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Sep | Oct | Nov 2020

High School TEACHER GUIDE

UNITS

1: Basic Training 3: Overcoming Sexual 2: Lessons from the Unknowns Tragedies


High School Teacher Guide Grades 9*–12

• Teaching Helps

Volume 62 Number 1 Sep • Oct • Nov 2020

What’s Ahead ............................................................................................................................................. 1 5 Steps to a Successful Sunday School Class . .......................................................................... 2 How Your Students Learn ................................................................................................................... 5 Teacher Training Series ........................................................................................................................ 6 Getting Some Answers (Tips for Effective Discussion) ..................................................... 66 High School Feedback Forum ........................................................................................................ 67 Lesson Planner ....................................................................................................................................... 69

• STUDIES Unit 1 Basic Training (Stories behind the Psalms)............................ 8 Sep 6 Sep 13 Sep 20 Sep 27 Oct 4

Life Isn’t Always Fair............................................................................................ Recover from Bad Choices............................................................................... Hard Times Will Come...................................................................................... Worship God......................................................................................................... Deal with Sin..........................................................................................................

10 16 22 28 34

Unit 2 Lessons from the Unknowns.................................... 40 Oct 11 Oct 18 Oct 25 Nov 1

Faithfulness and Failure.................................................................................... Unlikely Heroes.................................................................................................... Seize the Opportunity .................................................................................... Little-Known Apostles......................................................................................

42 48 54 60

Unit 3 Overcoming Sexual Tragedies.................................. 70 Nov 8 Nov 15 Nov 22 Nov 29

Lust: The Enemy in Your Mind...................................................................... Promiscuity: A Doomed Lifestyle................................................................ Rape and Incest: Violated Innocence........................................................ Homosexuality: A Distortion of God’s Gift............................................

72 78 84 90

Unless otherwise noted, Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by Biblica, Inc.™ All rights reserved worldwide. HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER GUIDE (ISSN 1080-9759) is published quarterly by The General Council of the Assemblies of God, Inc. (Gospel Publishing House), 1445 N. Boonville Ave., Springfield, MO 65802-1894. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER GUIDE, 1445 N. Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65802-1894. www.gospelpublishing.com 66 1161

* The High School materials would be conducive for 9th graders if they are in a combined senior high class with 10th to 12th graders. Otherwise, 9th graders on their own might be better served by the Young Teen level of resources.

© 2020 Gospel Publishing House, 1445 N. Boonville Ave.Springfield, Missouri 65802 Printed in U.S.A.


Wh at's

High School

Scope & Sequence

Ahead

Winter 2020-21 Unit 1 Unit 2   Unit 3

Short Answers to Big Problems When Things Go Wrong Christianity and the Big Questions

Spring 2021 Unit 1 Unit 2   Unit 3

Worship: It’s All about Him Grappling with the Gray Areas Lies the World Tells You

Summer 2021 Unit 1 Unit 2   Unit 3

No Compromise (Daniel) Out of Control: Habits That Can Destroy Finding God’s Will

1


STEPS to a SUCCESSFUL

Sunday School Class

1. Start with Curriculum You’ve made the right choice in choosing this curriculum. It provides solid biblical teaching at a level your students will enjoy and understand. The lessons are designed for easy preparation, and the

❏ High ❏ High ❏ High ❏ Take

2.

activities will keep your teens interested and reinforce the lessons. As you begin your preparation, make a list (either mental or literal) of all the curriculum pieces you will be using:

School Teacher Guide —13 easy-to-use lessons, plus helpful hints and tips School RESOURCE Packet —lesson helps for classroom use School Spirit Student Guide—full-color student take-home papers with stories and relevant information Five Plus —daily devotional with a thru-the-Bible format that encourages personal devotions

Think about Your Class

Now, consider what you already know about your class. ✔ T ime­—How much class time do you have? Be sure to consider total time as well as actual teaching time (after greeting, transitions, etc.). Estimating the time it will take for each activity will help you decide which ones to use. ✔ S etting —What is your classroom setting like? Is it arranged in lecture style? Do you have a table? Don’t be afraid to get creative in your arrangement. Experiment by bringing in informal furniture for a more relaxed atmosphere. ✔ Teachers —How many teachers and helpers do you have? You might have them facilitate small group discussions or set up for another activity. ✔ S tudents —Who are your regular attenders? How do they learn best? Do you frequently have visitors? It’s a good idea to plan your lesson for the regular attenders, but be prepared in case of visitors.

Next, consider what you know about your regular attenders. You may want to keep notes (see sample) on each student describing how he or she learns best.

talking at Nate, 16 hearing—He’s always to answer t y n the firs Learns b e stories. time, is oft the wrong nd loves to listen to a , n io a quest

, 17 he Michaelaseeing & touching—S hing

y matc Learns b together,” thoks “put es how o c ti o n always lo d n a , e s and to o e to d vi from head watching he enjoys S . k o lo ers t pictures. looking a nd 5 athletic a Amber, y1moving—She’s very fers games Learns b n the go, so she pre ment. o ve is always es that involve mo ti and activi

Zack, 17moving, talking, and earns by for him to

L ult —It’s diffic hand. He touching e task at th n o d se cu remain fo ADD. osed with was diagn

I f your regular students cover all the learning styles (like the sample note), you won’t have to plan other activities for less frequent attenders. If your class has primarily one or two learning styles,* you may want to have variations or additional activities ready for visitors. If you do not have consistent, regular attenders, plan a variety of activities to cover all learning styles.

2

*To learn more about learning styles, see page 5.


3.

Plan Your Lesson

At this point, sit down with your High School Teacher Guide and adapt the l­esson to fit the needs of your class. Highlight, circle, or mark the activities that your students will enjoy and, most importantly, that meet their learning styles. Here is an overview of the lesson and a sample way to teach it.

Teacher Focus: The Teacher Focus helps you become familiar with the lesson and how it relates to your students. Use the Activities list to make sure you have all your supplies ready.

Interest Them: An opening activity will help your students become comfortable and begin to open up and interact. This will help facilitate further conversation in class.

Inform Them: Discussion questions, like the ones provided in this lesson, will appeal to your students who, like Nate, learn by hearing. Teens like to talk and interact with one another. Discussion creates a sense of community, and will help them discover and develop their own ideas and better retain the lesson.

Tip: The sidebar offers additional background information and tips that will help you prepare and give you easy access to the information while you teach.

Student Guide: Using narratives like the ones in the Student Guide illustrates the lesson and helps students recognize how the objectives translate into everyday life.

Activities: Drama will involve students like Zack and Amber who learn by moving and touching. It also reinforces the lesson for your other students as they get to “experience” the illustrations.

3


3.

Plan Your Lesson (cont.)

RESOURCE Item: Activities that include “listing” and “writing,” like this one from the RESOURCE, benefit teens like Michaela who learn by seeing and touching.

Involve Them: Allowing time for personal reflection will help your students learn to apply the lesson to their own lives.

Inspire Them: It’s important to always leave the students with a spiritual action and give them something to consider and strive for throughout the week. This is also a good time to present the opportunity for salvation if you are unsure of the spiritual standing of some of your students.

4


4.

Teach the Lesson As you teach the lesson, constantly evaluate:

✔ Your students —What are you d­ iscovering about them and how they learn? ✔ Your lesson —Are the students grasping the concepts and objectives presented in the lesson? ✔ T he options —Are they working well with your teens? Is the order flowing like you’d hoped? ✔ T he time —Do you have enough (or too much) material planned for the allotted time?

Take a closer look at… HOW YOUR STUDENTS LEARN SEEING (visual) Miguel likes to “see” his world. He enjoys colors, contrast, posters, illustrations, and videos, but gets bored when there are no visuals.

HOW TO TEACH MIGUEL: • Display posters from the RESOURCE Packet. • Distribute Student Guides and incorporate them into the study. • Use visual illustration options.

HEARING (auditory)

5.

Evaluate After each class, evaluate the lesson as a whole using the questions from step four.

EVALUATION: ll. * The lesson went we t had great bu e, tim of t ou n  ra * We discussion. es. Note: * They loved the charad ! Drama is a hit

There’s no “magic formula” for a successful Sunday School class, and there’s no guarantee all your teens will remember what you teach them and apply it to their lives. But God promises His Word will not return void. By following these five simple steps, you can teach biblical p ­ rinciples so many of your students remember and apply them…and that’s what teaching is all about.

Alison “hears” her world. She responds well to verbal interaction and enjoys being involved in discussion and debate. She becomes bored when she hears information she already knows. HOW TO TEACH ALISON: • Discuss Bible and life-application stories. • Ask discussion questions from the study.

TOUCHING (tactual) Michaela likes to get in touch with her world. She learns best through handson activities. She needs to compare information and make decisions based on experience. HOW TO TEACH MICHAELA: • Do activities from the RESOURCE. • Use hands-on illustrations and activity options. • Role-play case studies to explore feelings and opinions.

MOVING (kinesthetic) Zack loves to experience his world. He moves a lot during class and enjoys ­participating in active illustrations like dramas and hands-on activities. HOW TO TEACH ZACK: •A  ct out the Bible story or case studies from the RESOURCE. • Create opportunities for small group interaction. • Allow for freedom of movement.

5


Teacher Training Series

Getting Students into Class —and keeping them there Let’s face it, numbers aren’t everything, but we would all like to boost attendance. While nothing can guarantee participation, here are more than a dozen things you can do to get more students into class— and keep them coming back.

1) Build relationships with students. Teens’ connection to class can depend largely on their tie to you. As relationships build, so will your influence. 2) Foster friendships. Teens attend events based on who else will be there. Class activities should help students connect with new friends. 3) Practice hospitality. People go where they feel welcome and appreciated. Newcomers are likely to return only if they connect with several students during their initial visit. Students should greet, register and introduce guests to as many others as possible. 4) Be prepared. Anything worthwhile takes time. Kids deserve more than a “Saturday night special” if they choose to attend on Sunday morning. 5) Get students involved. Active roles in lesson preparation and presentation (e.g., drama, illustrations, testimonies, teaching, and follow-up) give students a stake in the process. Interest and attention increase with student-to-student ministry. 6) Make it relevant. Students will value time in your class when scriptural principles are applied to issues that affect their everyday lives. 7) Meet their needs. Take time in class for Spirit-dependent ministry (not just prayer requests) that meets specific needs. 8) Apply technology. Make lessons more relevant and appealing by using the “language” of technology, a culture students have grown up in. 9) Use student video. Footage of students and events can lend unique perspective to illustrations and promotion. Some students will come just to see themselves in action. 10) D  o promotions. Periodic contests or special events give an immediate boost and may take student participation to the next level. 11) Keep in touch. Consistent contact and follow-up gives you a pre-class connection and often yields significant increase in overall participation. By focusing on a few students each week, you can achieve full coverage every month or two. 12) T  ie class to the overall ministry. More students are likely to be part of the broader youth ministry picture. Coordinate your class with other events, and make it indispensable by discipling students for all facets of ministry. 13) H  ave food. Whatever you do, be creative and have fun. Anticipation for your class will build among students. If teens think they might miss something enjoyable and worthwhile, they’ll be in class on Sunday morning.

6

HIGH SCHOOL


Relationships God’s Word is always relevant, but teens’ perceptions have everything to do with how truth is delivered. The world’s ability to sell products through hollow, destructive promises demonstrates the importance of “packaging.” But beyond exciting events and creative communication, the most essential package of gospel truth is something far more valuable and effective: you. You become the “package” when you present the truth of God’s Word to your students. Strong relationships are imperative if you desire significant spiritual influence with teens. Your life speaks more powerfully than your lessons. Even well-crafted lessons may not connect if you lack a personal bond with students. On the other hand, if you foster relationships, students may still receive something substantial from an unpolished delivery. The bottom line: Develop relationships with teenagers and your life, as well as your lessons, will be relevant to them. Here are some practical ways to build relationships with students. •• Trust God and pray for insight. He knows your students, and He chose you to impact their lives. Pray for them, about them, and with them. All other attempts at relevance remain powerless without prayer. •• Take initiative and step into their world. If you wait for students to meet you halfway, you won’t have many relationships with teens. Despite appearances, they are often more insecure about relationships than the leaders. Don’t expect students to come to “your world” unless you step beyond your comfort zone and go to events and places you don’t “have to be.” •• Let them into your life and into your home. Host students in small groups. Take them places with you. Communicate confidence by asking teens to work with you. As relationships grow, so will your influence. •• Ask questions and learn from them. Gain credibility with students by allowing them to teach you about their interests—and yours. Ask about current trends and technologies, and about what occupies their thoughts in and out of church. •• Focus attention on them and express interest. Don’t be distracted when talking with individuals. Listen respectfully to their interests and concerns, earning the right to address bigger concerns about their lives. Demonstrate that they are important to you by remembering names and other personal information. •• Love, accept, and affirm them unconditionally. Such attention is often sparse in teens’ lives, and they won’t quickly snub someone who is generous with personal encouragement. Take every opportunity to give genuine compliments and credit. Don’t leave students wondering what their gifts and successes are—point these things out to them and to others. •• Trust students and put them to work. Teens want to be trusted to make decisions. By giving them significant responsibilities, you gain interest and participation, give them a stake in the process, and communicate the trust they desire from adults. •• Keep in contact and provide personal ministry. Maintain consistent personal contact with students by phone, e-mail, and postcard. Keep up with their activities, communicate information, and use these contacts as individual ministry opportunities. Regular contact with teens will often increase overall participation by 10–15 percent without changing anything else. Presenting satisfactory lessons is not enough. In order to see real growth and changed lives, you must focus on the personal and individual nature of disciple-making. There is no more compelling “package” for gospel truth than an adult who wraps it in a caring relationship.


>>

UNIT 1

Basic Train ) s m l a s P e h t d n i h e b s e i r o (St Life isn’t always as easy as it seems! From your life experiences you know that it can be unfair and harsh at times. Your students will be greatly benefitted by learning this ahead of time so that when “life” hits them, they will be fully prepared. Some of your students have already learned about the harsh reality of life because of trials they have faced. This unit can be a place of healing for them where they can overcome those burdens from the past. This unit will use some biblical accounts of real people dealing with the harsh reality of life to show your students that they can overcome anything that comes their way!

8

HIGH SCHOOL


smaller groups and have a time of sharing. The focus of the sharing should be about things in the students’ lives that they believe are unfair and out of their control. After adequate sharing time, instruct each student to pray for the needs of another person in the group. An easy way to do this is to have them form a circle and pray for the person on their left. Sharing and prayer of this kind creates bonding between students that can be very helpful in the future when they have future needs and situations.

community OPTION >>

Be ready for real life. Take your students to a local soup kitchen or shelter where they can serve others in need. The experience will help them understand that sometimes life gets tough enough that we need help from others. It will also teach them thankfulness for their current state of life.

church OPTION >>

Overcoming Choices. Invite someone from your church that has overcome their poor choices (such as drug use, promiscuity, financial mistakes, etc.) to speak to your students. Have the speaker emphasize that even though the experiences were difficult, he or she was able to survive. Help the students focus on the positive outcome rather than the poor decision itself.

classroom OPTION >>

ning

Share and Prayer. Allow your class to split up into

9


>>

SEP 6, 2020

BIBLE TEXTS Main texts for class presentation:  1 Samuel 19:1–17; Psalm 59:1–17; 2 Peter 2:9

KEY VERSE 2 Peter 2:9

The Lord knows how to rescue godly men from trials and to hold the unrighteous for the day of judgment, while continuing their punishment (NIV). The Lord knoweth how to deliver the godly out of temptations, and to reserve the unjust unto the day of judgment to be punished (KJV).

ACTIVITIES

 And the Answer Is... •

Paper, pens/pencils

 Free Throws • •

2 baskets (1 large & 1 small) 2 balls (1 large & 1 small)

 Sour Melody

1 >>STUDY 1 Basic Training (Stories behind the Psalms) UNIT

t ’ n s I iL fe ays w l A ir Fa

TEACHER FOCUS

 Burden of Bitterness

If you’ve ever been a part of a group project you know that life can be unfair. In one group lazy members make a good grade without having to lift a finger while the others in the group do all the work. While in another group, hardworking individuals receive a poor grade because the of the poor performance of the others in the group. It can seem unfair since the students aren’t only graded on their own work, but the work of others. Life isn’t always fair. We say it, but we don’t really want to believe it. And, in one sense, we don’t. As Christians, we hold to the belief that one day God will make everything right, that He will rightfully settle every account. Yet we know, as the old expression goes, that God never promised us a rose garden: we will face unfair and unjust situations in this life. But our faith in God to help us when we call on Him and to one day right every wrong and address every injustice can see us through such situations. Reading today’s key verse (2 Peter 2:9) can bolster that confidence in God. Today’s lesson will look at a time in David’s life when he was treated unfairly. Rather than becoming bitter, David called out to God for help, confident that God could and would work in his life. Through this lesson, encourage your students to remain confident in God as they cry out to Him when life isn’t fair.

10

HIGH SCHOOL

High School RESOURCE item “Sour Melody”

 More Than I Can Handle •

Inflated balloons

 Deal or No Deal •

Board, chalk/markers

 Dealing •

High School RESOURCE item “Dealing” • Pens/pencils

 Confident in the Promises


What’s

the big idea?

Life isn’t always fair, but we can always rely on God no matter the circumstances.

Why

does it matter?

Unfairness and injustice in life can tempt us to lose faith and confidence in God.

How

do I live it?

Call out to God for help—rather than becoming bitter or angry—when life treats you unfairly.

INTEREST THEM Activity Option: And the Answer Is...

Make up two quizzes with three to five questions each based on current >> events of which students might be aware. Make the questions multiple choice, but one quiz should offer only A and B answers, with one being obviously wrong. (See teacher hint in the sidebar for example.) The other quiz should offer four or five possible answers all of which are reasonable choices. Begin the class by dividing students into two teams. Ask all the easily answered questions to team one, and the tougher questions to team two.

Activity Option: Free Throws

Bring one large basket, one small basket, one small ball, and one larger >> ball to class. Divide the class into two teams, giving each student three chances to shoot a basket. Allow one team to use the smaller ball with the bigger basket while the other team uses the bigger ball with the smaller basket (make sure the ball will fit into the basket). Award 10 points for the first basket a student makes, 50 points for the second, and 100 points for the third.

Discuss with students the fairness of the activity they just did. Ask

them what they think when they hear the saying, “Life isn’t always fair.”

Explain that life is not always fair. Being a Christian does not make a

person immune to the unfairness and injustices of life. Since it is likely all of us will be treated unfairly at times in our lives, we need to determine how we are to act when it happens.

STUDY OVERVIEW Explain that today’s study will consider: ••

how each of us will likely encounter times when we are treated unfairly even if we do our best to treat others fairly. •• how we are to respond when treated unfairly. •• how our response to unfair treatment can affect our relationship with God.

SEP 6, 2020

11


>>

INFORM THEM 1 You Will Be Mistreated. ?

How does jealousy affect the way someone treats the person he or she envies? (Jealousy can result in a wide variety of actions. It may be as simply as the jealous person doing things to prove he or she is better than the other person. But jealousy can spark violent actions, even murder.)

Read or have a volunteer read 1 Samuel 19:1–7. Explain

background INFO >>

that Saul had become very jealous of David. He was aware of David’s popularity and military successes, which fueled Saul’s fears that the kingship might pass to David. Also, Saul was aware that “the LORD was with David but had left” him (18:12). On top of all this, Saul was disturbed by the love and affection David received from members of his own household, particularly from Jonathan, the crown prince, and Michal, whom Saul gave to David in marriage. This is why Saul ordered that David be killed (19:1).

Saul: 1 Samuel 19:9 speaks

of “an evil spirit from the LORD.” This probably should not be understood to mean that God sent an evil spirit to Saul, but that God permitted an evil spirit to enter him. Saul’s hatred of David provided an opening for the evil spirit to exploit. Old Testament writers sometimes attributed evil actions to God as acknowledgement that He is in control of all history and that He can use anything—regardless of its nature—to accomplish His purposes. See Judges 9:22–24 and Genesis 50:19,20.

resource ITEM >>

12

?

If you aware of a situation in which people are having trouble getting along, what might you do to help them resolve their differences? (Answers will vary. Briefly summarize responses on the chalkboard.)

?

How do these ideas relate to what Jonathan did in 1 Samuel 19:2–7? (Jonathan did several things to help resolve the rift between his father and David. First, he acted as a mediator, talking to both sides about the situation. Second, he gently challenged the basis for his father’s actions against David, helping him realize that David had not purposely done anything to injure Saul. Third, he brought David to Saul to assist them in restoring their relationship.)

Discuss with students how they have felt being around people with whom they have resolved issues. Did they act as if nothing had taken place in the past or were they cautious in how they acted around these people? Were they confident things were going to be okay or were they afraid more issues might arise with these people?

Read or have two volunteers read 1 Samuel 19:8–17. Explain

that no matter how much we try to get along with some people, we may still end up being mistreated by them. In David’s case, his continued military success seems to have sparked renewed jealousy in Saul. Saul first tried to kill him with a spear, and when David fled, Saul sent men to kill David. David was able to escape with the help of his wife, Michal.

Activity Option: Sour Melody

Hand out the High School RESOURCE item “Sour Melody” to students. Discuss students’ responses to the questions following the case study.

HIGH SCHOOL


Help students realize that it is not wrong to feel hurt when mistreated, but we must be careful to not allow bitterness or other negative emotions to overcome us.

2 Call Out to God for Help. Activity Option: More Than I Can Handle

Have two or three students volunteer to see how many balloons they can keep up in the air at one time. Have each student begin by bouncing one balloon in the air. Each 15 seconds, add another balloon. If a balloon hits the floor or another surface, the volunteer who caused it is done.

?

Explain the meaning of the saying, “It was the straw that broke the camel’s back.” (That sometimes even adding one more thing, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant, can bring us to the breaking point. We get to where we feel that we just can’t handle any more.)

Discuss

with students how people respond when they reach that point where they feel they just can’t take any more. Note that some turn to drugs or alcohol, and that in extreme cases some have ended their own lives. The best thing to do is to turn to God for help.

Explain that David wrote this psalm to cry out to God when he was

being mistreated by Saul. The introduction to the psalm points to when Saul sent men to watch David’s house with the intention of killing him. David did more than just flee from Saul’s men, he cried out to God for help.

?

Discuss with students why unfairness and injustice can tempt us to

lose faith and confidence in God. Some may see trying times as a sign that God no longer loves them or is unconcerned about what happens to them. Others may have false assumptions, thinking that being a Christian means God should never let anything bad happen to them. When bad things do happen, they give up on God. Some may fail to look to God to help, preferring to try to deal with life’s problems in their own strength. Psalm 59:10 can reaffirm that our faith and confidence in God is not misplaced, for He is our Strength, our Fortress, our loving God.

Read or have a volunteer read 2 Peter 2:9. ?

include introductions that were added to many of the psalms to show the events to which they relate. The introduction to Psalm 59 notes that this psalm was written in response to the events recorded in 1 Samuel 19 covered in the first point of this lesson.

Ask Yourself: 1. 2. 3. 4.

text text text text

Ask Yourself: 1.

teacher HINT teacher >> HINT >>

Do you see any indication in Psalm 59:1–10 that David’s circumstances had caused David to lose faith or confidence in God? Explain. (While it is obvious that he is very upset by how he has been treated unfairly, David’s faith in God has not been shaken. David called out to God to deliver him, to look on his plight, and to judge those who would wrongfully take his life.)

Introductions: Many Bibles

teacher HINT >>

Read or have two volunteers read Psalm 59:1–10.

How can today’s key verse, 2 Peter 2:9, inspire us to call out to God for help when faced with unfair or unjust circumstances? (Since God knows how to rescue godly people from trials, we can trust

SEP 6, 2020

13


teacher HINT >>

>>

Here’s the Math:

Double $100,000 at your $$ 5% interest 1 $0.01 $100,000 2 $0.02 $105,000 3 $0.04 $110,250 4 $0.08 $115,763 5 $0.16 $121,551 6 $0.32 $127,628 7 $0.64 $134,010 8 $1.28 $140,710 9 $2.56 $147,746 10 $5.12 $155,133 11 $10.24 $162,889 12 $20.48 $171,034 13 $40.96 $179,586 14 $81.92 $188,565 15 $163.84 $197,993 16 $327.68 $207,893 17 $655.36 $218,287 18 $1,310.72 $229,202 19 $2,621.44 $240,662 20 $5,242.88 $252,695 21 $10,485.76 $265,330 22 $20,971.52 $278,596 23 $41,943.04 $292,526 24 $83,886.08 $307,152 25 $167,772.16 $322,510 26 $335,544.32 $338,635 27 $671,088.64 $355,567 28 $1,342,177.28 $373,346 29 $2,684,354.56 $392,013 30 $5,368,709.12 $411,614 31 $10,737,418.24 $432,194 32 $21,474,836.48 $453,804 33 $42,949,672.96 $476,494 34 $85,899,345.92 $500,319 35 $171,798,691.84 $525,335 36 $343,597,383.68 $551,602 Final Total $687,194,767.35 $551,602

that He will help us through such trials. Plus, we can be assured that God will settle every account in His time.)

3 Stay Confident in Him. Activity Option: Deal or No Deal

but have that amount doubled each month for the next 35 months, e.g., 1 cent in the first month, 2 cents in second month, 4 cents in the third month, 8 cents in the fourth month, and so on. • Which offer would you take, and why? (Responses will vary. The first instinct of most people will be to take the large amount up front, then to think that something sneaky is going on and reconsider. But it is hard to be patient and take a day-to-day approach to life when it seems you can have it all in one simple act. Point out that even if you invested the entire $100,000 at 5% interest per month, you would still only have about $550,000 instead of having received almost $700 million dollars over the 36-month period. See the sidebar.)

Read or have a volunteer read Psalm 59:11–17. ?

Do you think it strange that David didn’t pray for God to immediately kill his enemies, but to make them “wander about” until they were consumed by God’s wrath? Explain. (Responses will vary. Bring out the point that we often want God to make our problems go away at once. But there can be much more gained when we learn to trust God to take care of us daily.)

Discuss with students which situation brings more glory to God: a

person with a brain tumor who is instantly healed or a person to whom God gives strength and grace so he or she can get through life one day at a time. Point out that in both situations, God receives glory and brings honor to His name. We must stay confident in Him to know what is best when we face hard times.

Explain that in Psalm 59:14–16 David admitted that his problems had

not gone away. But David expressed his continuing confidence in God, stating that each morning he would sing of God’s love for he knew that God was his fortress, his refuge in times of trouble.

?

14

Read the following scenario to the class. You are offered the following

>> deal. Take a one-time gift of $100,000 or receive 1 cent the first month,

What can we do to stay confident in God each day, especially when we are going through the hard times that come when life seems unfair? (Obviously, the first thing we can do is call out to God for help each day. Another thing we can do is accept support from others when we are going through trials. Usually this means that they are there with us, being people who will listen to us and pray with us. We should let them know we are not expecting them to try to explain why something is happening. Another thing we can do is not to deny the situation exists, but by faith live each day in the belief that God will see us through.)

HIGH SCHOOL


INVOLVE THEM Activity Option: Dealing

>>

resource ITEM <<

Activity Option: Confident in the Promises

Have students read the verses listed in the Teacher Hint in the side>> bar. Have them discuss how these verses can help them daily remain confident in God when going through trials that come when life isn’t fair. Have students pray for those in their group who are going through tough times.

Scripture: There are many Scriptures in the Bible that can help us remain confident in God when tough times come, including Lamentations 3:19–24, 2 Corinthians 4:7– 11, and 1 Peter 2:18–21.

teacher HINT >>

Hand out pens or pencils and copies of the High School RESOURCE item “Dealing.” Have students complete the self-evaluation to help understand how they have been affected by injustice and unfairness in the past. Students won’t need to share these responses. Conclude the activity by praying for students, asking God to help them deal with any lingering anger or bitterness that might exist in their lives.

INSPIRE THEM Discuss

this week’s High School Spirit Student Guide story about how a young man handled being mistaken for a criminal.

<< student GUIDE

Explain

that life isn’t always fair. There are times when we can do everything right and still suffer. But rather than becoming bitter or angry and lose our faith in God, we need to call out to God for help. He will help us, sometimes by a miraculous deliverance, but He may also choose to help us by giving us what we need to get through today. Either way, we can stay confident in Him.

The Basic Message:

Ministry Activity: Burden of Bitterness

Encourage students to consider an unsaved friend or relative who is liv>> ing with the burden of bitterness over past wrongs. Remind them that

they shouldn’t try to answer the “why” questions, but to gently encourage the people to whom they are ministering to look to God for help, offering to pray with them.

SEP 6, 2020

Ask Yourself:

1. text 2. text 3. text Ask 4. textYourself: 1. Do students accept the truth that life isn’t always fair? 2. Do students realize the need and privilege of calling out to God for help when life is unfair? 3. Can students identify things they can do to keep their faith in God strong when life treats them unfairly?

teacher HINT >> teacher HINT >>

• WHAT: Life isn’t always fair, but we can always rely on God no matter the circumstances. • WHY: Unfairness and injustice in life can tempt us to lose faith and confidence in God. • HOW: Call out to God for help—rather than becoming bitter or angry—when life treats you unfairly.

15

Profile for My Healthy Church

Sample High School Teacher Guide Fall  

Sample High School Teacher Guide Fall  

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