘A’/’H2’ PASSES AND PASS IN GENERAL PAPER OR KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRY

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘A’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED MOTHER TONGUE LANGUAGE AT ‘AO’/‘H1’ LEVEL

100

100

90 80

81.1

85.2

87.3 87.2

86.6

88.6 84.2

87.2

82.2

81.6

87.6

87.1

87.0

82.7

85.4

87.8

88.3

90.8

90.8

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. Figures from 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

2002

94.0

90

96.5

95.5 90.8

91.9

94.2

94.0 93.2

94.3

92.2

91.4 91.4

92.7 91.9

94.3

92.3

94.4 94.0

90

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

0

2011

1. Figures for 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

Indian

Overall

91.7

94.6

92.2

95.9

92.8

95.4 90.6

94.9 90.3

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

92.9

2010

100

96.8 95.1

80

2002

94.7 89.0

93.3 93.7

2011

PERCENTAGE OF P1 COHORT ADMITTED TO POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS1

80

0

96.6

1. Figures for 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

PERCENTAGE OF GCE ‘A’ LEVEL STUDENTS WHO PASSED GENERAL PAPER OR KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRY 100

93.1

80 70

2002

96.7 97.6

90

86.6

70

0

96.2 96.7

88.0

87.6 80.1

2002

82.0

2003

85.1

90.9

89.5

2004

84.7

2005

90.8 86.6

2006

91.9 87.6

2007

89.8

92.9

2008

93.3 89.9

2009

90.5

93.8

2010

90.8

94.1

2011

1. Figures for 2007 - 2011 are preliminary. 2. Figures include participation in Junior Colleges, Millennia Institute, Polytechnics, ITE, LaSalle College of the Arts, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts and other private education institutions, and also take into account students who left the country.

Indian

Overall


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012


56

A NEW MOMENTUM

INCOME AT A GLANCE

EXPENDITURE AT A GLANCE

3%

TOTAL INCOME 2012 Donations - CPF Contributions Scheme

$7,734,411

Donations/Sponsorships

$2,700,737

Government Subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding, NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,948,875

Programme & tuition fees received Interest/Other Income

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 2012

19%

$465,988 $48,852

50% 11%

TOTAL INCOME

TOTAL INCOME 2011 $7,348,573

Donations/Sponsorships

$2,689,981

Government Subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding, NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,535,127

Programme & tuition fees received Interest/Other Income

17%

50%

12%

$435,925 $1,451,983

8% 7% 4% 4%

55%

6% 14%

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 2011

$448,588 $10,368

$1,220,341

2%

$18,489,043

3%

Donations CPF Contributions Scheme

$10,078,436 $2,622,862 $1,195,168 $686,010 $798,318

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

17%

$15,598,863

Education Programmes Family Services Youth Development Programmes Parent Programmes Children Programmes Community Engagement & Volunteer Management Corporate & Marketing Communications Administrative and Governance expenses

Education Programmes Family Services Youth Development Programmes Children Programmes Community Engagement & Volunteer Management & SINDA 2020 Expenses Corporate & Marketing Communications Administrative and Governance expenses

$8,460,506 $1,948,253 $970,500 $417,409

3%

9%

$2,136,686 $453,192 $1,463,604

14% 53%

3% 6%

TOTAL INCOME

$14,732,637

18%

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

$15,850,150

12%

57

A NEW MOMENTUM


58

A NEW MOMENTUM

STATEMENT BY PRESIDENT, TREASURER AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

We, Indranee T. Rajah, R. Subramaniam Iyer and T. Raja Segar, do hereby state that in our opinion: (a) the financial statements of Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association”) set out on pages 61 to 93 are properly drawn up to present fairly in all material respects, the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2012 and the income and expenditure, changes in funds and cash flows of the Association for the year ended on that date in accordance with the Singapore Financial Reporting Standards; and (b) at the date of this statement, the Association will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. The Executive Committee has, on the date of this statement, authorised these financial statements for issue.

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

59

A NEW MOMENTUM

Members of Singapore Indian Development Association (Registered under the Singapore Charities Act, Chapter 37 and the Singapore Societies Act, Chapter 311)

REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association”), which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2012, statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in funds and cash flow statement for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, as set out on pages 61 to 93. Executive Committee’s responsibility for the financial statements

On behalf of the Executive Committee

The Executive Committee is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the provisions of the Singapore Charities Act, Chapter 37 (the “Charities Act”), the Singapore Societies Act, Chapter 311 (the “Societies Act”) and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards, and for such internal control as the Executive Committee determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ responsibility

Indranee T. Rajah President

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Singapore Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

R. Subramaniam Iyer Treasurer

Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements of the Association present fairly, in all material respects, the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2012, the income and expenditure, changes in funds and the cash flows of the Association for the year then ended in accordance with the Provisions of the Charities Act and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards.

T. Raja Segar Chief Executive Officer 27 March 2013


60

A NEW MOMENTUM

BALANCE SHEET

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT (CONTINUED)

(AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2012)

REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

Note

2012 $

61

A NEW MOMENTUM

2011 $

In our opinion: (a) the accounting and other records required by the regulations enacted under the Societies Act to be kept by the Association have been properly kept in accordance with those regulations; and (b) the fund-raising appeal held during the year ended 31 December 2012 has been carried out in accordance with Regulation 6 of the Societies Regulations issued under the Societies Act and proper accounts and other records have been kept of the fund-raising appeal. During the course of our audit, nothing has come to our attention that causes us to believe that during the year: (a) The use of the donation monies was not in accordance with the objectives of the Association as required under Regulation 16 of the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character) Regulations; and (b) The Association has not complied with the requirements of Regulation 15 (fund-raising expenses) of the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character) Regulations.

Non-current asset Property, plant and equipment Current assets Government Subvention receivable Donations receivable – Central Provident Fund Board Scheme Donations receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board Deposits, prepayments and other receivables Financial assets – Investments Cash and cash equivalents

4

1,127,804

880,409

5

1,700,000 658,822 375,000 507,600 24,640,877 4,022,565 31,904,864 33,032,668

1,700,000 623,356 1,000,000 909,932 23,793,689 5,096,289 33,123,266 34,003,675

26,752,650 – 26,752,650 – 26,752,650

7,835,510 995,850 8,831,360 18,464,260 27,295,620

1,195,456 5,084,562 6,280,018 33,032,668

1,263,426 5,444,629 6,708,055 34,003,675

6 7 8

Total assets Representing: Funds Unrestricted funds Accumulated fund Sinking fund

KPMG LLP Public Accountants and Certified Public Accountants Singapore 27 March 2013

Endowment funds Total funds Current liabilities Other payables and accrued expenses Unutilised specific grants/donations Total liabilities Total liabilities and funds

9 10 11

12 13

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


62

A NEW MOMENTUM

63

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

2012 Unrestricted Fund Financial activities/Income and expenditure Incoming resources Incoming resources from generated funds (i) Voluntary income: Donation – Central Provident Fund (CPF) Contribution Donation from Singapore Totalisator Board (STB) Donation sponsorships Other donations Income from School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF)

2011 Unrestricted Funds

Accumulated Fund Operations $

Accumulated Fund Investments $

Accumulated Fund Total $

Accumulated Fund Operations $

Accumulated Fund Investments $

Accumulated Fund Total $

7,734,411

-

7,734,411

7,348,573

-

7,348,573

-

-

7,348,573

375,000 1,635,104 690,633

-

375,000 1,635,104 690,633

500,000 1,610,772 579,209

-

500,000 1,610,772 579,209

-

-

500,000 1,610,772 579,209

92,320

-

92,320

58,530

-

58,530

-

-

58,530

-

664,561

664,561

-

110,152

110,152

33,046

388,743

531,941

4,656

125,172 -

125,172 4,656

6,886

762 -

762 6,886

224 108

43,732 161

44,718 7,155

44,196

-

44,196

3,482

-

3,482

-

-

3,482

465,988

-

465,988

448,588

-

448,588

-

-

448,588

5

1,700,000 36,000

-

1,700,000 36,000

1,700,000 162,000

-

1,700,000 162,000

-

-

1,700,000 162,000

14

433,581

-

433,581

433,581

-

433,581

-

-

433,581

571,653 933,963

-

571,653 933,963

380,965 900,000

-

380,965 900,000

-

-

380,965 900,000

181,572

-

181,572

256,106

-

256,106

-

-

256,106

341,782 57,557

-

341,782 57,557

127,739 8,979

-

127,739 8,979

-

-

127,739 8,979

70,436 94,551

-

70,436 94,551

23,899 79,868

-

23,899 79,868

-

-

23,899 79,868

Note

(ii) Investment income: Dividend income Interest income - debt securities - fixed deposits and bank balances (iii) Other income

Sinking Fund $

Endowment Funds $

Total $

Incoming resources from charitable activities (i) Income from approved projects: Tuition programme fees (ii) Government Grants: Government Subvention GST Offset Package Grant Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS), Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee Grant MCYS – Family Services Centre (FSC) Funding MCYS – Additional Funding National Council of Social Services (NCSS) Funding Singapore Totalisator Board (STB) – Family Services Centre Funding Temasek Care Funding Voluntary Welfare Organisation (VWO) Charities Capability Fund (VCF) Funding by MCYS Other FSC Funding

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.


64

A NEW MOMENTUM

65

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (CONTINUED) YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

2012 Unrestricted Fund Accumulated Fund Operations $

Accumulated Fund Investments $

Accumulated Fund Total $

Accumulated Fund Operations $

Accumulated Fund Investments $

Accumulated Fund Total $

135,460

-

135,460

103,460

-

103,460

-

-

103,460

15,598,863

(126,147) (15,072) 1,698,696 2,347,210

(126,147) (15,072) 1,698,696 17,946,073

14,732,637

39,437 (165,556) (15,205)

39,437 (165,556) 14,717,432

11,831 (49,667) (4,458)

377,514 (367,898) (1,559,299) (1,117,047)

428,782 (367,898) (1,774,522) 13,595,927

99,579

-

99,579

112,332

-

112,332

-

-

112,332

14 14 14 14 14

10,078,436 2,530,542 1,195,168 686,010 798,318

-

10,078,436 2,530,542 1,195,168 686,010 798,318

8,460,506 1,889,723 970,500 417,409

-

8,460,506 1,889,723 970,500 417,409

-

-

8,460,506 1,889,723 970,500 417,409

14

1,220,341

-

1,220,341

2,136,686

-

2,136,686

-

-

2,136,686

14

435,925

-

435,925

453,192

-

453,192

-

-

453,192

92,320

-

92,320

58,530

-

58,530

-

-

58,530

14

1,352,404 18,489,043

-

1,352,404 18,489,043

1,351,272 15,850,150

-

1,351,272 15,850,150

-

-

1,351,272 15,850,150

16

(2,890,180)

2,347,210

(542,970)

(1,117,513)

(15,205)

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

(2,890,180)

2,347,210

(542,970)

(1,117,513)

(15,205)

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

Note

(iii) Other Grants: Singapore Press Holdings (SPH) Newspaper Project Funding Other incoming resources Investments gains/(losses): Net (loss)/gain on disposal of trading securities Exchange loss Unrealised gain/(loss) on trading securities Total incoming resources Resources Expended Cost of generating funds Cost of generating voluntary income: CPF Agency Charges Charitable activities: Education programmes Family services Youth development programmes Parent programmes Children programmes Community Engagement and Volunteer Management Corporate and Marketing Communications School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) programme Administrative and Governance costs: Corporate expenses Total resources expended Net (deficit)/gain for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive (loss)/income for the year

2011 Unrestricted Funds

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Endowment Funds $

Sinking Fund $

Total $


66

A NEW MOMENTUM

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUNDS

CASH FLOW STATEMENT

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

67

A NEW MOMENTUM

Unrestricted Fund Accumulated Fund $ At 1 January 2011 Total comprehensive loss for the year Net deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive loss for the year Transfers from Endowment Funds to Accumulated Fund (Note 9) At 31 December 2011 At 1 January 2012 Total comprehensive loss for the year Net deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive loss for the year Transfers from Sinking Fund to Accumulated Fund (Note 9) Transfers from Endowment Funds to Accumulated Fund (Note 9) At 31 December 2012

7,658,427

Endowment Funds (Note 11) $

Sinking Fund $ 1,000,308

20,891,108

Note Total $ 29,549,843

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

1,309,801 7,835,510

995,850

(1,309,801) 18,464,260

27,295,620

7,835,510

995,850

18,464,260

27,295,620

(542,970)

-

-

(542,970)

(542,970)

-

-

(542,970)

995,850

(995,850)

-

-

18,464,260 26,752,650

-

(18,464,260) -

26,752,650

Cash flows from operating activities Net deficit for the year Adjustments for: Dividend income Loss/(Gain) on disposal of trading securities Unrealised (gain)/loss on trading investment securities Exchange loss Depreciation Interest income: - debt securities - fixed deposits and bank balances

4

Changes in working capital: Donations, grants and subventions receivables Deposits, prepayments and other receivables Other payables, accrued expenses and unutilised grants Net cash (used in)/generated from operating activities Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of property, plant and equipment Purchase of investments Proceeds from sale of investments Interest received: - debt securities - fixed deposits and bank balances Dividend received Net cash used in investing activities Cash flows from financing activities Fixed deposits pledged Net cash used in financing activities Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at 1 January Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

8

2011 $

2012 $

(542,970)

(2,254,223)

(664,561) 126,147 (1,698,696) 15,072 422,729

(531,941) (428,782) 1,774,522 367,898 315,042

(125,172) (4,656) (2,472,107)

(44,718) (7,155) (809,357)

589,534 402,332 (428,036) (1,908,277)

(4,363) (83,775) 1,357,800 460,305

(670,124) (6,914,359) 6,422,873

(596,595) (9,363,023) 8,776,712

125,172 4,656 664,561 (367,221)

44,718 7,155 531,941 (599,092)

-

(101,000) (101,000)

(2,275,498) 7,363,063 5,087,565

(239,787) 7,602,850 7,363,063


68

A NEW MOMENTUM

69

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

These notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

2.3

Functional and presentation currency

The financial statements were authorised for issue by the Executive Committee (“Management”) on 27 March 2013.

The financial statements are presented in Singapore dollars which is the Association’s functional currency. All financial information is presented in Singapore dollars, unless otherwise stated.

2.4

Use of estimates and judgements

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with the FRSs requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affects the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates. There are no significant assumptions or estimation uncertainties that have a significant risk of resulting in a material adjustment to the financial statements within next financial year.

In the application of the Association’s accounting policies, which are described in note 3, Management is of the opinion that there is no instance of application of judgement which is expected to have a significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial statements.

2.5

Changes in accounting policies

1

DOMICILE AND ACTIVITIES

Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association”) is a society registered with the Registrar of Societies under the Societies Act, Chapter 311. Its registered office is located at No. 1 Beatty Road, Singapore 209943.

The Association’s Vision and Mission includes the following:

Vision

To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together.

Mission

On 1 January 2012, the Association adopted the new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS that are mandatory for application from that date.

To build a well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with the other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore. In order to achieve its vision and mission the Association has articulated four Strategic Thrusts as follows:

The adoption of these new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS did not result in substantial changes to the Association’s accounting policies and had no material effect to the amounts reported for the current or prior financial years.

i) ii) iii) iv)

3

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Association runs a range of programmes, services and initiatives aligned to its four Strategic Thrusts.

The Association is registered as a charity under the Charities Act, Chapter 37 and it has been granted as an Institution of Public Character (IPC) under the Charities Act for a period of 5 years, up to 15 December 2016.

2

BASIS OF PREPARATION

2.1

Statement of compliance

The financial statements are prepared in accordance with Singapore Financial Reporting Standards (FRS).

2.2

Basis of measurement

Maximising educational opportunities for all students Engaging parents to play an active role in their children’s lives Inspiring youths towards greater achievement Forging a stronger relationship with community partners

The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except as disclosed in accounting policies below.

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial statements. 3.1

Foreign currency transactions

Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rates ruling at the dates of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are retranslated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rate ruling at that date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies that are measured at fair value are retranslated to Singapore dollars at the exchange rate at the date on which the fair value is determined.

Foreign currency differences arising from retranslation are recognised in income and expenditure.


70

A NEW MOMENTUM

71

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

3.2

Property, plant and equipment

3.3

Financial instruments

Recognition and measurement

Non-derivative financial assets

Items of property, plant and equipment are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses.

The Association initially recognises loans and receivables on the date that they are originated. All other financial assets including investments are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.

Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Purchased software that is integral to the functionality of the related equipment is capitalised as part of that equipment.

When parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment.

The Association derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred. Any interest in transferred financial assets that is created or retained by the Association is recognised as a separate asset or liability.

The gains and losses on disposal of an item of property, plant and equipment are determined by comparing the proceeds from disposal with the carrying amount of property, plant and equipment, and are recognised in income and expenditure.

Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.

Subsequent costs

The cost of replacing part of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised in the carrying amount of the item if it is probable that the future economic benefits embodied within the part will flow to the Association and its cost can be measured reliably. The carrying amount of the replaced component is derecognised. The costs of the day-to-day servicing of property, plant and equipment are recognised in income and expenditure as incurred.

Loans and receivables are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Such assets are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment losses.

Depreciation

Loans and receivables comprise government subvention, donations, other receivables and cash and cash equivalents.

Depreciation is based on the cost of an asset, less its residual value. Significant components of individual assets are assessed and if a component has a useful life that is different from the remainder of that asset, that component is depreciated separately.

Depreciation is recognised in profit or loss on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of each component of an item of property, plant and equipment.

The estimated useful lives for the current and comparative years are as follows:

Computer equipment Furniture and fittings Office equipment Office renovation

3 years 5 years 5 years 3 years

Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values are reviewed at the end of each reporting period and adjusted if appropriate.

Financial assets - Investments at fair value through income and expenditure

Financial assets - investments are classified as at fair value through income and expenditure if they are held for trading or are designated as such upon initial recognition. Financial assets are designated as fair value through income and expenditure if the Association manages such investments and makes purchase and sale decisions based on their fair value. Upon initial recognition, attributable transaction costs are recognised in income and expenditure as incurred. The Association’s investments which are classified as financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure are measured at fair value, and changes therein are recognised in income and expenditure.

Non-derivative financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument.

The Association derecognises a financial liability when its contractual obligations are discharged or cancelled or expire.

Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.

The Association’s non-derivative financial liabilities comprises trade and other payables.


72

A NEW MOMENTUM

73

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

Such financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, these financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

3.4 Impairment

Financial assets (including receivables)

A financial asset is assessed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any objective evidence that it is impaired. A financial asset is impaired if objective evidence indicates that a loss event has occurred after the initial recognition of the asset, and that the loss event had a negative effect on the estimated future cash flows of that asset that can be estimated reliably.

Objective evidence that financial assets are impaired can include default or delinquency by a debtor, restructuring of an amount due to the Association on terms that the Association would not consider otherwise, indications that a debtor will enter bankruptcy.

The Association considers evidence of impairment for receivables at both a specific asset and collective level. All individually significant receivables are assessed for specific impairment. All individually significant receivables found not to be specifically impaired are then collectively assessed for any impairment that has been incurred but not yet identified. Receivables that are not individually significant are collectively assessed for impairment by grouping together receivables with similar risk characteristics.

In assessing collective impairment, the Association uses historical trends of the probability of default, timing of recoveries and the amount of loss incurred, adjusted for management’s judgement as to whether current economic and credit conditions are such that the actual losses are likely to be greater or lesser than suggested by historical trends.

An impairment loss in respect of a financial asset measured at amortised cost is calculated as the difference between its carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. Losses are recognised in income and expenditure and reflected in an allowance account against receivables. Interest on the impaired asset continues to be recognised through the unwinding of the discount. When a subsequent event causes the amount of impairment loss to decrease, the decrease in impairment loss is reversed through income and expenditure.

Non-financial assets

The carrying amounts of the Association’s non-financial assets are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, then the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. The impairment loss is charged to income and expenditure.

Impairment losses recognised in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date for any indications that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognised.

A NEW MOMENTUM

3.5 Provisions

Provisions are recognised if, as a result of past events the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and, it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability.

3.6

Employee benefits

Defined contribution plan

Obligations for contributions to defined contribution plans are recognised as an expense in income and expenditure as incurred.

Short-term accumulating compensated absences

Short-term accumulating compensated absences are recognised when employees render services that increase their entitlement to future compensated absences.

Short-term benefits

Short-term employee benefit obligations are measured on an undiscounted basis and are expensed as the related service is provided. A provision is recognised for the amount expected to be paid under short-term cash bonus if the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation to pay this amount as a result of past service provided by the employee and the obligation can be estimated reliably.

3.7

Income recognition

Donations from Central Provident Fund scheme and Singapore Totalisator Board are recognised on the accrual basis. All other donations are recognised on the receipt basis.

Tuition programme fees income is recognised on the accrual basis.

Grants for specific purposes are recognised to the extent the related expenditure has been incurred and the grant is receivable.

Government Subvention and grants are recognised on the accrual basis.

3.8

Resources expended on charitable activities

The costs of these activities comprise direct expenditure including, direct staff costs attributable to the activities. In addition, it also includes support costs (costs relating to central functions) and other costs that have been allocated on the basis consistent with the use of the resources.

Governance costs

Governance costs comprise all costs attributable to the general running of the Association, in providing the governance infrastructure and in ensuring public accountability.


74

A NEW MOMENTUM

75

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

3.9

Finance income and expenses

Finance income comprises interest income on funds invested, dividend income, gains on the disposal of investments, net foreign currency gains and changes in the fair value of investments at fair value through income and expenditure. Dividend income from equity investments is recognised when the dividends are received. Interest income is recognised on the accrual basis using the effective interest method.

Finance expenses comprise interest expense on borrowings, unwinding of the discount on provisions, net foreign currency losses, changes in the fair value of financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure and impairment losses recognised on financial assets that are recognised in income and expenditure.

A NEW MOMENTUM

4

When the association is a lessee of an operating lease

Where the Association has the use of assets under operating leases, payments made under the leases are recognised in income and expenditure on the straight-line basis over the term of the lease. Lease incentives received are recognised in the income and expenditure as an integral part of the total operating expenses.

3.11

Funds of the Association

The Association maintains unrestricted and restricted funds.

Restricted funds Funds set up for specific purposes are classified as restricted funds and may only be utilised in accordance with the purposes established by the source of such funds.

With effect from 1 January 2012, the restricted funds have ceased to exist.

Unrestricted funds All income and expenses other than those attributable to restricted funds and common overheads are recorded in unrestricted fund’s statement of financial activities/income statement.

Capital work-in progress $

Total

Furniture and fittings $

Office equipment

Office renovation

$

$

508,625 395,355 903,980 147,672 (86,360) 965,292

664,979 58,457 723,436 20,015 (271,061) 472,390

331,401 6,886 338,287 49,987 (251,739) 136,535

443,944 135,897 579,841 145,709 – 725,550

– – – 306,741 – 306,741

1,948,949 596,595 2,545,544 670,124 (609,160) 2,606,508

331,612

522,275

274,032

222,174

1,350,093

137,070 468,682

57,699 579,974

16,212 290,244

104,061 326,235

– –

315,042 1,665,135

182,856 (86,360) 565,178

60,320 (271,061) 369,233

22,004 (251,739) 60,509

157,549 – 483,784

– – –

422,729 (609,160) 1,478,704

177,013 435,298 400,114

142,704 143,462 103,157

57,369 48,043 76,026

221,770 253,606 241,766

– – 306,741

598,856 880,409 1,127,804

Computer equipment $

$

Cost At 1 January 2011 Additions At 31 December 2011 Additions Written off At 31 December 2012

3.10 Leases

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Accumulated depreciation At 1 January 2011 Depreciation charge for the year At 31 December 2011 Depreciation charge for the year Written off At 31 December 2012 Carrying amount At 1 January 2011 At 31 December 2011 At 31 December 2012

5

GOVERNMENT SUBVENTION RECEIVABLE

Unrestricted funds comprised of general operating and investment funds. These funds are available for use at the discretion of the management in furtherance of the general objectives of the Association.

This represents the annual “dollar for dollar” matching grant receivable, subject to a maximum of $1,700,000 (2011: $1,700,000), from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

3.12

New standards and interpretations not yet adopted

6

DEPOSITS, PREPAYMENTS AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

A number of new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations are effective for the annual periods beginning after 1 January 2012, and have not been applied in preparing these financial statements. None of these are expected to have a significant effect on the financial statements of the Association.

Deposits GST Offset Package grant receivable from Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports Other receivables Loans and receivables Prepayments

2012 $

2011 $

33,451

33,402

36,000 392,212 461,663 45,937 507,600

164,000 696,932 894,334 15,598 909,932


76

A NEW MOMENTUM

7

77

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

FINANCIAL ASSETS – INVESTMENTS

A NEW MOMENTUM

Note

Held for trading: - Equity securities - Debt securities - Commodities/Precious Metals Trust Funds - REITS/Real Estate Funds - Absolute return funds - Private equity funds - Mutual funds - Cash at bank investment account held with fund managers/custodians

8

2012 $ 6,915,635 10,276,487 996,764 4,019,732 107,199 906,200 252,860 23,474,877

2011 $ 5,925,980 9,178,774 1,313,928 4,016,503 132,945 857,785 – 21,425,915

1,166,000 24,640,877

2,367,774 23,793,689

During the financial year, the Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees has approved the transfer of $995,850 from Sinking Fund (Note 10) and $18,464,260 from Endowment Funds (Note 11) to the Accumulated Fund.

At the balance sheet date, the Association contracted commitments of S$448,190 (2011: S$953,809) in relation to its investments.

8

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Note

Cash in hand and at bank Fixed deposits Cash at bank investment account Fixed deposits pledged Cash and cash equivalents for cash flow statement

7

2012 $ 3,381,966 640,599 4,022,565 1,166,000 5,188,565 (101,000) 5,087,565

2011 $ 2,703,323 2,392,966 5,096,289 2,367,774 7,464,063 (101,000) 7,363,063

Fixed deposits have been pledged to obtain a letter of guarantee in lieu of deposit fee from a bank for the purpose of obtaining a Temporary Occupation Licence for the Association’s premises (Note 14).

9

ACCUMULATED FUND

The accumulated fund is the Association’s general operating funds and can be used for any of the Association’s activities. The accumulated fund is represented by the following assets and liabilities: 2012 2011 $ $ Property, plant and equipment 1,127,804 880,409 Government Subvention receivable 1,700,000 1,700,000 Donations receivable – Central Provident Fund Board Scheme 658,822 623,356 Donation receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board 375,000 1,000,000 Deposits and prepayments, other receivables 507,600 909,932 Financial assets – Investments 23,474,877 4,213,701 Cash at bank investment account 1,166,000 156,969 Cash in hand and at bank 3,371,971 2,703,323 Fixed deposits 650,594 2,355,875 Other payables and accrued expenses (1,195,456) (1,263,426) Unutilised specific grants (5,084,562) (5,444,629) 26,752,650 7,835,510

In prior year, the Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees has approved the transfer of $1,039,560 from Vijay and Amar Trust Fund and $270,241 from Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund respectively from the Endowment Fund to the Accumulated Fund.

These funds have been included in the following assets of the accumulated fund:

(i)

Financial assets – investments - Accumulated Fund - Vijay and Amar Trust Fund - Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund

(ii)

Cash at bank investment account - Accumulated Fund - Vijay and Amar Trust Fund - Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund

(iii)

Cash in hand and at bank - Accumulated Fund - Vijay and Amar Trust Fund

(iv)

Fixed deposits - Accumulated Fund - Vijay and Amar Trust Fund

10

SINKING FUND

The sinking fund is represented by the following assets:

Financial assets – Investments Cash at bank investment account Fixed deposits Transfer to Accumulated fund

2012 $

2011 $

22,222,285 964,495 288,097 23,474,877

3,083,196 870,453 260,052 4,213,701

1,138,866 20,893 6,241 1,166,000

112,667 34,113 10,189 156,969

3,371,971 – 3,371,971

2,668,516 34,807 2,703,323

650,594 – 650,594

2,255,688 100,187 2,355,875

2012 $

2011 $

924,959 33,800 37,091 (995,850) –

924,959 33,800 37,091 – 995,850

The sinking fund is designated to fund the upkeep and maintenance of the premises. There was no drawdown of fund (2011: $Nil) from the sinking fund during the financial year to defray the costs of the renovation and other works undertaken. During the year the Executive Committee and Board of Trustees approved the transfer of $995,850 (2011: $Nil) from Sinking Fund to Accumulated Fund (Note 9).


78

A NEW MOMENTUM

79

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

11

ENDOWMENT FUNDS

Income and expenditure of endowment funds are as follows:

A NEW MOMENTUM

2011

2012 General Endowment Fund $

Incoming resources Incoming resources from generated funds Investment income: Dividend income Interest income - debt securities - fixed deposits and bank balances

Other incoming resources Investments gains/(losses): Net gain on disposal of trading securities Exchange loss Unrealised loss on trading securities Total (outgoing) resources Net (deficit) for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive (loss) for the year

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund $

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund $

General Endowment Fund $

Total $

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund $

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund $

Total $

-

-

-

-

345,204

33,527

10,012

388,743

-

-

-

-

43,459 161

210 -

63 -

43,732 161

-

-

-

-

363,054 (367,898) (1,498,595) (1,114,615) (1,114,615) (1,114,615)

11,134 (46,742) (1,871) (1,871) (1,871)

3,326 (13,962) (561) (561) (561)

377,514 (367,898) (1,559,299) (1,117,047) (1,117,047) (1,117,047)


80

A NEW MOMENTUM

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

Endowment funds are represented by the following assets:

General Endowment Fund: Financial assets – Investments Cash at bank investment account Transfer to Accumulated fund

12

81

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

2012 $

2011 $

16,287,255 2,177,005 (18,464,260) –

16,287,255 2,177,005 – 18,464,260

13

UNUTILISED SPECIFIC GRANTS/DONATIONS

These comprise specific grants/donations for:

2012 $

2011 $

794,348 682,389 79,515 81,182 63,730 1,478,773 1,494,282 410,343 5,084,562

885,872 200,913 111,944 82,242 135,460 1,835,320 1,808,682 384,196 5,444,629

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii)

Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) and Tertiary Education Loan Scheme School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) Project Spark Singapore Press Holding (SPH) Foundation Newspaper Project Project Give Donations Youth Development Programmes Single Parent Programme/Sponsorships

(i)

Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) is a committee set up by the Ministry of Education (MOE) to promote the learning and use of the Tamil language. The Association provides support to TLLPC in the administration of the TLLPC grant. Grants and donations are the main sources of income with MOE providing a matching grant for funds raised by the TLLPC.

a)

The general endowment fund is a form of restricted fund, held in Association’s trust where the capital is required to be invested, or retained for approved purposes. From time to time the Association will transfer the income of the general endowment fund to the accumulated fund for the Association’s general activities. Transfers in and out of the fund are subject to the approval of the trustees.

During the year, the Executive Committee and Board of Trustees has reviewed the general endowment fund and has approved the transfer of $18,464,260 (2011: $Nil) from Endowment Fund to Accumulated Fund as the fund is not considered to be a restricted fund.

(b)

In prior year, the Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees has approved the transfer of $1,039,560 from Vijay and Amar Trust Fund and $270,241 from Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund to the Accumulated Fund.

The Vijay and Amar Trust Fund was set up to provide assistance and support to children from disadvantaged and dysfunctional families.

The Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund was set up to provide scholarships for needy students.

(ii)

Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET)

Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) is a registered charity offering solutions to the needs and challenges impacting the educational performance of the Indian Community. SINDA’s programmes are designed to focus mainly on the education of students from pre-primary to secondary while SIET’s focus is on tertiary level education. Both the organisations recognise the immense opportunity to leverage on the synergy between the two organisations. The collaborative arrangement has been set to manage SIET donations and its disbursements to students who qualify for financial assistance for their course of study at the tertiary institution and other schemes administered by SIET.

Tertiary Education Loan Scheme is supported by a donation to provide interest free Educational Loan assistance to bright Indian students facing financial challenges in pursuing their tertiary qualifications. This scheme will be jointly run by SIET and SINDA with SIET administering the scheme.

(iii)

School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF)

The Association receives yearly grant from the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) pertaining to SPMF. All bursary payments made under this service will be paid out from SPMF based on criteria set out by NCSS.

OTHER PAYABLES AND ACCRUED EXPENSES

Payables to suppliers and service providers Accrued expenses

2012 $

2011 $

1,036,691 158,765 1,195,456

1,116,192 147,234 1,263,426


82

A NEW MOMENTUM

83

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

(iv) Project Spark

Project Spark (Successful Parents and Resilient kids) is a collaborative effort between Temasek Cares (a charity arm of Temasek Holdings), Yayasan Mendaki, Chinese Development Assistance Council, SINDA and Eurasian Association. It aims to provide a more holistic and integrated intervention programme to help single parents rebuild their lives and overcome their disadvantage. Funding supports the provision of an assistance package consisting of employment assistance programmes and a starter kit.

(v) Singapore Press Holding (SPH) Foundation Newspaper Project

SPH Newspaper Project is a programme to sponsor subscriptions to the Straits Times and Tamil Murasu Newspapers. Under this project, SINDA will identify needy households who wish to read Straits Times newspaper and SPH will sponsor the subscription costs. The balances shown above represent grants/ donations that were unutilised as at the end of the financial year.

(vi) Project Give Donations

Project Give is a community fund raising campaign to raise money for the bursaries for students from needy families. It typically runs through the various festivities such as Hari Raya Puasa, Deepavali and Christmas. Funds are raised via direct cheque donations, donation boxes placed with partner retailers, on-line, at the booth during Deepavali Fair at Campbell Lane and through tele-poll in conjunction with the Project Give Charity Show on Mediacorp’s Vasantham TV Channel.

(vii) Youth Development Programmes

Youth Development Programmes are specific programmes under the funding support of $2,000,000 from Kewalram Group of Companies which focuses mainly on the following 3 key programmes:

• Project Victory/Senior Victory; a school based motivational programme that aims to bring out leadership qualities and encourage the practice of positive life skills through structured activities and trained facilitators. • Youth Empowerment Programme; a one-to-one mentorship programme to engage “at-risk” youth and who have low self-esteem or other behavioural problems. • Mentorship programme for Institute of Technical Education (ITE) students; a programme to engage students of ITE through interest-based mentoring.

In addition there was a donation of $18,256 from Bharathnatyam Dance Performance to help youths for the following programme:

• Leadership Training programme for Indian Youths from low income families.

The funds will be channelled towards the content development, programme evaluation tools, motivational camps and workshops for the above mentioned programmes.

(viii)

Single Parent Programme/Sponsorships Single Parent programme provides holistic assistance to the parent and the children. Children of single parent would receive assistance from all SINDA’s programmes including Tuition, NEU PC, Enrichment while parents receive assistance on skills upgrading, financial planning and family support to help build their self-esteem and become self-sufficient.

Sponsorships were received for specific programmes like Financial Assistance, Bursary, Educational programmes.

14 RESOURCES EXPENDED ON CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES AND GOVERNANCE COSTS Note

2012 $

2011 $

(i) Charitable activities Education programmes Tuition programmes: - STEP programme - Project Teach

Other education programmes: - Enrichment programmes - Bursary/Scholarships - Staff costs - Support costs

Family services - Casework and counselling - Single Parents programme - Other programmes - Staff costs - Support costs Youth development programmes - SINDA Youth Club activities - Youth Motivational programmes - Staff costs - Support costs

15

15

15

3,770,051 1,453,256

2,205,643 822,145

428,430 1,030,586 1,383,135 2,012,978 10,078,436

305,022 1,353,954 1,253,457 2,520,285 8,460,506

232,515 73,251 582,591 690,785 951,400 2,530,542

185,699 109,711 303,304 890,351 400,658 1,889,723

154,664 246,996 453,900 339,608 1,195,168

137,337 135,070 485,725 212,368 970,500


84

A NEW MOMENTUM

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

Note Parent Programmes - Preschool programmes - Programme for Parents - Staff costs - Support costs

Children Programmes - Numeracy and Literacy programme - Programme for Children - Staff costs - Support costs

Community Engagement and Volunteer Management - Networking initiatives - Collaborative Programmes/SINDA 2020 - Volunteer management - Staff costs - Support costs

Corporate and Marketing Communications - Corporate communications - Marketing communications - Staff costs - Support costs

(ii)

85

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

Administrative and Governance costs - Administrative and Governance Expenses - Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) *

15

15

15

15

2012 $

2011 $

The resources expended have been summarised as follows:

8,850 71,670 395,320 210,170 686,010

– – – – –

74,689 155,966 357,628 210,035 798,318

54,015 96,899 145,075 121,420 417,409

155,167 96,938 57,917 570,775 339,544 1,220,341

64,262 717,811 41,042 650,620 662,951 2,136,686

78,866 4,893 47,932 304,234 435,925

74,215 48,330 80,850 249,797 453,192

918,823 433,581 1,352,404

917,691 433,581 1,351,272

* The Association occupies Government land at 1, Beatty Road, Singapore 209943 and pays an annual Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) fee expense. The expense is supported by the Grant from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) of $433,581 (2011: $433,581)

2012 Direct costs Programmes Education Family services Youth development programmes Parent programmes Children programmes Community engagement and Volunteer management Corporate and Marketing communications Administrative and Governance costs

15

$

Support costs (note 15) $

2011 Total

Direct costs

$

$

8,065,458 2,012,978 10,078,436 951,400 2,530,542 1,579,142 339,608 1,195,168 855,560 686,010 210,170 475,840 798,318 210,035 588,283 880,797 131,691 433,581

339,544 1,220,341 435,925 304,234 1,352,404 918,823

Support costs (note 15) $

Total

$

5,940,221 2,520,285 8,460,506 400,658 1,889,723 1,489,065 970,500 212,368 758,132 – – – 417,409 121,420 295,989 662,951 2,136,686 453,192 249,797 1,351,272 917,691

1,473,735 203,395 433,581

SUPPORT COSTS Staff costs

2012

$

Maintenance and Administrative expenses $

Depreciation expenses

Total

$

$

Education programmes Family services Youth development programmes Parent programmes Children programmes Community engagement and Volunteer management Corporate and Marketing communications Administrative and Governance costs Total

963,770 592,867 138,770 92,091 92,091 138,770

888,571 295,124 175,474 101,170 101,035 175,410

160,637 63,409 25,364 16,909 16,909 25,364

2,012,978 951,400 339,608 210,170 210,035 339,544

181,658 502,048 2,702,065

92,985 332,228 2,161,997

29,591 84,547 422,729

304,234 918,823 5,286,792

2011

2,645,742

2,124,386

315,042

5,085,170

Support costs in respect of staff costs, maintenance and administrative expenses are allocated to charitable activities based on level of activities. Support costs in respect of depreciation expenses are allocated to charitable activities based on floor area occupied.


86

A NEW MOMENTUM

87

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

16

NET DEFICIT FOR THE YEAR

The following items have been included in arriving at net deficit for the year:

Staff costs Central Provident Fund contributions (included in staff costs) Depreciation

A NEW MOMENTUM

2012 $

2011 $

6,601,540 776,616 422,729

6,151,820 635,166 315,042

20

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Financial risk management

Overview

17 TAXATION

The Executive Committee has an overall responsibility for the establishment and oversight of the Association’s risk management framework. The Association’s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks: credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk (including currency risk, interest rate risk and price risk). The Association has policies and processes for measuring and managing these risks. The Executive Committee reviews and approves the policies for managing each of these risks.

The Association is an approved charity organisation under the Charities Act, Chapter 37 and an Institution of Public Character under the Income Tax Act, Chapter 134. No provision for tax has been made in the financial statements as the Association is exempt from income tax.

This note presents information about the Association’s exposure to each of the above financial risks. Further quantitative disclosures are included throughout these financial statements.

There were no significant changes to the Association’s financial risks during the year.

18

KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL

Credit risk

Remuneration paid/payable to key management personnel Short-term employment benefits Salary range Salary above $200,000 Salary within range $100,000 to $200,000 Total

2012 $

2011 $

695,973

877,161

2 1 3

2 1 3

Credit risk is the risk of financial loss to the Association if the counterparty to a financial instrument fails to meet its contractual obligations and arises principally from the Association’s receivables from various sources and investments.

The Association’s exposure to credit risk in receivables arises principally from receivables, investments and cash and cash equivalents.

The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the carrying amount of each financial asset in the statement of financial position.

The Association establishes an allowance for impairment that represents its estimate of incurred losses, only when required. The main components of this allowance are a specific loss component that relates specifically to individually significant exposures.

The key management personnel remuneration comprise remuneration paid to the top three (2011: three) key personnel including the Chief Executive Officer. The Trustees and Executive Committee members do not receive any remuneration.

19

RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

For the purpose of financial statements, parties are considered to be related to the Association if the Association has the ability, directly or indirectly, to control the party or exercise significant influence over the party in making financial and operating decisions, or vice versa, or where the Association and the party are subject to common control or common significant influence. Related parties may be individuals or other entities.

The Association’s exposure to the credit risk is low as most of its receivables are from government agencies. Approximately 84% (2011: 80%) of the Association’s receivables are due from three (3) counterparties in 2012 and 2011.

Other than the transactions disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements, there were no significant related party transactions between the Association and its related parties during the financial year.

At the balance sheet date, all receivables of the Association are not past due.

There is no allowance for receivables required as at 31 December 2012 (2011: Nil).

Receivables


88

A NEW MOMENTUM

89

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

Investments/Cash and cash equivalents

Currency risk

The Association strives to invest a portion of its funds in bonds of good credit quality, whenever possible.

Currency risk is the risk that the fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in foreign exchange rates.

Investments in debt securities are assessed using stringent investment criterion and this includes, but is not limited to, a thorough analysis of each debt security’s terms and conditions, the availability and quality of the guarantor, as well as financial strength of the issuer.

The Association’s foreign currency exposures are as follows:

The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with banks and financial institutions which are regulated and rated A and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings.

The Association’s debt securities consist of debt securities rated B and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings or debt securities of Singapore government related entities. There is no significant concentration of credit risk in relation to these investments.

For investment operations, the Investment Committee adopts very stringent quantitative and qualitative criteria, including financial statement analysis, type of securities, credit ratings and quality of management in selecting issuers of financial instruments that the Association invests in.

By virtue of its investment activities to optimise return, the Association is exposed to the effects of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, principally in currencies such as United States Dollar, Euro and Hong Kong Dollar. The Association does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge its foreign currency risks.

Financial assets – investments US Dollar Euro Hong Kong Dollar Other currencies

2012 $

2011 $

10,785,531 21,292 607,483 226,512

10,407,159 110,858 590,004 1,033,181

Sensitivity analysis

The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with three (3) financial institutions in 2012 and 2011.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that the Association will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The Association’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure, as far as possible, that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when due, under both normal and stressed conditions.

Typically, the Association ensures that it has sufficient cash on demand to meet expected operational demands excluding the potential impact of extreme circumstances that cannot reasonably be predicted.

Based on the contractual maturities, the Association’s financial liabilities mature within one year from the balance sheet date and the fair values approximate their carrying amounts.

Market risk

Market risk is the risk that changes in market prices, such as foreign exchange rates, interest rates and equity prices will affect the Association’s income or the value of its financial instruments. The objective of market risk management is to manage and control market risk exposures within acceptable parameters, while optimising the return on risk.

Market risk is managed by the Investment Committee by closely monitoring the market data and by setting up detailed investment policies.

A 10% strengthening of the Singapore dollar against the following currencies at the reporting date would decrease the net surplus by the amounts shown below. This analysis assumes that all other variables, in particular interest rates, remain constant. Surplus of income over expenditure $ 31 December 2012 US Dollar Euro Hong Kong Dollar

(1,078,553) (2,129) (60,748)

31 December 2011 US Dollar Euro Hong Kong Dollar

(1,040,716) (11,086) (59,000)

A 10% weakening of the Singapore dollar against those currencies at 31 December would have had the equal but opposite effect on the above currencies to the amounts shown above, on the basis that all other variables remain constant. Interest rate risk The Association’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates to the interest bearing cash and cash equivalents and debt securities.


90

A NEW MOMENTUM

91

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

A NEW MOMENTUM

At the reporting date, the interest rate profile of the interest-bearing financial instruments, as reported to the management, was as follows:

Nominal amount 2012 2011 $ $ Fixed rate instruments Fixed deposits with banks Debt securities

Variable rate instruments Debt securities

640,599 7,765,892 8,406,491

2,392,966 4,785,120 7,178,086

2,510,596 10,917,087

4,393,654 11,571,740

At the reporting date, management assessed that an increase/(decrease) of 25 basis points in the interest rates would have no significant impact to the results of the Association.

Ratio between the Association’s annual operating expenditure and its funds is as follows:

Total funds at 31 December Annual operating expenditure Ratio of funds to annual operating expenditure

Sensitivity analysis The Association’s investments are designated as held for trading investments. A 10% increase or decrease in the underlying market prices at the reporting date, with all variables held constant would increase or decrease income by $2,347,488 (2011: $2,142,592). Capital/Funds Management The Association is a society with no share capital. The Association builds up its Capital/Funds from donations received and also through prudent management of its financial resources. The capital of the Association include reserve fund in its Accumulated Fund. The reserves of the Association provide financial stability and the means for the development of the Association’s activities. The Association intends to maintain the reserves at a level sufficient for its operating needs. The Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees of the Association review the level of reserves regularly for the Association’s continuing obligations.

2011 $

26,752,650 18,849,043 1.4:1

27,295,620 15,850,150 1.7:1

The Association’s Funds are closely monitored to ensure that there are sufficient funds to support its programmes and activities.

The Association is not subject to externally imposed capital/funds requirements.

Accounting classification and fair values

Fair values versus carrying amounts

The fair values of financial assets and liabilities, together with the carrying amounts shown in the statement of financial position, are as follows:

Price risk Price risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices (other than those arising from interest rate risk or currency risk), whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer or factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market.

2012 $

Loans and receivables

Fair value through profit and loss $

Other financial liabilities

Total carrying amount

Fair value

$

$

$

1,700,000

1,700,000

1,700,000

Donation receivable Central Provident Fund Board Scheme

658,822

658,822

658,822

Donation receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board

375,000

375,000

375,000

Deposits and other receivables

461,663

461,663

461,663

– 4,022,565

24,640,877 –

– –

24,640,877 4,022,565

24,640,877 4,022,565

Other payables and accrued expenses

(1,195,456)

(1,195,456)

(1,195,456)

Unutilised specific grants/donations

(5,084,562)

(5,084,562)

(5,084,562)

7,218,050

24,640,877

(6,280,018)

25,578,909

25,578,909

$ 31 December 2012 Government subvention receivable

Financial assets – investments Cash and cash equivalents


92

A NEW MOMENTUM

93

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED)

YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

Loans and receivables

31 December 2011 Government subvention receivable

Donation receivable Central Provident Fund Board Scheme

Donation receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board

Deposits and other receivables

Financial assets – investments

Cash and cash equivalents

$

A NEW MOMENTUM

Fair value through profit and loss $

Other financial liabilities

Total carrying amount

Fair value

$

$

$

1,700,000

1,700,000

1,700,000

623,356

623,356

623,356

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

894,334

894,334

894,334

23,793,689

23,793,689

23,793,689

5,096,289

5,096,289

5,096,289

Other payables and accrued expenses

(1,263,426)

(1,263,426)

(1,263,426)

Unutilised specific grants/donations

(5,444,629)

(5,444,629)

(5,444,629)

9,313,979

23,793,689

(6,708,055)

26,399,613

26,399,613

21

Comparative information

Change in classification

During the current year, the Association enhanced the organisational capabilities for greater efficiency of charitable activities and effective Financial Management. Comparative amounts in Note 14 and 15 to the financial statements were reclassified as disclosed below for consistency with the current year’s presentation.

The changes are as follows: As previously reported $

Reclassification

As restated

$

$

Education programmes

8,179,169

281,337

8,460,506

Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations

3,332,434

(3,332,434)

Fair value hierarchy

Corporate Communication and Community Engagement (CCCE)

2,816,413

(2,816,413)

The table below analyses financial instruments carried at fair value, by valuation method. The different levels have been defined as follows:

Family Services

1,889,723

1,889,723

Youth Development

970,500

970,500

Children’s Programmes

417,409

417,409

Community Engagement and Volunteer Management

2,136,686

2,136,686

Corporate and Marketing Communications

453,192

453,192

• Level 1: quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities • Level 2: inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e., as prices) or indirectly (i.e., derived from prices) • Level 3: inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs). Level 1 $

Level 2 $

Level 3 $

Total $

31 December 2012 Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss

16,785,391

6,689,486

23,474,877

31 December 2011 Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss

12,440,734

8,985,181

21,425,915

Since the amounts are reclassification within operating activities in the income statement, this reclassification did not have any effect on the statements of financial position and statement on cash flows.


Singapore Indian Development Association No. 1 Beatty Road, Singapore 209943 Tel: 1800 295 4554 Fax: 6392 4300 www.sinda.org.sg www.facebook.com/mysinda

TOTAL DEFENCE AWARDS

SINDA Annual Report 2012  

Annual Report 2012

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