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March 2019 | Vol. 6 Iss. 03

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PROBLEM NEIGHBORS, INTERNET ACCESS AND INFRASTUCTURE all discussed during the first “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com

City council members – and Mayor Kristie Overson (3rd from left) – launch a new tradition, with their first-ever “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting. (Carl Fauver/Valley Journals)

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lenty of fireworks accompanied the launch of a new tradition on January 30, as the Taylorsville city council and mayor hosted their first-ever “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting, hearing concerns ranging from problem neighbors to internet connections to infrastructure issues. “I’m not exactly sure what we were expecting,” Mayor Kristie Overson said. “I am just glad people felt like they could come to the meeting and be heard. We didn’t resolve any issues on the spot – but we became aware of problems and are now following up on them.” The city council normally holds its bi-monthly meetings on the first and third Wednesdays of each month. For years, tradition has held, a mayor’s town hall meeting was held during those three or four months each year that have five Wednesdays – on that fifth Wednesday. “We were at one of our city priorities meetings when we began to talk about possibly changing the format of those town hall meetings to include the entire city council as well,” said Councilman Ernest Burgess. “I wasn’t sure how many different issues we would hear about. This was a good meeting. I think it’s important we try to be more accessible to residents.” More than half the meeting was consumed with one particular issue, as a group of concerned citizens all appeared to express frustration over the same home and its allegedly unruly residents. “My grandchildren get high on marijuana when they mow my lawn, as the smoke drifts from that house.”

“That place scares me to death – and we fear retaliation from the people living there.” “Loud music plays all night – there are domestic fights all the time – and the language.” These were among the comments from the group of citizens, speaking about a problem rental home and its occupants. Unified Police Taylorsville Precinct Chief Tracy Wyant attended the meeting and did confirm several calls to the address in question over the past several years – though not nearly as many as the concerned residents claimed to have made. “It is important when people call in to complain about neighbors, they provide us with the address of occurrence,” he said. “We also need complainants to tell us their name and contact information. We do not provide that information to the people being complained about. But providing that information allows those complaints to carry more weight.” A brand-new Taylorsville resident – who had just moved into the city two days earlier – raised a completely different concern when he asked the council why they have not agreed to allow the UTOPIA Fiber internet provider to operate in the city. “Why should I have to pay more to get less?” Ian Webb asked the council. “Fiber optics works at the speed of light, providing much better service.” In unison, council members said this is perhaps the most common question they receive. “UTOPIA just wants to cherry pick apartment buildings,

while not serving all of our residents,” Councilman Brad Christopherson explained. “If we granted them a franchise agreement, the increased tax burden is not something our residents would support. We continue to talk with (UTOPIA); but right now, it is not in our plans.” Talk at the meeting also turned to infrastructure. One resident expressed concern with poor walking access to Millrace Park. The park is in Councilman Curt Cochran’s district and he strongly concurred. “As long as I am in that (city council) chair, I will work to make improvements along 5400 South, between 1300 West and Millrace Park,” Cochran said. “I would like to see curbs and sidewalks in the area.” Former city planning commission member Dan Fazzini added another item to the infrastructure improvement wish list. “The railing on the bridge across from the Taylorsville Utah Heritage Museum (4800 South) has been in disrepair for a long time,” he told the council. “This is an aesthetic thing that I think could be fixed for not much cost.” Like most other topics of conversation at the meeting, the council agreed to look into it more thoroughly and take action if possible. There are three remaining months in 2019 with five Wednesdays. “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meetings are scheduled for May 29, July 31 and October 30.

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Utah Housing Gap Coalition raises awareness about housing affordability

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C ITY OURNAL The Taylorsville City Journal is a monthly publication distributed directly to residents via the USPS as well as locations throughout Taylorsville. For information about distribution please email circulation@mycityjournals. com or call our offices. Rack locations are also available on our website. For subscriptions please contact: circulation@mycityjournals.com The views and opinions expressed in display advertisements do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Loyal Perch Media or the City Journals. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the owner.

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By Justin Adams | justin.a@thecityjournals.com

The Utah Housing Gap Coalition is trying to find solutions for the state’s “housing crisis,” but it goes beyond just high-density developments like Daybreak, seen here. (Justin Adams/City Journals)

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ne of the hottest topics in Utah and this year’s legislative session is that of growth. Utah is expected to double its population by 2050 and the question is: where are all those people going to live? That’s the question that the Housing Gap Coalition is trying to answer. The coalition, which was formed last year by the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce, wants residents, government leaders and developers to start thinking now about how to handle Utah’s population growth. “We’re trying to get ahead of it,” said Abby Osborne, the vice president of public policy and government relations for the chamber of commerce. If Utah kicks the can down the road, she said, the state may be forced to take more radical approaches to accommodating rapid growth — something she sees happening across the country. Just last year, Minneapolis voted to abolish its single-family residential zone, which would “allow residential structures with up to three dwelling units — like duplexes and triplexes — in every neighborhood,” according to the New York Times. Or consider the case of California, where the state government is suing a city government for “failing to allow enough new homebuilding to accommodate a growing population,” according to the LA Times. Instead, the coalition is advocating for a more balanced approach to improving housing affordability. Local housing policies In Utah, municipal governments control what types of buildings are built and where. While some cities may be open to increasing the overall supply of homes by allowing “high-density” projects within their boundaries, many other cities are not. Last year, the coalition leadership visited the city council meetings of cities along the Wasatch Front, both educating and getting feedback about the issue. “It was fairly successful. We got pretty good reception from most of the cities,” said Osborne. Now with the Utah state legislative session

underway, the coalition has moved its focus to Capitol Hill. On Feb. 8, a group of about 70 coalition members gathered at the capitol to lobby their senators to support a series of bills aimed at improving housing affordability. One such bill is SB 34, sponsored by Sen. Jacob Anderegg, R-Lehi. The bill (whose fate wasn’t known at the time of deadline for this article) would require municipal governments to adopt certain policies designed to increase housing affordability in order to be eligible to receive money from the state’s Transportation Investment Fund. The bill would also appropriate $20 million to the Olene Walker Housing Loan Fund. One of the coalition members that participated in the lobbying effort was Chris Sloan, a past-president of the Utah Association of Realtors and a former chairman of the Tooele County Chamber of Commerce. He said housing affordability is a “sizable problem that affects all of us.” Education campaign While getting elected officials on board with combatting the housing gap is important for the coalition, getting the public on board is perhaps even more important. Draper Mayor Troy Walker called high density development a “four-letter word” when the coalition visited the Draper City Council. There are cases up and down the Wasatch Front of mayors and city councilors facing the wrath of their constituents for having approved a “high-density” development. From the Olympia Hills development in the south-west portion of the valley that was halted by then-Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams because of fierce community backlash, to the Holladay Quarter project that fell apart after the Utah Supreme Court ruled in favor of community organizers that opposed it, the biggest obstacle to increasing the housing supply is most often residents themselves. To change public perception about the issue, the coalition has launched a public education campaign consisting of billboards, radio ads, social media posts and appearances on local network morning shows. Osborne said she’s already seen changes in certain communities’ perception of high-density development. “We’re getting people thinking a little differently than they were before. And that’s all we can really do,” she said. Construction labor force Another impediment to increasing the housing supply is that construction companies simply can’t keep up with the demand because of a lack of skilled workers in the construction industry. Sen. Daniel Thatcher, who represents parts of Salt Lake and Tooele County, said that encouraging more young people to enter trade professions out of high school is the most im-

portant thing that can be done to improve housing affordability. “The AFL-CIO is the answer to the construction and trades labor shortage,” he said. “Republicans are traditionally against unions, but they really have some great apprenticeship programs. You get pay and benefits from day one, and four years later you’ll have the skills you need to be a freelance electrician, make $80,000 a year and have no college debt.” The Utah AFL-CIO website lists a number of apprenticeship programs in trades such as roofing, plumbing, masonry and cement and electrical work. Part of the coalition’s education campaign includes letting soon-to-be high school graduates know that they can enroll in such apprenticeship programs as an alternative to college. After a recent event in the Ogden School District, Osborne said that about 500 students expressed interest in the idea. Through these efforts, the Housing Gap Coalition is hopeful that Utah can avoid the big drastic moves taken by the likes of California and Minneapolis. “There’s many things causing the problem, so there’s a lot of different approaches to it,” said Osborne. l

Taylorsville City Journal


March is Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month

You were just in a car accident, now what?

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nless you’re one of the few anomalies in the world, we’ve all been in an accident. We’ve experienced that sickening feeling when your car makes unwanted contact with another vehicle. We’re frustrated and disheartened. While we may want to crawl into a hole, we can’t. There are things to do and we’ve given you 10 to be aware of (in no particular order). 1. Have an emergency kit in your car. While this step comes before the accident occurs, it’s essential to be prepared. Whatever you kit entails, make sure it has a first-aid kit, flashlight, reflective triangles and a small (and simple) camera in case there’s been damage to your phone. We’re typically frustrated or frazzled after an accident and not inclined to rational thinking. Being prepared limits the possibility of forgetfulness. 2. Take a deep breath. Accidents are traumatic experiences. Taking a breath will shift focus from what just happened to what needs to be done next. 3. Get a status check on everyone in the car. Check with each passenger to see if they are OK. Have someone call 911 immediately if someone is injured or unresponsive. 4. Move to a safe location. Most insurance companies recommend relocating the vehicle to the sidewalk or shoulder of the road as soon as possible after the accident. If the damage to the car is minor, this should be relatively easy. But if there are major injuries or questions about the safety of the car, leave it where it is, even if its blocking traffic. 5. Increase your visibility. Turn on your hazard lights and set out your attention items from the emergency kit—flares, orange cones, reflective triangles, etc. One accident should not lead to another. Take precaution to ensure other drivers on the road remain safe. 6. Stay calm. It is very easy to lose your temper in this situation, it’s human nature. Keeping your cool will keep the situation from getting worse. If it wasn’t your fault, it’s easy to want to let your emotions loose on the other driver. This will cloud your judgment and may lead to something that does not help the situation. You still need to exchange information.

TaylorsvilleJ ournal.com

7. Exchange insurance information. This is imperative. If you are to file a claim on your car, you will need the other driver’s information. Most likely, after an accident you are feeling jumpy or stressed. It means when you try to write down their information your handwriting will look like ancient hieroglyphics and, unless you are a cryptographer, will be unable to read it later. We live in the 21st century, take a photo of their information and take photos of the damage done to both cars. 8. Don’t admit guilt. Every insurance company will tell you to do this. Even if you are at fault and it was you to blame. This could drive your premium up or even lead to you being sued. Let the police and insurance companies determine this. 9. Call the police. While some minor accidents don’t require a report to be filed, it’s up to the discretion of the drivers in the accident to call the police. Law enforcement can take statements, get information on injuries and property damage. Be sure to ask for a copy of the accident report. If there is a dispute, the officer will be an important testimony. 10. See a doctor. Depending on the injuries suffered or not, it is easy to skip this. A large financial situation has just happened with the car accident, you don’t want another one by seeing the doctor and jacking up your health costs. It’s important to consider it, or possibly speak with one. Adrenaline can be pumping after the accident and one might not notice the amount of whiplash to your neck. Symptoms can take 24 hours to appear. The warning signs include neck pain, stiffness, loss of motion in the neck, headaches, fatigue, dizziness and pain in the shoulders or upper back. It can be better to be safe than sorry. l

By Amy Green | a.green@mycityjournals.com

Savannah enjoys picking out and sharing dandelions—her favorite flower. (Amy Green/City Journals)

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onning a green ribbon isn’t just for St. Patrick’s Day. This March, wearing a green ribbon represents a show of support for Celebral Palsy Awareness Month. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurological disorder that affects movement, motor skills and muscle tone. CP is caused by brain damage that happens in utero, during labor and delivery, or soon after birth. Adam Hunninghake, a doctor of physical medicine and rehabilitation explained, “There is a spectrum of how cerebral palsy can affect someone from very mild impairment to having spasticity in their limbs and having difficulty communicating.” There is no reversing or curing it. Jana Murray is a long-time resident of both Sandy and Herriman. She has a 24-yearold daughter Savannah, who was born with cerebral palsy. Murray has much experience keeping a child with cerebral palsy active, socialized and involved. There are rarely, if any, breaks. Savannah’s care is ongoing. Murray remembers a disappointing day taking Savannah to a public pool. Savannah needed to wear floaties (inflatable armbands) in order to swim safely, as the motor control area of her brain does not operate fully. The pool attendees would not allow Savannah to be an adult-sized person in the pool with floaties on. Only children were allowed to

wear them, they insisted. There was no exception made to allow Savannah to enjoy the water because of this policy. Murray knows there’s room for improvement, with facilities making accommodations for handicapped individuals. A few realistic safety measures can help everyone participate. Hunninghake said, “For all people, and that includes people with cerebral palsy, movement is vital. It’s what keeps us healthy. It’s what allows us independence. It lets us do things that give us quality of life.” Murray offers advice on being a support for those with special needs. She is also a strong advocate for the caregivers. “It can be uncomfortable to watch people with cerebral palsy move, interact and even eat. They can drool. They can be (what you might consider) inappropriate as far as a personal bubble space. They are human beings who deserve kindness. They do not always understand personal space,” Murray said. Caregivers know this and work closely to help their children with CP. “It’s okay to be uncomfortable,” Murray said. “If they are in your space, just be kind. They have needs, too. It’s not an easy thing for anyone.” A caregiver might not accept everyone’s offer of help, because a person with special needs might require a professional for many situations. But asking a caregiver how to help is best. Just being friendly and inclusive is what Murray suggested most. “I have a mom friend whose son has severe, severe CP. She would put stickers of race cars on her son’s wheelchair, just so that people would talk to him. I don’t know how much of that interaction the boy really understood, but it meant the world to his mother when people interacted with her son,” Murray said. Another friend of Savannah’s gave her a dog-walking job, so that Savannah could have an active, more grown-up type of experience she craves. March is a good time to talk about interacting with those with special needs. Saying hello, giving a high five and general inclusiveness are good ways to start. Invite a person with a disability to participate in an activity. The goal is to acknowledge and treat special needs people as one would a typical friend. The City Journals welcomes thoughts on helping to raise awareness, acceptance and opportunities for community members with unique challenges. Follow on social media www.facebook.com/thecityjournals/ to share or comment on this story. l

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Taylorsville natural disaster response program being overhauled and updated By Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.comt

Air filtering masks are among the items now held in CERT storage containers throughout Taylorsville. (Carl Fauver/City Journals)

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f you are of a certain age, the word CERT reminds you of a breath mint. Those people can also remember the television program “Mr. Ed” and a time when the New England Patriots were a consistently, reliably BAD football team. But teams, talking horses and times change. And with CERT now standing for Community Emergency Response Team, the man in charge of that program in Taylorsville is working hard to update the volunteer training and disaster response equipment. “I began this job in October 2017, after working about ten years – as a civilian – for the police department,” Donny Gasu said. “Since then I have been assessing our needs and working to resolve a few problems.” Specifically, Gasu says the list of certified, volunteer emergency responders living throughout Taylorsville is outdated. So too is much of the equipment stationed throughout the city in storage “caches.” “When I started the job, I was given a

list of about 800 Taylorsville residents who were CERT trained and ready to respond to a natural disaster,” Gasu continued. “But as I have been working my way through that list, making calls, I have discovered many people have either moved or passed away. I quickly determined we need a new push to get volunteers certified to help out.” Unfortunately, just about the time Donny was learning he had a problem, he got another one – when the city’s volunteer CERT program manager chose to leave that post. In effect, Gasu lost the only person he had helping him coordinate the program. “I’m now looking for a new volunteer Cert program manager,” he said. “Until someone steps forward, I will continue to handle it. If it looks like we may be without a manager for a while, I may ask the city’s Public Safety Committee to start coordinating it again.” “We were in charge of the city’s CERT program for quite some time, until it broke

off into its own committee,” said Public Safety Committee Chairman Tony Henderson. “We’re happy to help out again if they need it. Having people trained and equipped to respond to a natural disaster is critical and anything our committee can do to help we are happy to do.” Next on Gasu’s “to-do” list is getting the word out, that Taylorsville is now in almost desperate need of more CERT-trained emergency response volunteers. “I think people just don’t realize we need the help.” Gasu continued. “I just barely became CERT-certified myself, last September. The normal certification course consists of one 2-and-a-half-hour class per week, for eight weeks. People can also certify on line. They just need to contact me first so our office can help coordinate it.” Those interested in assisting should call Donny Gasu at city hall (801-963-5400 ext. 1002) or email him (dgasu@taylorsvilleut. gov). “I am also available to speak at schools, churches or other places about our need for the CERT training,” he said. “But, again, no one has requested that since I have been in this job.” The final hurdle facing the city emergency response department appears to be aging equipment and a lack of large storage containers positioned around the city. “If we did have a natural disaster, who knows how easy it will be for people to get around,” Gasu said. “That is why we have equipment caches in different locations. But right now, we have only five of those and they are immobile storage containers. I think we need more, and they should be wheeled trailers so they can be moved.” Donny hopes to replace the department’s five grounded storage caches with 12 trailers. His department has two of those already and he expects the other 10 to cost about $4000

each. The cost to properly equip the caches is about $5000 each, for first aid supplies, back braces, stretchers, tarps and many other items. So, the total cost to get things the way Gasu feels they need to be is right around $100,000. “This won’t happen in one year or one budget cycle,” Gasu concluded. “We hope to submit grant proposals to get some of the funding. And it’s likely we will also approach the city council during their next budget season to seek more funding.” Despite barely being in his job fewer than 18 months, Gasu already has one influential supporter on his side. “Donny is an asset to our city and is very focused on getting our community prepared with trained CERT volunteers and with the proper equipment for the program,” Mayor Kristie Overson said. “We want the CERT program to be strengthened. We rely on volunteers to make it work and always want it to be bigger and better. We’re now evaluating the emergency response equipment and making upgrades. I think Donny is doing a great job coordinating all of that.” l

Taylorsville Emergency Response Coordinator Donny Gasu is working to overhaul and update the city’s volunteer CERT program. (Carl Fauver/City Journals)

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Taylorsville Public Safety Committee pledges to assist neighborhoodwatch groups remain active By Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com

Mascots weren’t alone at last year’s annual Utah Department of Public Safety Family Safety Fair, as members of the Taylorsville Public Safety committee also operated an informational booth there. (Utah DPS)

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aylorsville Public Safety citizen volunteer committee chairman Tony Henderson has been a member of that committee since before the city was officially incorporated in 1996. He’s observed a lot of trends in that time. And one of them his committee hopes to help curb in 2019. “We’ve seen, time and time again, something will happen in a neighborhood – a series of car break-ins or home burglaries – and people will get worked up to start a neighborhood watch program,” Henderson said. “Then the problem will basically resolve itself – the crimes slow down – and the neighborhood watches generally stop functioning. Our committee pledged (to the Unified Police Department Taylorsville Precinct) that we will do what we can this year, to help those new neighborhood watch groups to keep operating.”

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Henderson’s committee made that promise to a pair of police officers who attended their monthly meeting in February, where a variety of possible projects were discussed. “We’re a pretty small committee – with only about six active members – so we can’t take on a lot of huge projects,” Henderson added. “But we have accomplished quite a few things over the years. We had a list of nine priorities during our meeting. The two police officers offered to address a couple of them by writing articles for the (Taylorsville Journal) newspaper.” Public Safety Committee members say, many residents have told them they would prefer educational campaigns – particularly to resolve driving issues – rather than to see an increase in the number of tickets being written. “The police officers said, someone in their department will write an article explaining what citizens should do if there are too many people speeding in their neighborhood,” Henderson said. “And the second police department article will be about laws for crosswalk safety.” For example, if you are stopped at a crosswalk and pedestrians pass in front of you, it is illegal to proceed through the crosswalk after the walkers have cleared your path, until they are completely off the road and onto the far sidewalk. After 22 years as a civilian electrical engineer and engineering manager at Hill Air Force Base, Henderson has made a career change, now teaching math at West Hills Middle School (West Jordan) in what he describes as “the most stressful year of my life.” About the time he started at Hill AFB

– in the mid- to late-1990s – Henderson landed on the Taylorsville Public Safety Committee purely by accident. “I just told the Taylorsville incorporation group I was willing to volunteer… they assigned me to public safety…. I had no background in it… but I joined, and have been on the committee ever since.” Over the years, the committee has spearheaded a variety of public safety educational initiatives. “One of our big events is our annual Night Out Against Crime,” he said. “The one coming in August will be our fifth annual. We also staff an informational booth at Taylorsville Dayzz, participate in various other safety fairs sponsored by other agencies and provide public education in other ways.” The Public Safety Committee has hosted anti-gang conferences, sold discounted radon gas test kits and conducted a variety of safety surveys on things like street lighting and sidewalk safety. “We’re simply trying to make Taylorsville a little bit nicer place to live,” Henderson concluded. The Taylorsville City Council liaison to the Public Safety Committee is chairman Dan Armstrong. “Neighborhood watch programs take a lot of work,” Armstrong said. “You can’t just appoint people and walk away. You need to make sure someone is keeping the group on track. I am glad the Public Safety Committee is taking this on as a priority.” Another Taylorsville resident who’s been active on the Public Safety Committee nearly as long as Henderson is former chairwoman Donna Pitman. “I think we have been able to bring people’s attention to problems and help

them get solved,” she said. “The typical number of people at our committee meetings is about six. So, we are always looking for more people – especially if they have valuable ideas to share.” Public Safety Committee meetings are held at 6 p.m. at Taylorsville City Hall, on the first Thursday of each month. Anyone interested in learning more about the committee should contact chairman Tony Henderson at tonysown@msn.com. l

The Taylorsville Public Safety volunteer committee has set a goal this year to assist fledgling neighborhood watch groups to sustain long-term success. (Carl Fauver/Valley Journals)

March 2019 | Page 7


LuCha leaders promote community at Latinx conference By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

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atinx student leaders at Salt Lake Community College have so many ideas to create impactful experiences for Latinx/os/ as students, they outgrew their previous leadership association. “With LIA [Latinos In Action] they were very limited, particularly in terms of their scope—what conversations they could have and what they could do,” said Richard Diaz, Interim Director for the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at Salt Lake Community College, Redwood Campus. “This new rebranding under the Student Life clubs organization gave them the opportunity to expand and do more in ways that they couldn’t do before.” Student leaders established LuCha, Latinx/os/as United for Change and Activism, under the umbrella of college clubs. They now have greater flexibility in how they can reach out to current and prospective students and how they implement their ideas for creating a supportive environment on campus. “Many of them just came out of high school, too, so they have a very good sense of what the need is,” said Diaz. “They’re trying to create a program that reflects the needs of those high school students that are coming in.” The organization has provided more opportunities to develop leaders. “The school is really good at creating

opportunities and having conversations to really help students articulate their thoughts and help them find ways to share their vision,” said Diaz. Their vision included a day-long conference for high school students held Jan. 25. Latinx students from high schools across the Wasatch Front were invited; 244 students attended. LuCha leaders and community professionals taught workshops focused on college-readiness (scholarships, college resources) and cultural topics (health disparity and cultural identity and pride) as well as social justice and gender norms. Andrew Busath, a teacher at Kearns High School, brought 43 students to the conference. He said the workshop topics were relevant to his students. “They were appropriate and ones that interest the kids,” he said. “It’s great because they don’t get to talk about these things in school but they are issues that are on their minds.” Busath recognized some of the LuCha leaders—they were high school LIA officers just a few years ago. “It makes it a little more special that these kids are a couple years ahead and know what they’re really going through and can really relate,” said Busath. The focus of the conference was to pro-

mote higher education and educate students about resources available to them. Diaz said he hoped students came away seeing college as a viable option in their future. “A lot of them are first generation college students,” said Joan Lopez, LuCha VP of Programming. “Most of the time they don’t have the resources or know who to talk to so this is away to get them started.” Keynote speaker, Sebastian Uprimny, a SLCC alum and Olympian, spoke to students about achieving goals. Cindy Diaz-Rey, a senior from Bingham High School, was inspired by the Olympian’s story and the obstacles he overcame to represent Colombia as a cross-country skier in the 2018 Winter Olympics. “He was trying to empower people through his story and his struggles,” she said. She felt empowered by the conference— especially the workshop about cultural identity. “I think it’s very important for us to recognize our roots and not be ashamed of it,” said Diaz-Rey, who feels community support is imperative. Diaz said cultural identity was a very popular topic for students at the conference. “Because a lot of the Latino community has indigenous roots, there’s a lot of exploration of what that means for our community, how that impacts our way of thinking, how

those are strengths for us to rely on to navigate challenges that we face—so really our culture as an asset and not so much as a deficit,” said Diaz. LuCha Co-President Jenny Jimenez said another goal of the conference was to connect high school students to a support system that will help them have a more successful college experience. “I want these high school students to know they have friends here, that they can come talk to us,” she said. Andrea Xiques, a sophomore from Kearns High School, said there was a good vibe at the conference. “I found this conference really moving and I really want to come again,” she said. “This conference makes me want to push more because education is such a big key to succeed in life.” l

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Taylorsville City Journal


Multi-million dollar federal grant will transform the look of Redwood Road through Taylorsville By Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com ed. “The cemetery belongs to the city and we want to be sure we are caring for it properly. One thing I know they plan to do is improve the entryway.” Administrator Taylor said the next step in the process is to hire a design team.

These unsightly utility poles – between 4100 and 5400 South – are to be replaced with underground lines as part of a Redwood Road beautification project. (Carl Fauver/Cit Journals)

T

“That bid (was) put out in February,” he said. “City council members and Taylorsville employees have all shared different ideas about what should be done to improve Redwood Road. But now we need a professional team to analyze it and begin to determine what can be completed with the available funding.” At this point no one is sure when construction work will begin. “We are all anxious to see it get started, we hope sometime this summer,” Mayor Overson concluded. “But we also want to make sure we get it right. We want to give designers time to really look at the options. So, we just don’t know the timeline yet.” The city council even passed a resolution specifically approving receipt of the federal grant funding for the “Redwood Mobility Project” weeks ahead of when such action would normally be taken, as part of the routine municipal budgeting process. “We have been on the Wasatch Front Regional Council list for the funding at least ten years,” Councilman Brad Christopherson said. “Now that the money is finally available, we knew the sooner we passed the resolution, the sooner work could begin. We’re all tired of waiting for it; so we fast-tracked the vote.” City officials hope to have a designer for the project selected by the end of March. “We will have at least one public hearing on the project, hopefully this spring or summer,” Taylor concluded. “This will give Redwood Road better curb appeal and better lighting,” Council Chairman Dan Armstrong added. “It should be very positive and I’m glad to see it finally happening.” l

he old adage ‘you have to spend money, to make money’ was never more true, than when the Taylorsville City Council made the very easy and unanimous decision to spend $835,000. That’s how much local taxpayers had to pony up, for the city to receive nearly 20 times that much, in federal tax money, for a major facelift on both sides of Redwood Road, from 4100 to 5400 South. “The city was approved to receive just under $13-million federal dollars through the Wasatch Front Regional Council,” said City Administrator John Taylor. “But to receive that funding, the city council had to approve a 6.6 percent match, or $835,000.” City officials were told of their grant proposal approval years ago. Since then, they have waited for the funding to actually become available, as Taylorsville worked its way up a list. “A number of different committees have to review grant requests – including the State Transportation Commission and the Council of Mayors – before it is approved,” Taylor continued. “(Taylorsville does) not actually receive the money. But we are involved in selecting the planning and design team, and construction contractors. The funds are then paid directly by the Wasatch Front Regional Council to those doing the work.” That project entails a major beautification along Redwood Road, from 4100 to 5400 South. It comes several years after a nearly identical project was completed on the much shorter stretch of Redwood Road, from 5400 South to the belt route (I-215) overpass. “It has been a long time since Phase 1 (of the Redwood Road beautification project) was completed and we are pleased to finally be able to move ahead with this second phase,” said Mayor Kristie Overson. “Mostly we want to do away with the visual clutter. This will include burying utility lines. Beautification walls will also be built along parts of the road. We want to give Redwood a more attractive, uniform look.” Some separate driveways into Redwood Road businesses will also be combined, to make access easier. Sidewalks will be overhauled and improved as needed. New street lights will be added along the corridor. And bus stop turnouts – to remove busses from the right travel lane – will be created as well. A planned Redwood Road beautification project – between 4100 and “We also want to give the Taylorsville Cemetery (4550 5400 South – is expected to include the installation of several new street South Redwood Road) the attention it deserves,” Overson add- lights. (Carl Fauver/City Journals)

TaylorsvilleJ ournal.com

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Taylorsville officials thrilled to see West Jordan join their business support organization, ChamberWest By Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com

The West Jordan City Council recently voted to affiliate with ChamberWest to help boost its area businesses, just as Taylorsville City has done for years. (Carl Fauver/ City Journals)

A

big change for West Jordan City.

A big validation for Taylorsville City. A big coup for ChamberWest. And a big disappointment for the West Jordan Chamber of Commerce. All of those things occurred simultaneously, earlier this year, when the West Jordan City Council voted to break its age old ties with their local chamber of commerce and contract for similar services with ChamberWest – something Taylorsville has been doing for decades. “We look forward to working with ChamberWest to promote West Jordan’s business culture and a positive business environment,” Mayor Jim Riding said in a news release. “ChamberWest is well respected and knows how to work effectively and develop productive partnerships with the business community and civic and political leaders.” Riding’s counterpart in Taylorsville could not be more thrilled. “Having West Jordan come in with us will strengthen what is already a strong and valuable organization in ChamberWest,” Taylorsville Mayor Kristie Overson said. “As they get to know everything ChamberWest has to offer, the West Jordan council and mayor will quickly learn what an asset ChamberWest is. We have been with them for years and it has been a great decision. Barbara Riddle is amazing.” Riddle – the president and CEO of ChamberWest – said her organization has been around more than 50 years, though under different names. She said they are anxious to provide the same professional service to West Jordan that they have been providing

Page 10 | March 2019

for years in Taylorsville, West Valley City and unincorporated Kearns. “(West Jordan voting to join ChamberWest) is a validation of the strength of our organization and the programs we offer,” Riddle said. “We are working to grow our organization now, and this is a major accomplishment getting West Jordan to join. It will improve all of ChamberWest and I am confident West Jordan leaders will be happy with their decision.” ChamberWest has only three full time employees – Riddle, a business development director and an office manager. They also rely on dozens of volunteers from the business community to be the chairs and vice chairs of countless service committees. “We have a board of directors, a board of governors and many committees addressing legislative affairs, education, economic development, air quality, health care and other issues,” Riddle said. “ChamberWest is also now rolling out a business sustainability program and developing a series of informational videos for social media.” West Jordan Public Information Officer Kim Wells says it was all too much for her city council to pass on. “ChamberWest is a regional chamber that serves 350,000 individuals and is available to serve approximately 9,000 businesses,” Wells said. “Back in August our city council decided to evaluate the services it was receiving from the West Jordan Chamber of Commerce. This led to an RFP process. ChamberWest was selected, with their $10,000 service agreement saving our city $38,000 per year, over the cost of membership in the West Jordan Chamber.”

The West Jordan City Council’s decision now puts that community’s business owners on the spot. They must decide whether to jump ship to ChamberWest as well, or remain with the West Jordan Chamber, which has suddenly seen its annual income drop by $48,000 per year. “Lots of West Jordan businesses have called us since the city announced it is joining ChamberWest,” Riddle continued. “We offer so many programs – along with regional representation – I am confident many of those businesses will join us as well.” Among the things Riddle said her organization provides are: a leadership institute, annual awards gala, fall business conference, annual golf tournament, emergency preparedness training, a women in business program and an ambassador committee that tends to new business ribbon cuttings, among other things. ChamberWest’s roots go back to 1961, when the organization began as the Granger-Hunter Chamber of Commerce. Later that same decade (“1967ish” Riddle said) the organization became the Granger-Hunter-Taylorsville Chamber of Commerce – nearly 30 years before Taylorsville actually incorporated. “(ChamberWest) has proven to be very valuable to our large and small businesses,” Taylorsville Mayor Overson concluded. “From a selfish standpoint, I am so excited to have West Jordan join us. That can’t help but make ChamberWest stronger, as it represents all of us in matters of regional interest.” About 300 businesses are currently members of ChamberWest, paying basic membership fees of $250 to $725. l

Taylorsville City Journal


In-house pet surgeries have proven successful at the West Valley City-Taylorsville Animal Shelter By Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com

W

est Valley City-Taylorsville Animal Control officials are pleased with a pair of experiments they launched last spring and are planning to continue them through 2019. A year ago, the agency began patrolling area parks on bicycles, keeping an eye out for unleashed and unattended animals. About the same time, they also chose to bring their animal surgeries in-house, to their shelter at 4522 West 3500 South. “The bike patrols proved very successful as our staff members were able to get to know pet owners in a less confrontational way,” said Animal Services Director David Moss. “The feedback we got from people was that they found the interactions to be more positive. Our people didn’t write many tickets. It was mostly a public relations thing. We plan to start those up again soon, now that the weather is improving.” As for the animal surgeries, Moss said things got off to a bit of a rocky start but have since improved. “We had more animal deaths during surgery during the first several months of the contract, which was creating morale problems for our staff.” Moss continued. “Our people care for these animals and deaths up-

set them. Our rate of deaths for those first months was higher than when we transported the animals for surgery. But I have seen improvement since then.” A year ago, semi-retired Bountiful veterinarian Dr. Daniel Sims won the contract to perform the surgeries. Dr. Sims, 75, became a veterinarian in 1967 and will reach 52 years in practice this summer. His contract with animal services pays him $70 per hour. “I particularly like performing surgeries, especially spays and neuters, so this has been a good fit for me,” Dr. Sims said. “I also set a few broken bones. And occasionally I have to treat something we call ‘happy tail.’ This occurs when a dog wags its tail so much it hits things and injures it. In these surgeries I amputate a part of the tail and simply make them short-tailed dogs.” As a part of his contract, Dr. Sims also supervises the West Valley City-Taylorsville rabies vaccination program. State law does not require a licensed veterinarian to perform all of the vaccinations. But a vet must train those administering the shots and supervise the program. Taylorsville City is a one-third partner in West Valley City Animal Control and a onethird owner in the agency’s relatively new

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animal shelter. “It is a good partnership with West Valley City and I see no reason why it won’t continue into the future,” Mayor Kristie Overson said. “We meet with David Moss often to understand and clarify policies and procedures. We have a really good relationship with West Valley City.” Before veterinary surgical procedures could be taken in-house a year ago, Moss requested and received $20,000 from the West Valley City Council to purchase necessary equipment. He remains convinced the change will save taxpayers money over the long haul, while also being better for the animals. But at this one-year anniversary of the change, Moss has also decided to reevaluate who is performing the work. “I spoke with Dr. Sims in late January and gave him a 90-day termination notice, meaning a new contract will need to be in place by April 30,” Moss continued. “Certainly Dr. Sims will remain in the running to continue his work for us. But we also want to consider other candidates.” “I will work there as long as I am capable and they want me,” Dr. Sims concluded. “I like what I do. We did have some fatalities

during our first few months, but have made improvements since then. I don’t like losing animals – period.” The doctor said, seven surgery-related animal fatalities – during his first six months on the job – prompted a change in animal anesthesia and some procedures. Since September, Dr. Sims says there has been only one animal fatality. The doctor also conducts the shelter’s popular pet vaccine clinics on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month, from 3 to 6 p.m. “We are committed to having an on-site vet,” Moss concluded. “There is a great benefit in not having to transport the animals. And the vet is also able to conduct wellness checks on animals that don’t need surgery. It’s a huge advantage.” Animal control officials say the change has also saved taxpayers money, though the exact amount is still being calculated. l

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March 2019 | Page 11


Bennion Elementary, a training school for superheroes By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

Kindergarten teacher Lynette Andrew teaches many concepts through books that incorporate superheroes, such as “Even Superheroes Make Mistakes” written by Shelly Becker and Illustrated by Eda Kaban. (Jet Burnham/City Journals)

B

ennion Elementary has become a training school for superheroes. With a cape and a mask added to their mascot, a superhero twist has been applied to everything from leadership programs and family activities to homework folders and classroom decorations. Students are constantly reminded to BE (Bennion Elementary) Heroes. “I think this theme is one that students can

relate to easily as superheroes are prevalent right now in movies—it’s something that makes sense to them,” said third-grade teacher Tracy Bell. At the beginning of the year, students were challenged to discover what makes them a superhero, identify their strengths and qualities and think about how to activate these as superpowers to help others and overcome personal challenges. Bethany Johnson, Bennion Elementary’s social worker, models this philosophy for students. She tells them, “I may not have superhuman strength but I have a lot of strength to talk about hard things and find answers.” She reminds students that everyone deals with hard things in their life. “Every hero has an origin story and every hero had adversity that they had to overcome,” said Johnson. “They used those things to become the great people that they are.” Likewise, she speaks with students of how they can use adversity—losing a parent, moving away from their home, experiencing scary situations—to fuel their strength and to help others. Bell inspires her students to find the power within themselves to do hard things, continually reinforcing the fact they each have unique strengths and powers. Bell also arms students with the superpower of words such as “yet” to help her students establish a growth mindset. Reframing discouraging thoughts into “I don’t understand a concept or skill, yet,” or “I’m

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Page 12 | March 2019

not at a certain level in reading, yet,” helps students see their progress toward success. Teachers at the school have embraced the theme in their classrooms, including superheroes in classroom décor, tools and projects. First-grade teacher Sandra Funk has filled her classroom with superhero-themed posters of class rules and school-wide expectations of being respectful, responsible, safe, and kind. “I teach first grade, so posters are a great visual reminder for these young learners,” said Funk. Superheroes can be found on behavior charts, job charts, counting visuals and bathroom passes in Lynette Andrew’s kindergarten classroom. With the super hero theme, she encourages her students to discover what makes them special. She said it is especially empowering for those who don’t excel in the outward skills that society usually celebrates. Andrew, who has taught for 21 years, said many 5 year-olds feel powerless in their lives. She teaches them the superpower of being proactive so they can take control of how they will react to a situation. “I think it empowers them and makes them feel that they have a choice, when in kindergarten, kids don’t feel like they really do have a choice on much of anything,” she said. Her students also love reading about super heroes. Andrew and Funk both use picture books about superheroes and leadership concepts they can relate to superhero powers. Principal Jane McClure said every school activity this year has had a superhero spin—assemblies, quarterly good behavior rewards, leadership award luncheons. Students dressed up as superheroes for the Daddy Daughter Dance in January and will again for the Mother and Son Game Night planned for March. Even the annual sixth-grade Wax Museum, when students research and then portray a historical figure, focused on heroes in history who used their superpowers to make world better place. Nathan Bentley chose to highlight Johannes Gutenberg, inventor of the printing press as his hero. “He was a hero because he obviously changed the world and he helped a lot of people be able to read—we probably wouldn’t have a school without it,” he said. Nathan built a model printing press out of cardboard, demonstrating that his creativity and love of building is his superpower. “I like to come up with ideas and create things. I like to build things out of what I have,” he said. “I hope I’m making something that’s going to change the world.” Miranda Canton dressed up in her great-grandmother’s clothes and jewelry to portray Lucille Ball, whose super power, she determined, was humor. “She was just a really sweet and funny person to cheer everybody up,” she said. Miranda said she used this same superpower to befriend a girl who was being bullied. By telling jokes and

cheering her up, Miranda became her best friend. ----if you want a shorter article, from here down could be either a sidebar/inset article or a separate article---Harnessing the superpower of emotional intelligence April Stevenson, a fourth-grade teacher at Bennion Elementary, has been using a “super leaders” theme for the last few years, to arm her students with leadership and emotional management skills. Through art and writing assignments, her students create a power statement—a positive declaration—about their abilities, which they recite almost daily to remind them of their positive powers. “I want them to say it with confidence and with a surety that they are declaring they are funny, they are smart, they are intelligent,” she said. “I’m a firm believer that words have power.” Believing that negative words damage self-confidence, she trains her students to defeat their negative self-talk. “Our negative self talk is so prevalent but we don’t talk about it enough,” said Stevenson, who believes all schools should teach emotional management skills. Her students routinely “slay the dragon”, an activity to help them deal with their frustrations, failures and fears. Students take 3-5 minutes to scribble their negative feelings and thoughts onto paper. Then they “slay the dragon.” “We tear it up, stomp on it and we throw it away,” she said. Stevenson has established a pre-test routine to help students to reduce their negative and anxious feelings about testing. She pumps them with power, she plays empowering, epic music, she recites positive affirmations, and she leads them in power poses. According to her research, the superhero pose (standing tall with fists on hips) or the victory pose (arms reaching up in a v-shape) create confidence and actually cause chemical changes in the body to make the person more powerful. Stevenson also regularly checks-in with students to see how they see themselves, others and the world. “If you see the world as a bad place, you live in a defense mode and expect bad things are going to happen to you,” she said. “But if you see the world as an ok, good or great place, you go about acting in the world differently.” She believes one’s view affects their behaviors, which ultimately determines if they are a superhero or a villain. Incorporating emotional management education into her curriculum takes extra time and effort, admits Stevenson. However, it is an investment she believes has a payoff down the road. “If they don’t have a sense of self, it doesn’t matter what I do all day long with reading, writing and arithmetic,” she said. “I’ve done my job if 15 years down the road, my students are kinder to themselves and others.” l

Taylorsville City Journal


Students developing superpowers at Bennion Elementary By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

B

ennion Elementary has become a training school for superheroes. With a cape and a mask added to their mascot, a superhero twist has been applied to everything from leadership programs and family activities to homework folders and classroom decorations. Students are constantly reminded to BE (Bennion Elementary) Heroes. “I think this theme is one that students can relate to easily, as superheroes are prevalent right now in movies—it’s something that makes sense to them,” said third-grade teacher Tracy Bell. At the beginning of the year, students were challenged to discover what makes them a superhero, identify their strengths and qualities, and think about how to activate these as superpowers to help others and overcome personal challenges. Bethany Johnson, Bennion Elementary’s social worker, models this philosophy for students. She tells them, “I may not have superhuman strength, but I have a lot of strength to talk about hard things and find answers.” She reminds students that all people deal with hard things in their life. “Every hero has an origin story, and every hero had adversity that they had to overcome,” said Johnson. “They used those

TaylorsvilleJ ournal.com

things to become the great people that they are.” Likewise, she speaks with students of how they can use adversity—losing a parent, moving away from their home, experiencing scary situations—to fuel their strength and to help others. Bell inspires her students to find the power within themselves to do hard things, continually reinforcing the fact they each have unique strengths and powers. Bell also arms students with the superpower of words such as “yet” to help her students establish a growth mindset. Reframing discouraging thoughts into “I don’t understand a concept or skill—yet,” or “I’m not at a certain level in reading— yet,” helps students see their progress toward success. Teachers at the school have embraced the theme in their classrooms, including having superheroes in classroom décor, tools and projects. First-grade teacher Sandra Funk has filled her classroom with superhero-themed posters of class rules and schoolwide expectations of being respectful, responsible, safe and kind. “I teach first grade, so posters are a great visual reminder for these young learners,” said Funk. Superheroes can be found on behav-

ior charts, job charts, counting visuals and bathroom passes in Lynette Andrew’s kindergarten classroom. With the superhero theme, she encourages her students to discover what makes them special. She said it is especially empowering for those who don’t excel in the outward skills that society usually celebrates. Andrew, who has taught for 21 years, said many 5-year-olds feel powerless in their lives. She teaches them the superpower of being proactive so they can take control of how they will react to a situation. “I think it empowers them and makes them feel that they have a choice,” she said. “When in kindergarten, kids don’t feel like they really do have a choice on much of anything.” Her students also love reading about super heroes. Andrew and Funk both use picture books about superheroes and leadership concepts they can relate to superhero powers. Principal Jane McClure said every school activity this year has had a superhero spin—assemblies, quarterly good behavior rewards, leadership award luncheons. Students dressed up as superheroes for the Daddy-Daughter Dance in January and will again for the Mother and Son Game Night planned for March.

Even the annual sixth-grade Wax Museum, when students research and then portray a historical figure, focused on heroes in history who used their superpowers to make world better place. Nathan Bentley chose to highlight Johannes Gutenberg, inventor of the printing press as his hero. “He was a hero because he obviously changed the world, and he helped a lot of people be able to read; we probably wouldn’t have a school without it,” he said. Nathan built a model printing press out of cardboard, demonstrating that his creativity and love of building is his superpower. “I like to come up with ideas and create things,” he said. “I like to build things out of what I have. I hope I’m making something that’s going to change the world.” Miranda Canton dressed up in her great-grandmother’s clothes and jewelry to portray Lucille Ball, whose superpower, she determined, was humor. “She was just a really sweet and funny person to cheer everybody up,” she said. Miranda said she used this same superpower to befriend a girl who was being bullied. By telling jokes and cheering her up, Miranda became her best friend. l

March 2019 | Page 13


Women’s Leadership Institute encourages Utah women to ‘Step Up and Run’ By Jennifer J. Johnson | j.johnson@mycityjournals.com

: The Women’s Leadership Institute honored the efforts of 43 Utah women who completed its 2018 six-month Political Development Series Feb. 7 at the State Capitol.

Make a difference in your community by stepping up and running for office.” That is the straightforward pitch of Utah’s Women’s Leadership Institute (WLI), an innovative organization whose class of more than 40 women politicians and public servants graduated last month. This year’s class was honored Feb. 7 at the Capitol on the floor of the Utah Senate and House of Representatives. This new cohort of women becomes a leadership force of more than 160 women who have completed the six-month, bipartisan training, covering everything from campaign finance to canvassing. Five of Utah’s mayors, (including Provo City’s first female mayor), two county commissioners, and multiple city council members are among the graduates. ‘Cultural Urgency’ for governing differently The WLI Political Development Series, which has been running since 2015, now, more than ever has “cultural urgency,” said Patricia Jones, WLI chief executive officer. This cultural urgency can be seen on topics such as education funding, an issue of particular concern to women. The 2016 New York Times article “Women Actually Do Govern Differently” articulates this point. “Women govern differently than men do in some important ways. They tend to be more collaborative and bipartisan [and] push for far more policies meant to support women, children, [and] social welfare.” But these bills are also more likely to die, largely because of gender bias, research shows. Women in Congress sponsor and co-sponsor more bills than men do, and bring nine percent more federal money to their districts, according to a study in the “American Journal of Political Science.” A 2018 “Political Science Research and Methods” study of more than 150,000 public

Page 14 | March 2019

bills introduced to the national legislature between 1973 and 2014 found that women were significantly more likely than men to sponsor bills in areas like civil rights, health and education. Men were more likely to sponsor bills in agriculture, energy and macroeconomics. “I think that we were actually ahead of our time with encouraging women to run for office,” observed Jones. Jones, who served 14 years in the Utah Senate and House of Representatives, was herself ahead of her time and now has helped mentor some of the women comprising Utah’s legislature, which has more women than ever before. While serving in the legislature, Jones’s sponsorship of funding to teach Utah high school students about personal finance is an example of what WLI does well – help women learn how to advance their unique, passionate perspectives through politics. (Thanks to Jones’ successful program, Utah is the only state in the United States credited by Yahoo Finance in 2018 as receiving an “A+” for preparing students with financial literacy.) The Women’s Legislative Network of the National Conference of State Legislatures reports that in 2019 women comprise 28.5 percent of all state legislators nationwide, an increase of 25.3 percent, and the most women elected at one time. Utah’s current legislature is 24 percent female – with 25 of 104 lawmakers being women. According to 2017 research by the Utah Women & Leadership Project, 24.1 percent of all council members in Utah municipalities are female. Stepping up to run and to encourage “These women are committed to run for office. Or at the very least make a difference in their communities,” Jones explained. Jones

went on to describe this year’s class as an extremely diverse group comprised of single moms, women of color, and women with disabilities. “These are women who represent our state and are willing to step up and run.” “Stepping up” is not just for women, Jones is quick to point out. Men mentoring women is part of WLI’s ElevateHER Challenge. “We encourage men and women to mentor each other and also to encourage women they know to run for office,” said Jones. Jones makes the pitch personal, actionable. “If you have a co-worker, neighbor, or family member who would be great — reach out and encourage them. Just like every other piece of advancement, supportive men are a critical component of women who run and end up winning in political office. “Helping women and men understand the value of gender diversity in business and politics has really become a critical piece of what we do. Not because it’s the ‘nice’ thing to do, but because it’s what can bring a return on investment rapidly. We need women’s voices and we need them at every level.” Women leaders: A gubernatorial mandate Utah Lieutenant Governor Spencer J. Cox has served on the board of directors for WLI the past five years. He joined WLI CEO Jones in presenting this year’s class with certificates of accomplishment at the Capitol. The City Journals asked the lieutenant governor how he sees his role – and that of the Governor – in helping Utah women engage and be enabled to make a difference in Utah politics. “Women need to know that they are needed at the highest levels. The Governor and I are committed to speaking up on this as often as we

can,” he said. Cox says he is familiar with dozens of women who have completed the training series. “I’m proud that many have gone on to run for office and earn leadership roles in business. This training provides them with skills and resources to make those leaps forward, and the opportunity to meet other strong women with the same drive and passion to make a difference.” Cox observed that, historically, Utah’s legislature “has not very many women.” “I am happy to see that changing — even though it is perhaps still changing too slowly,” he said. The new WLI graduates, he says, “represent what Utah has to offer by way of outstanding public leaders in years to come. I am encouraged by their desire to serve. They are prepared, and committed, to improving their world and our great state, and we are proud of their efforts.” How to step up There is already a waiting list for WLI’s 2019 training, which is scheduled to start September 2019. Interested women can join the list at www.wliut.com/pds. The 2018 cost was $179 for the six, three-hour sessions, which all included lunch. Sessions were alternatingly held at the Salt Lake Chamber and at Silicon Slopes, with live streaming available for those not able to attend in person. In addition to the Women’s Leadership Institute, Salt Lake Valley women might consider the national She Should Run organization (https://www.sheshouldrun.org/). Real Women Run (https://www.ywcautah.org/real-women-run/) is a local YWCA program tailored for women more in the beginnings of political interests and often collaborates with WLI.

Taylorsville City Journal


City of Taylorsville Newsletter 2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400

MAYOR'S MESSAGE

–Mayor Kristie S. Overson

WHAT’S INSIDE – March 2019 Frequently Called Numbers, Page 2 Council Corner, Page 3 Public Safety, Pages 4-5 Heritage Remembrances, Page 6 The Arts, Page 8

March 2019

City Leaders are Working to Bring BRT to Taylorsville

Dear Friends and Neighbors, Good deeds are happening all around us. We may not always be aware of everything outside our immediate neighborhood. But I have found that with the job of Mayor comes a vantage point to see all kinds of kind gestures that are occurring every day in our community. Mayor Kristie S. Overson These generous acts and compassionate service make me so proud of our Taylorsville home. I saw such neighborly kindness, in particular, this past month when our city was walloped by snowstorms, the largest of which closed schools and delayed garbage collection. Our snowplow drivers worked around the clock to clear the snow as quickly as possible. But the heavy snow, of course, complicated efforts. In response, I saw residents helping each other. I saw neighbors checking on each other and shoveling the snow. I saw individuals wheeling snow-blowers down streets to clear sidewalks and driveways of elderly neighbors. I saw parents exercise patience in getting around, and children who were overjoyed to have a rare snow day off school. Thank you for looking out for each other and helping your neighbors. It makes such a difference. Indeed, I would say these kind acts are priceless. They create a positive environment for our city, improve the quality of life we enjoy and generally make for a better place to live. Council Member Meredith Harker makes similar observations this month in concluding that the secret to making a better community is ‘you.’ (See the City Council’s column on Page 3). We also saw this at our first “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting, in January. The City Council and I wanted to hold these more informal meetings every 5th Wednesday to provide a venue where residents can talk to their elected city representatives about any issue. At our first meeting, a group of residents attended and did not hold back. They raised some difficult issues and let us know that they feared crime was occurring at a house in their neighborhood. They agreed to give us some time to look into the matter and come up with solutions. Just a few weeks later, our police officers brought resolution to the problem. It is incredible to me that the process worked just as it was supposed to. It means so much that our residents care so much about each other as neighbors. State Farm CEO Edward Rust said it well: “The definition of a good neighbor is someone to be trusted; a courteous, friendly source of help when help is needed; someone you can count on; someone who cares.”

www.taylorsvilleut.gov

An artist’s sketch shows a dedicated walking trail on the side of the proposed BRT route.

For the past several years, Taylorsville City has worked diligently with multiple partners, including West Valley City, Murray City, Salt Lake Community College, Salt Lake County, UDOT and the Utah Transit Authority, to bring the Midvalley Connector Bus Rapid Transit service (BRT) to the heart of the Salt Lake Valley. “Bus Rapid Transit makes sense, especially as state and local leaders seek innovative ways to improve air quality and cut through the inversion and smog we confront each winter,” said Mayor Kristie Overson. “It makes even more sense when looking at the significant growth that puts tens of thousands more drivers on Utah’s roadways each year.” BRT uses more frequent bus service, larger capacity buses, and dedicated bus lanes. The result is a fast, comfortable, and more effective transit system. The Midvalley Connector will link Frontrunner and the Green, Red, and Blue

TRAX lines with a convenient, clean system that connects Murray, Taylorsville (including Salt Lake Community College), and West Valley City. Riders will access 15 stations and 1.4 miles of dedicated transit lanes on 4500/4700 South, as well as a new transit hub at the college. It’s much more than a bus system. The Midvalley Connector brings seven miles of BRT service to large employment, educational, activity, and civic centers. The primary purpose of the project is to provide a frequent, efficient connection to this population center, improve transit service, provide a clean transit choice, increase mobility, and enhance the local economy. Particularly with service to 20,000 students at Salt Lake Community College’s main Taylorsville Redwood campus, ridership along the Midvalley Connector is projected at 2,200 to 2,700 people each day. Utah State University’s Salt Lake campus, as well as Stevens-Henager

BRT CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Taylorsville’s location in the heart of the Salt Lake Valley points to the need for the BRT project.


Emergency

PAGE 2



2600 West Taylorsville Blvd 801 -963-5400 ǁǁǁ͘ƚĂLJůŽƌƐǀŝůůĞƵƚ͘ŐŽǀ

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

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UPCOMING Taylorsville Events March 6 & March 20 – 6:30 p.m. City Council Meeting @ City Hall

March 12 – 7 p.m. & March 26 – 6 p.m. Planning Commission Meeting @ City Hall

March 16 – 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Whole Community Disaster Workshop @ Taylorsville Senior Center (See Page 4).

March 29-30

Taylorsville Arts Show @ Taylorsville Senior Center. Art Intake on Tuesday, March 26 and Wednesday, March 27. Also, new this year: The Taylorsville Arts Council is partnering with Story Crossroads to bring a professional storyteller to perform on Saturday at 1 p.m. Get your Arts Show People’s Choice Ballot stamped at the Storyteller event for a prize drawing (See Page 8).

City of Taylorsville Newsletter BRT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 College, also will be served by this BRT route. In addition, approximately 34,600 jobs are currently accessible within a half mile of the proposed project route. “This is a population that is already here and in need of service, and the roads are ready,” Mayor Overson said. What’s more, the project will use clean fuel buses, provide an alternative to single occupancy vehicles, and will add 1.4 miles of dedicated bike lanes with direct connection to the Jordan River Trail. In essence, it provides three forms of clean transportation: electric buses, bike lanes, and pedestrian trails. It is much more efficient than a regular bus system while actually taking buses off the roads in favor of electric vehicles — and all at a fraction of the cost of light rail. The Environmental Assessment 30-day public comment period, including a public open house, concluded Dec. 28. Area residents are supportive, and the long road of planning is complete. All that is holding BRT back at this point is additional funding, which city leaders are continuing to pursue. “BRT is on our minds,” Mayor Overson said. “It is the first thing we talk about with legislators and other stakeholders. We want them to know that Bus Rapid Transit is a good plan. The strategy is sound. Let’s keep moving ahead.”

Crews Hard at Work on Performing Arts Center Site

Following the ceremonial Groundbreaking for the Mid-Valley Performing Arts Center in December, crews have prepared the site and actually broken ground for construction. Mounds of dirt as tall as a house have now been piled up where there was once a field of sod. “We are thrilled to see the project moving forward,” said Mayor Kristie Overson. “It’s fun to see all the activity and construction happening right outside our windows at City Hall.” The Arts Center will feature a 400-seat Mainstage Theater and 200-seat smaller theater, as well as rehearsal and event space. It will serve as home to the Taylorsville Arts Council and is expected to open in the fall of 2020.


March 2019

COUNCIL CORNER

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

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The Secret to Making Our City Great? It’s You

By City Council Member Meredith Harker What makes a city great? Is it the businesses? Parks? Roads? Recreation? Government? Location? I argue that the thing that makes a city great are the people who live there. Coretta Scott King once said, “The greatness of a community is most accurately measured by the compassionate actions of its members.” I would say that Taylorsville has some of the best. So, what can you do as a member of the Taylorsville community to make our city even better? Let me give five suggestions:

4. Report problems or crime. If you see something suspicious or that doesn’t seem right, call the authorities. If there is a pothole that needs to be filled, call the city. If there are concerns or issues in your neighborhood that need help from the city, call us directly. Police and city officials cannot be in all places at all times, and we need residents to let us know if there are problems that we can help solve. 5. Attend community events. Taylorsville is host to a wide variety of family friendly activities and events — from plays and music concerts, to school sporting events, to city-sponsored fun events like movies in the park or Saturday with Santa. With the new addition of the Performing Arts Center, there will be plenty for residents to enjoy. If you want even more, you can get involved in a volunteer committee and help plan more events.

1. Be a good citizen. Follow the laws and ordinancLeft to right: Curt Cochran (District 2). Ernest Burgess (District 1). es of our state, county and city. Keep your grass Dan Armstrong, Chair (District 5). Meredith Harker, Vice Chair (District 4). trimmed and weeds at bay. Shovel your walks. Brad Christopherson (District 3). Keep your dog from barking into the night. Obey the speed limit, etc. By following the established rules of where we live, we respect our neighbors and keep our city In keeping with these ideas, the City Council wants to officially recognize resisafe and beautiful. dents in our community who are making a difference. We are planning to formally 2. Get to know your neighbors. The best way to keep crime low is to watch out present a “We Noticed” certificate to residents in each of our districts to those who for each other. Say hello or wave to those you see on your street. Take over a are contributing in ways big and small to making our Taylorsville community better. plate of cookies and introduce yourself. Help your neighbors paint their fence. It is a way of saying, we see the good things that you are doing each day. Watch for Maybe they will even let you borrow a cup of sugar when you need it. the presentation of these recognitions soon. We just might surprise you with one! As your city representatives, we do hope you will feel like Taylorsville is the best 3. Shop and eat in Taylorsville. Most of our city budget comes from sales tax generated in our city. If you eat out, buy groceries or get your car fixed in Tay- place to live. As author and activist Jane Jacobs once said, “Cities have the capabillorsville, that helps us maintain roads, parks and all other services supplied by ity of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” your city government.

Ribbon Cutting Marks Opening of Hamlet Homes

Hamlet Homes has opened a new community in Taylorsville. Located at 3845 W. 4700 South (Kinglassie Lane), the Muirhouse Community will feature 87 townhomes with two available floor plans. City officials, including Mayor Kristie Overson and City Council Member Ernest Burgess, joined ChamberWest representatives in welcoming Hamlet Homes with an official Ribbon Cutting this past month. "Hamlet Homes is a great partner and brings quality, value and enhances our sense of community in Taylorsville," Mayor Overson said, noting how well the business has worked with the city's Planning Commission in meeting all designated requirements. "We are excited to have them here." The community will include a future walking trail, enclosed dog park and open space for homeowners to entertain, play and barbecue. “The beautiful Muirhouse Community provides a brand-new option for housing in our city,” Mayor Overson said. In addition to the Ribbon Cutting to mark the opening, Hamlet Homes partnered with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah to host a donation drive. Since the company's founding in 1994, Hamlet Homes has built more than 3,500 homes in 53 communities in northern Utah.

AT THIS EVENT, WE WILL BE ACCEPTING: HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRONIC WASTE DOCUMENT SHREDDING PRESCRIPTION MEDICINE

BULK WASTE GREEN-YARD WASTE RECYCLING DONATIONS OF GOOD QUALITY

ADDITIONAL INFO FOR RESIDENTS OF TAYLORSVILLE ONLY NO COMMERCIAL DISPOSAL NO TIRES, MATTRESSES, FREON IN APPLIANCES, AMMUNITION OR MEDICAL WASTE

Please call 801-955-2013 or 801-955-2053 or email eburgess@taylorsvilleut.gov or mmt200541@yahoo.com for more information.


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City of Taylorsville Newsletter

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

Keep Looking When Cooking and Other Safety Tips

What Is Neighborhood Watch and Why Do We Need It?

By UFA Assistant Chief Jay Ziolkowski

By UPD Det. Scott Lloyd

Did you know cooking is the No. 1 cause of home fires? Distractions can quickly lead to a kitchen fire so it is important to always be aware and take caution when cooking in the home. Here are some good tips to prevent kitchen fires:

Neighborhood Watch is a crime prevention program that stresses education and common sense. It teaches citizens how to help themselves by identifying and reporting suspicious activity in their neighborhoods. In addition, it provides citizens with the opportunity to make their neighborhoods safer and improve the quality of life. Neighborhood Watch groups typically focus on observation and awareness as a means of preventing crime and employ strategies that range from simply promoting social interaction and "watching out for each other" to active patrols by groups of citizens. Our neighborhood watch groups are organized around a block or a neighborhood and are started with assistance from Unified Police Department officers in Taylorsville. The reason for the program’s effectiveness is simple: Involving community members in watch programs decreases opportunities for criminals to commit crime rather than attempting to change their behavior or motivation. Today's Neighborhood Watch is an effective means of crime control and neighborhood cohesiveness. While not all the programs in place go by the same name, they all accomplish the same goal: to bring community members together to fight crime. UPD offers Neighborhood Watch training at City Hall for those who are interested in starting this program in their neighborhood. The first Tuesday of every month will be set aside to talk about the program, starting at 7 p.m. Please call ahead, 385-4689435, two weeks prior to allow time for scheduling.

• The best time to cook is when you are wide awake, and not drowsy from medications or alcohol. • Always wipe clean the stove, oven, exhaust fan to prevent grease build up. • Wear short or close-fitting sleeves when cooking. • Keep a pan lid and dry potholders or oven mitts near you every time you cook.

UFA Assistant Fire Chief Jay Ziolkowski

• Turn pot or pan handles toward the back of the stove. • When heating food in the microwave, use microwave-safe cookware that allows steam to escape. • When frying, use a pan lid or splash guard to prevent grease splatter. • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave, turn off the stove. • After cooking, check the kitchen to make sure all burners and other appliances are turned off. In all, 47 percent of all home fires are caused by cooking. If you do experience a fire and it gets out of control, get out of your home. Stay out and call 911. Do not run inside for any reason. And remember, preventing a burn injury is always better than the pain and trauma of medical treatment afterward. Thank you and as always, stay safe!

Police Precinct Treats Card Winner to Lunch

Workshop Offers Emergency Prep Tools

Taylorsville Police Det. Scott Lloyd and Mayor Kristie Overson took Plymouth Elementary fifth-grader Joselyn Padilla and her friend Fernada Rico out to lunch this past month at Crown Burger. It was in honor of Joselyn’s first-place finish in the Taylorsville Police Precinct’s 2018 Christmas card contest. The Precinct holds the contest each year for Taylorsville fifth-graders, and more than 100 children drew pictures for 2018’s contest. Mayor Overson, Chief Tracy Wyant and UPD staff members helped pick the winning card. Joselyn’s picture was placed on the front of the UPD-Tayorsville’s holiday card and mailed to representatives across the city, as well as to the Governor’s Mansion, Washington, D.C., and all UPD precincts. At last month’s lunch, restaurant representatives also were on hand to extend their congratulations. Way to go, Joselyn!

Come participate this month in a Whole Community Disaster Workshop, sponsored by the city. This game-style simulation will provide a realistic look at what you could be facing post disaster, as well as a glimpse at all the partners you would be working with in order to recover. The simulation is a hands-on, experiential-based learning tool that teaches the importance of personal and family preparedness. It is scheduled for Saturday, March 16 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Taylorsville Senior Center, 4743 Plymouth View Dr. The event is free, and ages 12 and older are welcome. See the city’s website for additional information and how to register: www.taylorsvilleut.gov


March 2019

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

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Retiring Police Captain is Honored as a Pioneer Following 41 years as a law enforcement officer, Unified Police Department Capt. Kendra Herlin is turning off the lights (and sirens). She is retiring, effective March 1. A mentor to police officers across the Salt Lake Valley, she has continuously served in law enforcement since 1978. “I could tell you some stories about women in law enforcement in 1978. They’d curl your hair so we’ll save those for the book,” she says with a laugh. Capt. Herlin was honored this past month before the City Council by UPD Taylorsville Precinct Chief Tracy Wyant, who described her as a pioneer.

Chief Tracy Wyant formally recognized Capt. Herlin this past month.

“I can absolutely say with complete confidence, Kendra has been a pioneer – not just for women in law enforcement but for law enforcement itself,” Chief Wyant said. “As I’ve watched the captain the last 22 years of her career, I’ve seen an individual who did the right thing for the right reasons and wasn’t afraid to face criticism, and yet she persevered. That’s a testament to her, to her character and to her integrity.” At one point during his own career, Capt. Herlin was his manager, he said, “and managing me is not an easy thing to do! I can’t thank you enough for all you have done for me, and most importantly for the countless men and women you have led.” Capt. Herlin said it has been a privilege to serve as a law enforcement officer. “This is a profession that I have not regretted one second. There are days that I wasn’t sure I was going to make it but I’m really, really passionate about the profession and have been honored to work with so many incredible people.” She has especially enjoyed serving in the community where she grew up. “I’ve always been a west-side girl — I’m a Kearns girl — so I always told people that Redwood Road was the eastside to me. (Mayor Overson’s) mother was my teacher in Junior High, and my mother and her mother were good friends, so we go back a long way.”

Capt. Kendra Herlin thanked the City Council for their support. Chief Wyant presented Capt. Herlin with a plaque recognizing her “41 years of leadership and selfless service to the residents of Salt Lake County. Your contributions to the sheriff ’s office and the Unified Police Department will be felt for generations to come.” While she will miss her work and colleagues, Capt. Herlin said she is looking forward to her next chapter in life and new adventures. “I know it’s time. I wish you all well and I’m very proud of what you are doing in this city and taking care of our westside.”

Chief Names Police Officers of the Month Unified Police Department Taylorsville Precinct Det. Orin Neal and Officer Nate Clark have been honored as Officers of the Month for December and January, respectively. Police Chief Tracy Wyant presented them with certificates this past month before the City Council in recognition of their good work. During December 2018, Det. Neal self-initiated several notable investigations, Chief Wyant said. These cases ranged from drug distribution to weapons violations. The first case consisted of two juveniles distributing narcotics. They were arrested with 60 THC Vape cartridges, 3 pounds of high grade marijuana, 11 ounces of Psilocybin Mushrooms, LSD, MDMA and $2,394 in drug money. In the second case, Det. Neal located a victim’s stolen vehicle and arranged its return. The third case resulted in the arrest of a known gang member, listed as armed and dangerous, with a warrant for kidnapping. A fourth case resulted in the arrest of a convicted felon in possession of a firearm, heroin and items used for the distribution of narcotics. “Detective Neal’s proactivity removed several dangerous individuals from the streets in

Officer Nate Clark (pictured at right) received kudos as January’s Officer of the Month.

and around Taylorsville City,” Chief Wyant said. “He is to be commended for his work ethic, efficiencies and resolve in keeping the residents of Taylorsville City safe.” In January, Officer Nate Clark completed several proactive cases that resulted in felony arrests, Chief Wyant said. “More importantly, Nate is routinely relied upon as a senior officer with extensive experience and knowledge. This same experience not only assists officers with fewer years, but undoubtedly pays dividends to our community.” During one case, Officer Clark located a stolen vehicle in the parking lot of the Hometown Suites. While recovering the vehicle, officers located information suggesting that two suspects had recently been in the vehicle, which was stolen the previous morning. Officer Clark was able to identify which room both subjects were staying in and authored a knock and announce search warrant for the same room. Narcotics were seized, and arrests were made. “The City of Taylorsville is fortunate to have such an involved, competent and dedicated member protecting its streets,” the chief said.

Det. Orin Neal was recognized as December’s Officer of the Month.

CERT Discussion Planned at City Hall

A Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) discussion meeting is planned for Wednesday March 13, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall for those who have gone through the CERT training. This meeting will give CERT members an opportunity to meet teams in their neighborhoods as well as the City’s Emergency Response personnel. All those who have gone through the training and are available are encouraged to attend. If you have any questions, please contact City of Taylorsville Emergency Response Coordinator Donny Gasu at dgasu@taylorsvilleut. gov or 801-963-5400, ext. 1002. For more information and to register, see the city’s website at www.taylorsvilleut.gov


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| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

City of Taylorsville Newsletter

TAYLORSVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Taylorsville Bennion Heritage REMEMBRANCES

• Free AARP Tax Aide: Mondays through April 8, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 385-468-3370. Most appointments are full but call to see if there are any openings or to check the list of other centers offering aid. • Exercise with U students: Mondays and Wednesdays. Open Gym aid at 5:15 p.m., class at 5:45 p.m. • Earthquake and Emergency Preparedness: With the “Earthquake Lady” Maralin Hoff. Monday, March 4 at 11 a.m. • Birthday Tuesday Entertainment: Tuesday, March 5 at 11 a.m. Entertainer John Tibola on accordion. • Yellow Dot Program: Learn safe driving tips from the U Trauma Center and ways to help first responders. Monday, March 11 at 11 a.m. • Podiatrist: Thursday, March 14. Toenail clipping for $10 suggested donation. • St. Patrick’s Day Party: Friday, March 15 at 11 a.m. Karaoke and green drinks provided. • History Class: Early United States History in connection with Family History. Mechanics of immigration and writing family history. Two sessions will run first on Wednesdays, March 13 and 27 at 5 p.m., and second on Thursdays, March 14 and 28 at 10:30 a.m.

Abraham Todd and his wife, Ann Tofts Todd, were a delightful couple. They were born in England one year apart and married May 3, 1862, in St. Andrew Church, England. After joining The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, they experienced unpleasant conditions for “Mormons,” so Abraham and Ann decided to leave home and family and risk the lives of their two very young children. They set sail to America from London in 1866 on the “Cornelius G. Grinnell” ship, bound for New York City Harbor, with the Salt Lake Valley as their final destination. After a short time in Cottonwood, Salt Lake County, they moved across Abraham Todd and Ann Tofts Todd are the Jordan River to northern Taylorsville pictured in Salt Lake City. into a small house owned by the Mackay Family. By 1875, the Todd family homesteaded about 120 acres of land on the north side of 4100 South between Redwood Road and 2200 West. It was a great source of deep satisfaction for Abraham to finally have his own farm. Their new home was built of adobe. By this time their tenth child was born in 1879. Abraham was a “good shot” so he was able to provide meat for his family. He would shoot blackbirds and take them home to Ann to make blackbird pie. (So, the story of the “Four and 20 Blackbirds Baked in a Pie” was real to them!) The Todd home was a popular social center, mostly because of the many charming young ladies in the home. Their children played musical instruments — Abraham, the

Upcoming Events for March:

Drop by the center at 4743 Plymouth View Drive, or call 385-468-3371 for details.

Taylorsville Resident Celebrates 100th Birthday Zola Harman turned 100 years old, celebrating recently at Taylorsville's Golden Living Center where Mayor Overson officially paid tribute to her. "How lovely to be invited to help Zola celebrate her 100th birthday," Mayor Overson said. "Zola is a Taylorsville resident and simply delightful to be around." To mark her 100th birthday, the Golden Living Center gave her 100 cans of her favorite Diet Coke. “Family and friends have gathered from all over the country to celebrate you, the love you share, and all the ways you have touched their lives,” Mayor Overson said at her birthday celebration. Zola was born and raised in Mayor Overson recognized Zola West Valley City, the tenth of 13 Harman at the Golden Living Center. children. Her mother was a homemaker and her father was a farmer. She and her husband, Ted, met in high school and were happily married for 62 years – together raising three children. They loved to travel and visited many countries, including Japan, New Zealand, Russia and Egypt. They watched ships pass through the Panama Canal. The secret to her long life? “You ought to make your life worth living,” she said. Mayor Overson presented Zola with a letter from the city recognizing her for 100 years of accomplishments. “I know that you have spent countless hours serving your family and community,” Mayor Overson said. “We are so blessed that you are a part of our Taylorsville community. Thank you for all your contributions, and many, many congratulations on a life well lived!”

In 1885, Abraham Todd built this two-story home, just west of Redwood Road and north of 4100 South. concertina; Fanny, the piano and organ; Will, the fiddle and harmonica; and Abe, the banjo, guitar, fiddle and harmonica. Their 10 children were: Ellen Todd, Elizabeth Todd, Emily Todd, Anna Maria Todd, Mary Jane Todd, Harriet Todd, William Henry Todd, Charles Orson Todd, Fanny Alice Todd, and Abraham Alexander Todd. Their father, Abraham, enjoyed walking, and was known to be one the “best walkers” in the valley. He would walk from his home in Taylorsville to Salt Lake City to see a good Vaudeville show, then walk home afterward. He was not a tall man, and rather short and stalky. He had a mustache and beard. His hair was a grayish red, and he was bald-headed. Ann Todd was known to be kind, sweet and understanding. She kept a clean and neat appearance at all times. She is remembered as often wearing a sunbonnet. Both Abraham and Ann are buried side by side at the Todd family lot in the Taylorsville City Cemetery. If you want to know more, please drop by the Taylorsville-Bennion Heritage Museum, 1488 W. 4800 South, to see their family history in its entirety.


March 2019

2600 West Taylorsville Boulevard • 801-963-5400 |

PAGE 7

Gateway Sign at Vista Park is Coming Together The winter weather hasn’t stopped work from continuing on the gateway sign at Vista Park, where a mason has started to install the rock veneer. The sign is located at the top side of the park along 2200 West. The new signage is part of a plan, approved by the City Council, to bring a complete and unified system of public signs to the city. They are designed as a way to help orient and welcome visitors to the parks, while also providing a cohesive “look and feel” to the city’s public spaces. The sign at Vista Park, as well as one at T. John Labrum Memorial Park, 6041 S. Jordan Canal Rd, were precast by Dura-Crete Inc. and installed by city employees. The prison’s Utah Correctional Industries has made metal sign plates that will include park identifiers and other wording to provide information and help with wayfinding.

MARCH WFWRD UPDATES GREEN WASTE PROGRAM The weekly Green Waste Collection Program will resume Thursday, March 21 for Taylorsville residents. Taylorsville currently has 861 of the 5,939 districtwide subscribers. This is a subscription program that helps divert green waste from the landfill to be processed into mulch that can be purchased for use from the Salt Lake Valley and Trans-Jordan landfills. At $114 per year, a green waste can is less expensive than an additional black refuse can at $204 per year. For more information on this program and composting, please visit http://wasatchfrontwaste.org/green-waste.

LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

A Likely Water Line Question: Who Owns It? A question often asked when a water service line is leaking or if there is a blockage in a sewer lateral is: “Whose responsibility is it?” A water service line is a pipe that conveys water from a large water main to the home. The homeowner and the Taylorsville-Bennion Improvement District have responsibilities for portions of the water service line. The district owns and maintains the water service line from the water main, which is normally located in the road or park strip, into the meter box that services the home. The homeowner is responsible for maintaining and repairing the water service line after it leaves the meter box. A sewer lateral is a pipe that takes wastewater away from the home. The homeowner owns, maintains, repairs and replaces the sewer lateral and connection to the sewer main as needed. The district maintains the sewer main that receives the wastewater from the homeowners’ sewer lateral. Homeowner Taylorsville-Bennion Responsibility

Water Service Lateral

Improvement District Responsibility

Water Meter

Water Main Sewer Main

Sewer Service Lateral Homeowner Responsibility

Taylorsville-Bennion Improvement District Responsibility

If you have any questions, please contact the TaylorsvilleBennion Improvement District office by calling 801-968-9081 or visiting www.tbid.org. You can follow the district on Facebook and Twitter.

Now is the perfect time of year to trim your trees. Salt Lake County Ordinance 14.12.050, and other municipal ordinances, require that trees and landscaping that overhang the street pavement need to be trimmed to a minimum height of 13 ½ feet above the street pavement. Following these guidelines will help waste trucks navigate through neighborhoods and empty your cans without potential damage to your trees and the trucks. WFWRD appreciates your help!

BAGGING RECYCLABLES Wasatch Front Waste & Recycling District is still seeing many situations where residents are placing recycling materials in plastic bags. The recycling processing facilities will not accept plastic-bagged materials, and they often forward them to the landfill, unopened. Please do not place anything in your recycling can that is wrapped in plastic bags. Contact Sustainability Coordinator, Jeffrey Summerhays at jsummerhays@wasatchfrontwaste.org or 385-4686337 if you have specific recycling questions.


PAGE 8

| www.taylorsvilleut.gov

City of Taylorsville Newsletter

Get Ready for Taylorsville Dayzz Preparation is once again underway for Taylorsville Dayzz! This year's celebration is scheduled for June 27, 28 and 29 at Valley Regional Park. The Taylorsville Arts Council is taking applications for individuals and groups who would like to perform at the event. Applications are due by April 12, and stages will be filled on a first-come basis. Additional application forms for exhibits and food vendors, as well as sponsorship contracts are also now available. Please submit your applications as soon as possible and check the forms for deadlines. All application forms can be found on the city’s website: www.taylorsvilleut.gov Also this year, the city is sponsoring a T-shirt design contest for the Taylorsville Dayzz 5K run, scheduled for June 29. Submissions are due by April 22 to jandrus@taylorsvilleut. gov and the winner will receive $50 and a free T-shirt with their winning design.

2019 Taylorsville Dayzz 5K T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST

The Taylorsville Arts Council is offering dance clinics to give cast members a head start.

MAMMA MIA

Starting March 9th, at 9:00 a.m. The clinic will be every Saturday in March. At the Taylorsville Senior Center (4743 Plymouth View Drive).

Show runs July 15-20

Submissions due by April 22 see www.taylorsvilleut.gov for details

ART INTAKE ART SHOWING AWARDS Taylorsville Senior Center 4743 Plymouth View Dr.

TUESDAY, March 26 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY, March 27 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY, March 29 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. SATURDAY, March 30 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Presented Saturday, March 30 at 3:00 p.m.

FREE ADMISSION TO THE PUBLIC

NEW THIS YEAR: A professional storyteller, and junior and youth storytellers will perform Saturday at 1 p.m.


The Front Climbing Club hosts clean air fundraiser: a community reaching up to improve SLC skies By Amy Green | a.green@mycityjournals.com

Breathe Utah’s Executive Director Deborah Burney-Sigman, Ph.D (right) and teacher Molly Lewis (left) show a visual demo that mimics SLC’s dire air situation. (Amy Green/City Journals)

A

passionate group of individuals, all wanting better air quality in the Salt Lake valley, gathered on Feb. 10 at The Front Climbing Club (1470 S 400 West) with a purpose —to climb for clean air and raise funds for Breathe Utah. It has become an annual gathering for this cause. Breathe Utah is an organization with the mission to improve air quality through education and action. They work to propose better environmental policies and rely on good partnerships to make changes happen.

The brains behind the climbing event are Executive Director at Breathe Utah, Deborah Burney-Sigman, Ph.D. and Jared Campbell, a Salt Lake City local and world-class athlete, who started this series of clean air events. Everyone who purchased a ticket got to climb until they “peeled” (that means to climb until one peels off the wall). Some climbed hundreds of routes over eight hours straight. Climbers know that even just a few hours at the bouldering gym is a committed workout.

One person who came to watch the climbers and support the cause was Joey Cauceglia. He has been going to the University of Utah for the last five years and wears a mask commuting to campus on his bike. It’s a way to minimize the irritated cough he gets for a few hours after cycling. Cauceglia works at the University’s biology department and takes the train on yellow and red air days. “If you want to talk about human impact, there’s so much more to talk about than just seas warming and rising. We can talk about landfills, human impact, the smog in SLC — you can see it. We don’t need to argue about whether climate change happens. We can just agree that humans are making an impact on our environment. It seems like it’s become a distraction for the public, whether or not the earth is warming because of the human use of fossil fuels,” Cauceglia said. The climbers and those in attendance hold Utah’s environment dear and are concerned about the valley’s winter inversions and air pollution. Breathe Utah volunteer and school teacher Molly Lewis was there with a visual demo. “Density is a huge concept in winter air quality. The cold air near the ground compacts and becomes more dense. That air gets polluted and doesn’t want to go

anywhere. The pollution gets trapped in that dense layer. There’s no natural mixing of the warm air above and the cold air below,” Lewis explained. In short, we pollute the cold air that stays nearest to us. Lewis added, “The particulate matter that is most concerning, is teeny tiny like 1/30th the width of a human hair. When you breathe it in, it goes deep into your lungs, across the barrier into your circulatory system. It causes inflammation. It’s toxic.” Those who climbed to fight toxicity got tokens for a free dinner and a beer on the house, provided by Red Rock Brewing Co. and Lucky Slice Pizza. The event had a finale of awards for participants who completed the most routes and for the previous day’s runners who took laps up and down Grandeur Peak at RUFA (Running Up For Air), a connected event. A raffle was held featuring items from vendors including Black Diamond, Evolv, Petzl, Patagonia, Lululemon and more. All of these companies are eager to help with air quality consciousness. To watch for this event follow frontslc. com. To donate and get clean air ideas for action visit www.breatheutah.org. l

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March 2019 | Page 23


Taylorsville Volleyball Club Has No Place to Play By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.comt

T

he interest in boys volleyball has exploded. Taylorsville had more than 16 players show up for its initial tryout, but the Warriors team struggles to find a place to play. West Jordan has had a similar problem and the coaches are unsure what to do. “At this point we are back and forth with interest from the kids,” West Jordan boys volleyball head coach Jodi O’Farrell said. “We are not allowed to use the school facility unless we rent it and the boys do not have that kind of money to put out for that. We may not be able to have a team” Granite and Jordan School Districts serve a majority of the students living in the communities west of I-15. According to district guidelines facilities can be made available to charter school clubs to conduct meetings and events, but non-sanctioned sports clubs such as hockey, rugby, rodeo and boys volleyball are subject to rental fees for conditioning, practices and games. The fee structure is according to time and needs, but can be as much as $100 per hour. “We have found places to play at local churches,” Taylorsville head coach Braden Tye said. “We would like to have two teams if possible. I think it is important for the boys to get as much playing time as possible. Whether it be with a club or a high school club. The boys approached me and have spread the word. We

Page 24 | March 2019

don’t get scheduled gym time. It is hard to find time to practice and we want to keep the cost down. That is our biggest struggle right now.” Tye graduated from Taylorsville in 2006. He played club and high school volleyball. This is his first season as head coach. His uncle, Ronald Tye, had coached Taylorsville for several years. “It is tough that the chess club can use the library and other clubs including AAU teams use the gym,” O’farrell said. “My kids can’t afford to pay. Renting a volleyball club is $25 a boy for an hour. The issue is we have a state championship and we have no space for my boys to practice.” The Utah Boys Volleyball Association oversees boys club teams in the state. Boys volleyball is not a Utah High School Activities Association sanctioned sport. County programs host the competitive high school leagues. The Salt Lake County Sports Office administers the teams. “I think that if the boys attend the high school it should be available for them. I understand that sanctioned sports should get priority, but I have seen youth basketball teams in our gym practicing,” O’farrell said. “The association should step in and try to help us out.” At one point West Jordan had 70 boys trying out for three teams. Over the past ten

years boys volleyball participation nationally has increased by nearly 11 percent. In 2018 the National Federation of State High School Associations reported over 60,000 participants. “We have a couple of boys that are very good players,” Tye said. Sam Seitz is a 6-foot-4 returning left handed player. He plays setter and opposite hitter. “We have a core group of returning players that really recruited me to help them out and want to play. I will really need them to play together so we can have a good team,” Tye said. According to Tye the teams returning players include Dallin Bentley, David Sterzer and Trevor Jones. “I think we have a good group that have played volleyball, basketball and other sports all together. They have grown up together and will be a good team. We can work on a few fundamental things then we will be good,” Tye said. The UBVA runs February through May and culminates with a high school boys state championship. “These boys have a lot of passion for the sport. They all work at it really hard,” O’Farrell said. “I feel it is a shame that they are not allowed to use the gymnasium. Hopefully we can get some help and figure it out so these boys have a place.” l

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Playoffs a Possibility for The Stars By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.comt

The Salt Lake City Stars are just on the outside of the NBA G League playoff picture. Their final few games could determine where they end up in the postseason. (photo courtesy of the Salt Lake City Stars)

T

he Salt Lake City Stars enter the final month of their season in a dog-fight for a playoff spot. It could come down to the final home games of the year. The NBA’s next generation of superstars could be playing in your backyard. The Stars are the National Basketball Associations G league associate of the Utah Jazz. They play in the Western Conference Southwest Division and at press time stand in second place and seventh in the conference. “Little things like that, that young players can’t get with a parent club. Is where the G League is key,” Jazz General Manager Dennis Lindsay said in a radio interview. “Grayson Allen is working on his foot work and has accepted the assignments to come and learn to play better with the Stars.” Allen has played six games with the Stars in this his rookie season in the NBA. He was the first round draft pick of the Jazz last summer from Duke. The Stars have a 17-18 overall record. They have only won one of their last four games including a 102-78 blowout of Santa Cruz Feb 8 at Vivint Smart Home Arena on Education night. Despite the dip recently they have hovered around a .500 record most of the season. They have played three games this season at the home of the Jazz, but the rest of their home games are held at the Lifetime Activities Center on the campus of Salt Lake Community College. The team was founded in 2016 when they moved from Boise, Idaho. Willie Reed is the team’s leading scorer. He is averaging 20.1 points per game. He has seen limited time recently because of an injury. He has spent parts of the last four seasons with five different NBA teams.

TaylorsvilleJ ournal.com

NBA teams are allowed to have two players with two-way contracts. Those players spend the majority of the season on the affiliate G League team and not more than 45 days on the NBA roster. Stars players with two-way contracts include Naz Mitrou-Long and Tyler Cavanaugh. Mitrou-Long is a 6-foot-4 guard from Iowa State. He is averaging 16.9 points per game and 5.5 assists.The athletic floor general has helped run an efficient Stars offense this season. Cavanaugh stands 6-foot-9 and 238 lbs. He played collegiately at George Washington University. He has the ability to spread the floor with an improved three-point shot and deadly offensive rebounding skills. He is averaging 15.9 points per game. The Stars are coached by Martin Schiller. He is in his second season as the head man. They ended last season with a 16-34 record, but wins and losses are not the teams main concern. It is about using the G League pipeline to ready players for the NBA and Utah Jazz. The G League is the NBA’s official minor league. It prepares players, coaches, officials, trainers and front office personnel for the NBA. It also functions as a league research and development labo-

ratory. It features 27 teams all with oneto-one affiliations with a NBA franchise. In 2017 the NBA development league was renamed the G league with a corporate sponsorship with Gatorade. NBA teams began the 2018-19 season with 198 former G League player on their start-of-season rosters. This includes current Jazzman Rudy Gobert. That figure has more than doubled in the last six seasons.t Friday March 1 will be Donovan Mitchell bobblehead night. That game will be the beginning of a four of five stretch of home games, concluding March 4, 6 and 8th. l

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March 2019 | Page 25


Officials Encourage Better Sportsmanship

“To Strengthen and Promote the Shared Interests of the Business Community”

By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.comt

Representing the Business Voice in West Valley City, West Jordan City, Taylorsville & Kearns Areas

CHAMBER OF

COMMERCE

Contact Information: Barbara S. Riddle, CMP

801-977-8755 barbara@chamberwest.org

The Why of ChamberWest CATALYST for business growth CONVENER of leads and influencers CHAMPION for a stronger community

UPCOMING EVENTS March 6 – Business Connections March 7 – Legislative Affairs Committee March 8 – Casual Friday Lunch March 12 – Women in Business Luncheon March 14 – Leadership Institute Session March 20 – Business Connections March 28 – Multi Chamber Luncheon FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER FOR AN EVENT, CALL: 801-977-8755 or visit www.ChamberWest.com

Community Options Ribbon Cutting 2964 West 4700 South – West Valley City

To invest in your organization and community, invest in ChamberWest!

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Renewing Members: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Salt Lake Community College CCI Mechanical • Summit Vista Rex Williams and Sons Utah Grizzlies • Valley Fair Mall America First Credit Union (11 locals) Kearns Improvement District KeyBank Taylorsville Keycenter PostNet • Popcorn Cottage West Valley City • My Place Hotel Delton Sports Center Iron Workers Local Union 27 Lyle F. Braithwaite CPA Work Activity Center

Model Home Grand Opening at Muirhouse 3845 West 4700 South – Taylorsville

Thank You to our Community Investment Members

Page 26 | March 2019

The last week of February basketball officials wore blue arm bands to point out the need for improved sportsmanship from fans, coaches and players. (Photo courtesy of Greg James/City Journals)

B

asketball referees around the state wore blue arm bands the last week of January to emphasize good sportsmanship to fans, players and coaches. A seasoned referee finished a hotly contested game, grabbed his jacket and jogged to the locker room. Afterwards a group of fans followed him to his car. The entire way the fans made it clear they thought he was not good at his job in very loud overtones. He was threatened and eventually he called the police to make sure he could get home safely. “I did what I should not have,” said a long time referee that wished to remain anonymous. “I turned to the fans as they were heckling me and said. ‘This is why there will come a time when there will not be anyone here to referee these games.’ I had enough that night.” The Utah High School Activities Association has seen a two percent decline in the number of referees this year. Statewide referee associations declared Jan. 28 through Feb. 2 as sportsmanship week. The participating officials wore blue wrist bands to remind fans, players and coaches of the need for civility and respect in the game. “This has become and ongoing concern,” Utah County referee association President Stuart Dean said. “We have had a lot more situations with fans, parents and coaches that have arisen because of a deterioration in sportsmanship. Unfortunately this is problematic not only here but nationally.” In a National Association of Officials (naso.org) survey 57 percent of respondents believe sportsmanship is getting worse. Good behavior is more than interaction with the officials. It comes from how opponents are treated and what the cheering is like. According the the same survey 59 percent of poor sportsmanship is from the parents and fans. “I generally do not think the players and

coaches have had a big issue. It is really with fans and parents. They have taken a license to abuse officials. That is where this has gotten out of hand,” Dean said. A recent study by the Stanford Children’s Hospital emphasized things parents can do to encourage better sportsmanship. It includes avoid arguing, play fair, follow directions, respect the other team, encourage the team and respect the officials decisions. “We take their role seriously. There is testing, evaluations and orientation. We start the year by going to rules clinics. We have meetings five times during the season. We talk about how we can become better professionals. How can we handle things on the court. We work hard at that,” Dean said. Dean said the best officials are good communicators. “I was working with an official when I was an up and coming and I remember my partner telling a coach. ‘I am sorry if I missed that call. I will work hard to get it right next time.’ Those are things that make our role better,” Dean said. “We are down 400 officials from six years ago. We have seen the impact in the sub varsity games.” This is the start of something that could continue to happen every year. The UHSAA has received inquireis from schools and administrators hoping to participate more fully. “This is a call to draw attention to the issue. By and large the coaches in this state are very good. They are very competitive, but they know what their job is. This has been a cultural shift. There has been times I can’t believe what I’m hearing. It crosses the line,” Dean said. l

Taylorsville City Journal


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March 2019 | Page 27


Get your Irish on: The St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Siamsi celebration and beyond By Jennifer J. Johnson | j.johnson@mycityjournals.com

The Color Guard ensemble traditionally leads the 100-plus entries for Salt Lake City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

F

or many of us across the valley, St. Patrick’s Day is our chance to get our Irish on. Or, at least some green. City Journals wanted to take a deeper dive. What are the possibilities for St. Patrick’s Day in Salt Lake Valley, arguably not a major Irish town along the lines of Boston or Chicago? What does it mean to be Irish in Salt Lake on St. Patrick’s Day? Consider this our guide to living it up with one of the best holiday celebrations in the state to figuring out how to celebrate around home, and even explore spirituality with an iconic St. Patrick’s Day symbol. I say ‘Irish,’ you say ‘Hibernian?’ For the past 41 years, St. Patrick’s Day in the valley has been pretty much synonymous with Salt Lake City’s storied St. Patrick’s Day parade. This sense of history definitely imbues this year’s parade: The Utah Hibernian Society, hosts of the parade, have chosen a rich aspect of Utah history for its theme, the 150th anniversary of the Golden Spike. By way of definition, “Hibernian” means an Irish native or anything having to do with Ireland or the Irish. And the Golden Spike? That is also known as “The Last Spike” or the spike that joined the rails of the First Transcontinental Railroad across the United States connecting the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in 1869. Irish immigrants made a significant contribution to building the railroad, hence this year’s sub-theme – “Joining of the Rails; 1,776 Miles to Home.” Parade and Siamsa: family traditions, philanthropy as well as fun The Salt Lake City St. Patrick’s Day

Page 28 | March 2019

Parade and its after-parade Siamsa (pronounced “Shinsa” meaning celebration) at the Gateway is close to home for this year’s Hibernian President and Parade Chair Meghan Welsh-Gibson. Welsh-Gibson is a second-generation president of the Utah Hibernian Society, following in her father’s footsteps. Last year she introduced a new route for the parade and also instilled a new tradition, where proceeds of the parade go to benefit a charitable organization. Last year, longtime parade supporters the Shriners Children’s Hospital were the beneficiaries. This year, the Fisher House Foundation at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, “much like the Ronald McDonald House, but for veterans and military families,” is the recipient. Welsh-Gibson indicates that a member of the Fisher House will serve as the grand marshal for this year’s parade. While the parade was early in collecting applications at press time, Welsh-Gibson did indicate that Irish reporter Brónagh Tumulty from Channel 2 will be carrying the Irish flag along the parade route, and dedicated parade fans can expect enduring favorite entries and new participants embodying the sesquicentennial Golden Spike theme. The parade starts at 10 a.m. at 500 South and 200 East. The Siamsa after-party takes place at the Gateway. The festival features Irish dancers, musicians, food, drink, and “lots of vendors selling Irish things,” said Welsh-Gibson. “Such a fun, fun afternoon.” The parade route and float-prep site: one family’s second home Some people elect to “summer” in a location other than their primary home. Salt Lake City’s Clark family doesn’t summer. They “spring.” And their destination location is not a fancy vacation resort, but rather, a junkyard. It is very much a working spring. Prepping the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade float almost becomes a time-share, during the months leading up to the event. For the past 40 years, the Clark family and friends dedicate anywhere from 60-200 hours, spanning several months, preparing for the parade. Float-making has become second nature, and takes place at their second home — a friend’s junkyard. There they build each year’s float, and then take part in the St. Patrick’s Day practice event, and then finally gear up for actual show time – parade day along the route. Sean Clark, an Avenues resident living in the house he grew up in, is Vice President of Special Projects at Vista Staffing during his day job. And for his role on the parade committee for the Hibernian Society? He has a 134-slide chronicle of his family’s engagement in the parade over the past 40 years.

His grandfather was grand marshal of the parade in 1984. Sean was carried along the parade route as a 2 year old. To Sean Clark and family, the parade is a way of life, a tradition and happens to be his favorite topic to talk about. Clark even has a FaceBook page, “Clark’s St. Patty’s Float.” Through rain, snow and even Darth Vader: epic floats of the Clark clan Over the years, Clark has been part of epic floats. There were the 1984 and 2017 floats, which made their way down the parade route in tumultuous rain and snow, respectively. Then there have been first-place entries, floats featuring Gaelic superheroes (Fionn mac Cumhaill, pronounced Finn McCool), religious saints (St. Patrick driving snakes from Ireland), and Irish green-energy cars (powered by kegs of Guinness). There was even the one year Clark was not able to physically be in Salt Lake City for the parade. That did not stop him. In 2016, he and a friend used Apple iPhones and Facetime technology so that he was able to live-stream his singing of the Irish national anthem (in Gaelic) along the parade route, watching the reactions of delighted spectators as he cooed the lyrics into a mic from sunny San Diego. The blizzard float of 2018 epitomized the parade theme, “When Irish Eyes are Smiling.” Clark built a faux wooden piano, powered by an electric keyboard. “My 8-year-old played his first piano recital, in a moving vehicle, in a blizzard, in front of a few thousand people,” he recalled. Episode 3:17: the good side of the dark side All Clark’s creations are epic. However, 2017 forces its way to the top. It was then Clark realized a lifelong dream: uniting St. Patrick’s Day with “Star Wars.” The Clark family won the best family float for the float depicting “Episode 3:17, The Irish Immigrate to a Galaxy, Far, Far Away.” Clark himself portrayed Han Solo, to his friend’s Darth Vader, who had been cracking down on illegal immigration. Han Solo convinced Vader that Irish were good, worthy people and converted Vader to the dark side – the dark beer side, that is. As the parade advanced along the parade route, Darth Vader emerged from behind a curtain, “The Zion Curtain,” and the group presented their skit, right in front of the judge’s stand, securing the best family float honors. ‘Our Holiest Day’ Irishwoman Connie Smith lives in Sugar House with a Scottish spouse and three dogs. To her and her household, St. Patrick’s Day is “our holiest day.” Smith’s day job is being an associate broker and realtor at Constance Smith Realtor, but she is also a

chaplain. Smith explained the spiritual side of St. Patrick’s Day. St. Patrick brought Christianity to Ireland. One of the main emblems of the day, the shamrock, is an elegant symbol of the Christian Trinity. The three-leafed shamrock, then, represents, to Irish, God the Father, Jesus Christ the son, and the Holy Ghost. Being Irish in Utah, according to Smith, means to “usually be Catholic” and to be part of “a tight community.” It also, perhaps stereotypically, means being lucky, very lucky. “To be Irish in Utah is to be very lucky! Irish can laugh and cry at the same time. We wear hearts on our sleeve. All of us, whether fourth-generation or second-generation like me, we long for our Irish roots.” “All of us consider ourselves Irish American, not American Irish, and we all have a very deep tie to the Old Country,” she explained. The parade and beyond For Smith, celebrating St. Patrick’s Day is all about family and friends. For Smith and husband Alan Cunningham they attend the parade, go to the after-party and then go for a pint. “We always go to one of the bars – Sugar House’s Fiddler’s Elbow, Central City’s Piper’s Down, or downtown’s Green Pig.” “I always go to the parade,” said Smith, who is a proud product of the Catholic school system. Smith, who grew up in Holladay, attended St. Ann’s for K-8th, and then Judge Memorial for high school. “I run into all my friends from high school, even from grade school in the parade. If we don’t see each other any other time, we will see each other at the parade.” Like the “master float-building” Clark family, Smith views St. Patrick’s Day as a family day. “We always toast my father and my grandmother, who are no longer with us.” How to celebrate at home: DIY St. Patrick’s Day from Utah pros Love the parade but are not able to make it to downtown? Or to one of the other venues? The Hibernians interviewed here have some DIY tips. For most (except Irish Protestants or “Orange Men” who wear orange), celebrating St. Patrick’s Day starts with the color green. The look Utah’s family-owned Zurchers, with six stores in the Salt Lake Valley and online shopping, offer relatively inexpensive and zany St. Patrick’s Day attire and decorations. Millcreek’s venerable Costume Closet takes elegance up a notch and also has zany aplenty. The nine Deseret Industries thrift stores across the valley already organize clothing

Taylorsville City Journal


items by color, making St. Patrick’s Day scouting a snap. Nail salons all across the valley do custom-nail creations, or bottled polish and face paint from a grocery store can even one-up the pro stylists for the creative DIY’er. The goodies Food is always a big element for any St. Patrick’s Day celebration. Smith always makes traditional Irish dishes, including Irish soda bread, paired with corned beef and cabbage. Locally, downtown’s longstanding Mrs. Backer’s Pastry Shop prides itself in its Irish soda bread, which it offers only during the “green” season. On the infinitely less authentic, but easy side? Salt Lake’s Banbury Cross offers green donuts, and even McDonald’s offers shamrock shakes. Irish eyes are watching Film is also a celebratory that helps commemorate the day. “There are 1,001 amazing Irish movies,” exclaimed Hibernian President Welsh-Gibson. And all the ones recommended are available through the Salt Lake City Library and Salt Lake County Library systems, for checkout. Reserve your St. Patty CDs early. Some of the recommends include: “The Quiet Man,” a 1952 film with John Wayne as an Irishman returning to his native country. “In the Name of the Father”

is a drama-thriller with political overtones starring Daniel-Day Lewis. Welsh-Gibson recommends “Michael Collins,” another politically-themed film with Liam Neeson in the title role. For chaplain-realtor Smith, watching the film “Waking Ned Devine” on St. Patrick’s Day is akin to the tradition many have of watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” at Christmas. “We watch it every St. Patrick’s Day,” she said of the 1998 Indie film which looks at twisted luck. But, if you can, get out and enjoy the parade — in person or virtually. Parade-professional Clark encourages those not able to go to the parade to try to “be there” virtually by having a family member or friend broadcast it live to them via “Facetime,” the way he joined the parade from San Diego. However, he is convinced once you feel the contagious energy of the parade’s “wild atmosphere,” you are going to insist on heading downtown. “You are going to look at that, and say, ‘Oh my gosh! Why aren’t I down there?’” Clark says Irish music is “a great way to feel connected to Irish culture.” His favorite way to celebrate? “Smile at people, say hello, and wish them a happy St. Patrick’s Day,” he said. “Irish people like to live up to the stereotype of being a friendly, family people. It’s the biggest day for bars, but… it is so fun for families!”

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March 2019 | Page 29


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close to home, there’s always pizza! Papa Johns, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s, Little Caesars and Pizza Hut always have great rotating deals. I promote supporting local businesses through, so for pizza we’d recommend trying Este Pizzeria in Sugarhouse, MidiCi Neapolitan Pizza in Salt Lake City, The Junction Pizzeria in Midvale, Big Daddy’s Pizza in South Salt Lake, David’s Pizza in Kaysville, Francesco’s in Taylorsville, Wild Mushroom Pizza in Salt Lake, Big Apple Pizza in Salt Lake, The Pizza Runner in Ogden, or Pizza Factory in Lindon, Spanish Fork, Syracuse and Provo. Lastly, don’t forget that International Women’s Day is this month (March 8). So, ladies, if you need a place to eat, preferably without the munchkins, Bout Time Pub and Grub in Layton, Scoffy’s Social Pub in Midvale, Tailgaters Grill in Ogden, Christopher’s Prime Tavern or Grill in Salt Lake City should be your destination! These deals, and more (including The Pie Pizzeria and Leatherby’s) can always be found on the Entertainment app. For more information about the Entertainment Happenings book and app, please visit our website: coupons4utah.com, or follow us on social media: @coupons4utah, on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. l

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Life and Laughter—Humor Writing for Dummies

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’m sometimes asked how I consistently come up with funny column ideas. I laugh breezily, toss my hair and say, “It’s so easy. I sit down to write and it just pours out of me like warm chocolate syrup.” Of course, that’s a blatant lie. Writing’s like pulling out my own molars. I don’t consistently write funny. I often write pure garbage; you just don’t get to see it. And sometimes what I think is hilarious, isn’t received well at all. (Offending topics include gluten, dentists, graffiti and child labor.) I look at the funny side of life. It’s much happier there. But sitting down to write can be excruciating. Sometimes an idea just works. Other times (most of the time), the path from brain to published column is fraught with mind traps and self-doubt. My writing process goes like this: Deadline: I’ve just submitted my hilarious column to the editor. I vow to work on my next one right away! Three weeks later: I’ve written no column. I have no ideas. All is darkness. I’ve used all my funny lines. I’ll never write again. Four days before deadline: I need to write something! Two days before deadline (at 2 a.m.): I just thought of something funny! Day of deadline: Complete column. Send it to editor. Vow to work on the next column immediately. Repeat for 15 years. There are lots of ways to get funny inspiration. Get out of bed. Humans are insane, and

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by observing them you’ll get tons of humor writing ideas. Watch people at the mall. Watch people at church. Watch people in stressful situations. Eavesdrop. Read the headlines. Comic gold! Exaggerate. Hyperbole is a humor writer’s greatest tool in the known (and unknown) universe. You didn’t just fall down the stairs, you slipped on a sock and bounced down the stairs, hitting each step with your elbow, head and hip twice before falling to the next step. It took 15 minutes to reach the bottom of the stairs. Read humor. David Sedaris, Mark Twain, Nora Ephron and Tina Fey, are some of my favorites. The idea is not to plagiarize their writing (illegal) but to study the flow of humor (totally legal). What words make you laugh? (Shenanigans, bloviate, canoodle.) What phrases make you burn with jealousy that you didn’t think of them first? (Most of them.) Find the serious. Somber people almost write comedy for you. When you run into someone who’s all “Harrumph, harrumph. I’m an important grown up” you’ve struck a comedic motherlode. Look back on all the stuffy authority figures in your life; could be your parents, could be your algebra teacher or your precocious cousin who graduated from high school at 8 years old. People who take themselves seriously are super easy to satirize and/or lampoon. (Thank you, Prez Trump.) Do things that make you laugh. It’s hard to write comedy when you’re crying into your big pillow every afternoon. Go to funny

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PROBLEM NEIGHBORS, INTERNET ACCESS AND INFRASTUCTURE all discussed during the first “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting Carl Fauver | carlf@mycityjournals.com

City council members – and Mayor Kristie Overson (3rd from left) – launch a new tradition, with their first-ever “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting. (Carl Fauver/Valley Journals)

P

lenty of fireworks accompanied the launch of a new tradition on January 30, as the Taylorsville city council and mayor hosted their first-ever “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meeting, hearing concerns ranging from problem neighbors to internet connections to infrastructure issues. “I’m not exactly sure what we were expecting,” Mayor Kristie Overson said. “I am just glad people felt like they could come to the meeting and be heard. We didn’t resolve any issues on the spot – but we became aware of problems and are now following up on them.” The city council normally holds its bi-monthly meetings on the first and third Wednesdays of each month. For years, tradition has held, a mayor’s town hall meeting was held during those three or four months each year that have five Wednesdays – on that fifth Wednesday. “We were at one of our city priorities meetings when we began to talk about possibly changing the format of those town hall meetings to include the entire city council as well,” said Councilman Ernest Burgess. “I wasn’t sure how many different issues we would hear about. This was a good meeting. I think it’s important we try to be more accessible to residents.” More than half the meeting was consumed with one particular issue, as a group of concerned citizens all appeared to express frustration over the same home and its allegedly unruly residents. “My grandchildren get high on marijuana when they mow my lawn, as the smoke drifts from that house.”

“That place scares me to death – and we fear retaliation from the people living there.” “Loud music plays all night – there are domestic fights all the time – and the language.” These were among the comments from the group of citizens, speaking about a problem rental home and its occupants. Unified Police Taylorsville Precinct Chief Tracy Wyant attended the meeting and did confirm several calls to the address in question over the past several years – though not nearly as many as the concerned residents claimed to have made. “It is important when people call in to complain about neighbors, they provide us with the address of occurrence,” he said. “We also need complainants to tell us their name and contact information. We do not provide that information to the people being complained about. But providing that information allows those complaints to carry more weight.” A brand-new Taylorsville resident – who had just moved into the city two days earlier – raised a completely different concern when he asked the council why they have not agreed to allow the UTOPIA Fiber internet provider to operate in the city. “Why should I have to pay more to get less?” Ian Webb asked the council. “Fiber optics works at the speed of light, providing much better service.” In unison, council members said this is perhaps the most common question they receive. “UTOPIA just wants to cherry pick apartment buildings,

while not serving all of our residents,” Councilman Brad Christopherson explained. “If we granted them a franchise agreement, the increased tax burden is not something our residents would support. We continue to talk with (UTOPIA); but right now, it is not in our plans.” Talk at the meeting also turned to infrastructure. One resident expressed concern with poor walking access to Millrace Park. The park is in Councilman Curt Cochran’s district and he strongly concurred. “As long as I am in that (city council) chair, I will work to make improvements along 5400 South, between 1300 West and Millrace Park,” Cochran said. “I would like to see curbs and sidewalks in the area.” Former city planning commission member Dan Fazzini added another item to the infrastructure improvement wish list. “The railing on the bridge across from the Taylorsville Utah Heritage Museum (4800 South) has been in disrepair for a long time,” he told the council. “This is an aesthetic thing that I think could be fixed for not much cost.” Like most other topics of conversation at the meeting, the council agreed to look into it more thoroughly and take action if possible. There are three remaining months in 2019 with five Wednesdays. “Let’s Talk Taylorsville” meetings are scheduled for May 29, July 31 and October 30.

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