Page 1


Contents

President’s Message

02

Board of Trustees & Executive Commitee

05

Snapshots of 2011

06

SINDA 2020

12

Maximising Educational Opportunities For All

16

Nurturing More Enlightened Families

26

Community Strength in Unity and Partnership

42

Educational Indicators

52

Financial Statements

61

Vision

Mission

To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together

To build well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore

Values

Respect, our culture Integrity, our foundation Service, our promise Excellence, our pursuit


SINDA in 2011 Maximising educational opportunities for all Students enrolled in STEP

Students enrolled in Project Teach

Students in SINDA’s other tuition programmes1

Students at educational workshops and seminars

2,870

930

410

1,130

Nurturing more enlightened families Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund, SINDA and preschool bursaries disbursed

Direct cases managed by SINDA Family Service Centre

Enquiries received at SINDA’s Career Development and Resource Centre

1,920

400

660

STRENGTHENING PARTNERSHIPS, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND OUTREACH Total amount raised through Project Give

Number of households SINDA connections is distributed to

Celebrate! festival gift packs distributed during festive seasons

Total Number of Volunteers

Motivational Talks

$1.43 million

70,000

1,200

1,350

60

2011 marked the 20th Anniversary of SINDA. In the last two decades, SINDA has emerged as the pre-eminent organisation charged with the upliftment of the Singaporean Indian Community. In that time, we have positively impacted and made real differences in the lives of thousands of individuals and families. Still, there remains work to be done. A review of our initiatives and what ails the community has resulted in the publication of a strategic review report called SINDA 2020: A New Momentum; a blueprint to effective positive change in the coming years. This isn’t just a plan of action for SINDA but one for the entire Singaporean Indian community to embrace. As SINDA re-energises and restructures itself to meet these new challenges, we are confident that the community will support us and send ripples of inspiration and hope out into the nation. By joining together in groups and as individuals to support each other in this new chapter, those ripples become waves which will be instrumental in helping to build a brighter future for all of us. 1

Includes Collaborative Tuition Programme, STU-STAR, NUSTLS ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme – Saadhana.


Ms Indranee Rajah

SINDA 2020 is about Hope. It is about Aspiration. It is about Promise. And it is about Potential that can be realised…At the end of SINDA 2020 in ten years time, we will look back to this day and this stage where we hoped and said that the journey started here. And hopefully when we look at the end of that journey we will see that we have made tremendous progress and we would be what we want to be – that is an Indian Community that is a shining star in the Singapore constellation.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

At the SINDA Community Forum (2nd July 2011)

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President’s Message


Dear Friends, 2011 was a milestone year for SINDA for several reasons: n

We took a hard look at the progress made by the Indian community since SINDA’s inception in 1991.

n

Based on this wide-reaching review, we charted the future direction for SINDA in terms of its role and relevance in the Indian community given the rapidly changing social landscape and needs of the community.

n

As SINDA turned 20, we honoured the contributions of several key members of the community, and the critical role they each played in SINDA’s development over the last two decades.

Most importantly, it was also time for us to pause and reflect on the crucial questions – “Where are we going and how do we get there?”

Twenty years of achievement Over the last twenty years, SINDA has come a long way in terms of its contribution towards those who need support. Through its outreach efforts, it has established its presence in the community, and has played a part in our progress in both the academic and socio-economic arenas. Still, much has changed in the educational and social landscape in the last 20 years. We have embarked on a comprehensive review of our programmes and services as we sought to address the issues that will impact the Singaporean Indian community in the coming years. We took stock of what has worked and what has not and based on what we found, we are introducing new initiatives to take the educational progress of the Indian students to the next stage. We want to implement new strategies that are more suited to the new education landscape, where a connected world makes for learning in many modes. Unquestionably, 2011 was a time for meaningful discussions and consultation. Different groups from the whole spectrum of the Singapore Indian community were part of the consultative process. From focus group sessions to dialogues and the SINDA Community Forum, it was heartening to see diverse groups and individuals coming together to deliberate on key issues and brainstorm strategies to address concerns facing the community – all bound by a common goal and of purpose, which was to see the advancement of the Indian community.

The Journey Ahead The upshot was the report, SINDA 2020: the New Momentum, put together by the SINDA 2020 Review Committee, led by Dr N. Varaprasad. It sets out several hard truths. We have come a long way and what we have achieved so far together is highly commendable. However, we have reached a point where the climb gets steeper and tougher. To make further progress will require that much more effort and commitment from the entire community. The Review Committee made several pertinent recommendations. As a result, in December 2011, SINDA reorganised itself to better meet these challenges and address the needs of the community. For example, the newly formed Children and Parents Divisions are in direct response to the Review Committee’s recommendations to have a bigger presence in these sectors. SINDA will address these issues by: encouraging parents to send their children to preschool centres;

n

focusing more on Mathematics through innovative teaching methods;

n

expanding our STEP tuition and Project Teach programmes to more pupils and schools;

n

strengthening youth development by guiding them to stay focused and aim higher in their aspirations;

n

building family resilience amongst Indian families by engaging with parents, and

n

strengthening community partnerships by collaborating with various organisations.

A Brighter Future, Together

n

3


President’s Message When we look at pass rates, admission rates to institutes of higher learning, delinquency rates, and employment statistics, one thing stands out: there are Singaporean Indians who are not fully sharing in the promise of a better future for themselves and their children.

Confronting Future Challenges If we do not bridge this gap, we risk having a whole cohort of young Singaporean Indians left on the sidelines of our economy. To avoid this happening we must extend the reach of our quality education initiatives and how they address the learning challenges of our children. We are confronting these facts head-on so as to change them, and to ensure that each child from our community is given the opportunity to maximise his or her potential. SINDA will implement targeted and innovative strategies to bridge the achievement gap. But SINDA cannot do this alone. This must be done as a community, with everyone pulling together to ensure that the less-privileged among us get that much-needed help. This is a shared journey between all members of the extended Singaporean Indian community. It is about creating genuine partnerships across society with shared aspiration, mutual respect, joint responsibility and values. I am confident that the community will heed this call and move together as one, to achieve upliftment of the community and fulfill the potential of our young students. I would like to conclude by thanking all those who have helped SINDA in the past years, especially the Board of Trustees, the EXCO and the executive and management team, as well as our volunteers, partners and donors. Your unwavering support, service and dedication have created a difference in the lives of many Indians. I look forward to your continued support as we roll out the new initiatives and programmes arising from the SINDA 2020 Review.

Conclusion

SINDA Annual Report 2011

We have much to do this year, but one thing is clear – 2012 will see the introduction of many positive changes in our community. The directions have been charted, the groundwork has been laid and the new initiatives are being implemented. Together, we will achieve our vision of a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community.

4

Indranee T. Rajah President


Patron

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong

Board of Trustees Chairman & Life Trustee

Term Trustees

Advisors

Mr Tharman Shanmugaratnam

Mr Inderjit Singh

Dr Vivian Balakrishnan

Ms Indranee Rajah

Mr S. Iswaran

Mr Haider M. Sithawalla

Mr Hri Kumar Nair

Life Trustees Professor S. Jayakumar Mr S. Dhanabalan Mr S. Chandra Das Mr J. Y. Pillay Mr Sat Pal Khattar Mr K. Shanmugam Dr N. Varaprasad

Mr Bobby Chin Yoke Choong Mr M. Rajaram Mr V. Shankar

Audit Review Committee Members

Mr Ravi Menon

Chairman Mr Haider M. Sithawalla

Mr R. Jayachandran

Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai, PBM

Mr Hsieh Fu Hua

Mr K. V. Rao

Mr Girija Pande

Mr Sarjit Singh, BBM

Mr Gautam Banerjee

Mr Vinodh Sabesan Coomaraswamy

MG Ravinder Singh

Executive Committee President Ms Indranee Rajah

Vice Presidents Mr Viswa Sadasivan Mr Shabbir Hassanbhai, PBM

Secretary Mr Sarjit Singh, BBM

Members of Executive Committee

Resource Panel Members

Mr V. P. Jothi

Ms M. Nirmala

Mr R. Rajaram

Mr P. B. Desai

Mr Aaron Maniam

Dr Sivasankaran Subramaniam

Mr Naseer Ghani

Mr Mohamed Abdul Jaleel, PBM

Mr Puvan Ariaratnam

Ms Sabanitha Shanmugasundram

Mr P. Thirunal Karasu, BBM

Mr Sajen G. Aswani

Mr K. V. Rao

Dr Joshua V. M. Kuma

Treasurer Mr R. Subramaniam Iyer

Chief Executive Officer Mr T. Raja Segar

Auditors KPMG LLP


Snapshots of 2011 22 Jan 26 Mar

IAVE Delegate s visit SINDA

SINDA hosted 15 de legates from the 21st International Association for Volun teer Effort (IAVE) Wo rld Youth Volunteer Conference.

26 Feb

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SINDA Annual Report 2011

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6

ded 74 Junior College (JC) students atten three were kers spea key this seminar. The Keerthi, rav Gau LTC hs: yout exemplary Indian ical med NUS , Arun Joel Air Force Pilot; Mr her Teac ran, Eisv ari ehsw Ling student and Ms ol. Scho High ent ernm Gov at Bukit Panjang

P1 St arte

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50 parents attended the P1 Starters seminar at SINDA. Key speakers were Mrs Sarojini Padmanathan, Senior Director of SINDA, Mdm V. Balakrishna, Principal of Fernvale Primary School and Principal Consultant of Nascans Pte Ltd, Dr Chris Koh.


15 Ap r

27 Apr

ITE Fo rum 2011 Some 26 0 ITE stu dents att at ITE C ended th ollege E e ITE Fo ast. Mr M rum founder oonshi M of multi-m ohsenru ill ddin, ion dolla CommG r compa ate Solu ny tions, sh and insp ared his iring suc experien cess sto ces ry.

24 Apr s STEP Centre @ g in n r a e e-l L aunch of dlands Ring ed at the Woo lly launch subsequently ng was officia rtal has been STEP e-learni po ng ni ar le eand the new STEP Centre tres. l 21 STEP Cen al rolled out to

Narpani-SINDA Family More than 7,000 came to the n East. As part of Day that took place at Downtow tives, SINDA partnered SINDA’s 20th anniversary initia nise the event. PA’s Narpani Pearavai to orga

A Brighter Future, Together

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7


Snapshots of 2011

30 May

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SINDA Annual Report 2011

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Around 250 community leaders took the SINDA part in Community F orum (SCF The objectiv ). es of the SC F were to sh SINDA’s 20 are th annivers ary review present the pr oc ess, key issues affecting th Indian com e munity-at-la rge and cons community ult the on the reco mmendatio address them ns to .


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A Brighter Future, Together

Celebrat

9


Snapshots of 2011

13 Aug

11 Oct

Maths Mad About

p, designed ics worksho vel Mathemat Le ’ ‘O is hool based th sc attended ndmark and la r ei th r 74 students fo udents d prepare st to motivate an . examinations

Dialo g K. Sha ue with M iniste nmug r am

3 Sep

SINDA Annual Report 2011

nd IBR 50 members attended the seco with dialogue, held at the M Hotel Foreign Mr K. Shanmugam, Minister for Affairs and Minister for Law. el Members participated in a pan and discussion with Mr Shanmugam . IBR Mr Girija Pande, Chairman of

10

SINDA

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2011

A) ards (SE llence Aw e c ent x E e A achiev m 0th SIND academic ed the 2 d ir n e ll as e th e tt r a w fo s ents vels a gnised 458 stud and ‘A’ le are reco ls ts e n llowing v e fo d le ’ e tu th ‘O y. S In 2011, s PSLE, . a ceremon s h rt c a u e s s School s and th ark exam ingapore t in sport S n , e in landm rd m a e rd. w v hie iploma A ates Awa demic ac d: ITE D g Gradu e in c non-aca u rn d tu o e tr R in and rds were urs Award new awa cial Colo e p S il c n ou Sports C


13 Nov

3 Dec Riders Aid

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Indian Comm unit y Bursa Ceremony ry Awards and Back-T o -S chool Festi Around 660 pa rents and child val ren attended Bu

rsary Awards the Indian Com (ICBA) and SI munity NDA’s Back-to ceremony was -School Festiv held in collabo al. The ICBA ration with the Trust (SIET) an Singapore Indi d Tamils Rep an Education resentative C 800 back-to-s ouncil (TRC). chool kits wer In al l, e given out to after the festiv beneficiaries al. during and

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in y, .R Presid nd-rais t, Mr S mmunit rsary fu the Co residen e P in iv r n e e n c a form A Pla ’s 20th ry, was apore. SINDA ’s histo ia Sing A n D le graced il IN M S n, icling z-Carlto k chron the Rit ve boo ti ra o m e a comm dinner. d at the e h c n lau

A Brighter Future, Together

t s such a ner s 20 ’ n nitaries i ig A d D r bers, D e m th ry SIN and o a ard Me o m s B a Y r A g D IN en t ive y Tan K n and S r held a Ann ent Ton . Natha g dinne

11


SINDA 2020

SINDA 2020 Review Process

The key findings of the report highlighted some of the issues and challenges facing the Indian community. These include:

• •

Low enrolment in preschool

• • •

Low motivation and drive among youth

Gaps in academic performance, especially Mathematics Lack of family stability and support SINDA’s limited reach

SINDA will address these challenges by implementing strategies and recommendations in the following ways:

The SINDA 2020 Review was led by a Review Committee chaired by Dr N. Varaprasad, Life Trustee, SINDA. The committee, in consultation with an Education Study Team and a Family Study Team, discussed issues pertaining to educational and socio-economic underperformance in the Indian community. The Data Analysis Team was responsible for collating and analysing relevant data and statistics obtained from ministries.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

In addition, 16 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted, involving 175 people from various groups within the community. The general public was also engaged through the SINDA Community Forum which 250 community leaders and significant individuals attended.

12

The input gathered from these platforms were consolidated as a Review Report – SINDA 2020: A New Momentum, which was launched on 23 November at a Press Conference involving the Chairman and key members of the Review Committee.

• • • • • • •

Significantly increase preschool education Enhance focus on Mathematics Expand SINDA’s tuition reach Strengthen youth development Build family resilience Strengthen community partnerships Enhance organisational capabilities

SINDA 2020 Commemorative Book A special commemorative book was commissioned to chronicle two decades of SINDA’s history, its progress from birth and its programmes and initiatives. Titled A Place in the Community, it is a testament to the integral role that SINDA plays in the Indian community.


SINDA’s Action Plan: SINDA - Community Strategy House

To Build a Strong and Vibrant Singaporean Indian Community Together

Vision

To build a well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with Inspiring Youths towards greater achievement

Significantly Increase Preschool

• Increase Enrolment in Nursery • Increase Parental Awareness • Intensify Outreach Mechanisms

Enhance Focus on

• Improve Math Pedagogy • Increase Math Awareness

Strengthen Youth Development

Expand SINDA’s

• Rebrand STEP • Expand Project TEACH • Promote Programme Centres • Partner Private

• Align Influencers of Behaviour • Engagement through Peer Networks • Leverage on Sports and Team

role in their children’s lives

Build Family Resilience

• Increase Parent • Prepare couples for Parenthood • Empower Less-Educated Mothers

with community partners

Strengthen Community Partnerships

• Facilitate and Leverage on Community Resources • Forge Sustainable Partnerships

Enhance

• Increase awareness on SINDA’s role • Re-Organise Internal SINDA

Key Strategic Thrusts

Strategic Pillars

Strategic Initiatives

• Promote SINDA as a Youth Hub

•Targeted through Customised Programmes

Integrity

Social Media

Values

Service

Excellence

A Brighter Future, Together

Respect

Engaging Parents

Mission

13


Ruthra Thiyagarajan Student, National Junior College

It is comforting to know that you can rely on the support of your own community, particularly in difficult circumstances. And for Miss Ruthra, a student at the National Junior College, life has never been too comfortable. The 18-year-old JC2 Science student has suffered from health issues since she was young. But that has not stopped her from attaining high academic standards, especially in Tamil and Biology, overcoming every obstacle along the way. “I get dizzy easily because I’m anaemic, and the side effects from all the medications are severe,” she reveals. “But due to my family’s financial situation, I have to do well academically to ease the strain, and eventually help support the family.”

SINDA Annual Report 2011

14

Too many Indian youth allow life to pass them by. That’s just not ‘cool’.


SINDA helps further the education of a deserving student on her journey towards academic success.

Her father works in pest control and is the sole bread winner. Her mother suffers from osteoarthritis and is unable to work. Fortunately, Ruthra has always been strong academically, and hadn’t previously required tuition to excel in her studies. After her ‘O’ levels, she found life at junior college a challenge. She is grateful for being able to receive tuition under the Saadhana Project, a SINDA collaborative programme with the National University of Singapore Tamil Language Society (NUSTLS).

She is currently a SIET-SINDA bursary recipient and Ruthra plans on a career in either medicine or bio-chemistry. But either way, she plans to achieve the highest paper qualifications possible, an outcome she wishes on all young Singaporean Indians.

Ruthra adds: “We must not be too badly affected by the negatives in life. Just be happy with the positives (in life), and try to put others before self whenever possible. The whole community would be better off if we could reach out and help each other.”

A Brighter Future, Together

We must not be too badly affected by the negative. Just be happy with the positive, and try to put others before self whenever possible. The whole community would be better off if we could reach out and help each other.

“My family is proud that I could do well in my subjects without needing too much motivation,” she says. “I’ve always been personally motivated and thankfully, given my financial situation, my parents do not have to spend much needed funds on tuition.”

Some may remember Ruthra as the eloquent speaker who addressed the audience at the Back-to-School Festival 2011 where her message to other youth was to prepare seriously for the future. “It’s our loss if we don’t have the necessary qualifications to build a better life. Too many Indian youth allow life to pass them by. That’s just not ‘cool’,” she says.

15


Maximising Educational Opportunities For All A MAJOR aspect of SINDA’s work is to provide Singaporean Indian children with the educational opportunities to reach their full potential. This perennial objective is continually developing, the past year seeing new, as well as continued partnerships, with a host of schools, educational institutions, and community organisations. Educational programmes such as STEP and Project Teach are meant to help raise Indian students to, and in time surpass, the level of the national average for landmark examinations.

Step Launched in 1992, SINDA Tutorials For Enhanced Performance (STEP) provides affordable tuition to help Indian students perform better in the key subjects of English, Mathematics and Science. In 2011, STEP was conducted at 21 school premises from January to October on weekday evenings. STEP benefited 2,872 Primary and Secondary students, with a total of 984 receiving full or partial fee waivers.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

STEP features a number of benefits for participating students, including

16

• Small class size (10 to 12 per class) • Qualified and experienced tutors • Flexible choice of subjects • Double Maths • Curriculum materials • Regular tests and assessments • E-Learning • Holiday classes and programmes • Target setting book • Children’s Day gift packs containing dictionaries, calculators, stationery etc

• Refreshments

STEP E-Learning This initiative provides an e-Learning platform for STEP students, and enables them to take responsibility for their own education. The initiative was officially launched on 27 April 2011 at Woodlands Ring Primary School STEP Centre and then rolled out to all centres.

STEP Heritage Trail This activity was organised for STEP students in Primary 4 to 6. In all, 74 students set out on a heritage expedition along the Singapore River using mobile technology. The combination of learning and the fun elements of the trail had a significant impact on the participants.

SINDA STEP Futsal The programme was organised for Secondary level STEP students. In all, 65 students participated in this tournament which focused on developing sportsmanship and a healthy attitude towards living a balanced life among the youth.

Household Income 2011 - STEP Students 29.6%

16.1%

20.6%

849

463

593

20.2% 13.5% 580

387

$1000 & Below $1001 - $1500 Number of Households

2872

$1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500 Above $2500


STEP Centres 2011 Bowen Secondary School

North View Secondary School

Chua Chu Kang Secondary School

Pasir Ris Primary School

Clementi Primary School

Ping Yi Secondary School

East View Secondary School

Pioneer Secondary School

Fajar Secondary School

Sembawang Secondary School

Farrer Park Primary School

Seng Kang Secondary School

First Toa Payoh Primary School

Shuqun Primary School

Henderson Secondary School

Shuqun Secondary School

Jurong West Secondary School

Woodlands Ring Primary School

Marsiling Primary School

Yishun Primary School

Mayflower Secondary School

After STEP

English

English

- 40.0% scored a B grade or better - 23.4% failed

- 62.0% scored a B grade or better - 3.9% failed

Maths

Maths

- 16.9% scored a B grade or better - 70.2% failed

PS LE

Before STEP

- 27.1% scored a B grade or better - 48.1% failed Science

- 64.1% scored a C grade or better - 36.3% failed

- 74.7% scored a C grade or better - 24.8% failed

Maths

Maths

- 22.7% scored a B grade or better - 59.1% failed

- 54.5% scored a B grade or better - 22.7% failed

‘ O’le vel

Science

* The official 2011 school and national examination results will be available at a later date.

A Brighter Future, Together

S econ dar y 3 Exa ms

P rimar y 5 Exams

Impact of STEP (2010)*

17


Maximising Educational Opportunities For All

Project Teach is a school-based tutorial programme launched in 2001 specifically for Primary school students.

Project Teach Project Teach is a school-based tutorial programme launched in 2001 specifically for Primary school students. It aims to improve the academic performance of Singaporean Indian students in Primary 1 to Primary 6 through intensive small-group tuition for English, Maths and/or Science. These include students in the Foundation stream. Sessions are customised to the needs of the school and students, and are conducted at school premises before or after curriculum time. Key features of the programme include:

• • • • • • •

Close partnership with school Small class size of 1:5 tutor-to-pupil ratio Qualified and experienced tutors

SINDA Annual Report 2011

33.7%

14.8% 19.7%

312

Flexible choice of subjects

137

182

19.2% 178

12.6%

116

Curriculum materials

$1000 & Below

Regular tests and assessments

$1001 - $1500

Holiday classes

In 2011, Project Teach was conducted in 44 Primary schools for 925 Indian students. Some 342 of these students received full or partial fee waivers.

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Household Income Project Teach Students

Number of Households

925

$1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500 Above $2500


Project Teach Schools 2011 Ahmad Ibrahim Primary School

Lianhua Primary School

Anderson Primary School

Marsiling Primary School

Balestier Hill Primary School

Meridian Primary School

Beacon Primary School

Montfort Junior School

Boon Lay Garden Primary School

New Town Primary School

Bukit Panjang Primary School

Ngee Ann Primary School

Bukit Timah Primary School

North View Primary School

Bukit View Primary School

Pei Tong Primary School

Canossa Convent Primary School

Peiying Primary School

CHIJ Our Lady of Good Counsel

Qifa Primary School

CHIJ Our Lady of the Nativity

Qihua Primary School

Chua Chu Kang Primary School

Sembawang Primary School

Concord Primary School

Shuqun Primary School

Edgefield Primary School

Si Ling Primary School

Farrer Park Primary School

St. Anthony’s Primary School

First Toa Payoh Primary School

Tanjong Katong Primary School

Gan Eng Seng Primary School

Teck Ghee Primary School

Greenridge Primary School

Xingnan Primary School

Greenwood Primary School

Yew Tee Primary School

Haig Girls’ School

Yishun Primary School

Huamin Primary School

Yuhua Primary School

Lakeside Primary School

Zhangde Primary School

After Project Teach

English

English

- 37.4% scored a B grade or better - 20.9% failed

- 59.3% scored a B grade or better - 4.3% failed

Maths

Maths

- 18.0% scored a B grade or better - 65.5% failed

P SLE

Before Project Teach

- 28.6% scored a B grade or better - 42.1% failed

Science

Science

- 58.0% scored a C grade or better - 42.0% failed

- 78.6% scored a C grade or better - 21.4% failed

* The official 2011 school and national examination results will be available at a later date.

A Brighter Future, Together

P ri mar y 5 Exams

Impact of Project Teach (2010)*

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Maximising Educational Opportunities For All New initiatives to enhance STEP and Project Teach Curriculum Materials All students attending both STEP and Project Teach received curriculum materials. SINDA tutors are provided with a list of recommended titles for both the Primary and Secondary levels. This gives tutors the flexibility to decide on the materials that best fit each student. However, in the case of upper Secondary tutors (for students from the normal academic and express streams), SINDA provides a customised curriculum designed to meet their needs. The Ten Year Series are also provided as a supplement to this curriculum.

Guidelines for Classroom Teaching 400 STEP and Project Teach tutors were provided with guidelines for classroom teaching to ensure consistency across all STEP and Project Teach centres. The guidelines recommended teaching approaches and ways to engage students effectively.

More Focus on Maths Creative Maths Creative Maths was another pilot initiative to supplement the normal school curriculum. It offered fun-filled, activity based Math programmes for STEP and Project Teach students in Primary 1 and Primary 2. It is designed to create an interest in the subject, dispel the fear of numbers and cultivate numeracy skills. 171 students have benefited from this 10-week programme conducted at selected STEP and Project Teach centres.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Double Maths Double Maths sessions were piloted for Project Teach students. This provides weaker Mathematics students with an additional two hours of tutorials to help them perform better at school and at landmark examinations. Students were identified by the school for extra coaching in Mathematics based on their school mid-year examinations result.

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This scheme was also extended to STEP centres where Centre Principals and tutors identified weaker Mathematics students to take up the option. In all, 155 Primary and Secondary students benefited from this option in 2011.

Motivation/Enrichment As part of their centre-based activities, Farrer Park and North View STEP Centres engaged Vasantham celebrities PVSS Vadivalagan and Elamaran to conduct motivational talks for both Primary and Secondary students. The talks covered topics on academic, self motivation and social, behavioural, emotional aspects. 90 students attended and benefited from the talks. In addition, enrichment programmes such as Creative Maths classes for upper Primary students, Duck Tours, Learning Journey to Marina Barrage and visits to the Science Centre were organised. Selected STEP students also attended the NUS Camp Kathiroli. The objectives of these programmes were to engage students effectively during June holidays through fun Math and Science. A total of 824 students attended and benefited from the enrichment programmes/activities.

Engaging STEP and Project Teach Tutors Tutor Orientation Programme This annual programme attracted some 200 STEP and Project Teach tutors. The tutors were briefed on SINDA’s vision and mission, its educational directions, new STEP and Project Teach initiatives as well as issues surrounding corporate governance. Mrs Saraspathy Menon, Principal of Yuan Ching Secondary School and her subject specialist teachers were the guest speakers. STEP centre principals were also engaged in an interactive session on ways to improve the performance of Indian students. STEP and Project Teach Tutor Training A series of 11 Training Sessions were organised to equip tutors with newer pedagogies for classroom teaching. A total of 285 tutors attended these training sessions. Appreciation Dinner An Appreciation Dinner has been hosted annually by SINDA since 2008 to recognise tutors and support staff in STEP and Project Teach programmes. 23 personnel received awards for their dedicated service for 5, 10 or 15 years in 2011.


OTHER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES Collaborative Tuition Programme (CTP) To make tuition centres more accessible to students, Chinese Development Assistance Council (CDAC), Yayasan Mendaki and SINDA run 56 CTP centres island-wide for students of all ethnic groups. In 2011, around 162 students benefited from this programme.

Kip McGrath OnePeople.sg, the national body championing Racial Harmony, has set up a Multi-Racial Education Centre (MREC) in collaboration with the four Self-Help Groups, Central Singapore Community Development Council (CSCDC) and Kip McGrath Worldwide Education Centre (KMWEC). The programme identifies underachieving students from low-income families, and supports them in their education. SINDA has supported in marketing the programme and identified 6 students for the programme.

NUSTLS ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme – Saadhana Saadhana ‘A’ Level Tuition Programme is a non-profit project run by the National University of Singapore Tamil Language Society (NUSTLS). It aims to provide quality tutoring in all core GCE ‘A’ Level subjects at affordable rates. SINDA and SIET support this project every year. In 2011, a total of 90 students enrolled in the programme. Students who were not able to afford the fees were accorded waivers based on their household income.

C-2-A Seminar

Maths & Me was launched to help Primary 6 students attain better grades in PSLE Mathematics. The 12-week intensive preparatory programme aimed to reach out to more Singaporean Indian students, especially those who were not enrolled in STEP and Project Teach. Classes were conducted island-wide including STEP centres, Community Clubs, SINDA HQ, SINDA Service Centre and The Verge. Qualified and experienced tutors were assigned to conduct intensive lessons, with an emphasis on building on the fundamental aspects of Mathematics. Some 229 students attended the programme in 2011.

Project GuidE (Guiding for Excellence) Project GuidE targets students who underperform in Mathematics, English and Science, yet do not have any tuition assistance. Through close collaboration with Tamil language teachers, students from Primary 5 and 6 are identified and placed in this programme. 2 events and 1 workshop were conducted specifically for the benefit of students studying at the upper Primary levels. These included: Amazing Race The programme was organised in collaboration with Raffles Institution Junior College (RIJC) Indian Cultural Society to motivate students through a series of fun-filled activities held at Singapore Zoo. In all, 95 Primary 5 and 6 students benefited. Pathways to Mid-year Seminars This encompassed two series of workshops benefiting 104 Primary 5 and Primary 6 students. The programme focused on study skills and on preparing students for the mid-year examinations. A Brighter Future, Together

This initiative helps students study for ‘A’ Level Mathematics and General Paper. Presented in an exciting seminar format, students were provided with a survival kit to prepare them for the examinations. A total of 65 students attended this programme.

Maths & Me

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Maximising Educational Opportunities For All

Great Hunt The programme had a treasure hunt format, tasking students to unravel various secrets to success. A total of 100 Primary 5 and Primary 6 students took part in this event. Project Leap Some 157 Primary 4 and 5 students attended this experiential workshop at Republic Polytechnic. Students learnt skills on self-understanding, time management, public speaking and were also tasked to set goals for the upcoming year.

STU-STAR Programme The Singapore Teachers Union (STU) conducts the Special Tutorial and Revision (STAR) programme for students from Primary 4 to Primary 6. 11 centres located island-wide offer English, Maths and Science classes. SINDA provides subsidies for up to 50% of the total tuition fees for students enrolled in this programme. In 2011, 41 students benefited from this programme.

Math School This was a 10-week Math Tutorial Programme for students in Primary 3 to Primary 6. The trainers were students from RIJC ICS. A total of 82 students benefited from this programme.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Winning Strategies

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SINDA organised ‘Winning Strategies in PSLE Maths 2011’ for Primary 6 students and engaged Mr Vijayan Nambiar, a well-known motivator and MOE-trained educator. The students were taught skills to master challenging Mathematical concepts hence preparing them for the PSLE examinations. A total of 3 seminars were held for the 212 students who signed up.

‘O’ Level Maths Seminar A two-hour Maths revision seminar by education trainers, Nascans Pte Ltd, which focused on critical topics such as Algebra and Trigonometry, was organised for students from the Hindi Society and Punjabi Language Centre. A total of 50 students attended this programme which motivated them to score higher marks in school and landmark examinations.

Mirror Me & Mirror You This half-day workshop aimed to build students’ communication skills and encourage creative thinking to boost their confidence and enable them to converse better in English. A total of 21 students benefited from this programme.

Math-O-Mania Math-O-Mania was a 10-week comprehensive Math revision programme for students sitting for ‘O’ Level Elementary Mathematics. Presented by Phoenix EduHub in collaboration with SINDA, it equipped students with the necessary skills to ace their ‘O’ Levels Elementary Mathematics examination. A total of 25 students enrolled in the programme.

Bridging Programme 2011 The four SHGs, supported by the Ministry of Education (MOE) targeted academically weak K2 students who were about to enter Primary 1 for a nine-week intensive programme. The aim was to develop their basic social, emotional, literacy and numeracy skills so that they could be more ready for school. A total of 79 children across all the ethnic groups were identified, of which 2 were Indians.


P1 Starters

Some 60 parents attended this parenting seminar organised by Ramakrishna Mission Sarada Kindergarten in collaboration with SINDA on 16 July 2011. The interactive seminar, ‘Building Blocks and Happy Learners’ was conducted by Dr Chris Koh from Nascans. The seminar imparted essential skills and parenting techniques to help parents prepare their children for academic, social and emotional learning in Primary 1.

Scholarships

Also in 2011, SINDA and the Singapore Indian Chamber of Commerce & Industry (SICCI) partnered Nanyang Technological University (NTU) to award scholarships to Engineering and Business students for their Global Immersion Programme (GIP). The scholarship was awarded to two Singaporean Indian students for a 25-week internship and study programme in Pune, India. Ng Lao Chik-SINDA Secondary Study (NLC SSS) Awards SINDA, with a $6,000 donation from Mr Ng Siak Heng, introduced this new study awards scheme for deserving Indian students in mainstream Secondary schools who are outstanding in education, sports or art. In all, 12 students received the award in 2011. Dr Balaji Sadasivan Scholarship To honor the memory and work of SINDA’s former President, the late Dr Balaji Sadasivan, SINDA launched this scholarship that will be awarded to deserving Singaporean Indian undergraduates or post-graduates in Social Work. The scholarship will support up to 5 students with the study award of $5,000 to $10,000.

A Brighter Future, Together

SINDA offers a range of scholarships in collaboration with well-known organisations and institutions to encourage individuals to pursue higher studies and acquire more skills. In 2011, SINDA partnered three organisations to jointly award seven scholarships for diploma and certificate courses.

The institutions are the Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS), Singapore Airlines (SIA) and the Singapore Institute of Materials Management (SIMM).

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Passing on the Baton When Madam Krishnavani’s son, Sainiran, won a school reading competition in 1999, it launched a series of events that led to other young Singaporean Indians appreciating the gift of letters and words, not least of all her own daughter, Santhiya. The organisers of the competition commented on how well Sainiran, then 10-years old, read and pronounced. They recognised that Krishnavani, a housewife, had that rare gift of being able to ignite the love of reading in children, and urged her to use the ability for the benefit of other Singaporean Indian children.

This led to Krishnavani volunteering for the fledgling Project Read in 2000, a six-month series of weekly home visits where volunteers help children overcome reading difficulties while cultivating the reading habit. The programme pioneer has not looked back since. “When Sainiran and Santhiya were babies, I always placed books amongst their toys. Of course, at first they chose to play with toys. But they gradually learnt to like books more. And I often brought them to libraries and book fairs to reinforce the interest,” says the 48-year old mother. The highpoint in her career as a Project Read volunteer came when she helped a child who stammered. “The child was in Primary 3 then. After 8 months, with much perseverance, she overcame her stutter when reading. She even gained sufficient confidence to perform a small part in a school play and eventually acted in a Vasantham show telecast on national television,” explains Krishnavani with obvious satisfaction and pride.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

“Her mother said that this marked improvement would not have been possible without Project Read,” adds Krishnavani, who obviously has what it takes to make a difference in others’ lives.

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Mdm Krishnavani & Santhiya


Like mother, like daughter. The spirit of volunteerism runs deep in this family.

And this quality has been inherited by Santhiya, her 15-year old daughter. The Secondary 3 student from Boon Lay Secondary School has been further inspired to love the written word by her brother, Sainiran, now a psychology undergraduate. “He, too, loved reading and together we had a whole room full of books. We always encouraged each other to read as much as possible. For me, this has greatly improved my vocabulary and my ability to write compositions,” says Santhiya. She currently helps a K2 child on Saturdays, the only day she is free due to her school CCAs and her own packed schedule. “At first, she only knew the alphabet. But she gradually learned to read words, and after six to eight months, she has begun to read full sentences. This motivated me to strive harder to further improve her reading ability,” she adds. Krishnavani feels that sparking a child’s interest in reading is vital. Parents play an important role in this. Together with the Project Read volunteer, she feels they can ascertain how best to achieve this.

Santhiya feels there is a role to be played by Secondary school children. The older ones can make a difference by getting involved in Project Read. “Perhaps more Secondary school students can be involved in this programme to make a difference in the community. Some of them have quite a bit of spare time after school hours and a scheme like Project Read would be a good way to spend that time usefully,” she says. Constructive ideas from a mother and daughter, filled with the desire to help the Indian community fulfill its huge potential.

Perhaps more Secondary school students can be involved in this programme to make a difference in the community. Some of them have quite a bit of spare time after school hours and a scheme like Project Read would be a good way to spend that time usefully.

A Brighter Future, Together

“It’s the interest that is important,” she explains. “I used to have children calling me to find out if I’m coming for a session. While a volunteer is a powerful resource, a balance must be struck between the parents’ and the volunteer’s involvement in the child’s development.”

She understands that many who want to be of service are extremely busy. But she advises potential volunteers to give it a try for six months. “When you see the children showing improvement, it is very, very rewarding,” says Krishnavani.

Sparking a child’s interest in reading is vital. Parents play an important role in this.

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Nuturing More Enlightened Families SINDA Family Service Centre SINDA Family Service Centre (FSC) uses qualified social workers and counsellors to provide services to those experiencing difficulties in their personal, professional, marital and family lives. Experienced and trained officers carry out case assessments, conduct home visits and provide help where needed. The SINDA FSC provides financial assistance through bursaries, as well as more holistic support for families through its programmes such as Legal Clinic and Neu PC. Families and individuals can contact SINDA FSC if they require information or assistance regarding national schemes available to them. Referrals to such appropriate agencies are made when necessary. SINDA FSC handled a total of 403 cases in 2011.

Household Income - FSC 4.47% 12.66% 2.98%

12 18

24.81%

55.08%

100

222

51

$1000 & Below $1001 - $1500 Number of Households

SINDA Annual Report 2011

403

26

$1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500

Education Level

No. of Cases

%

26

6.45

Primary

136

33.75

Secondary

176

43.67

65

16.13

403

100

No Formal Education

Post Secondary / Tertiary Total

Above $2500

Families and individuals can contact the SINDA FSC if they require information or assistance regarding national schemes available to them.


SINDA Bursary and Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund SINDA provides bursaries for full-time Singaporean Indian students from low-income families, who are enrolled in government and independent schools, and educational institutions. These students range from Primary to pre-university levels. The bursaries complement other financial support schemes already available, such as the school bursaries, and community organisation bursaries. Recipients of SINDA bursaries and the Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) are also provided tuition at our STEP centres. Case officers assess if the families of bursary recipients require other assistance, such as Neu PC, financial assistance and job placement or job upgrading. In 2011, SINDA disbursed $58,530 to 146 students from the SPMF and 1,638 SINDA bursaries worth $1,056,130.

Household Income SINDA Bursary 10.32% 14.96% 20.57% 169

245

337

28.57%

419

468 $1000 & Below $1001 - $1500

Number of Households

1638

$1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500 Above $2500

Household Income - SPMF 2.74% 2.05% 10.96% 24.66% 3 16

36

4

59.59% 87 $1000 & Below

SIET-SINDA Bursary In 2011, a total of $170,530 was disbursed to 149 students under this scheme.

25.58%

$1001 - $1500 Number of Households

$2001 - $2500 Above $2500 A Brighter Future, Together

146

$1501 - $2000

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Nuturing More Enlightened Families

SINDA PreSchool Bursary SINDA gives out preschool bursaries to Singaporean Indian children from low-income families, to help them build a strong foundation before entering Primary 1. This bursary is given in addition to the subsidies provided by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS), through the Centre-Based Financial Assistance Scheme for Childcare (CFAC) and Kindergarten Financial Assistance Scheme (KIFAS).

Household Income Preschool Bursary 1.44% 13.57%

2

18.57%

35.71%

30.71%

26

50

43

19

$1000 & Below $1001 - $1500

Low-income families eligible for the Preschool Bursary must have children aged 18 months to 6 years enrolled in a non-profit childcare centre. To qualify, the mothers must be willing to seek employment to supplement the family income.

Number of Households

140

$1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500 Above $2500

In 2011, 140 children benefited from the Preschool Bursary amounting to $62,975.

Before and After School Care Subsidy

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Parents from the lower-income bracket who enrol their children in Before and After School Care (BASC) centres qualify for financial assistance. The BASC subsidy, provided to families with children aged 7 to 14, is offered in addition to the subsidies provided by MCYS, Community Development Councils (CDCs) and student care centres. Children must be enrolled in a non-profit student care centre to be eligible.

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In 2011, 91 children benefited from the BASC subsidy amounting to $52,548.

Household Income - BASC 7.61% 13.04%

6

32.61%

46.74%

30

43

12

$1000 & Below Number of Households

91

$1001 - $1500 $1501 - $2000 $2001 - $2500


Free Legal Clinic sessions are held once a month in SINDA, where volunteer lawyers offer legal advice to low-income Singaporean Indian families.

NEU PC Programme

Project Spark

Access to a computer with Internet connectivity is a basic necessity, given the prevalence of educational technologies that help empower and enrich our lives today. Since 1998, SINDA has collaborated with the Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) of Singapore in an effort to get Singaporean Indian students and their families to own PCs, along with affordable Internet connectivity. SINDA provides basic IT training to encourage low-income Indian families to be more computer savvy. Thus far, more than 4,554 new PCs have been placed in homes. In 2011 alone, 134 families benefited from the programme.

Project SPARK (Successful Parents and Resilient Kids) is a collaborative effort between SINDA and Temasek Cares (a charity arm of Temasek Holdings), Yayasan Mendaki, Chinese Development Assistance Council and the Eurasian Association.

Legal Clinic Free Legal Clinic sessions are held once a month in SINDA, where volunteer lawyers offer legal advice to low-income Singaporean Indian families. The lawyers help to explain to clients the legal procedures and terms and also highlight legal costs that may be incurred in resolving issues. In 2011, 24 families benefited from the services of the Legal Clinic.

It aims to provide a more holistic and integrated intervention programme to help single parents rebuild their lives and overcome challenges. Funding support of $180,000 over a period of 2 years will address the provision of an assistance package consisting of employment assistance programmes and a starter kit. In 2011, 65 single parent families participated in the programme.

Project Athena Introduced in 2009, Project Athena focuses on single mothers and their children. Project Athena aims to empower these mothers to become more confident individuals. Besides helping them to acquire skills that increase their employability, the project also serves as a peer support network for these mothers. In 2011, 31 mothers and 34 children benefited from the programme.

A Brighter Future, Together

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Nuturing More Enlightened Families

SINDA SERVICE CENTRE @ Jurong Point SINDA Service Centre (SSC) was officially opened at Jurong Point on 26 March 2011. The ceremony was graced by DPM Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Chairman of SINDA. The SSC provides similar services as the SINDA headquarters, to the Indian community living in the West of Singapore.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

From February to December 2011, the SSC served some 652 beneficiaries.

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The following services are available at SSC:

• Information and referral services • Counselling • Reading Circle • Bursary application • Programmes registration • Payment collection • NEU PC application • Training/Job referral services


CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND RESOURCE CENTRE SINDA’s Career Development and Resource Centre (CDRC) serves as a one-stop information and referral service centre for skills upgrading and career advancement for low-skilled adult Indian workers. From January to December 2011, 658 enquiries were made at the CDRC. In all 291 job seekers received referrals for employment placement, of which 33 were successfully placed in jobs.

PARTNERS CDRC’s partners include; 1. Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) 2. Community Development Councils (CDC) 3. The People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committees (PAIAEC) Co-ordinating Council 4. National Trades Union Congress (NTUC) 5. Self-Help Groups (SHG) 6. National Environment Agency (NEA) 7. Little India Shopkeepers and Heritage Association (LISHA) 8. NTUC Union for Casual & Contract Workers (NTUC-UCCW) 9. Ministry of Manpower (MOM)

National Schemes Available at CDRC

• • • • •

10. Singapore Manufacturers’ Federation (SMa)

Employability Skills System (ESS) Workforce Skills Qualification (WSQ) Certified Service Professional (CSP) Surrogate Employer Scheme (SEP) Place & Train Scheme (P&T)

A Brighter Future, Together

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Young SINDA beneficiaries stand to gain much from the vision and experience of these two youth volunteers. If there’s one quality that sets successful youth counsellors apart, it’s the ability to initiate positive change. Not just the capacity to adapt well, but to aspire through sheer hard work and foresight to achieve their desired goals, and then to share those experiences for the benefit of their charges. This is the trait that best describes Sumithra Nair and Haresh Kumar, SINDA youth volunteers who at an early age recognised the need for change, and have affected positive results through vision and industry. They are both able to relate to the problems of today’s youth, and take an active approach to sharing their own experiences with young Singaporean Indians in various SINDA programmes.

Sumithra grew up in a family with financial constraints. “I know what they’re going through; I faced the same problems,” says the 27-year old teacher. For four years, she worked with teens on probation under various Ministry of Community Development, Sports and Youth (MCYS) programmes. “You have to earn their trust and respect first before you can help them. I find counselling rewarding; you can see greatness in small successes,” she adds. “Then I learnt about SINDA’s Guidance and Mentorship programme (GAME). I volunteered to use my own experiences to help them. I was also inspired by the book Restorative Practices which gave me insights into education and social work, among other things,” says Sumithra.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Haresh Kumar & Sumithra Nair

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“It’s important that they stay in school. Family support is vital. Also, teachers and counsellors can provide the encouragement that can bring about positive change and break the cycle of dysfunction,” she feels. “Peer influence is crucial, as friends can support each other to make a difference.”

I find counselling rewarding; you can see greatness in small successes.

Sumithra points to the three ingredients required for positive change – leadership skills, empowerment and confidence building, components that fellow volunteer Haresh Kumar fully agrees with. He, too, took the academic route to beneficial transformation.

Haresh did not achieve good results when he first took the ‘O’ levels. The 26-year old communications and media executive, now a conference organiser with SPRING Singapore, had to repeat the examinations, back in 2003. “I didn’t retake my ‘O’ levels in a mainstream school but at a private school, even though people had a less favourable impression of private education back then,” he says. This just made him more determined to do well, and he successfully gained entry to Nanyang Polytechnic, studying business management. “This was a turning point for me. I realised firsthand how easy it is for young people to get discouraged. But perception has changed. Now private schools and the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) are accepted alternative education routes, so there’s no excuse,” he adds. “But I can still relate to the average youth with problems.”

He personally hopes to instill the confidence in Indian youth to be more business-minded. “Previous generations were very entrepreneurial, but now fewer youth are taking this route to success,” he says. “The social and employment infrastructure is such that young Indians with no aspiration just get stuck in the system.” Haresh feels Indian youth lack awareness of business opportunities. This is why he volunteered for the SINDA Young Leaders Programme (SYLP) last year, to work with youth and help them be more self-reliant and business minded. “At SPRING, we have more than 200 grants. It’s a matter of directing promising young Indians to the right website to find out for themselves the opportunities available,” he says. “It’s also about using one’s abilities to achieve desired outcomes.” He himself put his words into action by participating in ‘Be the Change’, a contest organised by MCYS and the National Youth Council. He won an iPad2 for his ideas on expanding social entrepreneurship, an area with much potential for young Singaporeans. Having previously been involved in SINDA focus groups, Haresh is currently helping organise the first ‘Ace the Race’ workshop for Normal stream and ITE students. The 1-day programme, to be held on 19 May 2012 will offer motivational talks by industry professionals, who make for good role models. Both Sumithra and Haresh have encountered situations that give them the ability to see things from their charges’ perspectives. “It’s about putting yourself in their shoes,” says Sumithra. That, and the ability to bring about change for the better.

Peer influence is crucial, as friends can support each other to make a difference.

She now mentors three young beneficiaries, displaying a deep commitment to the programme by texting them regularly to keep tabs on their progress. Her fun-loving personality enables her to connect with her charges, and give them the right kind of attention they seek.

A Brighter Future, Together

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Nuturing More Enlightened Families

SINDA YOUTH CLUB

The SINDA Youth Leaders Seminar

The SINDA Youth Club (SYC) engages Indian youths between the ages of 13 and 35. It focuses primarily on providing them with enrichment activities that have a strong educational agenda. The SYC aims to inspire more Indian youths to aspire and achieve more. Since its official launch in 2010 by Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean, SYC has been networking with other Indian youth groups to organise youth development programmes. In 2011, the SYC conducted the following:

SINDA Young Leaders Programme The SINDA Young Leaders Programme (SYLP) provides leadership training to empower Indian youths and channel them towards community service. Selected applicants from various institutions undergo an intensive six-month programme to hone their strengths and develop their passion for community service.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

In 2011, as part of the overseas component of the programme, 27 youths visited Kerala on a study trip. The experience allowed them to immerse themselves in the local culture and learn more about Kerala’s education system. Leveraging on the existing partnership between Singapore’s Ministry of Education and Kerala’s educational institutions, participants aimed to generate ideas and identify processes that could be modified to benefit STEP students.

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At the end of the programme, participants graduated as ambassadors of the SYLP. They continued contributing to the local community by sharing their knowledge at workshops conducted at STEP centres.

Some 53 youths attended the SINDA Youth Leaders Seminar (SYLS), a 3-day/2-night residential camp for tertiary students. The objective of the seminar is to build on knowledge and skills needed for young Indians to become effective leaders within a culturally diverse community. It also provided opportunities for participants to interact with key policy makers, leaders and academics.


Distinguished Speaker Series with Former President S. R. Nathan

In Conversation Series Sessions

The Distinguished Speaker Series (DSS) is an annual event targeted at tertiary students and young professionals. It enables them to engage and network with distinguished individuals within the community. Former President S. R. Nathan was the speaker for DSS 2011. He candidly shared his views on the community and nation with the 120 participants at this session.

Project Aspire Project Aspire, a workshop on goal-setting, portfolio and Curriculum Vitae (CV) development as well as interview preparatory skills, attracted 80 tertiary students last year. A team of facilitators led this workshop designed to adequately prepare participants for further studies and future employment.

These sessions are led by industry experts who share their experiences and discuss career opportunities in their respective fields. These experts share aspects such as the career prospects, criteria involved and challenges they faced. Some of the speakers engaged in 2011 were Dr Mohamad Maliki Osman (Senior Parliamentary Secretary, Ministry of Defence and Ministry of National Development and Mayor, South East District), Mr Moonshi Mohsenruddin, CEO and Founder of CommGates Solutions, and Dr Kumaran Rassapan, medical practitioner, adventurer and author of A Doctor by Profession & A Mountaineer by Choice. In all, 125 participants benefited from the ICS in 2011.

A Brighter Future, Together

35


Nuturing More Enlightened Families Kewalram Chanrai Initiatives The Primary focus of the four-year partnership between SINDA and the Kewalram Chanrai Group beginning in 2011 is to effectively reach out to Indian youths who need guidance, additional assistance and financial support. The initiatives are targeted at youths between 10 and 18 years of age from low-income families. The programme aims to provide guidance and build their self-esteem.

The funded programmes for 2011 included:

• • • •

Project Victory and Senior Victory, school-based motivation programmes Guidance and Mentorship (GAME) Holiday Enrichment Programmes (HEP) ‘I am Motivated’, motivational programme at STEP Centres

In addition, new initiatives were implemented in the middle of the year to further support youth within a non-academic framework. These initiatives were:

• •

F1 Experience Workshop ‘Take the Lead’ Dance Enrichment Workshop

Project Victory and Senior Victory Project Victory (PV) targeted at students in Primary 4 to 6 and Senior Victory targeted at Secondary students, are school-based motivation programmes. Both these values-based programmes provide students with support and guidance to bring out their leadership qualities and boost their self-esteem. Through planned and structured activities, experienced and trained facilitators help students redirect their focus towards education. PV and SV encourage participants to practice positive life skills by addressing areas such as anger management and conflict resolution.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

The programmes are conducted as two hour sessions every week for a maximum of six months. During this period the facilitators update parents on their children’s progress, and address their concerns. In 2011, 221 students benefited from PV and SV programme.

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Schools Participating in Project Victory Rivervale Primary Jurong Primary Xingnan Primary

Schools Offering Senior Victory Yishun Secondary Regent Secondary St Margaret’s Secondary CHIJ St Theresa’s Convent Chestnut Drive Secondary Yuhua Secondary


Leaders from SINDA Young Leaders Programme (SYLP)

Guidance and Mentorship Programme The Guidance and Mentorship Programme (GAME) is a group-based mentoring programme supporting the development of Primary and Secondary level Indian youth. Piloted in 2011, it targets students who are disengaged from school, appear to have self-esteem issues and display behavioural concerns.

These youths are referred to SINDA by school counsellors, caseworkers and Family Service Centres. They are paired with volunteer mentors for six months and engaged in structured activities that are supported by Positive Youth Development and Social Emotional Learning frameworks. Through these activities, mentors impart valuable life skills to help the youths make meaningful life choices and ultimately improve their performance in school. In 2011, 10 volunteers mentored 15 youths.

A Brighter Future, Together

The Guidance and Mentorship Programme (GAME) is a group-based mentoring programme supporting the development of Primary and Secondary level Indian youth.

37


Nuturing More Enlightened Families Holiday Enrichment Programme SINDA organises Holiday Enrichment Programmes (HEP) annually for beneficiaries in June, November and December. The programmes engage Primary and Secondary school students through fun enrichment activities that gainfully occupy them during the holidays, aid in personal development and ultimately, their academic performance in school. 609 students aged between 7 and 17 participated in the activities organised in 2011.

Title of Programme

Date

Participants

Camp United – An Overnight Camp

3 & 4 June 2011

11

Freestyle Soccer Workshop

4 June 2011

50

Winter Wonderland at Snow City

9 June 2011

173

Time Machine – A Universal Adventure at Universal Studios Singapore

21, 23 & 24 June 2011

196

Floorball Experience Workshop

6 & 7 September 2011

11

Night at the Singapore Philatelic Museum – Overnight Camp

24 & 25 November 2011

28

Chronicles of Narnia – An Interactive Exhibition (Learning Excursion)

3 December 2011

20

United We Play – Soccer Workshop

10 December 2011

26

Sleeping with the Beasts – An Overnight Camp at the Singapore Zoo

15 & 16 December 2011

94

Total Number of Participants

‘I am Motivated’

SINDA Annual Report 2011

‘I am Motivated’ is a non-academic motivational programme for Secondary students in STEP. This 16-week programme is based on the Ministry of Education’s (MOE) Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) framework and modelled after SINDA’s Senior Victory programme.

38

The programme engages Secondary students in a structured programme to nurture responsible and self-motivated individuals. 90 students from the STEP centres (table on the right) participated in the programme.

609

STEP Centres in the ‘I am Motivated’ Programme Mayflower Secondary School East View Secondary School Pioneer Secondary School North View Secondary School First Toa Payoh Primary School


F1 Experience Workshop The workshop created a stimulating environment for youths to learn about Science, Engineering and Technology. This helped them to develop an informed view about careers in Engineering, Science, Marketing and Technology. The programme also aimed to boost the academic performance of Indian youths who underperform in Math and Science at school and landmark examinations. Four half-day workshops were conducted at St Andrew’s Secondary school on 19, 21, 22 and 23 November 2011 for 86 students from Primary 5 to 6 and Secondary 1 to 4. The entire programme derives directly from Formula 1 and is endorsed by Mr Bernie Ecclestone, CEO of Formula One Management and Formula One Administration.

‘Take the Lead’ Dance Enrichment Workshop The programme instilled a sense of achievement and drive among students. It also enabled Indian youth to maximise their potential and build confidence through team-building, and leadership development activities. 10 dance sessions were conducted by Dance Arts for the students attending the Senior Victory programme. The students also had the opportunity to perform a hip hop dance item at SINDA’s annual Back-to-School Festival on 3 December 2011. Some 10 students from St Margaret’s Secondary School and Pioneer STEP Centre participated in this workshop. Following its success, a Hip-Hop Dance Enrichment Workshop was organised on 19 December 2011. In all, 35 upper Primary and Secondary students participated in this workshop.

A Brighter Future, Together

39


From delivering packages to making a difference in lives - DHL’s partnership with SINDA.

“We’re always looking for opportunities to further our corporate social responsibilities (CSR). It’s part of our corporate culture. We take ownership of the projects we get involved in.” says Sham Alexander, DHL Global Mail’s Managing Director for Southeast Asia. And this team’s dynamism was evident when 68 employees volunteered to deliver SINDA’s Celebrate! festive gift packs to needy Indian families over the Deepavali season in 2011. “SINDA approached our regional office requesting assistance in distributing gift packs during the Hari Raya Puasa and Deepavali periods last year,” reveals Mr Alexander. “We didn’t know the volumes involved, but in the end we made 37 deliveries for Hari Raya and 47 for Deepavali.”

SINDA Annual Report 2011

40

People do want to help, but they should realise it’s not only just about donating money. There are other ways that one can also contribute.

This was not DHL’s only collaboration with SINDA for the benefit of the needy. The express delivery and forwarding company also organised trips to the Singapore Flyer and Science Centre, and held a soccer clinic, as well. “It’s great to work for a company that has the same spirit of volunteerism that I have,” says Mohamad Ridzal bin Mazlan, who manages the Hybrid Mail Centre. He is often involved in projects benefiting the needy, while his colleague Chua Kian Huat, who works in the Southeast Asia Operations division, feels CSR projects are “good for personal bonding”. “We’ve started categorising our projects under the titles ‘Go Teach’, for children; ‘Go Green’, for environmental projects and ‘Go Help’, for disaster relief. And at the global level, we now have a corporate global effort called Volunteer Day,” says Alexander. Another DHL employee, Shawn Seah, who is with the Commercial Network department, feels not enough is known about volunteerism in Singapore. “People do want to help, but they should realise it’s not only just about donating money. There are other ways that one can also contribute,” he says.

The DHL Global Mail Team


“We’re aggressively initiating programmes due to our work with SINDA,” she adds.

SINDA approached our regional office requesting assistance in distributing gift packs during the Hari Raya Puasa and Deepavali periods last year. We made 37 deliveries for Hari Raya and 47 for Deepavali.

Another new initiative, called Global Mail Give Back, is a direct result of DHL’s collaborations with SINDA, says Jeanna Goh, from DHL’s Human Resource and Administration department.

A Brighter Future, Together

41


Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach Volunteer relations The Volunteer Relations Department (VRD) looks into innovative resources and meaningful opportunities that create a positive change within the Indian community. SINDA maintains a comprehensive Volunteer Management System that administers the recruitment, orientation, training, supervision and recognition of volunteers.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Volunteers make a positive difference in lives – by nurturing a love for reading among young children, mentoring youth, befriending families, imparting IT skills and providing free legal advice. By being there for anyone who needs the support, concern and guidance of someone who cares, these volunteers truly make all the difference.

42

Key Information on SINDA Volunteers

In 2011, a total of 1,351 volunteers contributed their time to SINDA.

350 new volunteers registered in 2011 to help in our assistance schemes.

719 volunteers dedicated their time to our ad-hoc projects, activities and events, each averaging about nine hours of service for the year.

632 volunteers were engaged in long term programmes, contributing an average of 24 hours for the whole year.

Volunteer Participation 54%

46%

719

632

Number of Volunteers

1351

Episodic Volunteers Long-term Volunteers


Volunteer Programmes Project Read Project Read brings the gift of reading to young children. Volunteers visit the children once a week at their homes and read to them to help them overcome reading difficulties and cultivate the reading habit in them. The volunteers monitor the child’s progress over a period of 6 months to ensure that the child benefits from the sessions. Project Read also gives Indian children a headstart in school by equipping them with basic literacy skills earlier, so that they perform better when they start school.

Reading Circle/Group-Based Reading Programme The Reading Circle/Group-Based reading programme is a centre-based programme for children between the ages of four and nine. These reading and enrichment sessions help them overcome their reading difficulties. Volunteers engage the children in creative and fun ways, and monitor their progress. The objective is to equip Singaporean Indian children with literacy skills and adequately prepare them for preschool and Primary school. It also aims to cultivate the love for reading in children from an early age. Key features include: • Small group reading session, with a volunteer to child ratio of 1: 5.

Conducted weekly, mostly on weekends for one-and-a-half to two hours per session.

Spearheaded by the People’s Association Indian Activity Executive Committees (PAIAECs), other grassroots, religious and Indian organisations. A Brighter Future, Together

43


Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach

Home-Based Tuition caters for students who need tuition assistance but are unable to travel to STEP or whose schools do not offer Project Teach.

Home-Based Tuition This is a tuition programme targeted at Primary and Secondary students who need tuition assistance, but are unable to travel to STEP classes or their schools do not offer Project Teach. The objective of this programme is to provide one-to-one remedial tuition for students who are weak in core subjects. Volunteers visit the homes of families once a week for an hour over a period of six to eight months. They tutor the child in English, Maths and Science, and monitor the child’s progress over the period.

Befrienders Programme Befrienders is a mentorship programme to provide holistic support and assistance to families requiring long term assistance. The programme aims to provide them with moral support and ultimately build their self-esteem. It is targeted at low-income Indian families, with at least one school-going child. Volunteers are matched with a family living within close proximity to them and contact the family at least once a fortnight. These Befrienders make at least one home visit a month.

Information Technology Workshop Information Technology (IT) workshops are conducted island wide for adults and senior citizens with the aim of equipping them with basic computer skills. The workshops are conducted mainly on weekends or weekday evenings to raise participants’ computer literacy levels by imparting basic PC skills such as Internet usage and Microsoft Office skills. The workshops also aim to cultivate an interest in IT among participants and encourage them to make IT their way of life.

Information Technology Lifestyle Information Technology (IT) Lifestyle is a home-based volunteer-driven programme meant to impart basic computer skills to school children from low income families with a PC at home. The programme aims to cultivate interest in IT among school children, imparting PC skills like basic computer and Internet usage, E-communications and basic Microsoft Office skills.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

IT Lifestyle targets school children between the ages of 6 and 12. Volunteers visit the homes of families for one hour once a week over a period of three months to instruct the child and monitor the progress.

44


Volunteer and Beneficiary outreach in long term volunteer programmes Programme

Beneficiaries

Volunteers

Project Read

200

151

Reading Circle

752

250

Group Based Reading programme

156

108

16

16

205

25

IT Lifestyle

22

22

Befrienders

17

17

Home Based Tuition

50

40

Legal Clinic

21

3

1439

632

GAME (Youth Mentorship Programme) IT Workshop

Total

A Brighter Future, Together

45


Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach

MEDIA AND PUBLICITY The media played a significant role in SINDA’s outreach efforts in 2011. Through our continued collaboration with the broadcast and print media, SINDA received more than 200 media mentions during the year. Many of SINDA’s programmes and services were brought to the attention of the public through astute engagement of the various Indian media. Besides the vernacular Tamil and English media, some of SINDA’s programmes were reported in non-Indian media such as Lianhe Zaobao, Channel NewsAsia, Masti 96.3 FM and Suria among others.

Print Media

SINDA Annual Report 2011

SINDA connections The SINDA connections newsletter is circulated three times a year to some 69,000 households contributing to the SINDA CPF Fund. This is an increase of around 4,000 more households in 2011, compared to 2010. Each issue was also distributed to various educational institutions, Indian organisations, community and grassroots leaders, the Community Development Councils (CDCs), National Library Board (NLB) branches and religious organisations.

46

Advertising support derived from various advertisers for the February, June and October 2011 editions helped defray designing and printing costs.

Advertorials From January to October 2011, SINDA placed a total of 13 advertorials in Tamil Murasu and tabla! on SINDA’s events, programmes and initiatives. These advertorials supplemented the community-oriented messages that were communicated across other media such as TV and radio.

Broadcast Media Radio Programme Kudumbam + Kannakku, designed mainly for parents and especially housewives with school-going children, was broadcast on Oli 96.8FM for a total of 16 weeks before the mid-year and final-year examinations. The topics and scenarios chosen for this series provided real-life examples on how Mathematics could serve as a conduit for parents to encourage positive behaviour in their children. During each of the 16 one-hour episodes, subject matter experts shared their experiences, provided tips and answered queries from callers. The programme also aimed to guide parents on ways to incorporate the teaching of Math and critical thinking skills into their day-to-day activities.


Television Programmes Neenga Sollunga was a SINDA – sponsored infotainment programme that was aired over 13 episodes on Sundays from October 2011. The series ran on Vannathirai – a popular Singapore cable channel reaching 40,000 households. The programme featured different segments of the Indian community including parents, children and youth who spoke about a wide range of interesting and current topics related to education, family and youth. SINDA infomercials and a “Did you know?” segment kept the audience informed of SINDA’s programmes and services. The series ended in December 2011 and a further 13 episodes were commissioned for January to March 2012 based on the success of its formula and reach. Radio and TV Publicity Besides commissioning programmes on television and radio, SINDA had also purchased airtime spots, ranging from 15 – 30 seconds, on various broadcast media to publicise its programmes and initiatives. Besides free-to-air channels like Vasantham and Oli, SINDA advertisements on the STEP programme and the In Conversation Series (ICS) were also broadcast on Vijay TV, Zee TV and Vannathirai. Through these publicity measures, SINDA received much support and positive feedback on its initiatives.

Online Media Facebook, Twitter and Corporate Website SINDA was also active on new media. Our Facebook page and Twitter stream became an alternative platform for youths to air their views and provide feedback. The corporate website underwent a revamp in June 2011 to include new features and links. Between August 2011 and February 2012, the SINDA website has served 15,381 unique visitors, of whom 33.2% revisit the site regularly. The average time spent on the site is 3 minutes and 16 seconds. e-newsletter The SINDA e-newsletter went through a revamp in February 2011. Since 2010, the e-newsletter has engaged more than 2,600 of our beneficiaries, stakeholders and partner organisations and thus kept the public aware of SINDA’s programmes and services. A new feature of the e-newsletter is the monitoring of the readership. The articles which are popular among readers are now identified and tracked to ensure that the e-newsletter caters to the interests and preferences of the readers.

A Brighter Future, Together

Many of SINDA’s programmes and services were brought to the attention of the public through astute engagement of the various broadcast media.

47


Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach Community Engagement Motivational Talks 60 talks and workshops were conducted in 2011. These workshops and talks were organised by schools, grassroots, community and religious organisations. A review of the talks was done in July with new speakers adding to the panel of resource speakers.

Let’s Reach Out Volunteers assisted the SINDA Family Service Centre (FSC) by conducting home visits to families who did not attend the bursary review. These volunteers visited 35 families in all, as a result of which 21 students received bursaries. SINDA also liaised with 5 Secondary schools in the western part of Singapore to promote this new initiative. Celebrate! Festive Gift Pack Distribution The Singapore Kadayanallur Muslim League (SKML), 6 churches and 2 IAECs came forward and assisted in Celebrate! festive gift pack distribution. These volunteers distributed gift packs to homes of needy families during the Hari Raya, Deepavali and Christmas festive seasons. Coporate volunteers such as DHL Global Mail, Credit Suisse and HSBC also assisted in Celebrate!.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Engaging Indian and Religious Organisations As part of the SINDA 2020 Review initiatives, several engagements with Indian and Religious organisations took place. Some 40 community leaders attended a dialogue session with Ms Indranee on 7 April 2011. Indian and religious organisations were also engaged through Focus Group Discussions and a SINDA Community Forum held in July 2011.

48

Project Give Booth Visits Project Give is SINDA’s annual fundraising campaign to support the educational needs of students from low income families. A record of 31 Indian organisations (grassroots, Indian, religious organisations) and schools made formal visits and donated at the Project Give Booth in Campbell Lane. As part of Project Give, a telethon for donations was also aired on Vasantham. Telephone lines were open until 31 December 2011 to raise funds for the project.

Narpani SINDA Forum SINDA participated in this forum on 15 July where a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the two organisations. The objective was to embark on closer collaboration to implement education initiatives.


Indian Business-leaders’ Roundtable (IBR) The IBR was formed in February 2011 and comprises business professionals of Indian origin. The objectives of IBR are as follows:

To engage with senior Indian business leaders based in Singapore who are in the higher echelons of businesses in Singapore, especially newly arrived ones.

To create a regular platform suitable for the sharing of ideas amongst Indian business leaders and government and business leaders from Singapore.

To enable SINDA to benefit from their energy, experience, advice and networks.

Key SINDA and IBR Office-holders DPM Tharman, Chairman of SINDA’s Board of Trustees, is the Patron of IBR. Mr Girija Pande, Chairman of Tata Consultancy Services Asia Pacific (TCS) and SINDA Term Trustee, chairs the IBR Managing Council. A total of 85 members joined the IBR in 2011.

IBR Activities IBR organises key activities each year which facilitates networking amongst its members. It also provides a platform for members to meet and interact with business leaders from government and private sectors. In addition, IBR members are briefed on SINDA and its programmes and services. Several members have also sponsored activities at SINDA. IBR Dialogues The IBR Dialogue Series is a closed-door dialogue on key issues with senior Singaporean government and business leaders. These dialogues provide IBR members with an opportunity to interact with key Singaporean leaders on issues of interest. Around 50 members, as well as SINDA Executive Committee members, attended the inaugural event held on 6 July 2011. DPM Tharman was the key speaker. He elaborated on strategic issues relating to Singapore and its economic policies.

A Brighter Future, Together

The second dialogue was held on 11 October 2011 with Mr K. Shanmugam, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Minister for Law. Around 50 members attended the session and engaged the minister on various international issues.

49


Strengthening Partnerships, Community Engagement and Outreach Corporate Services bizSAFE Level 3 Certification SINDA received bizSAFE Level 3 certification in December 2011. With this, SINDA now has in place Workplace Safety and Health Risk assessments for all its internal and external activities, including daily office work.

HR Updates Employer’s Pledge of Fair Employment Practices SINDA signed the employer’s pledge of Fair Employment Practices to signify our intention and commitment to be fair to our employees. Fair Employment Practices will help to foster an inclusive workplace, one that is based on merit and built on progressive HR practices. This is an initiative by the Tripartite Alliance for Fair Employment Practices. Total Defence Awards 2011 – Meritorious Defence Partner Award (MDPA) – 3rd Tier

SINDA received this award in recognition of our commitment and support towards the Total Defence of Singapore.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Workplace Health Promotion Programme SINDA received the Workplace Health Promotion (WHP) Grant of $4,441 to support the Workplace Health Programmes. These include activities to ensure better physical and mental health well-being and were spearheaded by the People’s Matters Club (PMC) of SINDA.

50

Training and Development Programmes To assist staff to achieve their professional goals, the Human Resource Department facilitated a wide range of training programmes (in-house and vendor driven) covering the general competency areas. The majority of courses were selected from the Social Service Training Institute (SSTI) as the course fees are subsidised by the Voluntary Welfare Organisations funding scheme. Staff also attended Professional Development courses such as the Certificate in Counselling, the Graduate Diploma in Social Work and Master of Social Work programmes. Community Attachment Programme As part of SINDA’s Community Engagement initiative, SINDA partnered the Institute of Policy Development (IPD) of the Civil Service College to host the new Community Attachment Programme (CAP). Accordingly, SINDA hosted five young Management Associates, who are in the first two years of their career in various government agencies, for two-and-a-half days. They undertook an education-related project for a period of six months, and presented their findings which have assisted the education team to enhance their programmes accordingly. Internship Programme In 2011, SINDA collaborated with Nanyang Polytechnic to support the Social Work Internship Programme. 2 interns from the School of Humanities & Social Science were attached to SINDA’s Family Service Centre for three months and exposed to the various programmes run by the SINDA Family Service Centre.

Two interns from the School of Humanities & Social Science were attached to SINDA’s Family Service Centre for three months and exposed to the various programmes run by the SINDA Family Service Centre.


The CRM capability will allow SINDA to achieve better situational awareness of clients and beneficiaries and therefore enhance our programme and services delivery.

MIS Initiatives Client Relationship Management SINDA commenced the implementation of the Client Relationship Management (CRM) software application in May 2011 with funding support from the National Council of Social Services VWO-Charities Capability Fund (VCF). The CRM capability will allow SINDA to achieve better situational awareness of clients and beneficiaries and therefore enhance our programme and services delivery. It will be an integrated database management system to facilitate processes and link currently isolated pockets of information together. CRM will be implemented in three phases and will be completed by September 2012. A cost saving of $78,000 was achieved through VCF Funding. Tuition Management System Both STEP and Project Teach, use software applications such as STEP21 and Teach to manage student, tutor and payroll information. The systems encountered capability constraints due to additional requirements, and have been recently enhanced to optimise capability.

WiFi Capability The SINDA premises at Beatty Road and the Jurong Service Centre have been WiFi-enabled since April 2011. Staff, clients and all parties who visit SINDA will be able to access the Internet from anywhere in the buildings using their laptops or WiFi-enabled smart phones. VPN Connectivity Virtual Private Network (VPN) capability was acquired in January 2011 for staff at SINDA Service Centre to access files stored in servers located at SINDA headquarters. The facility will be available to SINDA staff by April 2012. This ‘work-life’ balance initiative will enable staff to access their files from home, allowing for more flexible working arrangements.

A Brighter Future, Together

A revamped Tuition Management System (TMS) capable of tracking attendance and grades of students and providing analytical and value-added reports is in the implementation stage. The new application was launched in January 2012.

Event Registration Software SINDA commissioned a web-based Event Registration Software application that can electronically capture participants’ particulars with bar code scanners and mark their attendance at events. The software application was successfully rolled out during the SINDA Community Forum and the SINDA Excellence Awards ceremony 2011

51


Educational Indicators 2010

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Source: Ministry of Education

52


Percentage of Students who Passed PSLE 100

96.7 93.7

96.3 93.2

95.0

97.2

95.5

97.4

96.1

97.8

95.9

97.7

96.2

97.7

95.5

97.1

95.0

97.1

95.3

97.3

90

80

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2 Percentages are based on all students.

Percentage of PSLE Students Who Scored A* - C in Standard English Language 100

98.2 97.6

98.7 97.9

97.5 97.5

98.0 97.5

2001

2002

2003

2004

98.5

97.5

98.3 97.5

98.6 97.9

98.2 97.5

98.0 97.5

97.2 97.6

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

90

80

70

60

2005

Indian

Overall

A Brighter Future, Together

1 The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2 Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation English Language (2009 and 2010).

53


Educational Indicators 2010 Percentage of PSLE Students Who Scored A* - C in Standard Mother Tongue Language 100 95.5

97.8

97.0

98.3

97.0

98.1

96.6

97.9

96.4

98.0

96.8

98.0

97.1

98.0

96.7

98.1

97.1 97.6

96.4

97.5

90

80

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2 Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Mother Tongue Language (2009 and 2010).

Percentage of PSLE Students Who Scored A* - C in Standard Mathematics 100

90 83.3

83.0

82.8

84.1

83.9

83.2

83.2

80 72.4 70

SINDA Annual Report 2011

60

54

73.7

73.2

74.7

74.0

76.3

76.2

72.9

69.6

69.0

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

1 The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2 Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Mathematics (2009 and 2010).

Indian

84.1

83.8

83.1

Overall

2010


Percentage of PSLE Students Who Scored A* - C in Standard Science 100

91.4

90.5

90

86.2

85.4

84.1

91.3

90.9 85.5

90.7 85.5

90.5 84.8

90.9

90.3

86.6

85.8

84.4

91.5

90.8 86.5

80

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 The first batch of students under Subject-based Banding sat for PSLE in 2009. 2 Percentages exclude EM3 students (before 2009) and students taking Foundation Science (2010).

Percentage of GCE ‘O’ Level Students with At Least 3 ‘O’ Level Passes 100 94.2

93.5 90

90.1

89.1

95.0

94.7 91.8

91.3

92.6

95.4

92.9

95.2

91.3

95.2

95.1

94.8

94.7 91.3

91.8

91.7

80

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Indian

Overall

2010

A Brighter Future, Together

1 Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2 Figures are based only on graduating S4E and S5N O-level school candidates.

2009

55


Educational Indicators 2010

Percentage of GCE ‘O’ Level Students with At Least 5 ‘O’ Level Passes 100

90

80.0

80

70

60

71.3

70.3

2001

2002

82.7

81.6

80.0 73.5

2003

73.7

2004

82.0

81.1

72.9

2005

75.0

72.6

2006

2007

73.0

73.0

2008

82.1

81.9

81.3

80.8

2009

72.3

2010

1 Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2 Figures are based only on graduating S4E and S5N O-level school candidates.

Percentage of GCE ‘O’ Level Students Who Passed Mother Tongue Language 100 93.5

96.2

96.7 96.5

97.1 97.4

2002

2003

96.0 95.5

96.1 96.0

2004

2005

96.5

98.1

96.8 97.6

96.3

97.5

96.7 97.1

95.7 96.5

2009

2010

90

80

70

SINDA Annual Report 2011

60

56

2001

2006

2007

2008

1 Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2 Figures are based only on graduating S4E and S5N O-level school candidates.

Indian

Overall


Percentage of GCE ‘O’ Level Students Who Passed English Language 100

90

87.1

86.1

91.1

90.2

86.9

86.8

86.1

89.5 86.6

81.4

79.8

80

90.3 86.5

86.0

85.0

84.1

92.4

92.2

89.9

88.5

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2 Figures are based only on graduating S4E and S5N O-level school candidates.

Percentage of GCE ‘O’ Level Students Who Passed Mathematics 100

90

80 75.6

73.5

89.0

87.7

87.5

86.6

76.1

77.3

88.4

88.3

76.8

79.0 75.9

77.6

89.0

88.9

87.8

87.0

77.7

78.2

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Indian

Overall

2010

A Brighter Future, Together

1 Figures from 2005 onwards exclude IP students. 2 Figures are based only on graduating S4E and S5N O-level school candidates.

2009

57


Educational Indicators 2010

Percentage of GCE ‘A’ Level Students with At Least 3 ‘A’/’H2’ Passes and pass in General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry 100

90 85.8

85.2

84.8

87.3 87.2

86.6

88.6

87.2 84.2

81.1

80

82.2

81.6

87.6

87.1

87.0

82.7

85.4

87.8

88.3

90.8

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 Figures for 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

Percentage of GCE ‘A’ Level Students Who Passed General Paper or Knowledge and Inquiry 100

90

89.3

96.5

95.5

94.0

93.0

90.8

91.9

94.2

94.0 93.2

94.3

92.2

91.4 91.4

92.7 91.9

2007

2008

94.3

92.3

94.4 94.0

80

70

SINDA Annual Report 2011

60

58

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2009

1 Figures for 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

Indian

Overall

2010


Percentage of GCE ‘A’ Level Students Who Passed Mother Tongue Language at ‘AO’/‘H1’ Level 100 93.6

96.2

96.2 96.7

96.7

97.6

96.6

94.7

93.1

91.7

89.0

90

94.6

95.9 92.8

92.2

95.4

94.9 90.6

90.3

92.9

80

70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

1 Figures for 2007 and 2008 include students taking the new syllabus and those taking the old syllabus.

Percentage of P1 Cohort Admitted to Post-Secondary Institutions 100

90

80.1

80

88.0

87.6

86.2

90.9

89.5 85.1

82.0

84.7

91.4

90.6 86.1

86.5

93.2

92.7

92.5 89.0

88.9

89.8

77.7 70

60

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Indian

Overall

2010

A Brighter Future, Together

1 Figures for 2006 – 2010 are preliminary. 2 Figures include participation in Junior Colleges, Millennia Institute, Polytechnics, ITE, LaSalle College of the Arts, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts and other private education institutions, and also take into account students who left the country.

2009

59


60

SINDA Annual Report 2011


Financial Statements Year ended 31 December 2011

A Brighter Future, Together

61


Income At a Glance 3% Total Income 2011 Donations - CPF Scheme

$7,348,573

Donations/Sponsorships

$2,693,463

Government Subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding, NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,535,127

Programme & tuition fees received Interest/Investment Income

17%

12%

50%

$448,588

18%

- $8,319

Total Income

$14,717,432 2% 2%

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Total Income 2010

62

Donations - CPF Scheme

$6,911,805

Donations/Sponsorships

$1,471,512

Government Subvention

$1,700,000

MCYS Funding, NCSS & STB FSC Grant/SPMF

$2,739,070

Programme & tuition fees received

$308,981

Interest/Investment Income

$215,318

21% 52%

13% 11%

Total Income

$13,346,686


Expenditure At a Glance Total expenditure 2011

9%

Education

$8,237,699

Family & Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations

$3,332,434

Communications/Community Engagement

$2,816,413

Other Operating Costs

$1,463,604

18% 52% 21%

Total expenditure

$15,850,150 Total expenditure 2010

9%

Education

$7,030,607

Family & Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations

$3,201,142

Communications/Community Engagement

$1,678,592

Other Operating Costs

$1,218,142

$13,128,483

54% 24%

A Brighter Future, Together

Total expenditure

13%

63


Statement by President, Treasurer and Chief Executive Officer We, Indranee T. Rajah, R. Subramaniam Iyer and T. Raja Segar, do hereby state that in our opinion:

(a) the financial statements of Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association�) set out on pages 67 to 101 are properly drawn up to present fairly in all material respects, the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2011 and the income and expenditure, changes in funds and cash flows of the Association for the year ended on that date in accordance with the Singapore Financial Reporting Standards; and (b) at the date of this statement, the Association will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. The Executive Committee has, on the date of this statement, authorised these financial statements for issue.

On behalf of the Executive Committee

Indranee T. Rajah President

SINDA Annual Report 2011

R. Subramaniam Iyer Treasurer

64

T. Raja Segar Chief Executive Officer

8 March 2012


Independent Auditors’ Report Members of Singapore Indian Development Association (Registered under the Singapore Charities Act, Chapter 37 and the Singapore Societies Act, Chapter 311)

Report on the financial statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association”), which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2011, statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in funds and cash flow statement for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, as set out on pages 67 to 101. Executive Committee’s responsibility for the financial statements The Executive Committee is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the provisions of the Singapore Charities Act, Chapter 37 (the “Charities Act”), the Singapore Societies Act, Chapter 311 (the “Societies Act”) and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards, and for such internal control as the Executive Committee determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Singapore Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements of the Association present fairly, in all material respects, the state of affairs of the Association as at 31 December 2011, the income and expenditure, changes in funds and the cash flows of the Association for the year then ended in accordance with the Provisions of the Charities Act and Singapore Financial Reporting Standards. A Brighter Future, Together

65


Independent Auditors’ Report

(continued)

Report on other legal and regulatory requirements In our opinion: (a) the accounting and other records required by the regulations enacted under the Societies Act to be kept by the Association have been properly kept in accordance with those regulations; and (b) the fund-raising appeal held during the year ended 31 December 2011 has been carried out in accordance with Regulation 6 of the Societies Regulations issued under the Societies Act and proper accounts and other records have been kept of the fund-raising appeal. During the course of our audit, nothing has come to our attention that causes us to believe that during the year: (a) The use of the donation monies was not in accordance with the objectives of the Association as required under Regulation 16 of the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character) Regulations; and (b) The Association has not complied with the requirements of Regulation 15 (fund-raising expenses) of the Charities (Institutions of a Public Character) Regulations.

KPMG LLP Public Accountants and Certified Public Accountants

Singapore

SINDA Annual Report 2011

8 March 2012

66


Balance Sheet As at 31 December 2011

Note Non-current asset

Property, plant and equipment Current assets

Government Subvention receivable

Donations receivable - Central Provident Fund Board Scheme Donations receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board

2011 $

2010 $

4

880,409

598,856

12

1,700,000

1,700,000

1,000,000

1,025,000

23,793,689

24,930,684

33,123,266

34,301,242

34,003,675

34,900,098

7,835,510

7,658,427

8,831,360

8,658,735

Deposits, prepayments and other receivables

5

Cash and cash equivalents

7

Financial assets – Investments

6

Total assets

623,356 909,932

5,096,289

593,993 826,157

5,225,408

Representing: Funds

Unrestricted funds Accumulated fund

9

Sinking fund

10

Endowment funds

8

Total funds Current liabilities

Other payables and accrued expenses Unutilised specific grants/donations Total liabilities

Total liabilities and funds

1,000,308

18,464,260

20,891,108

27,295,620

29,549,843

1,263,426

871,907

5,444,629

4,478,348

34,003,675

34,900,098

6,708,055

5,350,255

A Brighter Future, Together

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

11

995,850

67


Statement of Comprehensive Income Year ended 31 December 2011 2011

Unrestricted Funds Financial activities/Income and expenditure

Incoming resources

Note

Incoming resources from generated funds (i) Voluntary income:

Accumulated Fund $

Sinking Fund $

Donation- Central Provident Fund (CPF) Contribution

7,348,573

-

Donation sponsorships

1,689,860

-

Donation from Singapore Totalisator Board (STB)

500,000

Other donations

503,603

Income from School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF)

58,530

(ii) Investment income: Dividend income Interest income

- debt securities - fixed deposits and bank balances

-

110,152

33,046

762

224

6,886

108

448,588

-

433,581

-

162,000

-

Incoming resources from charitable activities (i) Income from approved projects: Tuition programme fees

(ii) Government Grants: Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS), Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee Grant Government Subvention

GST Offset Package Grant

STB - Family Services Centre Funding

MCYS – Family Services Centre Funding

National Council of Social Services (NCSS) Funding Other Funding

MCYS – Additional Funding Jobs Credit Scheme

Temasek Care Funding Voluntary Welfare Organisations (VWO), Charities Capability Fund (VCF) Funding by MCYS/NCSS

(iii) Other Grants:

Singapore Press Holdings (SPH) Newspaper Project Funding

13

12

1,700,000 127,739 380,965 256,106

79,868

900,000

-

-

-

23,899

-

103,460

-

39,437

11,831

(165,556)

(49,667)

8,979

-

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Other incoming resources

68

Investments gains/(losses):

Net gain on disposal of trading securities Exchange loss

Unrealised (loss)/gain on trading securities

Total incoming resources

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

-

14,717,432

-

(4,458)


2010

Unrestricted Funds Endowment Fund (Note 8) $

Accumulated Fund

Total $

$

-

7,348,573

6,911,805

-

1,689,860

810,924

-

58,530

-

500,000 503,603

Sinking Fund $

-

Endowment Fund (Note 8) $

6,911,805

-

810,924

-

-

135,588

-

-

381,435

-

$

-

525,000

-

Total

-

525,000 135,588 381,435

388,743

531,941

51,981

15,595

292,765

360,341

43,732

44,718

3,062

916

11,138

15,116

161

7,155

4,233

734

571

5,538

-

448,588

308,981

-

-

308,981

431,270

-

-

162,000

-

-

-

433,581

-

1,700,000

1,700,000

-

127,739

467,981

-

162,000 380,965 256,106 79,868

470,357 333,528 78,580

-

900,000

360,000

-

8,979

7,127

-

-

(1,559,299) (1,117,047)

-

431,270

-

1,700,000

-

467,981

-

162,000 470,357 333,528 78,580

-

360,000

-

7,127

46,792

46,792

-

-

23,899

-

-

-

-

103,460

-

-

-

-

428,782

93,137

27,942

62,905

18,873

(367,898)

(1,774,522)

13,595,927

-

13,346,686

-

-

64,060

613,007

(360,827)

1,025,067

1,581,721

734,086

(360,827)

1,106,845

14,992,467

A Brighter Future, Together

377,514

(367,898)

-

-

69


Statement of Comprehensive Income

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011 2011

Unrestricted Funds

Resources Expended

Note

Accumulated Fund $

Sinking Fund $

Cost of generating funds Cost of generating voluntary income: CPF Agency Charges

Charitable activities:

112,332

-

Education programmes

13

8,179,169

-

Corporate Communications & Community Engagement

13

2,816,413

-

Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) programme

13

3,332,434

58,530

-

-

Governance costs Administrative expenses

SINDA Annual Report 2011

1,351,272

-

Total resources expended

15,850,150

-

Net (deficit)/surplus for the year

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

Total comprehensive (loss)/income for the year

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax

70

13

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

-

-


2010

Unrestricted Funds Endowment Fund (Note 8) $

Accumulated Fund $

Total $

Sinking Fund $

Endowment Fund (Note 8) $

Total $

-

112,332

108,826

-

-

108,826

-

8,179,169

6,649,172

-

-

6,649,172

-

2,816,413

1,678,592

-

-

1,678,592

-

3,332,434 58,530

3,201,142 381,435

1,351,272

1,109,316

-

-

-

3,201,142 381,435

-

1,109,316

-

15,850,150

13,128,483

-

-

13,128,483

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

218,203

64,060

1,581,721

1,863,984

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

218,203

64,060

1,581,721

1,863,984

-

-

-

-

-

-

A Brighter Future, Together

71


Statement of Changes in Funds Year ended 31 December 2011

Unrestricted Funds

At 1 January 2010

Total comprehensive income for the year Net surplus for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax

Total $

7,301,853

1,074,619

19,309,387

27,685,859

218,203

64,060

1,581,721

1,863,984

64,060

1,581,721

1,863,984

Transfer from Sinking Fund to Accumulated Fund#

138,371

(138,371)

At 31 December 2010

7,658,427

1,000,308

20,891,108

29,549,843

At 1 January 2011

7,658,427

1,000,308

20,891,108

29,549,843

(1,132,718)

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(2,254,223)

Total comprehensive (loss) for the year Transfers from Endowment Funds to Accumulated Fund (Note 8) At 31 December 2011

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Endowment Fund (Note 8) $

218,203

Net deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax

72

Sinking Fund $

Total comprehensive income for the year

Total comprehensive loss for the year

#

Accumulated Fund $

(1,132,718)

1,309,801

7,835,510

(4,458)

(1,117,047)

(1,309,801)

995,850

18,464,260

Transfer of $138,371 from the Sinking Fund to the Accumulated Fund was approved by the Executive Committee.

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

(2,254,223)

27,295,620


Cash Flow Statement Year ended 31 December 2011

Note

2011 $

2010 $

(2,254,223)

1,863,984

Dividend income

(531,941)

(360,341)

Unrealised loss/(gain) on trading investment securities

1,774,522

(1,106,845)

315,042

285,420

Cash flows from operating activities Net (deficit)/surplus for the year Adjustments for:

Gain on disposal of trading securities Exchange loss Depreciation

Interest income

(428,782)

4

- debt securities

- fixed deposits and bank balances

Donations, grants and subventions receivables Deposits, prepayments and other receivables Net cash from operating activities

Proceeds from sale of investments - debt securities

- fixed deposits and bank balances

(574,809)

1,357,800

2,468,548

7

7

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

2,200,132

(296,526)

44,718

15,116

8,694,771

5,538

360,341

(599,092)

(4,067,228)

(101,000)

-

(101,000)

-

(239,787)

(1,867,096)

7,363,063

7,602,850

7,602,850

9,469,946

A Brighter Future, Together

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

18,088

(12,846,468)

531,941

Net cash used in investing activities

(5,538)

(9,363,023)

7,155

Dividend received

Cash and cash equivalents at 31 December

(4,363)

8,776,712

Interest received

Cash and cash equivalents at 1 January

288,305

(596,595)

Purchase of investments

Net cash used in financing activities

(809,357)

460,305

Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of property, plant and equipment

Fixed deposits pledged

(15,116)

(83,775)

Other payables, accrued expenses and unutilised grants

360,827

(44,718)

(7,155)

Changes in working capital:

Cash flows from financing activities

367,898

(734,086)

73


Notes to the Financial Statements Year ended 31 December 2011

These notes form an integral part of the financial statements. The financial statements were authorised for issue by the Executive Committee (“Management”) on 8 March 2012.

1 Domicile and activities Singapore Indian Development Association (the “Association”) is a society registered with the Registrar of Societies under the Societies Act, Chapter 311. Its registered office is located at No. 1 Beatty Road, Singapore 209943. The Association’s Vision and Mission includes the following:

Vision

To build a strong and vibrant Singaporean Indian community together.

Mission To build a well-educated, resilient and confident community of Indians that stands together with the other communities in contributing to the progress of multi-racial Singapore. In order to achieve its vision and mission the Association has articulated four Strategic Thrusts as follows: i) ii) iii) iv)

Maximising educational opportunities for all students Engaging parents to play an active role in their children’s lives Inspiring youths towards greater achievement Forging a stronger relationship with community partners

The Association runs a range of programmes, services and initiatives aligned to its four Strategic Thrusts.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

The Association has been approved as an Institution of Public Character under the provisions of Income Tax Act for a period of 5 years with effect from 16 December 2006. This has been extended for further 5 years to 15 December 2016. The Association is also registered as a charity under the Charities Act, Chapter 37.

74


2 Basis of preparation 2.1 Statement of compliance The financial statements are prepared in accordance with Singapore Financial Reporting Standards (FRS). 2.2 Basis of measurement The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except as disclosed in accounting policies below. 2.3 Functional and presentation currency The financial statements are presented in Singapore dollars which is the Association’s functional currency. All financial information is presented in Singapore dollars, unless otherwise stated. 2.4 Use of estimates and judgements The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with the FRSs requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affects the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates. There are no significant assumptions or estimation uncertainties that have a significant risk of resulting in a material adjustment to the financial statements within next financial year. In the application of the Association’s accounting policies, which are described in note 3, Management is of the opinion that there is no instance of application of judgement which is expected to have a significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial statements. 2.5 Changes in accounting policies On 1 January 2011, the Association adopted the new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS that are mandatory for application from that date. The adoption of these new or amended FRS and Interpretations to FRS did not result in substantial changes to the Association’s accounting policies and had no material effect to the amounts reported for the current or prior financial years.

A Brighter Future, Together

75


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

3 Significant accounting policies

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial statements.

3.1 Foreign currency transactions Transactions in foreign currencies are translated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rates ruling at the dates of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are retranslated into Singapore dollars at foreign exchange rate ruling at that date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies that are measured at fair value are retranslated to Singapore dollars at the exchange rate at the date on which the fair value is determined. Foreign currency differences arising from retranslation are recognised in income and expenditure.

3.2 Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. Purchased software that is integral to the functionality of the related equipment is capitalised as part of that equipment. When parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment. The cost of replacing part of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised in the carrying amount of the item if it is probable that the future economic benefits embodied within the part will flow to the Association and its cost can be measured reliably. The costs of the day-to-day servicing of property, plant and equipment are recognised in income and expenditure as incurred. Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis so as to write off items of property, plant and equipment, over their estimated useful lives as follows:

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Computer equipment Furniture and fittings Office equipment Office renovation

76

3 years 5 years 5 years 3 years

Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values are reviewed, and adjusted as appropriate, at each reporting date.


3.3 Financial instruments Non-derivative financial assets The Association initially recognises loans and receivables on the date that they are originated. All other financial assets including investments are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. The Association derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred. Any interest in transferred financial assets that is created or retained by the Association is recognised as a separate asset or liability. Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. Loans and receivables are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. Such assets are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment losses. Loans and receivables comprise government subvention, donations, other receivables and cash and cash equivalents. Financial assets - Investments at fair value through income and expenditure Financial assets - investments are classified as at fair value through income and expenditure if they are held for trading or are designated as such upon initial recognition. Financial assets are designated as fair value through income and expenditure if the Association manages such investments and makes purchase and sale decisions based on their fair value. Upon initial recognition, attributable transaction costs are recognised in income and expenditure as incurred. The Association’s investments which are classified as financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure are measured at fair value, and changes therein are recognised in income and expenditure.

A Brighter Future, Together

77


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

Non-derivative financial liabilities Financial liabilities are recognised initially on the trade date at which the Association becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. The Association derecognises a financial liability when its contractual obligations are discharged or cancelled or expire. Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount presented in the balance sheet when, and only when, the Association has a legal right to offset the amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. The Association’s non-derivative financial liabilities comprised trade and other payables. Such financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition, these financial liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

3.4 Impairment Financial assets (including receivables) A financial asset is assessed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any objective evidence that it is impaired. A financial asset is impaired if objective evidence indicates that a loss event has occurred after the initial recognition of the asset, and that the loss event had a negative effect on the estimated future cash flows of that asset that can be estimated reliably. Objective evidence that financial assets are impaired can include default or delinquency by a debtor, restructuring of an amount due to the Association on terms that the Association would not consider otherwise, indications that a debtor will enter bankruptcy. The Association considers evidence of impairment for receivables at both a specific asset and collective level. All individually significant receivables are assessed for specific impairment. All individually significant receivables found not to be specifically impaired are then collectively assessed for any impairment that has been incurred but not yet identified. Receivables that are not individually significant are collectively assessed for impairment by grouping together receivables with similar risk characteristics.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

In assessing collective impairment, the Association uses historical trends of the probability of default, timing of recoveries and the amount of loss incurred, adjusted for management’s judgement as to whether current economic and credit conditions are such that the actual losses are likely to be greater or lesser than suggested by historical trends.

78

An impairment loss in respect of a financial asset measured at amortised cost is calculated as the difference between its carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. Losses are recognised in income and expenditure and reflected in an allowance account against receivables. Interest on the impaired asset continues to be recognised through the unwinding of the discount. When a subsequent event causes the amount of impairment loss to decrease, the decrease in impairment loss is reversed through income and expenditure.


Non-financial assets The carrying amounts of the Association’s non-financial assets are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, then the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. The impairment loss is charged to income and expenditure. Impairment losses recognised in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date for any indications that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognised. 3.5 Provisions Provisions are recognised if, as a result of past events the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation that can be estimated reliably, and, it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. Provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability.

3.6 Employee benefits Defined contribution plan Obligations for contributions to defined contribution plans are recognised as an expense in income and expenditure as incurred. Short-term accumulating compensated absences Short-term accumulating compensated absences are recognised when employees render services that increase their entitlement to future compensated absences. Short-term benefits Short-term employee benefit obligations are measured on an undiscounted basis and are expensed as the related service is provided. A provision is recognised for the amount expected to be paid under short-term cash bonus if the Association has a present legal or constructive obligation to pay this amount as a result of past service provided by the employee and the obligation can be estimated reliably.

A Brighter Future, Together

79


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

3.7 Income recognition Donations from Central Provident Fund scheme and Singapore Totalisator Board are recognised on the accrual basis. All other donations are recognised on the receipt basis. Tuition programme fees income is recognised on the accrual basis. Grants for specific purposes are recognised to the extent the related expenditure has been incurred and the grant is receivable. Government Subvention and grants are recognised on the accrual basis.

3.8 Resources expended on charitable activities The costs of these activities comprise direct expenditure including, direct staff costs attributable to the activities. In addition, it also includes support costs (costs relating to central functions) and other costs that have been allocated on the basis consistent with the use of the resources. Governance costs Governance costs comprise all costs attributable to the general running of the Association, in providing the governance infrastructure and in ensuring public accountability.

3.9 Finance income and expenses Finance income comprises interest income on funds invested, dividend income, gains on the disposal of investments, net foreign currency gains and changes in the fair value of investments at fair value through income and expenditure. Dividend income from equity investments is recognised when the dividends are received. Interest income is recognised on the accrual basis using the effective interest method.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Finance expenses comprise interest expense on borrowings, unwinding of the discount on provisions, net foreign currency losses, changes in the fair value of financial assets at fair value through income and expenditure and impairment losses recognised on financial assets that are recognised in income and expenditure.

80


3.10 Leases When the association is a lessee of an operating lease Where the Association has the use of assets under operating leases, payments made under the leases are recognised in income and expenditure on the straight-line basis over the term of the lease. Lease incentives received are recognised in the income and expenditure as an integral part of the total operating expenses.

3.11 New standards and interpretations not yet adopted A number of new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations are effective for the annual periods beginning after 1 January 2011, and have not been applied in preparing these financial statements. None of these are expected to have a significant effect on the financial statements of the Association.

A Brighter Future, Together

81


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

4 Property, plant and equipment Computer equipment $

Furniture and fittings $

Office equipment $

Office renovation $

Total $

At 1 January 2010

436,921

620,252

304,184

291,066

1,652,423

At 31 December 2010

508,625

664,979

331,401

443,944

1,948,949

At 31 December 2011

903,980

723,436

338,287

579,841

2,545,544

At 1 January 2010

202,193

473,712

261,504

127,264

1,064,673

At 31 December 2010

331,612

522,275

274,032

222,174

1,350,093

At 31 December 2011

468,682

579,974

290,244

326,235

1,665,135

At 1 January 2010

234,728

146,540

42,680

163,802

587,750

At 31 December 2011

435,298

143,462

48,043

253,606

880,409

Cost

Additions Additions

71,704

395,355

44,727

58,457

27,217 6,886

152,878

135,897

296,526 596,595

Accumulated depreciation Depreciation charge for the year

Depreciation charge for the year

129,419

137,070

48,563

57,699

12,528

16,212

94,910

104,061

285,420 315,042

Carrying amount At 31 December 2010

177,013

142,704

57,369

221,770

598,856

5 Deposits, prepayments and other receivables

SINDA Annual Report 2011

2011 $

82

Deposits GST Offset Package grant receivable from Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports

Other receivables

Loans and receivables

Prepayments

33,402 164,000

696,932

2010 $ 130,216 162,000

494,431

894,334

786,647

909,932

826,157

15,598

39,510


6 Financial assets – Investments 2011 $ Held for trading:

2010 $

- Equity securities

5,925,980

7,426,600

- Commodities/Precious Metals Trust Funds

1,313,928

1,905,323

- Debt securities

9,178,774

- REITS/Real Estate Funds

4,016,503

- Absolute return funds

132,945

- Private equity funds

857,785

- Cash at bank investment account held with fund managers/custodians

7,842,961 3,914,940 475,063 988,355

21,425,915

22,553,242

23,793,689

24,930,684

2,367,774

2,377,442

At the balance sheet date, the Association had commitments contracted for amounting to S$953,809 (2010: S$1,153,967) in relation to its investments.

7 Cash and cash equivalents Note

Cash in hand and at bank Fixed deposits

Cash at bank investment account Fixed deposits pledged

Cash and cash equivalents for cash flow statement

2011 $

2010 $

2,703,323

1,797,999

5,096,289

5,225,408

2,392,966 6

2,367,774 7,464,063

(101,000)

7,363,063

3,427,409 2,377,442 7,602,850

-

7,602,850

A Brighter Future, Together

Fixed deposits have been pledged to obtain a letter of guarantee from a bank, in lieu of a refundable deposit, for the purpose of obtaining a Temporary Occupation Licence for the Association’s premises (Note 13).

83


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

8 Endowment funds Income and expenditure of endowment funds are as follows:

2011 General Endowment Fund $

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund $

Dividend income

345,204

33,527

- debt securities

43,459

210

363,054

11,134

Incoming resources

Incoming resources from generated funds Investment income:

Interest income

- fixed deposits and bank balances

161

-

Other incoming resources Investments gains/(losses):

Net gain on disposal of trading securities Exchange loss

Unrealised (loss)/gain on trading securities Total (outgoing)/incoming resources Net (deficit)/surplus for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Total comprehensive (loss)/income for the year

84

(367,898)

-

(1,498,595) (1,114,615)

(46,742) (1,871)

(1,114,615)

(1,871)

-

(1,114,615)

-

(1,871)


2010 Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund $

General Endowment Fund $

Total $

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund $

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund $

Total $

10,012

388,743

273,705

14,676

4,384

292,765

63

43,732

10,016

864

258

11,138

578,857

26,296

7,854

(1,117,047)

997,485 1,499,807

22,534 64,370

5,048 17,544

1,025,067 1,581,721

(1,117,047)

1,499,807

64,370

17,544

1,581,721

-

3,326

-

(13,962) (561) (561)

-

(561)

161

377,514

(367,898) (1,559,299)

-

(1,117,047)

571

(360,827)

-

1,499,807

-

-

-

64,370

-

-

-

17,544

571

613,007

(360,827)

-

1,581,721

A Brighter Future, Together

85


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

The changes in endowment funds are as follows:

At 1 January 2010

Total comprehensive income for the year

Net surplus for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive income for the year

18,079,068

977,061

253,258

19,309,387

1,499,807

64,370

17,544

1,581,721

Total $

64,370

17,544

1,581,721

At 31 December 2010

19,578,875

1,041,431

270,802

20,891,108

At 1 January 2011

19,578,875

1,041,431

270,802

20,891,108

Net deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax

(1,114,615)

(1,871)

(561)

(1,117,047)

Total comprehensive income for the year (loss) Transfer from Endowment Funds to Accumulated Fund

At 31 December 2011

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund $

1,499,807

Total comprehensive income for the year (loss)

86

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund $

General Endowment Fund $

(1,114,615)

(1,871)

(561)

(1,117,047)

(1,039,560)

(270,241)

(1,309,801)

18,464,260

18,464,260


Endowment funds are represented by the following assets:

General Endowment Fund

- Financial assets – investments

- Cash at bank investment account

2011 $

2010 $

16,287,255

17,397,245

873,425

2,177,005

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund

- Financial assets – investments

2,181,630

- Cash at bank investment account

- Fixed deposits

100,038

260,893

18,464,260

20,891,108

- Cash at bank

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund - Financial assets – investments

- Cash at bank investment account

33,171 34,797

9,909

The general endowment fund is a form of restricted fund, held in Association’s trust where the capital is required to be invested, or retained for approved purposes. From time to time the Association will transfer the income of the general endowment fund to the accumulated fund for the Association’s general activities. Transfers in and out of the fund are subject to the approval of the trustees. The Vijay and Amar Trust Fund was set up to provide assistance and support to children from disadvantaged and dysfunctional families. The Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund was set up to provide scholarships for needy students. During the year, the Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees approved transfer of $1,039,560 (2010: Nil) from Vijay and Amar Trust Fund and $270,241 (2010: Nil) from Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund to the Accumulated Fund.

A Brighter Future, Together

87


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

9 Accumulated fund The accumulated fund is represented by the following assets and liabilities: Note

Property, plant and equipment

2011 $ 880,409

2010 $ 598,856

Government subvention receivable

1,700,000

1,700,000

Donation receivable – Singapore Totalisator Board

1,000,000

1,025,000

Financial assets – investments

3,083,196

3,093,600

2,668,516

1,763,202

Donations receivable – Central Provident Fund Board scheme

623,356

Deposits and prepayments, other receivables

909,932

Cash at bank investment account

112,667

Cash at bank and in hand

Fixed deposits

Other payables and accrued expenses Unutilised specific grants

2,255,688

826,157 117,486

3,290,388 (871,907)

(5,444,629)

(4,478,348)

- Financial assets - Investments

870,453

-

- Fixed Deposit

100,187

-

Vijay and Amar Trust Fund

- Cash at bank investment account - Cash at bank

Padma and Hari Harilela Scholarship Fund - Financial assets - Investments

- Cash at bank investment account

11

(1,263,426)

593,993

34,113

-

34,807

-

260,052 10,189

7,835,510

-

7,658,427

SINDA Annual Report 2011

The accumulated fund is the Association’s general operating fund and can be used for any of the Association’s activities.

88

-


10 Sinking fund The sinking fund is represented by the following assets: 2011 $ Financial assets – investments

Cash at bank investment account Fixed deposits

2010 $

924,959

928,079

37,091

36,983

33,800

995,850

35,246

1,000,308

The sinking fund is designated to fund the upkeep and maintenance of the premises. There was a drawdown of $ nil (2010: $138,371) from the sinking fund during the financial year mainly to defray the costs of the renovation and other works undertaken.

11 Unutilised specific grants / donations These comprise specific grants/donations for:

(i) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) (ii) School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) (iii) Project Give Donations

(iv) Single Parent Programme/sponsorship

(v) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) (vi) Project Spark

(vii) Youth Development Programmes

(viii) Singapore Press Holding (SPH) Foundation Newspaper Project

2011 $

2010 $

885,872

389,645

1,835,320

1,143,151

200,913

84,883

111,944

384,196

82,242

825,946

34,723

1,808,682

2,000,000

5,444,629

4,478,348

135,460

A Brighter Future, Together

89


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

(i) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) Tamil Language Learning and Promotion Committee (TLLPC) is a committee set up by the Ministry of Education (MOE) to promote the learning and use of the Tamil language. The Association provides support to TLLPC in the administration of the TLLPC grant. Grants and donations are the main sources of income with MOE providing a matching grant for funds raised by the TLLPC. (ii) School Pocket Money Fund (SPMF) The Association receives yearly grant from the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) pertaining to SPMF. All bursary payments made under this service will be paid out from SPMF based on criteria set out by NCSS. (iii) Project Give donations Project Give is a community fund raising campaign to raise money for the educational assistance for students from needy families. It typically runs through the various festivities such as Hari Raya Puasa, Deepavali and Christmas. Funds are raised via direct cheque donations, donation boxes placed with partner retailers, on-line, at the booth during Deepavali Fair at Campbell Lane and through tele-poll in conjunction with the “Live” Project Give Charity Show on Mediacorp’s Vasantham TV Channel. Surplus from SINDA Anniversary Dinner 2011 amounting to $872,994 is also included under Project Give Donations. (iv) Single Parent programme/sponsorship Single Parent programme provides holistic assistance to the parent and the children. Children of single parent would receive assistance from all SINDA’s programmes including Tuition, NEU PC, Enrichment while parents receive assistance on skills upgrading, financial planning and family support to help build their self-esteem and become self-sufficient.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Sponsorships were received for specific programmes like Financial Assistance, Bursary, Educational programmes.

90

(v) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) Singapore Indian Education Trust (SIET) is a registered charity offering solutions to the needs and challenges impacting the educational performance of the Indian Community. SINDA’s programmes are designed to focus mainly on the education of students from pre-primary to Secondary while SIET’s focus is on tertiary level education. Both the organisations recognise the immense opportunity to leverage on the synergy between the two organisations. The collaborative arrangement has been set to manage SIET donations and its disbursements to students who qualify for financial assistance for their course of study at the tertiary institution and other schemes administered by SIET.


(vi) Project Spark Project Spark (Successful Parents and Resilient kids) is a collaborative effort between Temasek Cares (a charity arm of Temasek Holdings), Yayasan Mendaki, Chinese Development Assistance Council, SINDA and Eurasian Association. It aims to provide a more holistic and integrated intervention programme to help single parents rebuild their lives and overcome their disadvantage. Funding support of $600,000 over a period of two years will address the provision of an assistance package consisting of employment assistance programmes and a starter kit. (vii) Youth Development Programmes

Youth Development Programmes are specific programmes under the funding support of $2,000,000 from Kewalram Group of Companies which focuses mainly on the following 3 key programmes:

• • •

Project Victory/Senior Victory; a school based motivational programme that aims to bring out leadership qualities and encourage the practice of positive life skills through structured activities and trained facilitators. Youth Empowerment Programme; a one-to-one mentorship programme to engage “at-risk” youth and who have low self-esteem or other behavioural problems. Mentorship programme for Institute of Technical Education (ITE) students; a programme to engage students of ITE through interest-based mentoring.

In addition there was a donation of $18,256 from Bharathnatyam Dance Performance to help youths for the following programme:

Leadership Training programme for Indian Youths from low income families.

The funds will be channelled towards the content development, programme evaluation tools, motivational camps and workshops for the above mentioned programmes. (viii) Singapore Press Holding Foundation (SPH) Newspaper Project SPH Newspaper Project is a programme to sponsor subscriptions to the Straits Times and Tamil Murasu Newspapers. Under this project, SINDA will identify needy households who wish to read Straits Times newspaper and SPH will sponsor the subscription costs.

A Brighter Future, Together

The balances shown above represent grants/donations that were unutilised as at the end of the financial year.

91


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

12 Government subvention receivable

This represents the annual “dollar for dollar� matching grant receivable, subject to a maximum of $1,700,000 (2010: $1,700,000), from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

13 Resources expended on charitable activities and governance costs

(i) Charitable activities

Note

2011 $

2010 $

2,230,749

2,416,904

305,022

311,892

Education programmes Tuition programmes: - STEP programme - Project Teach

822,145

Other education programmes: - Enrichment Programmes - Bursary/Scholarships - Education staff costs - Support costs

1,353,954 14

1,141,260

- Casework and Counselling

376,650

261,350

- Single Parents Programme

109,711

75,192

- Career Development and Resource Centre - Children and Youth programmes

434,724

- Volunteer Programmes

- Volunteer Relations staff costs

- Support costs

8,179,169

4,753

- Family and Youth services staff costs

SINDA Annual Report 2011

729,554

1,112,400

2,213,840

Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations

92

1,253,459

937,162

34,514

267,301

1,376,076

1,295,640

334,423

297,946

3,332,434

3,201,142

111,960

14

6,649,172

584,137

151,503

817,696


Note

2011 $

2010 $

- Corporate Communications

781,421

576,491

- SINDA 2020

642,977

Corporate Communications & Community Engagement (CCCE) - Community Engagement

85,696

- CCCE Staff costs

- Support costs

14

- Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) Fee*

-

806,725

625,135

2,816,413

1,678,592

433,581

431,270

1,351,272

1,109,316

499,594

(ii) Administrative and Governance costs - Support costs

134,129

14

342,837

917,691

678,046

* The Association occupies government land at 1, Beatty Road, Singapore 209943 and pays a monthly Temporary Occupation Licence (TOL) fee. The Grant from the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports (MCYS) of $433,581 (2010: $431,270) is for the full reimbursement of the TOL fee paid by the Association.

The resources expended have been summarised as follows:

2011

Programmes Education Family and Youth Development/Volunteer Relations Corporate Communications & Community Engagement Administrative and Governance Costs

Direct costs $

Support costs (note 14) $

5,965,329

2010

Total  $

Direct costs $

Support costs (note 14) $

Total  $

2,213,840

8,179,169

5,507,912

1,141,260

6,649,172

2,748,297

584,137

3,332,434

2,383,446

817,696

3,201,142

2,316,819

499,594

2,816,413

1,335,755

342,837

1,678,592

433,581

917,691

1,351,272

431,270

678,046

1,109,316 A Brighter Future, Together

93


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

14 Support costs

Education $

Staff costs

Maintenance and administrative expenses

Depreciation expenses

1,286,445

754,122

173,273

Family and Youth Development/ Volunteer Relations $

304,069

239,112

40,956

Corporate Communications & Community Engagement $

280,679

181,110

37,805

Administrative and Governance Costs $

Basis of allocation

509,946

Usage in terms of time spent

344,737

Floor area in terms of floor area occupied and usage

63,008

Total for 2011

2,213,840

584,137

499,594

917,691

Total for 2010

1,141,260

817,696

342,837

678,046

Usage in terms of assets acquired

15 Total resources expended Total expenditure includes the following:

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Staff costs

94

Central Provident Fund contributions (included in staff costs) Depreciation

2011 $

2010 $

6,151,822

5,003,622

315,042

285,420

635,166

524,895


16 Taxation The Association is an approved charity organisation under the Charities Act, Chapter 37 and an Institution of Public Character under the Income Tax Act, Chapter 134. No provision for tax has been made in the financial statements as the Association is exempt from income tax.

17 Key management personnel 2011 $

2010 $

877,161

705,439

2011

2010

Salary above $200,000

2

2

Total

4

4

Remuneration paid/payable to key management personnel - Short-term employment benefits Salary Range

Salary within range $100,000 to $200,000

2

2

The key management personnel remuneration comprise remuneration paid to the top four (2010: four) key executives including the Chief Executive Officer. The Trustees and Executive Committee members do not receive any remuneration.

18 Related party transactions For the purpose of financial statements, parties are considered to be related to the Association if the Association has the ability, directly, or indirectly, to control the party or exercise significant influence over the party in making financial and operating decisions, or vice versa, or where the Association and the party are subject to common control or common significant influence. Related parties may be individuals or other entities.

A Brighter Future, Together

Other than the transactions disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements, there were no significant related party transactions between the Association and its related parties during the financial year.

95


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

19 Financial risk management Overview The Executive Committee has an overall responsibility for the establishment and oversight of the Association’s risk management framework. The Association’s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks: credit risk, liquidity risk and market risk (including currency risk, interest rate risk and price risk). The Association has policies and processes for measuring and managing these risks. The Executive Committee reviews and approves the policies for managing each of these risks. This note presents information about the Association’s exposure to each of the above financial risks. Further quantitative disclosures are included throughout these financial statements. There were no significant changes to the Association’s financial risks during the year. Credit risk Credit risk is the risk of financial loss to the Association if the counterparty to a financial instrument fails to meet its contractual obligations, and arises principally from the Association’s receivables from various sources and investments. The Association’s exposure to credit risk in receivables arises principally from receivables, investments and cash and cash equivalents. The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the carrying amount of each financial asset in the balance sheet. The Association establishes an allowance for impairment that represents its estimate of incurred losses, only when required. The main components of this allowance are a specific loss component that relates specifically to individually significant exposures. Receivables The Association’s exposure to the credit risk is low as most of its receivables are from government agencies. Approximately 80% (2010: 78%) of the Association’s receivables are due from three (3) counterparties in 2011 and 2010. At the balance sheet date, all receivables of the Association are not past due.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

There is no allowance for receivables required as at 31 December 2011 (2010: Nil).

96


Investments/Cash and cash equivalents The Association strives to invest a portion of its funds in bonds of good credit quality, whenever possible. For investment operations, the Investment Committee adopts very stringent quantitative and qualitative criteria, including financial statement analysis, type of securities, credit ratings and quality of management in selecting issuers of financial instruments that the Association invests in. Investments in debt securities are assessed using stringent investment criterion and this includes, but is not limited to, a thorough analysis of each debt security’s terms and conditions, the availability and quality of the guarantor, as well as financial strength of the issuer. The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with banks and financial institutions which are regulated and rated A and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings. The Association’s debt securities consist of debt securities rated B and above on Standard & Poor’s financial strength ratings or debt securities of Singapore government related entities. There is no significant concentration of credit risk in relation to these investments. The Association’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with three (3) financial institutions in 2011 and 2010. Liquidity risk Liquidity risk is the risk that the Association will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The Association’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure, as far as possible, that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when due, under both normal and stressed conditions. Typically, the Association ensures that it has sufficient cash on demand to meet expected operational demands excluding the potential impact of extreme circumstances that cannot reasonably be predicted. Based on the contractual maturities, the Association’s financial liabilities mature within one year from the balance sheet date, and the fair values approximate their carrying amounts. Market risk Market risk is the risk that changes in market prices, such as foreign exchange rates, interest rates and equity prices will affect the Association’s income or the value of its financial instruments. The objective of market risk management is to manage and control market risk exposures within acceptable parameters, while optimising the return on risk.

A Brighter Future, Together

Market risk is managed by the Investment Committee by closely monitoring the market data and by setting up detailed investment policies.

97


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

Currency risk Currency risk is the risk that the fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in foreign exchange rates. By virtue of its investment activities to optimise return, the Association is exposed to the effects of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, principally in currencies such as United States Dollar, Euro and Hong Kong Dollar. The Association does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge its foreign currency risks. The Association’s foreign currency exposures are as follows:

Financial assets – investments US Dollar Euro

Hong Kong Dollar

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Other currencies

98

2011 $

2010 $

10,407,159

12,117,537

590,004

1,016,196

110,858

1,033,181

1,350,448 2,159,154


Sensitivity analysis A 10% strengthening of the Singapore dollar against the following currencies at the reporting date would decrease the net surplus by the amounts shown below. This analysis assumes that all other variables, in particular interest rates, remain constant. Surplus of income over expenditure $ 31 December 2011 US Dollar Euro

Hong Kong Dollar 31 December 2010 US Dollar Euro

Hong Kong Dollar

(1,040,716) (11,086)

(59,000)

(1,211,754)

(135,045) (101,620)

A 10% weakening of the Singapore dollar against those currencies at 31 December would have had the equal but opposite effect on the above currencies to the amounts shown above, on the basis that all other variables remain constant.

A Brighter Future, Together

99


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

Interest rate risk The Association’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates to cash and cash equivalents and debt securities. At the balance sheet date, the interest rate profile of the financial instruments was:

Fixed rate instruments

Fixed deposits with banks Debt securities

Variable rate instruments

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Debt securities

100

2011 $

2010 $

2,392,966

3,427,409

7,178,086

7,386,301

4,785,120

4,393,654

11,571,740

3,958,892

3,884,069

11,270,370


Sensitivity analysis At the balance sheet date, management assessed that an increase/(decrease) of 25 basis points in the interest rates would have no significant impact to the results of the Association. Price risk Price risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices (other than those arising from interest rate risk or currency risk), whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer, or factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market. Sensitivity analysis The Association’s investments are designated as held for trading investments. A 10% increase or decrease in the underlying market prices at the reporting date, with all variables held constant would increase or decrease income by $2,142,592 (2010: $2,255,324).

A Brighter Future, Together

101


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

Capital/Funds Management The Association is a society with no share capital. The Association builds up its Capital/Funds from donations received and also through prudent management of its financial resources. The capital of the Association includes reserve funds in its Accumulated Fund, Sinking Fund, General Endowment Fund and other funds. The funds of the Association provide financial stability and the means for the development of the Association’s activities. The Association intends to maintain the funds at a level sufficient for its operating needs. The Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees of the Association review the level of funds regularly for the Association’s continuing obligations. Ratio between the Association’s annual operating expenditure and its funds is as follows;

Total funds at 31 December Ratio of funds to annual operating expenditure

2011

2010

$27,295,620

$29,549,843

1.7:1

2.2:1

The Association’s Funds are closely monitored to ensure that there are sufficient funds to support its programmes and activities.

SINDA Annual Report 2011

The Association is not subject to externally imposed capital/funds requirements.

102


Fair values Estimation of fair values Investments The fair value of investments in trading securities is determined by reference to their quoted bid prices at the reporting date. The fair values of investments that are not traded in an active market are determined by reference to their dealer quotes/net asset valuation reports/fair values provided by the fund managers at the reporting date. Other financial assets and liabilities The carrying amounts of other financial assets and liabilities with a maturity of less than one year (including trade and other receivables, grant and donations receivables, cash and cash equivalents, trade payables, other payables and accrued expenses) are assumed to approximate their fair values because of the short period to maturity.

A Brighter Future, Together

103


Notes to the Financial Statements

(continued)

Year ended 31 December 2011

Fair value hierarchy The table below analyses financial instruments carried at fair value, by valuation method. The different levels have been defined as follows:

• • •

Level 1: quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities Level 2: inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e., as prices) or indirectly (i.e., derived from prices) Level 3: inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).

31 December 2011

Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss

Level 1 $

Level 2 $

Level 3 $

Total $

12,440,734

8,985,181

21,425,915

14,486,030

8,067,212

22,553,242

31 December 2010

SINDA Annual Report 2011

Financial assets designated at fair value through profit or loss

104


SINDA Annual Report 2011  

A Brighter Future, Together

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