Creative Talents Issue 006

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Digital Art Magazine Issue 6: May '23 CREATIVE TALENTS NFT Art Showcasing and the creative talents behind some of the amazing NFT projects https://www.mycreativeimages.com/nft-magazine/

In this edition of the Creative Talents magazine I am excited to introduce you to the world of social photojournalism, where photography is used to create awareness, promote understanding, and inspire action on social issues.

Social photojournalists use their camera to document and report on important issues such as poverty, human rights, social inequality, and environmental concerns. Their images tell powerful stories that convey information and provoke thought. Through their work, photojournalists aim to engage their audience and create a dialogue around social issues. They collaborate with other journalists, activists, and organizations to amplify their message, and their work is often shared on social media, websites, and in print publications.

These type of photographs are a powerful tool for social change, and we are excited to showcase the work of a very talented individual, Leslie Spurlock.

Leslie has been published worldwide including in Time, Wall Street Journal, Mother Jones, NY Post, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Miami Herald, Austin American Statesman, Daily Mail, ABC, CNN, Yahoo and many more. It is therefore a great honour to be able to showcase some of her work in this special edition of the Creative Talents Magazine.

Join me on this journey to explore the world of social photojournalism and discover the human experience of social issues through the lens of a camera.

Important

Links

This magazine does not offer financial or investment advice. It simply showcases the creators behind NFT projects and gives you to opportunity to explore their work. As with any financial transaction you should ensure you are aware of what you are buying, if it has unlockables, utility and any associated terms and conditions.

All images in this publication are sourced / owned / created by the creators featured, unless otherwise stated on their websites or social media pages and as such must not be copied or sold without the express consent of the artist.

This publication is created and owned by James Hurley, ©mycreativeimages.com 2023.

Please feel free to share the magazine but do not make changes to any of the content.

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- -Twitter Website Contents The Rise of the Photojournalist 3 Leslie Spurlock Interview 5 Storm Chasing & the Aftermath 10 Storms across recent history 13 Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic 14 Protests - Issues of Injustice 16 Louisville, Portland and Zinc Protests 24 A Journey through the Tribal Lands 28 Creative Portraits 36 Websites and Links 38

The Rise of the Photojournalist

Photojournalism has a rich and fascinating history, spanning more than a century of human events and social movements. From the early days of black-andwhite news photography to the digital age of instant imagery, the art of capturing the world through a lens has undergone a remarkable evolution.

As the 20th century wore on, photojournalism continued to evolve, with the rise of new technologies and platforms like television and the internet. Digital cameras made it easier than ever for photographers to capture and share images in real-time, while social media platforms like Instagram and Twitter gave rise to a new generation of citizen journalists.

At the dawn of the 20th century, photojournalism was still in its infancy. Cameras were large and cumbersome, and the process of developing images was slow and laborious. But despite these limitations, photographers were able to capture some of the most significant events of the day, from the sinking of the Titanic to the horrors of World War I.

In the 1930s and 1940s, photojournalism came of age, with iconic images from the Great Depression and World War II shaping public perceptions of the world. The work of photographers like Dorothea Lange, Margaret Bourke-White, and Robert Capa brought the struggles of ordinary people to life in a way that had never been seen before.

The post-war era brought a new era of optimism and possibility, as photographers like Henri CartierBresson and Elliott Erwitt captured the joy and beauty of everyday life. Meanwhile, the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s saw photojournalists like Gordon Parks and Ernest Withers document the struggle for equality and justice.

Today, photojournalism remains as vital as ever, with photographers around the world capturing the struggles and triumphs of humanity with skill and sensitivity. From war zones and disaster areas to the streets of our cities, photojournalism has the power to inspire, educate, and move us to action.

So whether you're an aspiring photojournalist or simply a lover of great photography, take a moment to appreciate the incredible history of this art form. From the early pioneers to the digital revolutionaries, photojournalists have changed the way we see the world, and they continue to shape the course of history with their images. So next time you pick up a camera, remember that you're part of a long and proud tradition – and that the best is yet to come.

Notable Photojournalists

Ami Vitale - https://www.amivitale.com/

Ami Vitale is a photojournalist and filmmaker whose work focuses on wildlife and conservation, as well as social and cultural issues. Her photos have been featured in National Geographic, Time, and other publications.

David Burnett - http://www.davidburnett.com/

David Burnett is a veteran photojournalist whose work has appeared in numerous publications, including Time, Life, and Sports Illustrated. He is known for his coverage of political events and social issues.

Lynsey Addario - https://www.lynseyaddario.com/

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist who has covered conflicts and humanitarian crises. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, National Geographic, and other publications.

Matt Black - https://www.mattblack.com/

Matt Black is a documentary photographer whose work explores poverty, migration, and rural life in the United States. His photos have been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world.

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The images in this article were created using the Midjourney AI tool

Introducing.......

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Leslie Spurlock

Tell us a little aboout yourself and how you treansitioned between wedding photography and the role of, photo Journalism?

I actually started out doing photojournalism. Wedding photography only came about because I got a divorce, and photojournalism doesn’t pay as well. As soon as I got remarried, and I was able to quit weddings, I immediately went back to that type of work.

In terms of how I got into that type of work, I actually just decided I wasn’t getting any younger, and I had to just make the leap and do my passion. That is when I took off for Haiti. I ended up going to Haiti 6 times and covering things like the uprising (when I lived with the rebels), to voodoo, to a flood that killed 3000 and a variety of other things.

The range of emotions and drama that you capture in your images is amazing, from an intimate portrait to a dramatic scene in the thick of the action. Can you walk us through your process for capturing candid shots that capture the truth, beauty, and heart of humanity?

Sure, first, I try to make people feel comfortable with me, whether it’s portraits, or covering a natural disaster or anything of that nature. I try to capture emotions no matter what I’m photographing. It’s an important part of telling the story, even in wedding photography. When I’m covering disasters, the

people actually want you to show the world what is happening because they need people to care about them. I try to be their voice. Even in protests, it’s the raw emotions that draw the viewer in. I’m constantly looking around me to find that emotion or drama and to predict where I think it might happen. - - -

Which of the “events” that you have documented is the one that has had the biggest impact on you personally and why?

While there are several, I would have to say it’s the time I covered the flood that killed 3000 people in Haiti. It was also during this time that I almost died. It was such a hard event to cover. People were buried alive in a mudslide, there were bodies everywhere, I

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walked in water with dead bodies, and people were begging me to get the word out about what was happening in order to get more help. It was at that moment I really realized how important the job that I do is to the people in these situations. It was also the time I realized my mortality.

A guy was actually shooting and trying to kill my friend and I back in the capitol. I always thought I would die for a Pulitzer, but as he was coming closer, I didn’t even try to get more shots. All I could think about was how bad this was going to hurt and whether or not I should be shot in my head or my stomach.

In your opinion how has the rise of social media and citizen journalism affected the role of professional photojournalists in today's world?

I believe it has in good and bad ways. It has definitely gotten even more difficult to make a living in this profession. A lot of the time, citizens are there first and can capture immediately what is happening.

Photojournalism is a time sensitive profession, and being first to get the images out is of utmost importance. While this is true, sometimes, it’s the things that happen after everyone leaves that are the moments that are most impactful.

media rather than news on tv. Even news outlets post first on social media a lot of the time, especially Reuters and AP and others like that. Sadly, social media can also spread propaganda which hurts our business. So, we just strive to continue to tell the truth and show the world what is happening and try to make the world care.

How do you approach covering sensitive or controversial topics, such as those related to politics or social justice?

Oh, that’s such a tricky one. I do my best to cover both sides. You have to, but you can’t help but feel for one side or the other. It’s really difficult but you just do the best you can to remain as neutral as possible.

As far as social media, it has definitely helped to spread the word of situations happening. For me, I use social media not only to get my work seen more, but I also use it as a news source. A lot of the time, when things happen, we first see them come across social

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What drew you to storm chasing and how do you capture the heart of the storms in your photographs?

Actually, storm chasing was my release for the wedding photography world. It was a time to be with my friends and enjoy Mother Nature and its fury. I have a team that I started, Tornado Sirens, and I try to have a driver, a navigator and myself (I choose what storms to cover and where to position ourselves). It’s always a long day. We drive for hours, often to other states just for the day, and spend many hours just waiting for things to happen. When they do, that’s when I’m in my element. There’s nothing like being out there and witnessing the beautiful, yet sometimes, sadly, destructive, forces of nature. I try to get in the best position to stay safe, yet capture the beauty of the storm. If you are too close, you miss the structure of the storm. I will say, if there is damage and people injured, I always stop the chase and try to help. - - -

How has your experience covering events like Hurricane Katrina and other natural disasters influenced your perspective on climate change and environmental issues?

As the years go on, I’ve noticed these events that I’m covering have been getting worse and worse. Katrina was bad due to the levees breaking. It was actually only a category 3 storm at landfall. Years later, covering Hurricane Harvey, some areas got up to 50 inches of rain. It was devastating. I’ve seen that the amount of category 3 storms or greater has seemed to increase a lot over the years. - - -

Can you tell us about your experience living with the rebels in Haiti and how it impacted your approach to photojournalism?

Sure, that was a crazy time. I had never been in a situation like that before, where there was gunfire and all. I arrived in Port-au-Prince, and set out the next day for Gonaïves, which was rebel territory. The rebels had the only road into the area blocked off with large containers. I managed to get around the containers,

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where I was met with rebels, but they let me pass through. At one point, I noticed some of the leaders of the rebels drive by in an SUV. I flagged them down and asked if I could tell their story. They had a meeting with me that night, in the slums of the area. I had no idea what would happen, but they decided to allow me to live with them. I lived with them for 3 weeks. Most of the time, there was no electricity and the airport had been shut down.

They eventually ousted President Aristide, and I was the only photographer allowed in to photograph all the rebels doing a champagne toast to Guy Philippe for his birthday and for the celebration of the removal of the President.

I eventually went back home to my family. The experience was a huge influence in my photojournalism career. It made me believe in myself, and I realized I could indeed do this type of work. It taught me that life was short, and it could be over before you even know it. It also made me realize how lucky we have it in the US. - - -

How do you balance capturing the events you are witnessing with your own safety and well-being during protests and other volatile situations?

It’s a hard balance. I am always watching all around me for any impending danger. I’m watching people’s reactions to see if they are about to turn on me.

In the protests, not only do I have to make sure the protesters are ok with me being there, but I have to watch for the police/federal troops. I’ve been tear gassed a lot and shot with a paint ball by police. I do have a bullet proof vest, helmet and gas mask.

For hurricanes, since we are usually in the biggest danger zone, we just do the best we can to survive the storm. The places we stay in often get damaged quite a bit, so we’ve been pretty lucky. After the storm ends, we have to make sure we have quite a bit of extra fuel, since there is usually no access to gas. We have to bring food, water, portable battery chargers, etc, since there is no electricity and often no water. - - -

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Can you tell us about a particularly challenging project you've had as a photographer and how you overcame them?

Hmm, I think the most challenging was when I was covering the flood that killed 3000 people in Haiti. Not only was it emotionally hard, it was logistically hard. There was one road into the area that was hardest hit, and it was basically a lake. Many vehicles, including UN vehicles, didn’t make it and were stranded in the flood waters. I went in with a smaller vehicle, but somehow, my driver and I made it through. When we got in, it was nightfall. The city was still underwater, and people were living on top of their roofs. I was on assignment, and the agency I was working for wanted me to get the images (that night, in the dark, with no electricity) and transmit them back. We had no internet at all. It was impossible for me to get safely back to the capitol with the images that night. I ended up getting fired, but that’s ok. I wasn’t going to risk my life, and I was picked up by a better agency.

The emotional toll has had a lot of effect on me. There were bloated bodies everywhere, people buried alive in a mudslide that also occurred, and I was walking in water, risking staph infection, with bodies to try and get some of the shots. I will never forget the scene when I looked into a large, open window, and sticking out of the mud that engulfed the house, was a hand, as if they were trying their best to escape. It was one of the saddest things I’ve seen. The images still haunt me to this day.

Are there any projects you are currently working on that you can tell us about?

Right now, I am not currently working on a project, but I have a few that I plan to do. I want to continue my series on tribal cultures that are dying out, and I want to go to Ukraine and cover the war from a family’s view.

What advice would you give to aspiring photojournalists who are interested in covering social and political issues?

The best advice would be to start small, with a smaller protest, and get your feet wet. Try your best to stay neutral and make sure you know the environment you are heading into. You always need an escape route, if at all possible. Anyone interested in photojournalism at all, should first start with something in your own area, where you can spend time with the people you are photographing, build up a name. I don’t suggest what I did and just go straight into a war zone. You need to really know what you are doing, typically, to go into that type of atmosphere. - - -

What equipment do you suggest a new photographer carry with them?

I would suggest keeping it simple and light. You might need to run at any point, so you don’t want to have to carry a bunch of equipment. Make sure you have equipment that can handle low light since not everything happens during the day or outside, and a lot of people find flash distracting. I carry just two cameras and two lenses. Also, make sure you have water with you. You might be there for hours with no access to water or food.

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Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

Hurricane Harvey was a catastrophic tropical cyclone that struck the Gulf Coast of the United States in August 2017, causing widespread flooding and damage. It was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history, with damages estimated at over $125 billion. Many people lost their homes, businesses, and loved ones in the storm.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, many organizations and individuals worked tirelessly to provide relief and assistance to those affected by the storm. Emergency responders, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and volunteers all came

together to provide shelter, food, water, medical care, and other forms of support to those in need.

Overall, Hurricane Harvey was a devastating event that had a significant impact on the Gulf Coast of the United States. While storm chasers may have documented the storm, it is important to prioritize safety and support for those affected by natural disasters.

It is important to note that storm chasing can be dangerous and is not recommended for inexperienced individuals.

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The impact of storms across recent history

The power of storms and subsequent damage and loss of life must not be underestimated. I appreciate that there have been many storms around the world and throught history and have listed some of them here to show the impact that weather has on us fragile humans.

Bhola Cyclone - November 1970 - East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) - estimated death toll of 300,000 to 500,000

Haiphong Typhoon - October 1881 - Vietnamestimated death toll of 300,000 to 500,000

Hooghly River Cyclone - October 1737 - India and Bangladesh - estimated death toll of 300,000 to 350,000

Honshin Typhoon - September 1959 - Japanestimated death toll of 5,098

Great Hurricane of 1780 - October 1780Caribbean - estimated death toll of 22,000 to 27,500

Typhoon Nina - August 1975 - China - estimated death toll of 229,000

Hurricane Mitch - October 1998 - Central America - estimated death toll of 11,000 to 19,000

Cyclone Nargis - May 2008 - Myanmar (Burma)estimated death toll of 138,000 to 146,000

Galveston Hurricane - September 1900 - United States - estimated death toll of 8,000 to 12,000

Hurricane Katrina - August 2005 - United States - estimated death toll of 1,833

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Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

These images are captured during Dia de los Muertos in Mixquic. This is a celebration of the Day of the Dead that takes place in Mixquic, a neighborhood in Mexico City, Mexico. The celebration typically runs from October 31st to November 2nd and is a time for families and communities to come together to remember and honor their loved ones who have passed away.

One of the key features of this celerbration are the altars, or ofrendas, which are decorated with colorful flowers, candles, food, and other offerings. These altars are set up in homes and public spaces, and they are meant to welcome the spirits of the deceased back to the world of the living.

The celebration is also marked by processions, music, and dance. People dress up in colorful costumes and paint their faces in the traditional calavera, or skull, style. This style of makeup is often associated with the Day of the Dead and is meant to symbolize the acceptance of death as a natural part of life.

In short the Dia de los Muertos Mixquic is a vibrant and meaningful celebration of life and death, and it is an important part of Mexican culture and heritage.

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Protests - Issues of Injustice

These thought provoking images were taken during protests sparked by acts of injustice.

From the outset whilst writting this background information to introduce these photographs and this sensitive subject I realised I have no personal knowledge, expreince or insights into the reasons why these events took place and why they escalated. I have therefore only been able to base the words used in this artcle on the information I have available on the web. And as such they should only be used as an introduction to the photographs rather than factual information pertaining to the reason behind the passionate responce to life changing events that led to the protest.

There is always a reason, a trigger event that sparks a protest and these have been know to include:

• Injustice and discrimination: Protests often arise in response to perceived injustices or discrimination, such as police brutality or racial profiling.

• Environmental issues: Protests can also be related to environmental issues, such as climate change or the destruction of natural habitats.

• Human rights: Protests may also be related to human rights issues, such as violations of freedom of speech, assembly, or religion.

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In the case of Minneapolis it was triggerd by the killing of an African American man by a police officer. The outrage and passion triggered by this tragic event quickly spread to other cities in the United States and around the world, as people expressed their anger.

Some of the protests were peaceful, while others turned violent, with looting, arson, and clashes between protesters and police.

The Minnesota National Guard was activated to assist law enforcement in controlling the protests, and a curfew was imposed in the city to try and restore order.

The officer in question was later found guilty of murder and manslaughter charges sentenced to 22.5 years in prison.

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Louisville, Portland and Zinc Protests

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A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

Northeast India is home to a diverse range of indigenous tribes, each with their own distinct culture, language, and customs. The region is sometimes referred to as the "tribal belt" of India, as more than 200 of the country's 645 recognized tribes live in the area.

The tribal lands of Northeast India cover much of the region's hilly terrain, including the states of Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram, Meghalaya, and Tripura. Characterized by their dense forests, rugged mountains, and rich biodiversity, this area is home to many unique plant and animal species.

The indigenous tribes have faced a number of challenges over the years, including displacement from their ancestral lands, loss of traditional knowledge, and marginalization

from mainstream society. However, many communities in the region have worked to preserve their cultural heritage and promote sustainable development through initiatives such as community-based tourism, traditional handicrafts, and conservation programs.

Some of the prominent tribes include the Naga, Khasi, Garo, Mizo, and Adi, among others. Each has its own distinct language, customs, and traditions, and many continue to maintain their traditional way of life despite the challenges posed by modernization and globalization.

The tribal lands of Northeast India are a rich and diverse region, full of cultural and ecological treasures that are worth exploring and preserving for generations to come.

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Creative Portraits

As with all creative photographers there is the need to explore how far you can expand your vision and technical skills. After all the joy of photography not only includes the techcnical process of understand light and how to capture shadows, fine detail and colour in a perfetly composed image. All artists have the desire to push their boundaries and explore new creative avenues which results in them experimenting with different styles and techniques in order to incorporate new ideas into their own work. This constant growth is very fulfilling and rewarding aspect of their creative practice.

This is reflected in the " Ethereal Beauties" series of fine art portraits which are presented here.

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Websites and Links

To find out more about Leslie Spurlock visit all of the following links:

Website: https://lesliespurlock.com/

Foundation: https://foundation.app/@lesliespurlock?tab=created

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LeslieASpurlock

ETH: https://twitter.com/LeslieASpurlock

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Digital Art Magazine Previous editions Issue 6: May '23 CREATIVE TALENTS https://www.mycreativeimages.com/creative-talents-issue-006/

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Articles inside

Creative Portraits

1min
pages 36-37

A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

1min
pages 28-33

Protests - Issues of Injustice

1min
pages 16-22

Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

1min
pages 14-15

The impact of storms across recent history

1min
page 13

Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

1min
pages 10-12

Leslie Spurlock

8min
pages 5-9

The Rise of the Photojournalist

2min
page 3

Creative Portraits

1min
pages 36-37

A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

1min
pages 28-33

Protests - Issues of Injustice

1min
pages 16-22

Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

1min
pages 14-15

The impact of storms across recent history

1min
page 13

Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

1min
pages 10-12

Leslie Spurlock

8min
pages 5-9

The Rise of the Photojournalist

2min
page 3

Creative Portraits

1min
pages 19-20

A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

1min
pages 15-17

Protests - Issues of Injustice

1min
pages 9-12

Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

1min
page 8

Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

1min
pages 6-7

Leslie Spurlock Introducing.......

8min
pages 3-5

The Rise of the Photojournalist

2min
page 2

Creative Portraits

1min
pages 36-37

A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

1min
pages 28-33

Protests - Issues of Injustice

1min
pages 16-22

Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

1min
pages 14-15

The impact of storms across recent history

1min
page 13

Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

1min
pages 10-12

Leslie Spurlock

8min
pages 5-9

The Rise of the Photojournalist

2min
page 3

Creative Portraits

1min
pages 19-20

A Journey through the Tribal Lands of India

1min
pages 15-17

Protests - Issues of Injustice

1min
pages 9-12

Dia De Los Muertos - Mixquic

1min
page 8

Storm Chasing & Recording the Aftermath

1min
pages 6-7

Leslie Spurlock Introducing.......

8min
pages 3-5

The Rise of the Photojournalist

2min
page 2
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