Taylorsville City Newsletter | November 2022

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City of Taylorsville Newsletter

www.taylorsvilleut.gov

November 2022

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400

MAYOR'S MESSAGE Dear Friends and Neighbors, I hope you will join me this month in extending a huge thank you to our Taylorsville Police Department and Unified Fire Authority for the substantial efforts they make to connect with our community in myriad ways. We are so fortunate to work with public safety entities who Mayor Kristie S. Overson know and value the importance of community. Several successful events recently hosted by each provide the perfect examples. Those events included our Night Out Against Crime held at the end of summer, as well as the fantastically attended Pancake Breakfast and Trick-or-Treating events, respectively sponsored by UFA and the Taylorsville Fraternal Order of Police in conjunction with Taylorsville’s Parks and Recreation Committee. What a wonderful time we had on each of these occasions. At the Night Out Against Crime, residents had a chance to learn about ways to keep their neighborhoods safe while having fun with family and friends. Hosted by the Public Safety Committee, the night featured a Bike Rodeo for kids that was set up by the Taylorsville Youth Council, a helicopter tour, police and fire truck tours, a K-9 demo, rock climbing wall and UHP seatbelt safety demo. At the Pancake Breakfast this past month, we literally served up thousands of pancakes. Our own firefighters from Taylorsville Stations 117 and 118 manned the grills, as the City Council and I, as well as city and TVPD employees and our Youth Council, all gave a helping hand. In addition to breakfast, those attending had a chance to tour the fire station, see the fire trucks and gather safety information, and kids dressed up as firefighters themselves. (Read more on Page 4 of this section). Turnout for our Trick-or-Treating event was equally incredible. Inclement weather forced organizers to scramble to move the event that was planned as an outdoor affair at Centennial Plaza indoors to City Hall. But the rain did not damper spirits. More than 50 groups and individuals passed out candy at booths quickly set up inside as costumed children with their parents eagerly lined up outside with umbrellas for trick-ortreating throughout City Hall. This type of dedication and can-do determination from our public safety employees and supporting entities mean the world to me. Not only do our public safety partners support and work to connect with our community but by doing so, they are integral to the very definition. The efforts of our police and fire departments truly make our Taylorsville community the best place to be. –Mayor Kristie S. Overson

WHAT’S INSIDE – NOVEMBER 2022 Frequently Called Numbers, Page 2 Council Corner, Page 3 TVPD News, Page 4 Heritage Remembrances, Page 7 Environment, Page 8

Take a Walk Through History with Tombstone Tales Videos Now Online

If you missed this year’s Tombstone Tales, you can now watch the presentations in full online. Learn more about Taylorsville’s history and its trailblazers in nine videos featuring the event. The Taylorsville Preservation Committee and Taylorsville Arts Council presented Tombstone Tales in August at the Taylorsville Memorial Park Cemetery, and the videos of those performances can be viewed online at www.taylorsvilleut.gov. The presentations feature costumed volunteer actors portraying a cross-section of prominent community contributors, almost all of whom are buried at the cemetery. With utmost respect to the cemetery setting, each volunteer recited a short dramatic dialogue to highlight nine individuals instrumental in building the Taylorsville community. One of the characters is an original settler and some of the performers are direct descendants. The event was part of Taylorsville’s Historic Week from Aug. 21-27, which Mayor Kristie Overson declared in a proclamation adopted by the City Council. According to the proclamation, “Tombstone Tales activities will help increase the public’s awareness of the traditions and heritage of Taylorsville City.”

TOMBSTONE TALES CONTINUED ON PAGE 6


FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS

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City of Taylorsville Newsletter

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

Emergency ...................................................................................................911 Police Department ............................................................... 801-840-4000 Poison Control Center .................................................... 1-800-222-1222 Animal Control Shelter ....................................................... 801-965-5800 Animal Control After House Dispatch ........................... 801-840-4000 Building Inspection ............................................................. 801-955-2030 Chamber West (Chamber of Commerce) ...................... 801-977-8755 Fire Department ................................................................... 801-743-7200 Gang Tip Line ......................................................................... 385-468-9768 Garbage/Recycle/GreenWaste Pick-up ........................ 385-468-6325 (Wasatch Front Waste & Recycling) Granite School District........................................................ 385-646-5000 Health Department ............................................................. 385-468-4100 Highway Conditions (from cell phone) .............................................511 Park Reservations ................................................................. 385-468-7275 Public Works (Salt Lake County) ....................................... 385-468-6101 Dominion Energy ................................................................. 800-323-5517 Rocky Mountain Power ...................................................... 888-221-7070 Salt Lake County Recycling/Landfill .............................. 801-974-6920 Taylorsville Bennion Improvement District................. 801-968-9081 Taylorsville Food Pantry ..................................................... 801-815-0003 Taylorsville Senior Center .................................................. 385-468-3370 Taylorsville Code Enforcement ........................................ 801-955-2013 Taylorsville Justice Court ................................................... 801-963-0268 Taylorsville Library ............................................................... 801-943-4636 Taylorsville Recreation Center ......................................... 385-468-1732 Swimming Pool (Memorial Day to Labor Day) ........... 801-967-5006 Taylorsville-Bennion Heritage Center ........................... 801-281-0631 UDOT Region 2 ...................................................................... 801-975-4900 Utah Transit Authority (UTA)............................................. 801-743-3882

EVENTS NOVEMBER 2022 Nov. 6 – 2 a.m. Daylight Saving Time ends. Move your clocks back one hour.

Nov. 8 – All Day Election Day. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. You can also deposit your ballot in Salt Lake County drop boxes, including the one in front of City Hall, before 8 p.m.

Nov. 2 & 16 – 6:30 p.m. City Council Meeting @ City Hall and online. Watch a livestream of the meeting on the city’s website, www.taylorsvilleut.gov

November 3-5 Salt Contemporary Dance presents FALL ‘22

MID-VALLEY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Nov. 11 – All Day Veterans Day. City Offices are closed in observance.

Nov. 24 & 25 – All Day Thanksgiving. City Offices are closed Thursday and Friday.

Nov. 28 – 6:30 p.m.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Tree Lighting Ceremony @ City Hall. Hot chocolate and cookies will be served at 6:30 p.m. The lighting begins at 7.

November 11-12 Utah Dance Institute presents THE NUTCRACKER

UPCOMING: Dec. 10 – 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday with Santa @ Taylorsville-Bennion Heritage Center. (See accompanying ad on this page)

UPCOMING: Dec. 17 – 10 a.m. Wreaths Across America Ceremony @ City Hall. Immediately following, wreaths will be laid at the Taylorsville Cemetery. The event is part of the Youth Council’s holiday service project. (See ad on Page 5). Find our calendar of events every month on the city’s website, where you can also submit your own events for possible publication. Go to www.taylorsvilleut.gov

GET TICKETS AT SaltLakeCountyArts.org

February 11-19 Lyrical Opera Theater presents GIANNI SCHICCHI & PAGLIACCI


November 2022

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

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COUNCIL CORNER We are Grateful for the Many Volunteers Making a Difference Every Day By Council Member Meredith Harker “Service doesn’t have to be big and grandiose to be meaningful and make a difference.” —Cheryl Esplin “Do your little bits of good where you are; it’s those little bits of good put together that overwhelm the world.” —Desmond Tutu One of the things I love about serving on the Taylorsville City Council is having the privilege of seeing so many of our citizens volunteer in so many different ways to make our city and community a better place. There are people all around our city giving up their time, talents and resources to serve others in our community. It is heartwarming and touching to see the people of Taylorsville who want to make a positive difference and contribution. Here is just a small sample of the service I’ve seen given in the past year: Our city has seven volunteer committees. Each committee spends time each month meeting, planning, discussing and preparing for events and activities to bring our community together. All of these people are unpaid and volunteer with no thought of compensation for the work they are doing and the time they are putting in. Tombstone Tales was a production put on by the Historic Preservation Committee and the Arts Council.

This production took months to plan, practice and execute. This was all done out of love for the history of our city and wanting people to get a glimpse of our past. Starry Nights happened every Saturday night on our new Centennial Plaza this summer. There was free entertainment every week, and most of the performers volunteered their time and talents to entertain those attending. They shared their talents freely so that the community could enjoy an evening on the plaza. The day of service in honor of Sept. 11 saw hundreds of volunteers across the city cleaning, painting, fixing and working hard to improve the look and feel of Taylorsville. Each of our local schools have a PTA and Community Council made up of parents who want to make a difference in the lives of the students. These volunteers care deeply about the experience of our schoolchildren and want to make sure they have everything they need to be successful. Trick-or-Treating on the Plaza was a new event this year. After reaching out to community members and asking them to set up a booth or table and hand out candy, we had more than 50 organizations sign up to give free candy to the children of Taylorsville. Taylorsville Dayzz is run solely by volunteers. This committee meets for months before this enormous three-day event to work through all the details and

LEFT TO RIGHT: Bob Knudsen (District 5), Curt Cochran (District 2), Anna Barbieri, Chair (District 3), Meredith Harker, Vice Chair (District 4) and Ernest Burgess (District 1)

logistics. It is a huge undertaking that is only possible because of the hard work and dedication of so many. These are just a few examples of the dedicated and unselfish acts I’ve seen rendered by caring citizens in Taylorsville. There are hundreds of others happening every day when neighbors serve neighbors and citizens watch out for one another in kind and generous ways. It really is through small and simple acts of service that we make our community, and in turn our world, a better place.

Taylorsville Art Show Showcases Talent of Local and Area Artists The 2022 Taylorsville Art Show featured more than 100 entries in four categories, including fine arts, creative arts, needlework and sidewalk chalk art — a new addition this year. The show was sponsored by the Taylorsville Arts Council and Salt Lake County Arts & Culture Public Art Program. The artwork was displayed on Sept. 23 and 24 at the Mid-Valley Performing Arts Center, and grand prize honors were presented to: • Kregg Clemens, who won the People’s Choice award for his oil painting "Northern Lights" • Kregg Clemens, who won the Youth Council/Ambassadors Choice award for his oil painting "Utah, North versus South" • Nancy Henderson, presented Best of Show (by the Arts Council) for her quilt "Woodland Animals" • Edith Olsen, presented with the Mayor's Choice award for her creative arts piece "Sunflower" “Taylorsville is home to some incredible artists,” said Mayor Kristie Overson. “We thank each of them for sharing their talents and extend further appreciation to the Taylorsville Arts Council and Salt Lake County Public Art Program for putting on a truly fantastic show.”

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Tree Lighting Ceremony Kick off the holiday season by attending Taylorsville City's first-ever tree lighting ceremony! The event will take place at Centennial Plaza (in front of City Hall) at 7 pm. Hot chocolate and cookies will be served at 6:30 pm.


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City of Taylorsville Newsletter

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

TVPD Arrests Key Suspects in Catalytic Converter Thefts Check this space each month for news about the Taylorsville Police Department (TVPD) and their valuable service to our community. TVPD detectives working with the Utah Attorney General’s Office Crimes Against Statewide Economy (CASE) Unit arrested multiple suspects, as well as a major buyer, in a catalytic converter theft ring. The suspects arrested on Oct. 18 allegedly committed hundreds of catalytic converter thefts throughout several counties. These suspects were selling stolen catalytic converters to a buyer, Omar Ernesto Martinez-Gomez, who was then allegedly selling them for profit. In total, it was suspected that Martinez-Gomez had purchased and sold 3,556 stolen catalytic converters, valued at $915,230 in 423 separate transactions. Martinez-Gomez was booked into the Salt Lake County Adult Detention Center on numerous felony charges.

The extensive investigation, that spanned several months, required the cooperation of multiple police jurisdictions with the end goal of dismantling a major criminal ring. A huge thanks to these agencies, the Utah Attorney General’s Office and our TVPD Attorney General’s Office task force (CASE) detective who brought these investigations together. You can read more about the arrest in news articles from KUTV, ABC4 and Fox 13. There are also steps you can take to deter criminals from stealing your catalytic converter. They include installing an anti-theft device; talking with a certified mechanic about etching your VIN number on your converter; parking your vehicle in well-lit areas, near cameras in high-traffic areas or in a locked area or garage, and reporting thefts and suspicious people and vehicles to police. While none of these suggestions are foolproof, they can be a deterrent.

TVPD EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH Congratulations to Employee of the Month Brandy Stephens, who is our TVPD office manager and one of our civilian employees. With more than 25 years of experience, Brandy has an extensive career within law enforcement. She has worked for the Salt Lake County Sheriff ’s Office dispatch center, Metro Gang Unit, Serious Habitual Offender Comprehensive Action Analyst Team, Unified Police Department and Taylorsville Police Department. Brandy has served in Taylorsville City for 18 of her 25 years in law enforcement. She regularly demonstrates her ability to bridge the various units within TVPD and has played a role in the formation of each. If you have followed our “About TVPD” articles, you can see how invaluable this ability has been, as we have transitioned to our own Taylorsville City Police Department. Brandy consistently goes above and beyond her defined role as an office manager to being “a key player within our TVPD administrative team,” as described by Chief Cottam. Many within TVPD point to Brandy as “the glue that holds it together.” She regularly assists not only our TVPD administration but every TVPD unit, officer and civilian employee within TVPD. Often this results in her working outside “normal hours” to complete her regular defined responsibilities as an officer manager. Chief Cottam lists her contributions as incalculable. “Her knowledge of TVPD, city government and the overall city needs has been invaluable,” he said. Congratulations, Brandy, and thank you for all you do and have done for TVPD and Team Taylorsville!

UFA, City Leaders Serve Thousands of Pancakes at Community Breakfast Unified Fire Authority held a pancake breakfast this past month that drew more than 800 people to Fire Station 118. “We were so pleased and surprised by the incredible turnout to this event,” said Mayor Kristie Overson. “Not only did we enjoy the delicious breakfast served up by our firefighters, but we were able to learn more about what they do each day to keep our community safe.” In addition to breakfast, those attending had a chance to tour the fire station, see the fire trucks up close and gather safety information, and kids dressed up as firefighters themselves. “It was a wonderful day,” Mayor Overson said. “Thank you to all who attended, and to the Unified Fire Authority for planning such a fun morning. We are already looking forward to the next one.”


November 2022

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

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City of Taylorsville Newsletter

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

TOMBSTONE TALES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Taylorsville leaders and residents highlighted in the videos at each of their cemetery plots are: Jim Taney (B-60), Marcus and Mildred Bennion (D-54), Adrian and Gwen Versteeg (F-40), Eliza Spencer Harker (daughter, D-12), Frankie Montoya (E-14), Raymond Bennion Spencer (J-139) and John Taylor, who is buried at the Salt Lake City Cemetery. The late Jim Taney was played by his son Brandon Taney. Jess Hansen played the sexton and other narratives featured: David Oldroyd and Macie Muller as Bennion and his daughter; Craig and Julie Clemens as the Versteegs; Susan Yadeskie as Harker; Aaron Christensen as Spencer, George Dye as Taylor, and Linda Cochran who told the story of Montoya and the cemetery’s Potter’s Field. The Tombstone Tales event occurs every six years due to the amount of work and preparation required for the project; it was postponed last year due to the COVID pandemic. The Tombstone Tales scripts were written by Yadeskie, who chairs the Taylorsville Preservation Committee, and Taylorsville Arts Council Cochair Susan Holman. “Tombstone Tales is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about our community and perhaps gain a new appreciation for the history of Taylorsville along the way,” said Mayor Overson. “We hope that the video presentations filmed from the live event will further help bring history to life.” In addition to the videos, you can also find online at www.taylorsvilleut.gov an interactive map of the Taylorsville Cemetery, showing all plots, as well as the name, date of birth, date of death and headstone photo (if available) of the person interred there. The Taylorsville Cemetery is owned and operated by the City of Taylorsville.

Youth Council is Sworn In, Ready to Serve

The 2022-23 Taylorsville Youth Council was sworn in before the City Council this past month. They number 15 members, including nine seniors, five juniors and one sophomore. Serving as Youth Ambassadors are Dillon Nguyen and Tyne Vanderbilt. The Youth Council will be participating in several service projects in the coming months, including their holiday service project to lay wreaths at every veteran's grave at the Taylorsville Cemetery. You can find more information about that project and sponsor a wreath at www. taylorsvilleut.gov under Our City and Wreaths Across America. Also, see the ad on Page 5 of this section. The Youth Council also will attend the annual Leadership Conference at Utah State University in March.


November 2022 Taylorsville Bennion Heritage

REMEMBRANCES

By Susan Yadeskie – Historic Preservation Committee Chair The Taylorsville community was established in 1948 when Joseph Harker, John and Samuel Bennion and six other families moved south “Over Jordan” where their final homes were erected along 4800 South, the historic district of Taylorsville. Archibald Frame, a master builder from Scotland, along with his five sons are responsible for building many of the brick homes that are still standing today. Two of these buildings are the Al Rasool Islamic Center, formerly the LDS Ward Meetinghouse, and the Taylorsville-Bennion Heritage Center (the Taylorsville City museum/Gerrard house). Our preservation committee and representatives for the Al Rasool Islamic Center have been working to have these two locations recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

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TAYLORSVILLE SENIOR CENTER 4743 S. Plymouth View Drive

Enjoy Lunch at the Taylorsville Senior Center Lunch is available at the Taylorsville Senior Center for seniors ages 60 and over from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. for a suggested donation of $4. You can visit the center’s website at www.slco.org/taylorsville-senior-center for menu and activities information. The Taylorsville Senior Center is located at 4743 S. Plymouth View Drive and can be contacted by phone at 801-385-3370.

Don’t Miss These Library Events The Taylorsville Library has planned several programs during the month of November. You’ll want to mark your calendar for these events: ART MUSEUM PASSPORT CHALLENGE Nov. 1-30 Pick up an art museum passport at the Info Desk. Visit at least two museums listed on the passport and return it by Nov. 30 to be eligible to enter the contest drawing. Contest winner will receive an Easily Art Studio gift card.

The register is the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate and protect America’s historic and archeological resources. The Utah State Review Board evaluates applications and advises during the application process. Preservation committee members and representatives of the Islamic Center worked with a knowledgeable application writer, Sherri Murray Ellis, on both the LDS Ward Meetinghouse and the John Thomas and Jenny Bennion Gerrard house designations. The Islamic Center/ meetinghouse qualified for nomination for its religious, social and architectural value. It was constructed over 17 years in three phases, with Victorian Gothic architecture and eclectic Prairie School and Arts and Crafts styles. It is also one of a very few historical Latter-day Saint meetinghouses from this period that remain standing on the westside of the Salt Lake Valley and is substantially unaltered on the exterior. The Gerrard house was nominated for its architectural value. Data from the Utah State Historic Preservation Office indicates that only nine central block-with projected bays dwellings exhibiting Victorian Eclectic style have been documented in the area. Only two are two-story forms. The Gerard house is the only one that retains historical integrity. The meetinghouse was officially placed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 24. On Aug. 18, the Gerrard house was approved by the Utah State Review Board to be submitted for national review. We should know sometime this month if it will be on the national register. For more information about the Historic Register including advantages of seeking such a designation, visit: www.nps.gov/subjects/ nationalregister

WALKING BOOK CLUB Thursdays in November, 10 to 11:15 a.m. The Walking Book Club is great for readers interested in a weekly exercise session and book discussion. Walk for 30 minutes, then participate in a 30-minute book discussion. Be sure to wear comfortable shoes and bring a water bottle. Strollers are welcome. “TRAVELS WITH GEORGE” READING SCHEDULE: Nov. 3: chapters 1-7 Nov. 10: chapters 8-14 Nov. 17: chapters 15-end TEEN AFTER HOURS: MINI GOLF Friday, Nov. 4, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Teens! Design, build and play your own mini-golf course! HELP ME GROW DEVELOPMENTAL PLAYTIME EVENT Nov. 9, 10:30 a.m. Join in open play time. You'll also have the opportunity to answer a questionnaire that will help you see how your child is growing. Help Me Grow, a partner from United Way, will be on hand to answer developmental and parenting questions. VIRTUAL ADULT LECTURE: How King Tutankhamun and Howard Carter Reshaped the Western World Monday, Nov. 14, 7 p.m. You must register for this event to receive the link to the WebEx Virtual Lecture. Register at: thecountylibrary.org/LectureSeries Dr. Cunningham-Bryant will explore the history, mystery and enduring power of King Tutankhamun and the 100th anniversary of Howard Carter's discovery. LIBRARY CLOSURES Veterans Day – Friday, Nov. 11, all day Thanksgiving – Wednesday, Nov. 23, the library will close at 6 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 24, all day; Friday, Nov. 25, all day


ANNUAL COLLECTION DAY PAGE 8

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

City of Taylorsville Newsletter Follow These Easy Habits to Help Conserve Water

NOVEMBER UPDATES Proposed Fee Increases for 2023 WFWRD’s Board of Trustees will hold a public hearing on Monday, Nov. 14, at 6 p.m. to allow public comment for the Tentative 2023 Budget that includes fee increases. The location will be at WFWRD’s offices at 604 W. 6960 South in Midvale. The last fee increase occurred January 2018. The 2023 increased fees will help to keep up with the rapidly rising costs with labor markets, maintenance shop rates, processing costs at the landfills and recycling facilities, and truck prices to purchase replacement trucks. Here is an outline of the fee increases: • The base fees garbage and recycling collections will increase $2.50 per month/$7.50 per quarter/$30 per year. ($19.50 per month/$58.50 per quarter/$234 per year). • Additional waste (black) cans will increase to $19.50 per month/$58.50 per quarter/$234 per year. For collections. • Additional recycling (blue) cans will be $5 per month fee ($2 per month increase). For collections. • There will be a $70 per can rental fee for a new can, or $45 for a refurbished can will pay for the can plus delivery. • Trailer rental for bulk: $190 from $175 and green: $55 from $45.

As we celebrate Thanksgiving in November, the TaylorsvilleBennion Improvement District is grateful for the opportunity it has to provide readily available, safe and reliable water and sewer services. Now, it is time we consider water conservation for all those that will need water in the future. As you consider implementing your personal strategy for water conservation, here are some easy habits to establish: • Carefully and properly shut down your sprinkling system for the season, making sure the stop and waste valve is off with no leaks. A leak 1/32 inch in size, roughly the size of a pencil lead, would cause a loss of 6,000 gallons per month! • When doing laundry, match the water level to the size of the load. • When shopping for a new washing machine, compare resource savings among Energy Star models. Some can save up to 20 gallons of water per load. • Limit the amount of water when brushing your teeth. When we do our part to conserve water today, we help provide water for future generations to come. If you have any questions, please contact Taylorsville-Bennion Improvement District by calling 801-968-9081 or visiting www.tbid.org. Follow TBID on Facebook and Twitter.

Please see WFWRD’s website for the details: wasatchfrontwaste. org/fees-logistics

Broken/Damaged Cans Did you know that you can get your broken can repaired or replaced at no additional cost? Report a broken can on the WFWRD website under the “Services & Requests” tab and their Cart Team will be out within the following one to 14 business days to repair or replace your can. Please leave the cans where they are visible from the street and accessible as the requested team will not go behind gates to retrieve cans. Feel free to go ahead and use the cans to the best of your ability until repair crews arrive.

Remote Recycling Education for Schools In spring 2022, Wasatch Front Waste & Recycling District’s Sustainability Team provided education to 40 classes at 11 different elementary schools throughout the district remotely. The district’s team has a lot of availability and would love to p re s e nt t h e b e n e f i t s o f sustainable waste management. If you are a teacher or know of a teacher who is interested in this opportunity, contact Sustainability Coordinator McKenna Tupa’i at mtupai@wasatchfrontwaste.org or 385-468-6337.

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Please no parking after snowstorms Taylorsville Ordinance 11.20.080:

No parking after snow and/or ice accumulation, until after the street or highway is cleared. Towing and/or citations are enforced. Call 801-963-5400 opt. 5 with questions.

Taylorsville City Journal