Page 1

March 2019 | Vol. 29 Iss. 03

FREE

February was National Dental Month

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS LAST CHANCE FOR A DISCOUNT!

Save our Teeth

• Did you know 8 out of 10 dogs over the age of 3 are affected by significant dental issues? • Dental problems are one of the leading causes of heart problems in pets.

Signs Your Pet Should Be Checked: • Bad breath • Red along gumline • Drooling • Difficulty or change • Tartar & Plaque buildup in eating habits • Swollen gums • Missing/loose teeth Just one of symptom is enough to be concerned...

Book Today! 801-254-4840

MENTION THIS AD AND

SAVE $20

On Full Cleaning

1381 W. Stone Ridge Lane • Riverton

801-254-4840

Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 3/31/19

RIVERTON COMMUNITY COMES TOGETHER FOR HOPE WALK By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

H

undreds of Riverton community members gathered together on Feb. 2 to spread hope for Riverton’s annual Hope Walk for Suicide Prevention. The Walk — which began at Riverton High School with a moment of silence and a balloon release and ended a mile away at Spirit Corner with hot cocoa and doughnuts—was held to raise awareness for suicide prevention. It is a topic on the minds of parents, teachers, teens and community members. During the 2005–2006 school year, Riverton High School lost six students to suicide. “When somebody has those thoughts, they have just that moment of insanity,” said Linda Tranter, counselor at RHS. “I don’t believe they really want to die; they just want whatever pain they are going through to stop. If we can catch them when they’re thinking those thoughts and intervene, then a lot of times they’re fine after that — they get the help they need.” RHS has taken a proactive response to suicide prevention, establishing a Hope (Hold On. Persuade. Empower.) Squad club to educate students how to identify and help their peers who are struggling with suicidal thoughts. Squad membership has been growing for the last eight years, and the numbers of suicide ideation, attempts and completions have gone down at RHS. “I think our efforts are paying off,” said Tranter, adviser to the club. “We’ve created an environment here that is outside of the Hope Squad — kids that are not on Hope Squad are still coming in and reporting because they’ve been trained on what to do. A lot of our community is just reacting so beautifully and doing just exactly what we need them to do.” Riverton City officials and Intermountain Riverton Hospital partnered with Riverton High School to host the Hope Walk. RHS Principal Carolyn Goff said community support is needed for preventing suicide. “This is not a school issue, it’s a community issue,” she said. Employees from Intermountain Riverton Hospital and Riverton City were involved in RHS’s Hope Week, leading up to the day of the walk. They helped squad members distribute little gifts and treats to students during lunch time activities to remind them of prevention resources available to them. Senior Kyle Boden, vice president of Hope Squad, said the most moving part of Hope Week was the pledge wall in the school’s commons area. “The whole wall is covered,” he said. “I think that’s so cool that you see all the names of every student just on the wall, pledg-

The annual Hope Walk was supported by Hope Squad members from neighboring schools such as South Hills and Oquirrh Middle. (Linda Tranter/ RHS)

ing that they choose life.” Boden has been affected by teen suicide. At the end of his sophomore year, his good friend took his own life. “I decided I couldn’t change what happened, but instead I wanted to be able to prevent this happening to anyone else,” said Boden. “So, I joined Hope Squad. I just love being able to help people, reaching out to anyone who may be suffering or having a hard time. I want to be there for them so I can prevent what happened to my good friend.” Hope Squad members receive regular training on identifying warning signs in peers who are struggling with suicidal thoughts and ways to guide them to get help. “Being in Hope Squad just gives me a better way to help people,” said Boden. “It’s not just helping people with extreme cases of depression, it’s just helping everyone fit it and everyone feel like they’re having a good day.” His involvement in Hope Squad has given him hope that he doesn’t have to lose another friend. “If I had had the Hope Squad experience I have now, I feel like I could’ve — I can’t say I could’ve prevented it because you never know what’s going on in someone’s mind — but I feel like I could’ve reached out and been a lot more help to him,” said Boden. “I wish I had known what I know now, then, for sure.” Riverton City officials also provide similar training for their

employees and regularly sponsor community training. Healthy Riverton teaches a monthly QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) class, which is a first aid response training for mental health issues. For more information on classes, visit Healthy Riverton on Facebook. Other cities, such as nearby South Jordan, also offer QPR trainings. “We encourage anybody who works with youth to attend because these issues are so prevalent,” said Casey Saxton, director of communications for Riverton. “You want to catch something like this before something bad happens.” Other Hope Week events included an assembly by Collin Kartchner about social media’s effect on mental health as well as the community event Live in Real Life Part 2, when psychologist Matt Swenson spoke with residents about anxiety disorders following a screening of the movie “Angst.” Tranter said the movie and discussion were helpful for those who don’t have a personal experience with anxiety and mental health issues. Tranter said one of the best resources for suicide prevention has been the Safe UT app. Teens use the app to contact mental health professionals via text, getting support to help a friend or themselves. Administrators, parents, counselors or police are notified promptly if a serious case is identified. Tranter said because of this resource, many suicide attempts have been thwarted and lives have been saved. l

Thank You to our Community Sponsors for supporting City Journals

Local Postal Customer ECRWSS

Presort Std U.S. Postage PAID Ogden, UT Permit #190


Page 2 | March 2019

South Valley City Journal


S outh ValleyJournal .com

March 2019 | Page 3


Riverton woman wins Disney sweepstakes

SOUTH VALLEY

C ITY OURNAL

By Mariden Williams | mariden.w@mycityjournals.com

The South Valley City Journal is a monthly publication distributed directly to residents via the USPS as well as locations throughout South Valley. For information about distribution please email circulation@mycityjournals. com or call our offices. Rack locations are also available on our website. For subscriptions please contact: circulation@mycityjournals.com The views and opinions expressed in display advertisements do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Loyal Perch Media or the City Journals. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the owner.

South Valley Team CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Bryan Scott bryan@mycityjournals.com EDITOR: Travis Barton travis@mycityjournals.com ADVERTISING: 801-254-5974 DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING: Ryan Casper ryan.casper@mycityjournals.com 801-671-2034 ACCOUNTV ASSOCIATES: Melissa Worthen melissa@mycityjournals.com 801-897-5231 Tracy Langer Tracy.l@mycityjournals.com 385-557-1021 CIRCULATION COORDINATOR: Brad Casper circulation@mycityjournals.com EDITORIAL & AD DESIGN: Ty Gorton Kevin Bushrow Amanda Luker

South Valley City Journal 9500 South 500 West Suite 205 Sandy, UT 84070 Phone: 801 254 5974

Peterson’s employees Brandon Peterson and Lorie Millett deliver the exciting news to Adele Doyle. (Laura Williams)

W

hen Riverton resident Adele Doyle got a call from Peterson's Fresh Market requesting to meet with her, she was a little confused and very surprised. But she was even more surprised when she found out why: She had won a national sweepstakes for a $5,000-value Disney vacation for four. Early on Jan. 21, Peterson's employees Brandon Peterson and Lorie Millett waited for Doyle in the lobby of her retirement home, bearing a big bundle of balloons and the envelope containing her winnings. "She knows that we're coming, but she doesn't know why, so she's a little nervous!" Peterson told the South Valley Journal. But nervousness soon gave way to shock, followed by good-natured cheer. "Yeah, this was worth waking up at 9 o'clock for," said Doyle, who initially had some reservations about losing her chance to sleep in. "This is fantastic!" Included in the winnings was a fournight stay at a hotel in Anaheim, four days' access to the Disney and Universal Studios

parks for two adults and two children, and vouchers for four plane tickets to Southern California. "I doubt I'll use it myself," Doyle confessed. "Disneyland is fun, but I'm getting kind of old for that,” she said. “Now, if it was about 20, 30 years ago, I would have said, 'You bet! I'll go on all those rides!' But I don't like the loop-de-loops anymore. Ferris wheel, maybe, but no loop-de-loops. So I'll see if my daughter and her hubby might like it." More than 300 grocery stores across seven states participated in the sweepstakes, a promotion offered by Food Club brand foods. Everybody who purchased a Food Club product from October 2018 to January 2019 was automatically entered, so many entrants probably didn't even realize that they were participating. Such was the case with Doyle. "I've only used that product a couple of times, so I was really surprised," she said. Delivering the news and winnings was fun for Peterson and Millet as well, who have built up a friendly relationship with Doyle over the years. "We do a lot of free delivery here to the center, just to help the seniors out, and she's been one of the ones we deliver to a couple times a week," said Peterson. "We've been doing that for probably three or four years. It's been nice to get to know a lot of the residents here. You get to know them, and you get to know their dog; you know their order before they tell you because a lot of them kind of buy habitually. And today we got to bring something kind of fun." Doyle was pleased with the Disney tickets, but she seemed even more delighted by the bundle of balloons they came with. t"Balloons!" she said, grinning up at the Mickey Mouse face bobbing above her. "I haven't had balloons in years. This is great."

Designed, Published & Distributed by

MISSION STATEMENT Our mission is to inform and entertain our community while promoting a strong local economy via relevant content presented across a synergetic network of print and digital media.

free l community l papers

Page 4 | March 2019

Adele Doyle hugs Lorie Millett, who handles most of Fresh Market’s deliveries to the senior center. (Laura Williams)

South Valley City Journal


How to help loved ones with depression and anxiety By Mariden Williams | mariden.w@mycityjournals.com

C

ountless studies have shown that depression and anxiety are on the rise nationwide. The inevitable question is, what’s causing this increase in depression and anxiety? According to Matt Swenson, a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist, that isn’t the question we should be asking. “We think that if we can find a cause, we can give them a solution, but it’s more complicated than that,” he said. “We don’t need to figure out why somebody’s depressed. If someone’s been diagnosed with cancer, you wouldn’t say, ‘Where did you get that? Where did it come from? Why is cancer increasing?’ There are researchers who are interested in those questions, but I think if it’s your neighbor or your friend or your loved one, you should say, ‘What can I do? How can I help?’” Swenson suggests looking at your children’s, and other loved ones’, problems through the lens of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, and he particularly advises focusing on the two most basic, important steps of the pyramid: physical needs and safety. Once those two are in place, it’s much easier for the others to follow suit. Sometimes people feel off because something nearer the top of the hierarchy, like self-esteem or loving social connections, are missing—but sometimes, they actually just need a nap. Safety refers to emotional safety as much as to physical safety. Parents and teachers often tell kids to come talk to them if they’re struggling at all, but according to Swenson, they rarely do because they don’t actually believe their teachers and parents really want to hear it. “I know that because these kids are in my office, and I say, ‘Talk to a teacher,’ and they say, ‘It wouldn’t help. They don’t care,’” said Swenson. “We need to get them to a point where it’s safe to talk, safe to feel and safe to fail.” Often, that lack of safety stems from kids who are worried they’ll be scolded for having problems, or bombarded with ‘solutions’ and ultimatums about what they should or shouldn’t do. “For parents, safety often means putting duct tape over your mouth and not talking, or ‘fixing,’ or ‘problem solving,’ or moralizing,” said Swenson. “When you hear somebody has anxiety or depression, don’t come in and say, ‘Well, here’s what you should do.’” Your worries as a parent, well-intended as they are, can rub off on your children. If you fret a lot about what will happen if they fail and talk too much about how important it is to avoid failure, Swenson says

S outh ValleyJournal .com

that your children will fret about those same things. It can cause them to become overwhelmed and freeze up. “There’s a lot that we can teach, and there’s a lot that we can do, but, especially with older kids, the best way to build confidence in them is by having confidence in them,” said Swenson. “It’s not about motivating someone to behave differently. It’s about caring for their needs and having a little faith that they will want to grow. Focus on meeting needs rather than explaining or fixing problems.” To explain the pitfalls of trying too hard to motivate people, Swenson gave the metaphor of himself as an inexperienced batter trying, and usually failing, to hit a baseball. You can bring in everybody you know to cheer for him and promise to give him $100 if he hits the ball and even threaten to throw another ball at his legs if he misses. “I’m motivated,” Swenson said. “There’s nothing else you can do to motivate me. I could get $100, everybody’s watching, somebody’s threatening to hit me, but I might still miss. And the tragedy is that all those efforts made to motivate me actually made me feel worse. Because everybody saw, and I didn’t get the $100, and I got hit with a baseball.” Swenson shared these insights Jan. 28 at a conference titled Live in Real Life 2, held at Riverton High School to kick off its annual Hope Week for mental health awareness. As the title indicates, this is the second in a series of mental health workshops hosted by Riverton City. The first of these, held in September 2018, was packed, with 1,500 parents crammed into the Riverton High School’s auditorium to hear about the effects of excessive screen time on teens. The follow-up event was significantly less well-attended, but the takeaway message was just as meaningful, if not more so. There are a lot of ways to go wrong in caring for someone with depression or anxiety. But, according to Swenson, “You will always be right if you focus on caring for what a person needs.” l

ALL OF OUR PROVIDERS

ARE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. Same day and next day appointments are available.

Tina Goldsmith, MSNP

Sue Anders, MD

Jeffrey Quinn, MD

Robert Merrill, DO, MD

David Matthews, MD

Diane Heubusch, CNM, FNP

INSURANCES ACCEPTED: Select Med & Med Plus Select Value Select Care & Care Plus Select Shared Select Advantage Select Choice Select Community Care Blue Cross Blue Shield PEHP United Health Care Aetna Altius Tricare Educators Mutual And Many More

Angela Judd, MD

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT:

(801)-285-4800

801-285-4800 | www.westerngynob.com 3723 West 12600 South, Suite 350 • Riverton, Utah 84065 March 2019 | Page 5


South valley royalty collecting shoes for the barefoot By Travis Barton | travis.b@thecityjournals.com

M

iss Utah contestants, notably Miss Herriman, are running a drive to collect shoes for Soles 4 Souls. A nonprofit organization, Soles 4 Souls takes donated shoes and distributes them around the world to countries in need. Shoes are not required to be used, said Jade Hansen, Miss Herriman. “They can be new, old, heels, sandals, tennis, dress. Any kind of shoes, I’ll take ‘em.” Collection bins are located at Herriman Library, Herriman City Hall [insert other locations]. For Hansen, shoes have a place in her platform as Miss Herriman, “Protecting Our Athletes,” where she’s focusing on preventing athletic injuries. “The right pair of shoes can prevent injuries,” she said. The shoe drive lasts through April 22. The pageant winner who collects the most shoes gets to go on the humanitarian trip to deliver the shoes. Hansen said she’s always wanted to serve others. Having grown up in a world where she’s never lacked food or footwear, she wants to provide that comfort to those without it. “One pair of shoes can change their whole life, change their attitude,” Hansen said. “I want to be able to give that opportunity to people. I want everyone else to be a part of that with me so they Miss Herriman Jade Hansen stands next to the collection bin at Herriman City Hall. (Photo courtesy Jade can feel like they’re getting some of the rewards Hansen) from this.” l

Page 6 | March 2019

URGENT AND PRIMARY CARE:

Only $10 A Visit!

WITH MEMBERSHIP

Medallus Medical Membership is a simple membership program to all of our 8 clinics. Members can receive discounted medical services at $10/visit flat fee in exchange for a monthly membership fee: • $50 / month (1 member) • $75 / month (party of 2) • $100 / month (family of 3) • $120 / month (family of 4 to 6) *$25 additional per person (family of 7 to 12)

$20 registration fee – 12-month contract

801-810-7058

arlissf@medallus.com AfterHoursMedical.com

South Valley City Journal


Harmonyx presents an original production: “Down the Rabbit Hole, Return to Wonderland” By Clinton Haws | c.haws@mycityjournals.com to its founder and longtime member, Debra Taylor. Taylor has devoted much of her time for the past eight years to the city’s arts programs and performances. Throughout that time, Taylor has been volunteering not only her time but her artistic talents for much of the decade to the city’s arts endeavors. The group has its next member already participating with the group, which is why it consists of 11 members instead of the usual 10, often used in the previous shows. Past attendees of Herriman Days (in July) might recall performances from the musical group. “We typically open for the main act on the last night of Herriman Days,” said Allphin. The group regularly performs for Herriman’s Christmas program as well. Herriman Harmonyx in their 2017 original musical based off of “Gilligan’s Island” (Tonia McPeak/Herriman Arts Council)

H

erriman Harmonyx, typically a 10-person a capella group, is an 11-person a capella group partnering with the Herriman Arts Council for its annual Valentine’s Cabaret. The ensemble partners with the city’s arts council to offer an a capella-style musical annually around Valentine’s Day. It is a date-themed musical comedy that takes places at the city’s building Feb. 28 to March 2. Based on Disney’s “Alice in Wonderland,” the script and songs are originals created by members of the performance group. Without a lead role, the a capella group Harmonyx performs solos, duets and as a

group. Members try to include balanced performances throughout the group. Some will naturally have more presence than others due to characters and script. Don Allphin is a performer and the president of Harmonyx. He is the writer of the original script for “Down the Rabbit Hole, Return to Wonderland.” “We self-edit the script,” he said. “As we read through it, everyone contributes and offers insight. If it makes sense, we will make changes.” The scenes, characters might resemble and be based on “Alice in Wonderland,” but all the lines and songs are originally created by the a capella group.

“It is an ‘Alice in Wonderland’ scene but with our own story,” Allphin said. “Although it is called a cabaret, it is a mini-musical theme that does various songs throughout the different genres. Some of the songs are a capella, and some are accompanied (by piano). Make it a date night The cast interacts with the audience throughout the musical comedy. “The entire group contributes to the final script and any changes to lines or songs,” Allphin said. “The audience tends to be able to relate to a character that is well-known, and it allows us to take well-known characters and add our own spin to them, and the audience seems to really like that.” In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, there is dessert offered during intermission of the performance. Tickets are sold in pairs for the musical comedy, as it is intended for a date night-type activity, though dates are not required to attend. Anybody that is interested in attending, from individuals to families, is encouraged to attend. Young adults and older people are recommended Previous city Cabaret event showings typically sell out. You can purchase tickets online or via telephone through the council. Attendees sit at tables of four because of the dessert and space is limited for the five shows in total. The musical group is made up of all volunteers that perform and rehearse during their free time. This includes all aspects of the production, including the stage, costumes, lighting and all other aspects of the musical. “We do bring in people from the (Herriman) arts council to come pitch in,” Allphine said. “We do self-direct, but there is not a designated director and do not make any Various mental health advocacy booths were available for attendees to browse following the conference. money from anything we do.” The a capella group will bid farewell (Mariden Williams/City Journals)

S outh ValleyJournal .com

Notes: • Harmonyx sounds like “harmonics.” • Herriman City Arts Council and Harmonyx have partnered up for the city’s Valentine’s Cabaret show for the last six years (since 2013). • The group consists of five men and five women most performances. • There are five shows in total offered from Feb. 28 to March 2. • Feb. 28 offers one showing at 7:30 p.m. and two showings each, March 1–2 at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. • The show runs for approximately 90 minutes. • It takes place at Herriman City Hall (Building) at 5355 West Main Street in Herriman.

3285 W. 12600 S. Riverton, UT 84065

801-446-9766

Guaranteed Auto Body Repairs For ANY Insurance Company March 2019 | Page 7


Vintage World War I propaganda posters displayed at Riverton’s Old Dome Meeting Hall By Mariden Williams | mariden.w@mycityjournals.com “Most of these posters were obviously targeted at men,” Williams said. “The women are depicted in these rather skimpy toga-like white dresses, off the shoulder in some cases, and they’re always looking down at the viewer with hooded eyes and lips apart, and come-hither expressions, and they’re all made up, of course. And in contrast was the one poster targeted at women, featuring Joan of Arc, fully armored. She’s all made up, too, but she’s looking at the viewers straight on. She’s in control. The idea is that women viewers can act to defend their country, just like Joan did, by purchasing war bonds.” Both nationally and in Utah, the posters and other public outreach efforts had their desired impact. Utahns purchased millions of dollars of Liberty Bonds and increased its production of vital metals and agricultural goods to meet the growing demands of a nation at war. Around 24,000 Utahns enlisted in the military, and 80 Utah nurses joined the Army and Navy

Nurse corps. More than 5 percent of the state’s population—estimated to be about 450,000 in 1917—served in the war. In spite of the terrifying imagery of enemy soldiers in these propaganda posters, it was not human enemies that caused the greatest harm to Utah’s troops, but microbial ones. Of the 665 casualties Utah suffered, only 219 were killed in action; 15 died in non-combat-related accidents. The rest died of diseases such as influenza, typhoid, malaria, trench fever and trench foot, which is a necrotic rotting of the feet caused by persistent submersion in dirty water; it was common in the cold, cramped conditions of the trenches. The exhibit is presented by Riverton City through the Utah Division of Arts & Museums Traveling Exhibition Program, marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I last November. The Old Dome Meeting Hall is open to the public on Monday through Wednesday from noon to 5 p.m.

(Sidney Reisenberg)

F

rom now through March 6, Riverton’s Old Dome Meeting Hall will be hosting an exhibit of a few dozen World War I-era promotional posters. The posters were part of a larger public relations effort by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson’s Committee of Public Information, which produced movie reels, newspaper and magazine articles, pamphlets, exhibits and public speeches, and more than 700 propaganda posters. “Through this exhibit, viewers can experience how an advertising campaign can stir patriotic feelings and unite people toward a common goal,” said Casey Saxton, Riverton’s communications director. “They can also consider how these 100-year-old posters would work in today’s world.” Created by some of the country’s top advertising illustrators, these posters used simple, emotional imagery and messages to generate

Page 8 | March 2019

support for the war effort. The simple symbolism and bold styling of the art have embedded them firmly in the national psyche, and many of them will feel instantly familiar to viewers. “They’re very skillfully done to arouse patriotic sentiment—the desire to contribute,” said Dr. Laura Williams, an instructor of arts and humanities at Salt Lake Community College. “They always show the enemy as a big hulking thing in a spiked helmet with a bushy walrus mustache, and he’s frequently shown attacking young women, particularly young women holding babies, to play upon men’s protective feelings and inspire them to fight.” Pictures depict hulking brutish enemies with severed heads tied at their belts; a little girl impishly asking viewers if their daddy has bought them any war bonds; Lady Liberty, frail and delicate, hoisting an American flag at the (Henry Chandler Christy) head of a valiantly determined army.

South Valley City Journal


Herriman City takes flight: Drones to help accident investigation, search and rescue By Jennifer Gardiner | j.gardiner@mycityjournals.com

Herriman City now has two active drones available (Photo Courtesy Herriman City)

A

s a way of keeping up with the future of aviation, Herriman City officials recently introduced two new drones, bringing a wide range of potential benefits, opportunities and capabilities to the community. In February, two employees became Federal Aviation Administration-certified drone pilots as part of the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Department in an effort to help the city with reconstructing accidents, search and rescue operations, and to better help other departments, especially after dark. Drone pilot training was recently imple-

mented as a way to help employees understand the importance of drone usage as well as the privacy and safety of its residents. City leaders have purchased two drones. Tami Moody, the director of Herriman City Administration, said she and other city officials want to make sure people understand that drones won’t run all day, every day; officiala are working on training additional pilots to have them available for on-call situations. City leaders plan on starting a process of working to educate the public and local business owners of the appropriate use of drone technology. By getting ahead of the questions and concerns, city administrators will be able to help prevent misuse and abuse. There will be community meetings and town halls in the future to help residents bring up any concerns and get answers to their questions. Brown said being a pilot is supplemental to the employees’ other duties and responsibilities, and the training they participated in is twofold. “One is accident reconstruction training using drones,” said Moody. “The other is what is called a Daylight Waiver certification that allows us to fly after sunset. We still need to apply for that waiver, and after that is

returned by the FAA, our trained pilots will have the ability to fly at night if needed.” The drones will be used to help with multiple operations and departments, including search and rescue operation with the police, accident reconstruction, surface analysis for engineering, GIS, parks and water, creating contours for engineering projects, aerial photogrammetry, analysis of traffic patterns, video for communications and planning, and development and analysis of drainages. Moody said they will be following all of the FAA rules when flying and will create a list of restrictions based on the FAA guidelines. Safety of the reisdents and employees come first, said Moody. There will be a comprehensive policy and procedure for drone use, including, but not limited to, maintenance, logging, flight planning, safety protocols, flight notifications and training. Drone use has increased over the years around the world and has become increasingly popular for use within each state’s county and local governments. The Bard College Center for the Study of the Drone reported an 82 percent increase of drones use by public safety agencies from 2016 to 2017.

Applications for drone usage around the country varies based on region. For example, the Flathead County Mosquito Control uses them to help combat the pesty insects, and in Kentucky, Louisville police use drones when responding to shots fired calls. Drone usage in municipalities is still new and will come with its own set of challenges, but drones are quickly changing the way many agencies deal with and respond to multiple situations. Many people are familiar with drones after hobbyists have used them in various capacities, sometimes incorrectly and even hindered working operations, making some people feel drones are invasive and unsafe. But as the sales of drones have skyrocketed from $443 million in 2015 to $1.9 billion in 2017 (Westerncity.com), the popularity of these high-flying hovering cameras continues to increase at a zooming rate. There is also the challenge of the cities now using drones with having to manage conflicts over municipal airspace, protecting residents’ privacy, noise complaints and any other situations that could arise as the community and the city come to agreements on its usage.

Discover all the best parts of working here. Join our team.

Text “mcdworksforme” to 36453 mcdonalds.com/careers Choose your hours.

NOW HIRIN G

for McDona ld’s in The Distric t, River ton & Her riman

No, really. Just tell us the hours you’re free (and the hours you aren’t). We’ll work around your needs.

Pursue your education.

From high school completion to college tuition assistance, we can help you reach your dreams

Build your skills.

Wherever you are now, come here to build the job skills, people skills, and life skills that can take you further.

Delight our guests.

Our team gets to share delicious food, fun moments, and big smiles all day long. Come make happy happen!

Be you.

Around here, you can be who you are, become even more, and move toward your dreams — with a great team to back you up.

COMMITTED TO BEING AMERICA’S BEST FIRST JOB.™ Locations Now Hiring:

• 11374 S River Heights Drive • 2002 W 12600 S • 5018 W 13400 S • 5434 W Daybreak Parkway • 1780 W 7800 S • 10381 S Redwood Road • 1265 W 9000 S • 4607 W 6200 S • 3963 W 9000 S • 5706 W 7800 S

S outh ValleyJournal .com

STARTING BETWEEN

$900 TO $1100 AN HOUR

March 2019 | Page 9


PRO FOOTBALL IN UTAH IS HERE

HOME GAMES WILL BE PLAYED AT RICE-ECCLES STADIUM

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY SALTLAKESTALLIONS.COM - 385-399-1301.

FREE CACTUS BLOSSOM With Purchase Of Adult Entrée 12556 South Rhetski Lane, Riverton Call Ahead Seating: 801-253-8600 Not valid with any other offers. Valid only at Riverton location. Expires 3/31/2019.

Page 10 | March 2019

South Valley City Journal


An Arcadia Properties Development

Phas

e2

ow n g in sell

Model Now Open

!

3700 S 6400 W | West Valley City, UT 84128 | 385-355-4790 Monday - Friday 12 - 6pm Saturday 10am - 6pm Sunday CLOSED

• 6 Rambler options

• .3 Acre lots

• Ideal location and amenities

• 6 Two story options

• Included 3 car garage

• Neighborhood park

For more information please visit us at www.newtonfarm.com S outh ValleyJournal .com

March 2019 | Page 11


REAL. LOCAL. SAVINGS. See how much you could save on car insurance today.

801-262-5200

1399 W 9000 S, West Jordan Saving people money on more than just car insurance.® Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999-2019. © 2019 GEICO

America’s Choice in Senior Homecare® Visiting Angels allows your loved one to remain where they are the most comfortable... in their own home.

We Care Every Day in Every Way® Bathing Assistance Dressing Assistance • Grooming Assistance with Walking Medication Reminders • Errands Shopping • Light Housekeeping Meal Preparation Friendly Companionship Flexible Hourly Care Respite Care for Families

801-542-8282 801-820-0684 www.visitingangels.com

Cajun

Boil

Tuesday, March 5Th 5:30 - 7:30 pM • Dinner served between 5:30 - 7:30 pm • Live Cajun Music • Beads • Children’s Activities • French Quarter Adult Beverage Garden

TicKETS: contact us ASAP 801-580-9318 Or 801-651-2300 Palm Sunday Divine Service April 14 @ 9:00 am Maundy Thursday Service April 18 @ 6:30 pm Good Friday Service April 19 @ 6:30 pm Holy Saturday Prayer Vigil April 20 All Day

Sausage on Shrimp corn Bread King Crab Legs the Brownies Potatoes Menu Corn on the Cob chili

PB&J Sandwiches Also Available

Easter Sunrise Service LEnT SErVicES April 21 @ 6:30 am @ 6:30 pm Easter Breakfast March 6 April 21 @ 7:45 am March 13 March 20 Easter Divine Service April 21 @ 9:00 am March 27

April 3 April 10

Each Visiting Angels agency is independently owned and operated

Now Hiring Compassionate Caregivers! Page 12 | March 2019

concordia Learning center HOLy TriniTy LuTHErAn cHurcH 13249 S. Redwood Rd • Riverton, UT 84065 801.580.9318 | 801.651.2300

South Valley City Journal


SPOTLIGHT

Medallus Medical

Business Spotlights are a service offered to our advertisers to help them inform our readers about their businesses. For information on scheduling a Spotlight, please call us at 801-254-5974 or email us at ryan.casper@mycityjournals.com

H

ave you ever put off treatment from a doctor because of high copays? Medallus Medical believes you shouldn’t have to and are here to help. Even though they are not a health insurance plan, they can help you manage healthcare costs by eliminating the need to visit expensive ERs and hospitals for urgent or primary care. In fact, it was specifically designed for the uninsured or those who have a high-deductible health insurance. If you choose to become a member of Medallus Medical, it will decrease the cost of your next visit to the doctor. This way you can get better and stay healthy for less money. Some of the benefits of Medallus Medical membership are: $10 clinic visits, including in-clinic tests, X-rays, and treatments without extra charges, unlimited visits, urgent care services and reduced out-of-pocket costs when used with your high-deductible health plan. Medallus has eight urgent care clinics readily available in Utah: Layton, Holladay, Sandy, West Valley, South Jordan, Draper, Riverton (at South Bangerter) and American Fork. They are open seven days a week from morning until evening, 363 days a year including major holidays, except Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. Walk-ins for urgent care are welcome, appointments are needed for primary care services. They also accept most insurance plans namely: Regence Blue Cross, United Healthcare, Altius, Aetna, Cigna, Coventry, First Health, Humana, Medicaid, Medicare, PEHP, PHCS, GEHA, Great West, Health Choice, Health Utah,

S outh ValleyJournal .com

Healthy U, Tricare, University of Utah Healthcare, Three Rivers Provider Network, Wise Provider Network and Railroad Medicare to name a few. Primary Care Medicine includes annual physical exams, long-term medical care for diabetes, hypertension and asthma, health maintenance, physicals for Scouts, school, sports, missionaries and pre-employment. Acute illnesses like cough, sore throat, fever, sinus infection, bronchitis, pneumonia, allergy treatment, kidney and bladder infection, skin infection, cellulitis, and abscesses. Acute injuries such as sprains, lacerations, broken bones, auto accidents, work injuries and sports injuries. Other problems include any non-life-threatening medical issues, work injuries and urine drug screening. Additional procedures, test and treatments they provide are rapid strep tests, mono tests, influenza tests, X-rays, EKG, breathing treatments (nebulizer therapy), IM and IV medications, IV fluid therapy, laceration repair (suturing), draining abscess, skin procedures, Ortho Glass splinting, and casting broken bones. The only services they don’t provide are chronic pain management, long-term treatment with controlled medications, substance addiction, withdrawal and advanced psychiatric problems. Those who would benefit the most from Medallus Medical are people with no insurance. Roughly 90 percent of medical needs are urgent and primary care. Many people can’t afford the high cost of medical insurance. For this reason,

Medallus prices their membership program to make sure at least basic medical care is affordable. Those with high deductible health insurance plans can also benefit from Medallus. A doctor visit can cost over $100 each time you go when using your insurance. With a membership you can have unlimited visits for $10 each. Why wait to start saving money? l

March 2019 | Page 13


Herriman Youth Council delivers almost 400 pounds to Utah Food Bank By Travis Barton | travis.b@thecityjournals.com

The Herriman Youth Council delivered 396 pounds of food to the Utah Food Bank, 56 percent more than the 254 it raised last year. (Photo courtesy Destiny Skinner/Herriman City)

W

hat a difference a year can make. Last year, the Herriman City Youth Council raised 254 pounds for its food drive. This year, there was a 56 percent increase, as the council raised 396 pounds of food at its Lights on Ice event at Crane Park’s Ice Ribbon in January. Residents could pay with food instead of money to skate.

The council has done food drives in years past, organized as dances for the youth rather than a skate night. But members tried something different this time. “We wanted to utilize our city assets as well as appeal to a larger number of families to provide a fun recreation opportunity for everybody,” said Alex Hill, the member credited with the dance to ice skating change. On the night of the event, the council made a playlist, created decorations and even presented to the city council to waive fees for the night, allowing them to accept cans of food instead. Two days later, the council delivered every ounce of food to the Utah Food Bank. Alex, a sophomore at Herriman High, said it was special to witness where the fruits of their labors were going. “You could tell it was a lot,” he said. That same day, the youth council had its day at the legislature. Members toured the capitol, attended committee meetings, listened to advocacy groups, saw historical sites, listened to Gov. Gary Herbert and ate lunch with their legislators and city leaders. Youth council members—including Hill, Kala Hyte, Liam Hyte, Abby Edwards and Lea Seo—said the day was educational—teaching them how to affect change, making government officials feel more approachable and feel

more involved in city government. Destiny Skinner has been with Herriman City for 15 years, seven of them advising the youth council. Having the youth experience the dynamics of government makes them liaisons with the community, she said. “These guys kind of get the concept of how local government works,” Skinner said. “A lot of people don’t, including adults. For us, we’re wanting the youth to help educate their parents or their peers’ parents or family members who don’t realize how government is run.” Alex, 15, did just that. During his time on the council — terms last one year from July to June — Alex has learned the “importance of staying informed.” Someone once told him they couldn’t believe the city was leaving Unified Police. “They’re going to go bankrupt,” Alex recalled being told before responding, “Have you looked at the finance report? You look at that, and you can see the savings, and you can see it was a good decision in the long run.” It was also Alex’s idea to place youth council members on city boards, creating another link to government business. “He watches every single council meeting,” said Councilwoman Sherrie Ohrn, the youth council liaison. “How many 15 year olds [do that]? It’s cool to see his desire to

know what’s going on.” Youth 14–18 who reside in Herriman may be considered to serve on the council. This year’s group has 26 members, the most it has ever had. “We have an awesome group of youth, and it just continues to grow every year,” Skinner said shortly before a February meeting where the council made goals on what to accomplish before July. “They just do more and more.” “They’re just amazing kids,” Ohrn said. “I think any kids who want to dedicate their time to service to a community says something about their character. They have a desire to do good and give back to the community.” Up next for the youth council is the Utah Association of Youth Councils’ Leadership Conference at Utah State University this spring. Ohrn said she heard grumbling from residents while running for office about the increase in the youth council’s budget by a few thousand dollars—a raise that came because of its conference participation. “(The leadership conference) is a valuable tool for these kids because we’re trying to train leaders right, that’s the future,” she said. “The more they can be involved and engaged and learning service, the better off we all are.”

We Treat More than Arthritis... We Treat More than Arthritis...

Steward Medical Group and Internal Medicine of Salt Lake areMedical pleasedGroup to welcome Dr. Pankhuri Gupta. Steward and Internal Medicine of Salt Lake pleased to welcomeinternal Dr. Pankhuri Gupta. Dr. Pankhuri are Gupta is a board-certified medicine physician specializing inDr. rheumatology. Sheisdevelops a differential diagnosis and treatment plan Pankhuri Gupta a board-certified internal medicine physician specializing forineach patient, whether it’s a young persondiagnosis with newly diagnosed rheumatology. She develops a differential and treatmentlupus plan or a senior withpatient, arthritis. for each whether it’s a young person with newly diagnosed lupus or a senior with arthritis.

Pankhuri Gupta, MD Pankhuri Gupta, MD Rheumatology Rheumatology

• Rheumatoid Arthritis • Rheumatic Eye Disease •• Vasculitis Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis •• Rheumatic Eye Disease •• Myositis Psoriatic Arthritis Vasculitis •• Osteoarthritis Myositis •• Psoriatic •• Lupus Gout andArthritis Other Crystal Lupus and Other Crystal •• Ankylosing Spondylitis • Gout Arthropathy Ankylosing Lung Spondylitis • Arthropathy •• Interstitial Joint Arthrocentesis • Disease Interstitial Lung Arthrocentesis Associated with •• Joint Scleroderma Disease Associated Rheumatic Etiologywith •• Scleroderma Sjrogen’s Syndrome Rheumatic Etiology • Sjrogen’s Syndrome

Call 801-505-5299 to schedule an appointment today! Call 801-505-5299 to schedule an appointment today! 82 S 1100 E, Suite 403 S 1100 Suite 403 Salt82Lake City,E,UT 84102 Salt Lake City, UT 84102

Page 14 | March 2019

In Partnership with Physician Owners In Partnership with Physician Owners

South Valley City Journal


Herriman High students jazzed for New Orleans trip By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

HHS’s Jazz Band impressed guests with background music. (Photo Courtesy of Scott Burnham)

H

erriman High School’s band students are jazzed about going to New Orleans next month. “I’ve wanted to go to a place that’s special for band kids, and New Orleans is where jazz was born,” said HHS band director Brandon Larsen. He hopes the experience will have an enormous effect on his students. “It’s like showing kids the beach for the first time,” he said. “You see their faces, and they light up, and they’re all excited. I get to show the kids the stuff that I’ve been teaching them, day in and day out, for the first time. I’m passionate about it, and I want to show them why I’m passionate about it.” Larsen will take 95 students to New Orleans where they will perform in Mardi Gras World, the French Quarter and in a combined concert with New Orleans-area high school bands. They will also attend workshops at Tulane University. Another highlight of the trip will be the iconic Mississippi River steamboat ride, complete with a live jazz band. Sophomore Rylee Mecham, a percussionist, looks forward to watching jazz musicians perform up close. She hopes to pick up some of the tricks they do with their drumsticks. Larsen hopes his students’ own perfor-

mance will be inspired by seeing, hearing and feeling the spirit of jazz that defines the city. “You go anywhere on the streets there, and you’re going to hear jazz—just pure, real jazz,” said Larsen. Cheryl Wanlass is thrilled that her son, Russell Horrocks, a percussionist in the Jazz Band, has the opportunity to experience the music and culture of New Orleans before he graduates. “I hope it seeps into his bones and he never wants to stop playing music,” said Wanlass, who is also a musician. “I just hope it cements his desire to play for the rest of his life.” Other band parents view the trip as a bonding experience for their children, who feel a sense of belonging to a band family. “With all the suicides and bullying, these kids really stick up and are there for each other,” said Andrea Campbell, whose son is a trumpeter. She said the cost of the trip is worth it for her son to form stronger connections with his bandmates and the wider music community. Denise Christiansen, band fundraiser director, organized numerous fundraisers to make the trip possible. “It’s been a dream of our band director for a couple of years, and it’s never come to

fruition,” said Christiansen, whose son has played the tuba at HHS for two years. “But they’ve never had a fundraising director like me. We’re going to make it happen.” To jumpstart the fundraising, she coordinated HHS’s first Valentine’s Day fundraising gala, “A Night in New Orleans,” which offered couples a romantic evening of dinner, mocktails, a dessert buffet and, of course, jazz music. HHS’s jazz band provided live music for the evening, impressing guests with its skills and inspiring them to hit the dance floor of the lavishly decorated JATC South campus building. Wanlass, whose son is a senior, regularly feeds the marching band and was asked to cater the event. With the help of volunteers, including HHS cafeteria manager Jodie Bowles, she prepared a French-Creole-inspired chicken cordon bleu. While initially reluctant, Wanlass volunteered her extensive catering experience to ensure the inaugural fundraiser dinner set a successful precedent. She also loves being part of the band family. “I would do anything for these kids,” she said. While the jazz band entertained diners, members of the symphonic and concert band helped in the kitchen and worked as servers, attending to the details that would ensure everyone had a special night.

Kerry and Jenni Romney enjoyed the Valentine’s date the event provided. They purchased their ticket from their son, a sophomore who plays the trumpet. Because of a conflict with his work schedule, he was not able to volunteer at the gala. Fortunately, there are other fundraisers in which he can participate. Christiansen brainstormed a variety of creative ways for students to earn their trip. She said district officials frown upon fundraisers that require selling door to door, which is fine with her. “If I have to sell cookie dough and wrapping paper and pizza cards, I’m going to puke,” she said. Upcoming fundraisers include selling Krispy Kreme doughnuts (Feb. 25–March 8) and a yard sale. Students are also selling HHS car air fresheners and working at the concession stand during University of Utah sporting events. The proceeds from all the fundraising efforts, including the silent auction held during the gala, will pay for all the tour expenses.

Lim ited Tim eO ffer !

Wash All You Want

Valid at this location only!

FIRST MONTH FREE* UNLIMITED BEST WASH Membership *$1 activation fee

7610 Union ParkW. Ave. 7824 S. 3800 Midvale, UT 84047 West 84088 (AcrossJordan from AsianUT Star Restaurant and Zion Bank Union Heights)

DontDriveDirty.com

@ QuickQuackUtah

888-772-2792 Gala attendees enjoy dinner and mocktails. (Photo Courtesy of Scott Burnham)

S outh ValleyJournal .com

QQ_509_BestSpecial_AD_5.1563x5.1563_FINAL.indd 1

12/14/18 10:53 AM

March 2019 | Page 19


GH_DRAPER_AD_5.1563X.pdf 9/20/18 7:03 AM GH_DRAPER_AD_5.1563X.pdf 1 1 9/20/18 7:03 AM

BAKERY CAFE CAFE BAKERY • Sandwiches • Sandwiches • Salads & Soups • Salads & Soups • Specialty Toasts • Specialty Toasts

• Fresh Breads • Fresh Breads • Great Gifts • Great Gifts • Tasty Catering • Tasty Catering

Weare areyour yourNeighborhood NeighborhoodBakers! Bakers! We Come try freshly baked favorites in our New Café Style Bakery Come try freshly baked favorites in our New Café Style Bakery

GetOne OneLoaf Loaf Get 50% OFF 50% OFF (Loaf of your choice.

NOW OPEN! NOW SOUTHOPEN! JORDAN 3591 West 11400 South SOUTH JORDAN

www.greatharvestutah.com 3591 West 11400 South www.greatharvestutah.com

(Loaf of your choice. Excludes cake breads) Excludes cake breads)

DRAPER

217 E 12300 S • Draper Peaks DRAPER (801) 217 E 12300 S •572-3373 Draper Peaks www.greatharvestutah.com/draper (801) 572-3373 www.greatharvestutah.com/draper

Hurry in! Expires 01/31/19. One coupon per visit.

Hurry in! Expires 03/31/19 01/31/19. One coupon per visit.

Page 20 | March 2019

South Valley City Journal


If You’re Reading This, So Are Your Customers. Winter Indoor Lessons River Oaks in Sandy Backyard Greens in Lindon

Our programs are taught by PGA Professionals, Todd Tanner & Stacey Jones. 1 and 2 hour programs are held once a week. Each class has a 5:1 student to instructor ratio. All programs include short game practice, range balls, in depth instruction, video analysis and on course playing time.

BEGINNER: 3-4 • 4-7 • 8-12 | ADVANCED: 5-7 • 9-13 • 14-18 | Girl Only Programs Programs start February 5-8, March 5-8, and spring programs start April 1! Programs offered year round, outdoors in the summer and indoors in the winter.

Get addItIOnaL InfO and ReGISteR OnLIne at

www.inmotionjuniorgolf.com OR caLL 801-980-0162

S outh ValleyJournal .com

Tracy Langer

13 community newspapers serving 15 cities for over 27 years.

801-515-0582

Print and digital ad opportunites.

Account Executive

Tracy.L@thecityjournals.com

Real and trackable results.

WE’RE YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION

March 2019 | Page 21


Spirited sixth-grader wins Prudential Spirit of Community Award By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

We are excited to announce that our second clinic has opened in South Jordan. Treating All Aspects of Medical, Surgical and Cosmetic Dermatology ·Skin Cancer ·Mohs Surgery ·Acne ·Moles ·Belotero ·Eczema ·Chemical Peels

·Botox ·Juvederm ·Kybella ·Radiesse ·Bellafill ·Microneedling ·Laser Treatments

Twelve-year old Gabbie Lundberg has received national recognition of her community service project benefitting refugees. (Adrienne Lundberg)

G

abbie Lundberg, a sixth-grader at North Star Academy in Bluffdale, was chosen as one of two State Honorees of the Prudential Spirit of Community Award. Representatives from the national awards program, which recognizes students in grades 5–12 for their community service, were impressed by Gabbie’s donation to refugees in Utah. Last summer, Gabbie organized Camp Awesome in her basement to entertain children in her neighborhood during summer break. Breton Yates Elena Douglas M Woseth Angela Brimhall Camp Awesome raised almost $200, which D.O. FAOCD M.D. FAAD Hadjicharalambous M.D. Gabbie donated to a local organization that M.D. FAAD helps refugee families. Gabbie said she was inspired by the donations she’d seen her mom collecting for refugee families and believed that even at a young age she could make a difference, too. “I was 11 when I had this thought in my head,” said Gabbie, who woke in the middle of the night with the idea for the day camp. “I just thought it, I made a flier the next day, passed it out, and then the next week I was having Camp Awesome.” Shane Farr Michael R Swinyer Alisa Seeberger A total of 38 children, ages 4 to 7, attendP.A. -C P.A. -C F.N.P. -C ed Camp Awesome, participating in the games, songs and dance parties Gabbie organized. “It was just so fun to hang out with the Main Office: 1548 East 4500 South, Suite 202, Salt Lake City kids—I love nurturing and caring for kids,” said South Jordan Office: 4040 West Daybreak Pkwy, Suite 200, South Jordan the now 12 year old. Gabbie felt it was important to have a special recognition for each child who attended. Phone: 801-266-8841 “I had to spend time with each child, individually, talking and laughing and playing with them and finding out what their unique qualities

www.dwoseth.com

Page 22 | March 2019

were,” she said. She created personalized certificates and awarded plastic medals to each child to recognize one of their characteristics or skills. She plans to hold Camp Awesome again this summer. Gabbie is the daughter of Derek and Adrienne Lundberg, of South Jordan. They were not surprised that Gabbie orchestrated such a big project. “I feel like my job as her mom is to make sure I don’t get in her way because she is always trying to do these awesome things,” said Adrienne Lundberg. “I just want to support her. She loves to help—she has that nature. She takes care of everyone.” Gabbie’s extended family runs a nonprofit organization, Bridges of Love, in Romania, and the practice of serving others is part of their family culture, said Lundberg. She said Gabbie has a big heart and feels strongly about issues such as helping refugees. When Gabbie heard that not all states would accept them, she was shocked. “She actually wrote a letter to the governor of Kansas saying she felt like he should accept refugees because that would be the right thing to do,” said Lundberg. Lisa Hardy, school counselor at Northstar Academy in Bluffdale, which emphasizes community service within its curriculum, encouraged students to apply for the Prudential award. “We definitely need to highlight these kids that are go-getters and do what needs to be done without any fanfare,” said Hardy, who works with Gabbie in the school’s Hope Squad. “She’s just a go-getter and just figures out what needs to be done and goes and does it. She is always looking for volunteer opportunities and is willing to help out wherever we need.” Gabbie will attend the Prudential awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., this May, where 102 state honorees—one middle school and one high school student from each state and the District of Columbia—will each receive $1,000 and a silver medallion. Ten finalists will be chosen as America’s top youth volunteers of 2019 and will receive $5,000, a gold medallion, a trophy for their school and a donation of $5,000 to a charity of the student’s choice. The other state honoree from Utah, Armani McFarland, a sophomore at Weber High School, has conducted 27 collection and fundraising drives in the past seven years to benefit low-income families. An additional 234 students nationwide were honored as Distinguished Finalists, including four from Utah: Raymond Briener, Kanab; Noah Dansie, Provo; Caleb O’Neill, North Ogden; McCall Tebbs, Panguitch. More than 450 other applicants were awarded Certificates of Excellence.

South Valley City Journal


Jazz players surprise Herriman Hope squad during basketball game By Jennifer Gardiner | j.gardiner@mycityjournals.com

Hope Squad with Jazz players in choir room. (Photo Courtesy of Jordan School District)

T

wo Utah Jazz players took time out of their day to stop in at Herriman High to lend support to the school’s Hope Squad, which works year-round to help prevent teen suicide in their communities. Jazz players Ekpe Udoh and Tyler Cavanaugh surprised the students during a basketball game in February. Representatives with the Utah Jazz said the players wanted to recognize those students for their efforts, so they made a surprise stop at the school before a basketball game between Herriman and rival Riverton. After the surprise at the beginning of the game, the members of the Hope Squad, along with Udoh and Cavanaugh, went into the choir room to discuss the serious issue of suicide. “They really were so ecstatic and hap-

py to get to meet them,” said Herriman High Vice President Stewart Hudnall. “They congratulated them with what they are doing and shared some personal experiences.“ “What you all are doing is amazing,” Udoh told the Hope Squad. “It’s so courageous and important, looking out for each other, especially with what has happened.” Udoh and Cavanaugh gave the students Utah Jazz hats and tickets to an upcoming game, one for them and one for someone who they think could use a night with a friend. Udoh also gave each student a copy of Nicole Russell’s book, “Everything a BandAid Can’t Fix” and an offer to work with the group in the future. “I want to give myself and my platform to y’all,” Udoh said. “This is a conversation that should be had on a national level. And

when we found out about this, we were eager to come here and see the faces that are making an impact on a grassroots level." After the session with the Hope Squad, Udoh stayed to watch the remainder of the game, pledging his support to the Herriman team, said Hudnall. The Herriman High Hope Squad works throughout the year to listen to their peers, provide much-needed support and to give hope to those suffering from suicidal thoughts. During the 2017–2018 school year, Herriman High School lost six students to suicide just in the first five months of of the year. “It was emotionally draining,” said Hudnall in the press release. “It was really hard. Our school and our students are like our surrogate families. Losing one of them really is like losing a family member.” Utah ranks fifth in the nation for highest number of suicides and is now the leading cause of death for children aged 10–17. There is no doubt the manner in which suicides have sharply been increasing has gripped our state with fear, but it has also created an outpouring of support and determination to find a solution. KayCee DeYoung is a theater teacher at Herriman High School. She says the last year was tough. "We care about these kids," said

DeYoung. "We're not here because of the paycheck. We're not here for any glory or fame. We're not here other than because we love our students. We want them to be happy." South Jordan Mayor Dawn Ramsey released a statement after Jordan School District officials agreed to pour $1 million into suicide prevention and awareness, saying as a parent she has seen first-hand the great efforts of their young people, teachers, counselors administrators, parents and members of the Herriman High community to combat suicide. "I appreciate all Jordan School District is doing by taking such significant action districtwide," said Ramsey. "At their Board Meeting this past Tuesday, I heard nationally renowned expert Dr. Scott Polland applaud the significant efforts of the district, saying it is extremely rare for a school district to go to such great lengths to prevent suicide." The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, as well as prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please call 1-800-273-8255.

Hope Squad with Jazz at game. (Photo Courtesy of Jordan School District)

S outh ValleyJournal .com

March 2019 | Page 23


Lee takes over silverwolves program By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.com

The Silverwolves leading scorer is senior Kaitlin Burgess, she is averaging nearly 15 points per game. (photo courtesy of dsandersonpics.com)

T

aking over for a school icon can be a daunting experience. New Riverton High School girls basketball head coach Jodi Lee knows the feeling. Ron Ence had been the only head coach the girls program at Riverton had ever had.

The school opened in 1999, and the team won a state championship in 2013. Lee took over at the beginning of the school year after being the head coach at Taylorsville. “I want nothing but the best for my old Taylorsville team,” Lee said. “My move

was nothing more than a proximity thing. My commute is more than cut in half. The opportunity came about and I took it. There is pressure in taking over for coach Ence. Most of that is my own insecurities. I need to be confident in my own abilities. The man taught me a lot. He excelled at getting the best out of his kids.” Ence continues to teach at the school and coaches girls tennis in the fall. “I knew in the first year there would be some ups and downs,” Lee said. “There have been a lot of ups. I think that we could be better. I am getting to know these girls, and we have a good group of girls. I do not have to worry about if they are going to class. Their grades are up where they need to be. It was emotional to leave Taylorsville, but I knew there were good girls everywhere.” The Silverwolves finished with 3-5 region record in fourth place. They beat West Jordan twice and Herriman once this season. “Sometimes we have been a better team,” Lee said. “Like tonight (after a 47-43 loss at Taylorsville), we got beat by a better team. They were able to key in on our best player and shut her down.” Kaitlin Burgess has led the team in scoring averaging 14.7 points per game. Taylorsville held her in check in the loss, where she went scoreless.

“I was really proud of her,” Lee said. “Taylorsville locked in on her, but she contributed in many ways. I am not sure how we win anytime without her scoring a bucket.” In games that Burgess is held under her average, the Silverwolves are 3-6. Senior Megan Hedrick leads the team in rebounding with 9.2 per game. The 6-foot1-inch senior has grabbed a season high 15 boards twice this season. “I think our team is learning that any team can win on any night,” Lee said. “We have got to be better at focusing on that and not letting our record get in the way.” Returning to Taylorsville for the first time to coach against the girls she had mentored for four years was difficult. “This game was full of emotion,” Lee said. “I want nothing but the best for those girls. I talked to some of the seniors before the game and told them I would do anything for them. I want it to get that way here at Riverton. I think this is a great group of girls.” Riverton finished fourth in Region 3 and qualified for the girls state tournament. It began Feb. 18 at Salt Lake Community College. Riverton blasted Cyprus 70-30 in its first-round game.

Utah GirlsTACKLE FOOTBALL A positive Experience We engage concerns to make coming to the dentist enjoyable.

Registration for Spring League open now! This football league is the first of its kind and we invite all girls (4th-12th grade) to join. www.UtahGirlsTackleFootball.com

2364 West 12600 South, Suite F Riverton, UT 84065 (801) 446-5050 kevinyeagerdds.com

Page 24 | March 2019

FOOTBALL IS WHAT WE DO. South Valley City Journal


Herriman girl wins Super bowl’s Best commercial By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.com

Sam Gordon was the first female to be recognized by the NFL at its honors assembly. (photo courtesy of Utah Girls Tackle Football League)

H

erriman resident Sam Gordon stole the spotlight on Super Bowl Sunday. The two-minute commercial aired shortly after the halftime show. Nation-

al Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell is in the midst of giving a rather dull speech welcoming banquet goers to the 100th season of the league. Marshawn Lynch, a running back in the league, leans over in his chair to get a swipe of frosting from an elaborately decorated cake. He falls into the cake and knocks a gold painted football from the top. The ball rolling on the ground begins a deluge of players passing, tackling and running with the ball around the banquet room. The spot includes NFL greats such as Joe Montana, Tom Brady and Franco Harris. At one point the ball flies through the air and lands in Gordon’s hands. The San Francisco 49ers defensive back Richard Sherman walks to her and asks for the ball. She responds, “You want this? Come and get it.” At which point she spins to her left and pitches the ball to New York Giants rookie Saquon Barkley. Her appearance in the commercial dressed in a majestic red dress ends the spot welcoming the leagues fans to the next 100 years. Gordon was not the only female football participant to be featured in ads during the game. Toyota ran a spot that included Toni Harris, who played football at East

Los Angeles College, and CBS ran an announcement for Girls Inc.—team of young girls lined up against the New York Giants. It was not her first time to participate with the NFL. She was given the inaugural NFL Game Changer Award at the NFL Honors awards ceremony before last year’s Super Bowl. The award is not limited to players and coaches. It is given to someone who effects positive change in the world of football. She was the first recipient of the award and the first female to be honored by the NFL. Gordon was part of a group that organized the Utah Girls Tackle Football League in 2015, and her team, the Herriman Mustangs, won the first high school state championship in 2017. The league was the first all-girls league in the country. It is currently accepting registrations for the upcoming season. The teams begin play in March. All girls 4th through 12th grades play on district teams divide into three age groups. For more information, visit the league website, utahgirlstacklefootball.com.

LUCK SHOULDN’T BE YOUR ONLY INHERITANCE ALLY! If you have a loved one with special needs or using SSDI and/or Medicaid, we’ll help make a plan that will not jeopardize social program eligibility.

$100 OFF

Any Special Needs/Medicaid Planning

Rebekah Wightman, J.D. Rebekah Wightman, J.D. of Sandberg, Stettler, & Bloxham located in South Jordan, Utah is an experienced Estate Planning and Probate attorney. She takes pride in serving her clients and providing them a pleasant present and a peaceful future. Rebekah’s fun personality and commitment to her clients, make an often dreary experience “a-heck-of-a-lot-of-fun”!

SeRVICeS:

• Medicaid and Special Needs Planning • Wills • Trusts • Medical Directives • Powers of Attorney • Estate Settlement • Caretaker Authority Forms • Probate • Guardianship proceedings

801-984-2040 rebekah@ssb.law 10808 S. River Front Pkwy, Ste. 344 South Jordan, UT 84095

S outh ValleyJournal .com

March 2019 | Page 25


Referees say respect, good manners win the game By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.com

Now enrolling for the 2019-2020 school year

Real Salt Lake Offers: • A Quality STEM Education • 1:1 Technology

385-474-9052

Page 26 | March 2019

• Many Extra Curricular Activities • Excellent Soccer Training and Facilities

rslacademy.org

The last week of January, basketball officials wore blue arm bands to point out the need for improved sportsmanship from coaches and athletes but especially from fans and parents. (Greg James/City Journals)

B

asketball referees around the state wore blue arm bands the last week of January to emphasize good sportsmanship to fans, players and coaches. They’ve witnessed poor sportsmanship rearing its ugly head at many games. One seasoned referee said after finishing a hotly contested game a group of fans followed him to his car. The entire way the fans made it clear they thought he was not good at his job in loud overtones. He was threatened and eventually, he called the police to make sure he could get home safely. “I did what I should not have,” said the referee who wished to remain anonymous. “I turned to the fans as they were heckling me and said, ‘This is why there will come a time when there will not be anyone here to referee these games.’ I had enough that night.” The Utah High School Activities Association has seen a 2 percent decline in the number of referees this year. Statewide referee associations declared Jan. 28 through Feb. 2 as sportsmanship week. The participating officials wore blue wrist bands to remind fans, players and coaches of the need for civility and respect in the game. “This has become an ongoing concern,” Utah County referee association President Stuart Dean said. “We have had a lot more situations with fans, parents and coaches that have arisen because of a deterioration in sportsmanship. Unfortunately, this is problematic not only here but nationally.” In a National Association of Officials (naso.org) survey, 57 percent of respondents believe sportsmanship is getting worse. Good behavior is more than interaction with the officials. It comes from how opponents are treated and what the cheering is like. According the same survey, 59 percent of poor sportsmanship is from the parents and fans.

“I generally do not think the players and coaches have had a big issue,” Dean said. “It is really with fans and parents. They have taken a license to abuse officials. That is where this has gotten out of hand.” A recent study by the Stanford Children's Hospital emphasized things parents can do to encourage better sportsmanship. It includes avoid arguing, playing fair, following directions, respecting the other team, encouraging the team and respecting the officials’ decisions. “We take our role seriously,” Dean said. “There is testing, evaluations and orientation. We start the year by going to rules clinics. We have meetings five times during the season. We talk about how we can become better professionals. How can we handle things on the court. We work hard at that.” Dean said the best officials are good communicators. “I was working with an official when I was up-and-coming, and I remember my partner telling a coach, ‘I am sorry if I missed that call. I will work hard to get it right next time.’ Those are things that make our role better,” Dean said. “We are down 400 officials from six years ago. We have seen the impact in the sub-varsity games.” This is the start of something that could continue to happen every year. The UHSAA has received inquiries from schools and administrators hoping to participate more fully. “This is a call to draw attention to the issue,” Dean said. “By and large, the coaches in this state are very good. They are very competitive, but they know what their job is. This has been a cultural shift. There has been times I can’t believe what I'm hearing. It crosses the line.”

South Valley City Journal


Athletes using more than feet at RSL Academy By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.com

RSL Academy’s Jordan Day is averaging 14 points per game, the most for any reshman in the state. (photo courtesy of Greg Jame/City Journals)

T

he rule book used by high school basketball teams around the state does include dribbling, but not with your feet. RSL Academy in Herriman opened as a charter school giving young soccer phenoms an opportunity to attend school and learn the game they love. After enrollment, some of these upand-coming soccer stars signed up to play a different kind of game, basketball. “The school is a development academy for RSL,” RSL Academy boys basketball head coach Justin Perfili said. “(RSL owner) Dell Loy Hansen started this all in Arizona and wanted to move them (the training facility) up

here as a public charter school. It is open to the general public. I have come on board to help soccer players become basketball players.” The Griffins competed in the charter school league last year and finished fifth out of 16 teams. This season they are enrolled as part the Utah High School Activities Association. “I am here because I love basketball and am helping teach these kids the game,” Perfili said. “Our biggest draw is soccer, of course. Now, we are building just like any other basketball program.” The school is a commuter-style charter with students from Layton to Springville. “I am a big proponent of the fact that the more sports you play, the better you become in your primary sport,” he said. “These guys have wanted to become part of something.” The school population this year is 280 students. Next year, it is forecasted to be at capacity of 360. The first season in the UHSAA is a probationary year. During that time, school officals must prove they can support the program with facilities, coaches and equipment. Because the gymnasium at the school is not regulation size, the boys basketball team plays its home games at Salt Lake Community College. The team lost their first game to East 8120. “Every game, we are getting better and

better,” Perfili said. “Each night, we focus on winning a quarter, then maybe we can win two or three then an entire game.” Teaching a game to athletes that many of them have never played has proven difficult. “Yeah, we had to teach that you can’t be out of bounds and dribble the ball in bounds,” he said. “In soccer, as long as the ball is inbounds it is fine. We had to start at square one. Some have played on super league teams, but for the most part not at all. One of our starting players had not touched a basketball before this season.” Jordan Day leads the team in scoring averaging 14.1 points per game. He is the top freshman varsity scorer in the state. He has hit 54 percent of his shots this season. Sophomore Max Palmer is second in the state in steals averaging 3.6 per game. The Griffins are 3-11. Their wins include two contests against Freedom Prep and one over Westridge. Despite the challenging season, Perfili said it has been a fun season. “Not bad for a bunch of soccer players,” he said. “We are all about the team.”

12590 South 2200 West Riverton, Utah 84605

801-254-3389

Readers like you keep us printing! Be part of YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS by donating to City Journals today! Name:

Phone:

Address: City:

State:

One Time Donation: $

Monthly Donation: $

Credit Card Number:

Zip:

Ex Date:

Send to City Journals at 9500 South 500 West Suite 205 | Sandy, Utah | 84070 For security reasons, if you would rather contact City Journals directly, call (385)557-1010 or email accounting@mycityjournals.com

When

Compassion

S outh ValleyJournal .com

and

Caring

Matter

Most.

WE’RE YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION.

March 2019 | Page 27


You were just in a car accident, now what?

U

nless you’re one of the few anomalies in the world, we’ve all been in an accident. We’ve experienced that sickening feeling when your car makes unwanted contact with another vehicle. We’re frustrated and disheartened. While we may want to crawl into a hole, we can’t. There are things to do and we’ve given you 10 to be aware of (in no particular order). 1. Have an emergency kit in your car. While this step comes before the accident occurs, it’s essential to be prepared. Whatever you kit entails, make sure it has a first-aid kit, flashlight, reflective triangles and a small (and simple) camera in case there’s been damage to your phone. We’re typically frustrated or frazzled after an accident and not inclined to rational thinking. Being prepared limits the possibility of forgetfulness. 2. Take a deep breath. Accidents are traumatic experiences. Taking a breath will shift focus from what just happened to what needs to be done next. 3. Get a status check on everyone in the car. Check with each passenger to see if they are OK. Have someone call 911 immediately if someone is injured or unresponsive. 4. Move to a safe location. Most insurance companies recommend relocating the vehicle to the sidewalk or shoulder of the road as soon as possible after the accident. If

the damage to the car is minor, this should be relatively easy. But if there are major injuries or questions about the safety of the car, leave it where it is, even if its blocking traffic. 5. Increase your visibility. Turn on your hazard lights and set out your attention items from the emergency kit—flares, orange cones, reflective triangles, etc. One accident should not lead to another. Take precaution to ensure other drivers on the road remain safe. 6. Stay calm. It is very easy to lose your temper in this situation, it’s human nature. Keeping your cool will keep the situation from getting worse. If it wasn’t your fault, it’s easy to want to let your emotions loose on the other driver. This will cloud your judgment and may lead to something that does not help the situation. You still need to exchange information. 7. Exchange insurance information. This is imperative. If you are to file a claim on your car, you will need the other driver’s information. Most likely, after an accident you are feeling jumpy or stressed. It means when you try to write down their information your handwriting will look like ancient hieroglyphics and, unless you are a cryptographer, will be unable to read it later. We live in the 21st century, take a photo of their information and take photos of the damage done to both cars. 8. Don’t admit guilt. Every insurance

company will tell you to do this. Even if you are at fault and it was you to blame. This could drive your premium up or even lead to you being sued. Let the police and insurance companies determine this. 9. Call the police. While some minor accidents don’t require a report to be filed, it’s up to the discretion of the drivers in the accident to call the police. Law enforcement can take statements, get information on injuries and property damage. Be sure to ask for a copy of the accident report. If there is a dispute, the officer will be an important testimony. 10. See a doctor. Depending on the in-

juries suffered or not, it is easy to skip this. A large financial situation has just happened with the car accident, you don’t want another one by seeing the doctor and jacking up your health costs. It’s important to consider it, or possibly speak with one. Adrenaline can be pumping after the accident and one might not notice the amount of whiplash to your neck. Symptoms can take 24 hours to appear. The warning signs include neck pain, stiffness, loss of motion in the neck, headaches, fatigue, dizziness and pain in the shoulders or upper back. It can be better to be safe than sorry. l

LOVE YOUR HOME

Open 11 Hours A Day • 6 Days A Week Monday-Saturday 10am – 9pm • Closed Sundays Shop online at rcwilley.com.

Page 28 | March 2019

South Valley City Journal


Growing youth track club back for spring season

POSTPONE YOUR HEADSTONE

By Catherine Garrett | c.garrett@mycityjournals.com

Dont Text & Drive

Race Cats Herriman has grown from around 30 runners to more than 200 in just a few short seasons. (Photo courtesy Caisa Brown)

T

Nearly 330,000 injuries occur each year from accidents caused by texting while driving. 1 out of every 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving. PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Helping Families Heal for Over 130 years

LarkinMortuary.com S outh ValleyJournal .com

he Race Cats track program for kids ages 8 to 15 has simply kept on growing since it was formed by Draper’s Nanette Evans Kennard, a two-time All-American runner at Brigham Young University. After just a few years, the program boasted 40 teams and 1,100 athletes last fall and was the third-largest team in the country at last year’s national championships. “My vision for Race Cats is to facilitate opportunities for youth to discover running at a younger age than I did,” Kennard said. “I’ve designed the Race Cats program to be fun and positive so we can ignite a love of exercise in young children. I want them to experience the positive physical and mental benefits, confidence, joy and lifelong friendships that running provides.” This past December, 24 Race Cat athletes from the Jordan School District competed in Reno, Nevada,. at the Junior Olympic National Championships. Kennard said the experience of 13-year-old Grayson Milne during the 13- to 14-year-old boys race at nationals exemplifies what this program is all about. “Early on in his race, his shoe was yanked off by the mud on the course,” she said. “He didn’t even stop to think about it. He just kept going and ran more than half of the race with only one shoe on (which was later retrieved by Grayson and his teammates)! I was inspired by his courage and willingness to press onward despite uncomfortable circumstances. These kids are learning grit, sportsmanship and teamwork at a young age, and I am so proud of them. I am so grateful for all the coaches and parents who help make this possible. We all had a blast this past season and grew as at team.” Caisa Brown and Heidi Summers co-direct the 11-week Race Cats program that will practice at Herriman High as sanctioned by USA Track and Field. The spring season, the team will hold practices twice a week for young kids who will compete at meets through the season running from April 8 through June 22. The state meet will be held June 6–8 with those qualifying for regionals traveling to Montana to compete June 20–22. More information on registration for the spring league is available at www.racecats.org. The number of athletes will be capped at 160. The Instagram page for the Race Cats

spring program at Herriman High is @racecatssouthjordan. “I love how well thought-out and inclusive this program is,” Brown said. “Plus, Nan [Kennard] incorporates goals and learning principles beyond running techniques with this program’s philosophy, which helps these kids with some real-life skills.”

Beckley Brown, son of Race Cats Herriman co-director Caisa Brown, participates in an event last year. (Photo courtesy Caisa Brown)

March 2019 | Page 29


Delicious Deals

A

by

CASSIE GOFF

re you looking for deals on Utah restaurants? Or maybe you’re trying to find a new favorite restaurant? We’ve got you covered! If you check out our website, we update our restaurant deals weekly to keep you up to date on the best local food deals. Here are some of the frequent highlights. For breakfast deals, you could always visit the regulars like IHOP and Village Inn. Or, you could try Pig & A Jelly Jar in Salt Lake, or the famous Belgian Waffle and Omelet Inn in Midvale. Are you needing that raw energy to get you through the day? Check out Chopfuku Sushi Bar in Taylorsville, Blue Marlin in Sandy, or Itto Sushi in downtown Salt Lake. If you’re invoking your inner carnivore this weekend there’s Tokyo Steakhouse & Asian Fusion in Lehi, Tony Burgers or Ruby River Steak House in Salt Lake City. Eating at home all the time can get boring, just like American food. If your taste buds are craving a vacation, try any of the following restaurants to trick your taste buds into believing they are out of town. Instead of taking a 13+ hour flight to Asia, visit Chow Time Buffet in West Valley or Lanikai Grill in South Jordan. If the ideal vacation destination is Europe, visit The Gallery Grill in Sugarhouse for Russian and European Cuisine. Or take a lavish trip to the Mediterranean, by visiting Bountiful Greek Café

(in Bountiful, of course) or The Olympian Restaurant in Salt Lake City. Don’t plan a quick trip down to Mexico for authentic Mexican food, instead visit: Taco Burrito in Orem, La Puente in Centerville, Mi Ranchito Grill in Salt Lake, or Moe’s Southwest Grill in Layton. Personally, my taste buds have been craving Thai food, so I’ll be visiting District Thai Lao in Orem, and Sala Thai Kitchen in Salt Lake. However, my family’s favorite place to take their taste buds is Italy. For fantastic Italian food, our thrifty options are Oregano Italian Kitchen in Provo, Macaroni Grill in Murray, or Johnny Carino’s in West Jordan. But, if you’re taste buds want to stay

close to home, there’s always pizza! Papa Johns, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s, Little Caesars and Pizza Hut always have great rotating deals. I promote supporting local businesses through, so for pizza we’d recommend trying Este Pizzeria in Sugarhouse, MidiCi Neapolitan Pizza in Salt Lake City, The Junction Pizzeria in Midvale, Big Daddy’s Pizza in South Salt Lake, David’s Pizza in Kaysville, Francesco’s in Taylorsville, Wild Mushroom Pizza in Salt Lake, Big Apple Pizza in Salt Lake, The Pizza Runner in Ogden, or Pizza Factory in Lindon, Spanish Fork, Syracuse and Provo. Lastly, don’t forget that International Women’s Day is this month (March 8). So, ladies, if you need a place to eat, preferably without the munchkins, Bout Time Pub and Grub in Layton, Scoffy’s Social Pub in Midvale, Tailgaters Grill in Ogden, Christopher’s Prime Tavern or Grill in Salt Lake City should be your destination! These deals, and more (including The Pie Pizzeria and Leatherby’s) can always be found on the Entertainment app. For more information about the Entertainment Happenings book and app, please visit our website: coupons4utah.com, or follow us on social media: @coupons4utah, on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. l

Wellness Relax Center

$100

Foot Massage Reflexology

801-889-0087

• 90 Min $60 • 60 Min $40 • 30 Min $30

Receive

$20 OFF

10334 S Redwood Rd, South Jordan, UT 84095

$25 Or More

Limit 1 per table. Expires 3/31/19.

801-446-6644 www.tusharexpress.com 1078 West 10400 South • South Jordan, UT 84095

Page 30 | March 2019

First time exam for your exotic pet 8052 South 700 East Sandy, UT 84070

carpet cleaning

Buy 10 get 1 FREE

$5 0ff

oFF

Now Serving Exotic Pets!

Open 7 days: 10am - 10pm

(801) 566-1234 www.altavet.org

any iteM

Mention this ad and we will pay of your bill! (bills over $500)

$50

expires 3.31.19

the clever Bean 656 E 11400 s suite J Draper, UT 84020

28 West 700 South • Salt Lake City, UT 84101

801.363.440 rickwarnerbodyshop.com

www.thecleverbean.com 801-998-8457

4898 s. Highland Drive Holladay, UT

Mention this ad and get

5 BedrooMs + 1 hallway

50% Off

just $120

a Variety Box

(385) 299-4307

662 e. Union square, sandy, 84070 385.515.9630 teamcookieco.com

ExpirEs 4/15/19

Licensed & insured | Hablamos Espanol

Must present coupon expires 3/31/2019

We’re the BEST SPOT for your pets!

FREE

selF dog wash

With coupon on first visit. Expires 3/31/19.

South Valley City Journal


Life and Laughter—Humor Writing for Dummies

I

’m sometimes asked how I consistently come up with funny column ideas. I laugh breezily, toss my hair and say, “It’s so easy. I sit down to write and it just pours out of me like warm chocolate syrup.” Of course, that’s a blatant lie. Writing’s like pulling out my own molars. I don’t consistently write funny. I often write pure garbage; you just don’t get to see it. And sometimes what I think is hilarious, isn’t received well at all. (Offending topics include gluten, dentists, graffiti and child labor.) I look at the funny side of life. It’s much happier there. But sitting down to write can be excruciating. Sometimes an idea just works. Other times (most of the time), the path from brain to published column is fraught with mind traps and self-doubt. My writing process goes like this: Deadline: I’ve just submitted my hilarious column to the editor. I vow to work on my next one right away! Three weeks later: I’ve written no column. I have no ideas. All is darkness. I’ve used all my funny lines. I’ll never write again. Four days before deadline: I need to write something! Two days before deadline (at 2 a.m.): I just thought of something funny! Day of deadline: Complete column. Send it to editor. Vow to work on the next column immediately. Repeat for 15 years. There are lots of ways to get funny inspiration. Get out of bed. Humans are insane, and

Life

Laughter AND

by

PERI KINDER

SOUTH VALLEY

PROFESSIONALS

Value HOUSE PLANS

Put your dream home on paper!

www.fivestarhomedesigns.com

Plans will show what exterior and all interior rooms will look like including all the furnishings.

Call Charles: 425-478-7141 CONCRETE WORK

PLACE AN AD: Call

801-254-5974 YARD SERVICES

Affordable Yard Care / Tree Trimming & Removal Flower Beds, Hedges, Railroad Ties, Mulching, Sod, Mowing, Concrete Senior Discounts

Call Dan:

801-518-7365

VEHICLES WANTED

Reasonable Prices, Quality Work, Prompt Service

Gumby’s Auto Parts

Flat work, Driveways, Patios, RV Pads, Sidwalks, Etc.

(801) 506-6098

Call Dan: 801.518.7365 Windows and Doors

Ace Windows and Doors 14 Years Experience, Licensed & Insured Free Estimates Senior Discounts Saturday Install Available

Call Lee 801-214-4532

S outh ValleyJournal .com

by observing them you’ll get tons of humor writing ideas. Watch people at the mall. Watch people at church. Watch people in stressful situations. Eavesdrop. Read the headlines. Comic gold! Exaggerate. Hyperbole is a humor writer’s greatest tool in the known (and unknown) universe. You didn’t just fall down the stairs, you slipped on a sock and bounced down the stairs, hitting each step with your elbow, head and hip twice before falling to the next step. It took 15 minutes to reach the bottom of the stairs. Read humor. David Sedaris, Mark Twain, Nora Ephron and Tina Fey, are some of my favorites. The idea is not to plagiarize their writing (illegal) but to study the flow of humor (totally legal). What words make you laugh? (Shenanigans, bloviate, canoodle.) What phrases make you burn with jealousy that you didn’t think of them first? (Most of them.) Find the serious. Somber people almost write comedy for you. When you run into someone who’s all “Harrumph, harrumph. I’m an important grown up” you’ve struck a comedic motherlode. Look back on all the stuffy authority figures in your life; could be your parents, could be your algebra teacher or your precocious cousin who graduated from high school at 8 years old. People who take themselves seriously are super easy to satirize and/or lampoon. (Thank you, Prez Trump.) Do things that make you laugh. It’s hard to write comedy when you’re crying into your big pillow every afternoon. Go to funny

PAINTING Custom Interior/Exterior Painting Decks & Cabinets Basic Home Repair

Installations & Repairs

Call Amanda: 385-299-3383

www.bounce-crazy-llc.business.site

Handy Home Service Mark Landers 801-641-9644

PEST CONTROL

Automotive Services

801-618-4649

Bounce Houses Bounce Crazy Party Rentals

20 Styles to Choose from Non-Water, Water & Bubble Bouncers Complete Set Up and Take Down Other Rentals: Tables, Chairs, Canopies

ECO FRIENDLY KID & PET SAFE

Your Utah Pest Solution Expert

7 yrs Experience

Call for Free Estimates Garret Nunnelley 801-831-3005 mantispestcontrolslc.com

TREE SERVICES

INTERMOUNTAIN TREE EXPERTS

We’ll buy your non-running, wrecked or broken car, truck or van.

Removals . Trimming . Pruning

“It’s worth your time to call!”

801-244-3542

TAX PREPARATION

ROOFING

Tax Preparation Simple to Complicated CPA PROFESSIONAL

30 Years of Experience Business and Individual Filings Located on FT Union Blvd

Call Mike 801-599-8455

movies, hang out with funny people, try standup, tell knock-knock jokes at work until your co-workers poison your tea. Laugh out loud. Snort. Giggle. Guffaw. Write. If you don’t put your arse in a chair and write, your humor writing career will never take off. Write something every day. Compose a funny book or movie review. Write a description of your grandpa’s Edsel. Describe how to make dinner while holding a toddler. Then one day, when someone asks you how you come up with such funny ideas, you can toss your hair and say, “It just drips out of me like melted butter.” Well, don’t say that. Say something funny. l

Licensed and Insured / 15 Yrs Experience FREE ESTIMATES

801-449-9875

All types of roofs

$650 OFF any reroof over 2,000 sq. ft.

Randy’s Tire and Muffler

Complete Auto Repair & Service Manager Owned and Operated Serving Bluffdale/South Valley for 3 Generations 14250 S Redwood Rd 801.254.9971

RandysTireAndMuffler.com FLAT ROOF SPECIALISTS

OLYMPUS ROOFING

801.887.7663 SERVING WASATCH FRONT SINCE 1973

CONCRETE SERVICE Concrete Pouring & Flatwork, Epoxy, Acid Stain, Repair, Curbing

Free Estimates. Easy Scheduling. Call/Text

(385)309-2872 www.utahsurfacesolutions.com

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

Apex Clean Air Call today for a free in home estimate. HOME IMPROVEMENT

Katie Sheen Painter Excellent Paint Jobs - Affordable Prices Interior/Exterior . Residential/Commercial LICENSED AND INSURED

Call Katie 385.628.7514

FREE ESTIMATES! NO JOB TOO SMALL!

GARAGE DOORS

A PLUS GARAGE DOORS

Service Available 24/7 Certified Experts 100% Warrantied

801-260-2030

TAX SERVICES

Whitehead Tax Services More than 15 years tax experience/Enrolled Agent FREE

SAVE

Federal and State efile $100 1040 returns Pickup and Delivery $150 1040 w Sch C/E (West/South Jordan area) $30 Dpnt Return

801-414-5437

whiteheadtaxservices@gmail.com

March 2019 | Page 31


$750 OFF

INVISALIGN TREATMENT EXPIRES 3/31/2019

south hills ORTHODONTICS 4013 W. 13400 S. • RIVERTON

$500 OFF 385-425-6841 ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT EXPIRES 3/31/2019

FREE!

ORTHO EVALUATION

Utah’s #1 Invisalign Provider Board Certified Orthodontist Kids And Adults Treated At One Convenient Location Continuity Of Care: See The Same Orthodontist At Every Visit Family Discounts And Flexible Payment Plans Dr. Tony Skanchy, DMD, MDS

EXPIRES 3/31/2019

Board Certified Orthodontist

“Pain meds? Shots? Physical Therapy? ... even Surgery, but STill Have Pain?” The Controversial Truth and How This May be the Only Way Out of Pain for Some Dear friendFor the 15 years that I’ve been in practice, I’ve been somewhat known as “the guy that sends out those flyers with his kids on them”. However, that’s only a part of the story. You see, new information and technology has come forward that has helped so many people eliminate spinal pain without taking pills, shots, and surgery. Let Me First Point Out that in many cases, medicine, shots, and operations are necessary for proper health and recovery. I’m grateful that this stuff exists. However, in my 15 years of practice, I’ve seen thousands of patients who are regularly getting meds, injections, and even operations that they didn’t need, and who are still in ridiculous pain...it’s tragic...NO WONDER that person is frustrated and skeptical that anything will help. I WOULD BE TOO!!! The problem is that with many doctors, if health insurance doesn’t cover a procedure, it’s almost as if it doesn’t exist! The reality is that the “accepted” treatment for spinal conditions is as follows: medication, physical therapy, steroid injections (pain management) and then surgery. Period. No matter how effective anything else may be. BUT... The Real Truth is that other effective scientifically based solutions do exist. In fact, over the past couple years we have used an innovative approach of combining Deep Tissue Laser (a Class IV device) and spinal decompression. The Laser beam penetrates

about 3-5 inches into the human body. Injured cells respond with an increase in energy and blood supply to injured areas (like Spinal Stenosis and discs) And it stimulates healing in stagnant decaying areas (like arthritic joints). Also, the Deep Tissue Laser stimulates the production of new healthy cells. Spinal Disc Decompression Therapy is performed on a computerized table that allows separation of vertebral segments. The “pull” is very gentle and specifically directed to the compromised regions. Vertebral segments are separated approximately 3-5 millimeters creating a negative pressure between the vertebrae. Disc bulges or herniations can resorb back and dehydrated (narrowed) discs can be rehydrated or thickened. Typical treatment protocol is 20 to 25 office visits, but most patients start feeling better by visit 4. A study performed by Thomas A. Gionis, MD and Eric Groteke, DC. showed an amazing success rate of 86 to 94%! Most of the cases used in the study were disc herniations with or without spinal degeneration. These success rates are consistent with my personal treatment of thousands of similar cases.

juries, along with gentle Chiropractic care for cases that may need it. And finally, the treatment is pain-free.

YOU NEED TO KNOW: I only take cases that I know I can help. (I won’t waste your time & money). We are on most insurance including Aetna, Altius, Blue Cross, Cigna, Deseret Mutual, Educators Mutual, IHC Select Med, PEHP, UHC, and others. And Regardless of fault, Auto Injuries are 100% Covered by Auto Insurance. When you call, you will receive a Complete Spinal Assessment which includes an exam, X-rays (if needed) and 2 office visits along with 2 Pain Relieving Treatments (for a limited time) for only $27 ($293 Value). We are Elite Performance Health Center. We are located at Deep Tissue Laser combined with Disc Decompression Therapy is 86-94% successful I-15 and Bangerter Hwy (13552 S. 110 W.). Our number is 888-YOUR-CARE. in the treatment of Failed Back-Surgery Syndromes. Herniated, Bulging or “Slipped” –Matthew D. Smith, D.C. CSCS Discs, Disc Degeneration and Spinal Stenosis, Neuropathy, Weakness, Pain,Tingling, Chiropractic Physician Numbing in Arms or Legs, Acute or Chronic Joint Pains. We also offer laser treatment for Carpal Tunnel Pain, Headaches, Shoulder, Elbow, Hip or Knee Pains, and Auto In- P.S. I am also extending this offer to one family member for only $7.

Complete Spinal Exam (X-rays if needed)

& 2 pain relieving Treatments

for only $27($293 Value)

Auto Injuries are 100%

covered by Auto Insurance.

888-yoUr-CArE (888-968-7227)

www.elite-spinal-care.com

DRX 9000


March 2019 | Vol. 29 Iss. 03

FREE

February was National Dental Month

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS LAST CHANCE FOR A DISCOUNT!

Save our Teeth

• Did you know 8 out of 10 dogs over the age of 3 are affected by significant dental issues? • Dental problems are one of the leading causes of heart problems in pets.

Signs Your Pet Should Be Checked: • Bad breath • Red along gumline • Drooling • Difficulty or change • Tartar & Plaque buildup in eating habits • Swollen gums • Missing/loose teeth Just one of symptom is enough to be concerned...

Book Today! 801-254-4840

MENTION THIS AD AND

SAVE $20

On Full Cleaning

1381 W. Stone Ridge Lane • Riverton

801-254-4840

Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 3/31/19

RIVERTON COMMUNITY COMES TOGETHER FOR HOPE WALK By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

H

undreds of Riverton community members gathered together on Feb. 2 to spread hope for Riverton’s annual Hope Walk for Suicide Prevention. The Walk — which began at Riverton High School with a moment of silence and a balloon release and ended a mile away at Spirit Corner with hot cocoa and doughnuts—was held to raise awareness for suicide prevention. It is a topic on the minds of parents, teachers, teens and community members. During the 2005–2006 school year, Riverton High School lost six students to suicide. “When somebody has those thoughts, they have just that moment of insanity,” said Linda Tranter, counselor at RHS. “I don’t believe they really want to die; they just want whatever pain they are going through to stop. If we can catch them when they’re thinking those thoughts and intervene, then a lot of times they’re fine after that — they get the help they need.” RHS has taken a proactive response to suicide prevention, establishing a Hope (Hold On. Persuade. Empower.) Squad club to educate students how to identify and help their peers who are struggling with suicidal thoughts. Squad membership has been growing for the last eight years, and the numbers of suicide ideation, attempts and completions have gone down at RHS. “I think our efforts are paying off,” said Tranter, adviser to the club. “We’ve created an environment here that is outside of the Hope Squad — kids that are not on Hope Squad are still coming in and reporting because they’ve been trained on what to do. A lot of our community is just reacting so beautifully and doing just exactly what we need them to do.” Riverton City officials and Intermountain Riverton Hospital partnered with Riverton High School to host the Hope Walk. RHS Principal Carolyn Goff said community support is needed for preventing suicide. “This is not a school issue, it’s a community issue,” she said. Employees from Intermountain Riverton Hospital and Riverton City were involved in RHS’s Hope Week, leading up to the day of the walk. They helped squad members distribute little gifts and treats to students during lunch time activities to remind them of prevention resources available to them. Senior Kyle Boden, vice president of Hope Squad, said the most moving part of Hope Week was the pledge wall in the school’s commons area. “The whole wall is covered,” he said. “I think that’s so cool that you see all the names of every student just on the wall, pledg-

The annual Hope Walk was supported by Hope Squad members from neighboring schools such as South Hills and Oquirrh Middle. (Linda Tranter/ RHS)

ing that they choose life.” Boden has been affected by teen suicide. At the end of his sophomore year, his good friend took his own life. “I decided I couldn’t change what happened, but instead I wanted to be able to prevent this happening to anyone else,” said Boden. “So, I joined Hope Squad. I just love being able to help people, reaching out to anyone who may be suffering or having a hard time. I want to be there for them so I can prevent what happened to my good friend.” Hope Squad members receive regular training on identifying warning signs in peers who are struggling with suicidal thoughts and ways to guide them to get help. “Being in Hope Squad just gives me a better way to help people,” said Boden. “It’s not just helping people with extreme cases of depression, it’s just helping everyone fit it and everyone feel like they’re having a good day.” His involvement in Hope Squad has given him hope that he doesn’t have to lose another friend. “If I had had the Hope Squad experience I have now, I feel like I could’ve — I can’t say I could’ve prevented it because you never know what’s going on in someone’s mind — but I feel like I could’ve reached out and been a lot more help to him,” said Boden. “I wish I had known what I know now, then, for sure.” Riverton City officials also provide similar training for their

employees and regularly sponsor community training. Healthy Riverton teaches a monthly QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) class, which is a first aid response training for mental health issues. For more information on classes, visit Healthy Riverton on Facebook. Other cities, such as nearby South Jordan, also offer QPR trainings. “We encourage anybody who works with youth to attend because these issues are so prevalent,” said Casey Saxton, director of communications for Riverton. “You want to catch something like this before something bad happens.” Other Hope Week events included an assembly by Collin Kartchner about social media’s effect on mental health as well as the community event Live in Real Life Part 2, when psychologist Matt Swenson spoke with residents about anxiety disorders following a screening of the movie “Angst.” Tranter said the movie and discussion were helpful for those who don’t have a personal experience with anxiety and mental health issues. Tranter said one of the best resources for suicide prevention has been the Safe UT app. Teens use the app to contact mental health professionals via text, getting support to help a friend or themselves. Administrators, parents, counselors or police are notified promptly if a serious case is identified. Tranter said because of this resource, many suicide attempts have been thwarted and lives have been saved. l

Thank You to our Community Sponsors for supporting City Journals

Local Postal Customer ECRWSS

Presort Std U.S. Postage PAID Ogden, UT Permit #190

Profile for My City Journals

South Valley Journal March 2019  

South Valley Journal March 2019

South Valley Journal March 2019  

South Valley Journal March 2019

Advertisement