__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

April 2020 | Vol. 30 Iss. 04

FREE

Our #1 Priority is

The Health of Your Pets NEW CLIENTS:

$25 EXAM

10% OFF

With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 4/30/20

With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 4/30/20

for your first pet!

RIVERTON CHURCH MEMBERS COLLECT, DELIVER ESSENTIALS TO ELDERLY TRAPPED INSIDE BECAUSE OF COVID-19

EXISTING CLIENTS:

any services!

1381 W. Stone Ridge Lane • Riverton

BOOK TODAY:

801-254-4840

By Stephanie Yrungaray | s.yrungaray@mycityjournals.com

T

he uncertainty of COVID-19 sent people scrambling for supplies and left grocery store shelves empty of many essentials. While many people worked to fill their own cupboards, two members of a Riverton church looked beyond their own needs and set up a plan to encourage helping and hope. Paul Fulks, a member of the Gospel Hope Church in Riverton was talking to a fellow parishioner Nick Peterson after seeing posts on Facebook about seniors struggling to get groceries. “The elderly don’t need to be out in public,” Fulks said. “We see grocery stores are empty of nonperishable food items and cleaning supplies. We need to be able to get supplies to them.” Fulks and Peterson got permission to designate Gospel Hope Church (11869 South 2700 West in Riverton) as a donation center, setting up hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day of the week to accept donations of “nonperishable food, cleaning supplies, and personal hygiene items” that they can then turn around and give to elderly and at-risk residents. They are calling the campaign, “Hope and Help for our City.” “People [in need] can call, come to the church, or contact us through social media,” Fulks said. “We are able to deliver to them if they need that as well.” Two days after the start of Hope and Help for our City,

around 300 items had been donated. Needs have been filled including distilled water for a grandmother’s CPAP (sleep apnea) machine, and several items delivered to homebound residents. Fulks said they are also reaching out to local nursing homes and hope to deliver donated items that are needed. In this time of fear and self-isolation, their campaign is showing that people can and want to do better. “We hope that this will serve as a reminder that in times

like these, it is much better to give and share than to hoard,” Fulks said. “We just hope that our neighbors will see the love of Jesus that has transformed the lives of the people in our church.” If you are interested in donating nonperishables or know someone in need, you can contact Gospel Hope Church at @gospelhopechurch on Instagram, @gospelhoperiverton on Facebook, or at 801-254-2147. l

Some of the supplies that have been donated to the Hope and Help for our City campaign being run by Gospel Hope Church in Riverton. (Photo courtesy of Paul Fulks)

The Gospel Hope Church in Riverton is seeking donations of nonperishable items to help the elderly and immune compromised who can’t get supplies at the store because of the COVID-19 scare. (Photo courtesy of Paul Fulks)

Mention this Ad

for 10% off Expires 4/30/2020

801-938-4345

• Stump Grinding • 24/7 Emergency Services • Powerline Trimming • Land Clearing • Demolition Options Available • Organic Mulch Products - Delivery Available

Contact us at 801-938-4345 or DiamondTreeExperts.com Local Postal Customer ECRWSS Scan Here: Interactive online edition with more photos.

g! rin + H i 0K w $8 No 35$

TREE TRIMMING & REMOVAL

Full Benefits & Bonuses Call 801-262-1596 or email trent@diamondtreeexperts.com

Thank You to our Community Sponsors for supporting City Journals

Presort Std U.S. Postage PAID Ogden, UT Permit #190


SALT LAKE VALLEY JOURNALS 7.73x5.49.eps

1

10/6/2014

2:38:03 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CENSUS 2020 BEGINS ONLINE MARCH 12, 2020

CMY

K

The U.S. Census helps fund our schools, health care, roads, and other important parts of our community. It’s quick, easy to fill out and confidential.

WATCH FOR A

Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy Just

CENSUS BUREAU LETTER WITH INSTRUCTIONS

Call to schedule your

ARRIVING IN

FREE Initial Consultation

MAILBOXES SOON

Cutting-edge Stem Cell and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) treatment of:

VISIT SLCO.ORG/CENSUS FOR MORE I N F O R M AT I O N

P U E D E V I S I TA R SLCO.ORG/CENSUS PA R A O B T E N E R MÁS INFORMACIÓN

$1,950

• • • • •

Arthritis/Osteoarthritis Knee replacement alternative Tendonitis Ligament tears Failed prior surgery

Don’t let old age or lingering injury break your stride!

10623 S. Redwood Rd South Jordan, UT 84095 801.566.4242

www.SouthValleyOM.com

Page 2 | April 2020

John D. Sonnenberg, MD

Riverton City Journal


PREVENTION METHODS COVID-19 (NOVEL CORONAVIRUS) The best way to protect yourself and loved ones from contracting the Coronavirus is by using the same six daily habits that help prevent the spread of many viruses, including the common cold and the flu:

KEEP HANDS CLEAN

Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for 15 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

PHYSICAL CONTACT

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

AVOID TOUCHING FACE Try to avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

HAVE A COUGH OR COLD? Cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hand.

CLEAN SURFACES

Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

FEELING SICK?

Stay home when you’re sick. (and keep sick children home from school).

Go to: intermountainhealthcare.org for the most updated information.

RivertonJournal.com

April 2020 | Page 3


Sources of Strength help teens deal with stress By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

W

hen Avery Houghton gets stressed out, she goes for a run, she listens to music, she talks to her mom, she prays. As a participant in the new Sources of Strength program at Mountain Ridge High School, the junior is an example to her peers of where to turn for strength through troubling times. “I learned that in our lives, we have so

Connecting with therapy dogs was a popular activity during kick off week. (Ashley Taylor/MRHS)

GORE LENDING GROUP

GORESTARTLENDING GROUP THE NEW YEAR DEBT-FREE. STARTNeed THEaNEW YEAR DEBT-FREE. loan? We can help! Need a loan? We can help!

When “no”,we wesay say“yes”! “yes”! Whenbanks bankssay so “no”,

LOWLOW MONTHLY EASYAPPLICATION APPLICATION MONTHLYPAYMENTS PAYMENTS --EASY Poor or bad credit OK bad credit OK No hasslePoor and or secure $5000 to $50,000

Call now for fast approval: Call now for fast approval: 1-855-314-9443 1-855-314-9443

AS-10720472

No hassle and secure $5,000 to $50,000

Journals

many sources of strength,” she said. “The tiny things we do in our lives have so much meaning to help mental health.” MRHS counselor John Blodgett said the program promotes positive behaviors so teens don’t turn to unhealthy coping strategies. “Sources of Strength builds a culture within the school,” Blodgett said. “It creates a network of social norms that promote healthy ways that students can turn for strength.” The eight areas of support the program emphasizes are: family support, positive friends, mentors, healthy activities, generosity, spirituality, medical access and mental health. Mountain Ridge students were introduced to the program during a Kickoff Week held March 9–13. Students wrote down their ideas of sources in each area available to them, creating a colorful wheel on a wall in the Commons Area. Interactive activities gave students examples of how to deal with stress in healthy ways. Group games such as 9 Square and parachute games were an example of Healthy Activities and Positive Friends. The most popular activity was when cuddly therapy dogs visited on Positive Friends Day. Blodgett transferred to MRHS from Herriman High School where he was a counselor for eight years. He chose to implement a new suicide prevention program at the new school to address issues not covered by HHS’s Hope Squad program, which was aimed at students already in crisis. “Source of Strength is looking at the upstream approach of suicide prevention, really looking way far upstream before a student gets into a mode of crisis,” Blodgett said. “So, it’s not only just suicide prevenThese high school students become agents of social change as they spread a message of support to their peers. tion and mental health, but it encompasses a lot—spreading messages of hope and health (Ashley Taylor/MRHS) and strength.”

C I T Y

Y O U R C O M M U N I T Y N E W S PA P E R S

RIVERTON CITY TEAM

The RivertonJournal is a monthly publication distributed directly to residents via the USPS as well as locations throughout Riverton.

RIVERTON JOURNAL.COM

FACEBOOK.COM/ RIVERTON JOURNAL/

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Bryan Scott | bryan.s@thecityjournals.com

EDITOR

Travis Barton | travis.b@thecityjournals.com

For information about distribution please email brad.c@thecityjournals.com or call our offices. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING ___________________________ O.K. WITH on CORRECTIONS Rack locations are also available our website. BY:________________________ Ryan Casper | ryan.c@thecityjournals.com Y • SUBMIT CORRECTIONS ONLINE The views and opinions expressed in display ad801-254-5974 | advertise@thecityjournals.com 2 (100%)vertisements do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Loyal Perch ING GROUP PROOF CREATED AT: 1/10/2020 8:59:13 AM Media orNEXT theRUN CityDATE: Journals. This publication may ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 01/14/20 not be reproduced in whole or in part without Keith Curtis | keith.c@thecityjournals.com PROOF DUE: 01/13/20 11:59:55 the express written consent of the owner. Kristi Holker | kristi.h@thecityjournals.com d Times-Gazette Josh Ragsdale | josh.r@thecityjournals.com © 2019 Loyal Perch Media, Inc.

Page 4 | April 2020

TWITTER.COM/ RIVERTONJOURNAL

Connect social media

CIRCULATION COORDINATOR

Brad Casper | brad.c@thecityjournals.com 801-254-5974 | Rack locations are also available on our website.

EDITORIAL & AD DESIGN Ty Gorton Amanda Luker Wayland Holfeltz

INSTAGRAM.COM/ CITYJOURNALS

LINKEDIN.COM/ COMPANY/ CITY-JOURNALS

MISSION STATEMENT

Our mission is to inform and entertain our community while promoting a strong local economy via relevant content presented across a synergetic network of print and digital media.

PUBLISHER

Designed, Published, & Distributed by

RIVERTON JOURNAL

9500 South 500 West, Suite 205 Sandy, UT 84070

PHONE: 801-254-5974

FREE | COMMUNITY | PAPERS

Riverton City Journal


Sources of Strength is also a more inclusive program than Hope Squad, which turned into a kind of popularity contest, said Blodgett. “I think it’s really neat to see the unity and bringing everyone together-—it doesn’t matter who you are; just anybody can participate,” said Lydia Douglas, a junior who jumped at the opportunity to help her peers through the program. Blodgett calls core students like Avery and Lydia agents of social change. Their role is to help their peers identify supports they have available to them during difficult times in their lives. “It’s neat to see that it’s not just a school-based program but something that you can apply outside of your school life,” Lydia said. “I think it’s going to be really beneficial. And it’s not all about just suicide prevention in general. It’s just about drawing on core values that can help us become better people.” Currently, 33 students have been trained in the program. Anyone is welcome to attend the twice-a-month meetings to talk about how to spread their message and plan monthly themes and activities. “We don’t just want one cookie-cutter model of what we think is an exemplary kid,” Blodgett said. “It’s designed to incorporate all aspects of every sub-group—the whole peer social network within a school.

A colorful parachute brings students together for fun group games. (Ashley Taylor/MRHS)

That’s what was the draw to me. It wasn’t just limited to a certain mold of kids, but it’s widespread and helps us build resiliency.” Blodgett said students are enthusias-

tic, and school staff and administrators are on board for the new program. Blodgett is aware of only two other local schools using the program, which has been widely praised.

West Jordan High and Timpanogos High both recently started programs. Follow SOS on Instagram@sourcesofstrengthmrhs. l

Safe Driving Habits

S

pring is upon us, summer is on the way; and with warmer temperatures and (hopefully) blue skies on the horizon, drivers can’t blame slick roads or blinding flurries for their faulty driving anymore. Driving safely requires good driving habits. Habits. Not occasionally safe maneuvers. The following are some prudent practices to implement in your daily travels. Blinkers and blind spots Driving 101. If you plan on changing lanes, let others in on your secret. Everyone will appreciate it. Others want to know what you are planning. Likewise, if you see a blinker come on indicating your lane is that car’s desired destination, let it in. This isn’t the Daytona 500. We are not racing for $19 million. It is common courtesy, if we want people to use their blinkers, then we should reward them for doing so. Remember the blinker doesn’t automatically assume safe passage to the next lane. And while your car’s sensors in the rearview mirrors are helpful, they are not omniscient. Check your blind spot with your own eyes. There’s a reason it’s called a “blind” spot. Tire pressure This one is almost as simple as the first. Check your tire pressure on a regular basis to know if there is a small leak. Maybe you drove over a nail and didn’t realize it. We often don’t look at the tires on the passenger side since we don’t approach the car from that direction, checking regularly allows you to examine those opposite side wheels.

RivertonJournal.com

It will keep your car’s handling in its best condition. Each vehicle can have different appropriate PSI (measurement for tire pressure), but when temperatures drop, so does the pressure in your tires. Drive defensively This means keeping distance between you and the car in front of you. Touching their bumper does nothing for you. And if you need to get that close to read their license plate or sticker, your eyesight is troubling and you probably shouldn’t be behind a steering wheel. Also you can’t always see what’s in front of the car before you. They may have to slam on their brakes due to an unexpected obstruction. If you rear end them, insurance rarely works out in your favor. This can also mean slowing down on wet roads or not weaving in and out of traffic. Distractions This is the No. 1 reason for accidents. This is not limited to using the cell phone, though texting, checking news alerts or making a phone call are all terrible decisions to make while driving. It also extends to dozing off or checking the price at the gas station you just passed. Be alert, stay vigilant. Other drivers may suddenly stop, they may not see you as you yield or turn. By staying engaged and sharp, your reactions can be sharper and you may even anticipate what other drivers are looking to do. These habits are important and it is not overdramatic to say that they could save a life.

ACCIDENT? CALL US...

WE CAN HELP. AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS

INJURY & DEATH CASES

FREE CASE REVIEW 801-214-1457 Se Habla Español!

Learn more at - www.siegfriedandjensen.com April 2020 | Page 5


Companies in the South Valley work to keep the elderly safe during COVID-19 scare By Stephanie Yrungaray | s.yrungaray@mycityjournals.com

A

s individuals in the South Valley begin to hunker down and isolate, companies that work with the people most at risk of COVID-19, the elderly, are ramping up efforts to keep their customers and patrons safe and well taken care of. On March 13, all 16 senior centers operated by the Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Besides offering recreational activities and a chance to socialize, the centers offer breakfast and lunch service. “What we are focused on right now is continuing to provide our midday meal service,” said Afton January, communications manager for Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services. January said many of the 19,000 people who visited county senior centers last year are dependent on the midday meal as a critical part of their daily nutrition. Prior to closing, center managers worked to communicate with patrons and made a list of those who were relying on the meals offered at the senior center. The following day when the sites were officially closed, employees gathered outside of the senior centers to pass out prepackaged meals to clients who needed it. This midday meal service will continue even while the centers are closed.

“In the coming days we may reduce the number of sites to make it more centralized but right now all regular meal patrons can go to their center Monday to Friday to pick up a meal.” Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services also run the “Meals on Wheels” program that delivers a midday meal to “frail and isolated older adults.” January said the program, which delivers to around 2400 seniors, will continue to operate with a few changes during the COVID-19 crisis. “We are taking extra precautions going into client homes with people who have chronic conditions,” January said. “Sanitation is always at the top of our minds and we are also providing additional hand sanitizer, Lysol wipes and things of that nature. We are also instructing all of our staff members and volunteers to not enter the home, but do a distant handoff; alert the client and put the meal where they can receive it.” Tasha Lopez, executive director of Beehive Homes in Herriman said they are taking extra precautions with cleaning and hand washing as well. “We used to let people in and direct them to the handwashing sink,” Lopez said. “Now we are escorting them right to the sinks to make sure it gets done.”

Beehive Homes is also trying to decrease exposure by temporarily stopping volunteers and limiting visitors to one per resident. “The family will designate one sole person allowed to come in,” Lopez said. Limiting volunteers and increased cleaning requirements puts more stress on staff and employees, but both Lopez and January say that everyone is happily contributing. “I’ve got angels on our team,” Lopez said. “They are the best most caring people and aren’t giving it a second thought. They love residents like their own family. It has been incredible to see.” “I am highly confident in our staff and volunteers,” January said. “This is a scary time but it is when we remember why we do what we do. Everyone is incredible and is stepping up.” January said that help is available to any older adult whether they are a current senior center member or not. “We want to make sure to help any older adult who needs assistance,” January said. “Our message to the community of older people is to call us at (385) 468-3200. We don’t want to have closed centers and have people isolated and not know what to do if something happens to them. Our intake lines will be operational throughout this crisis.”

January said there are two major things that individuals can do to help the older community. “First, people need to socially distance. Stay home, stay out of crowds, don’t go to the grocery store if you don’t need to,” January said. “As people withdraw from social life for a short amount of time people at lower risk fill in the gaps for people whose lives depend on staying inside.” January said the second thing people in the community can do to help is reach out to older adults in their lives. “It is a really good time for individuals who feel like they want to help to reach out to people and offer assistance,” January said. “Whether it is your grandparents, aunts, uncles, people you go to church with, elderly neighbors or colleagues...if you are in good health you could offer to go to the store for them or help in other ways.” Lopez said the one thing she would request from people in the community is prayer. “Pray for them,” Lopez said. “Good vibes, happy thoughts, whatever your thing is we could all use it, but especially this population.” l

south hills $750 OFF ORTHODONTICS 4013 W. 13400 S. • RIVERTON

Utah’s #1 Invisalign Provider Board Certified Orthodontist Kids And Adults Treated At One Convenient Location Continuity Of Care: See The Same Orthodontist At Every Visit Family Discounts And Flexible Payment Plans

Dr. Tony Skanchy, DMD, MDS Board Certified Orthodontist

Page 6 | April 2020

INVISALIGN TREATMENT

EXPIRES 04/30/2020

$500 OFF ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT EXPIRES 04/30/2020

FREE

ORTHODONTIC EVALUATION EXPIRES 04/30/2020

385-337-3824 Riverton City Journal


Riverton residents encouraged to use coronavirus prevention methods By Kirk Bradford | k.bradford@mycityjournals.com

L

ast month, Utahns watched the novel coronavirus, termed COVID-19, as it spread first throughout China, then made its way in a massive spread across Italy, resulting in more than 41,000 cases and 3,400 deaths as of this writing. Here in Utah, city and state leaders are doing their part to keep residents informed on how they can keep themselves and others safe. Riverton City Mayor Trent Staggs issued a directive to Riverton City staff to, “Implement measures to reduce potential spread of COVID-19 at city facilities and events.” The citywide advisory encouraged all residents to proactively employ these prevention methods, recommended by the CDC: • Keep hands clean. Wash your hands often with soap and warm water for 20 seconds. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. • Avoid physical contact with people who are sick. • Avoid gatherings of over 10 people. • Avoid touching your face (eyes, nose, and mouth) with unwashed hands. • Avoid touching high-touch surfaces in public spaces. • Clean and disinfect surfaces

and objects that are frequently touched in your home and place of work. • Avoid all non-essential travel. Some Utah residents have cut back on going into work; others now work from home; travel plans have been canceled; schools are closed for several weeks; and everyone is encouraged to avoid crowded spaces. As more studies try to understand the pathways the virus has taken in its spread throughout Italy, one cultural activity is being studied carefully — how you greet someone. In Italy, it’s common to greet someone with a kiss on one or both cheeks. As we learn more about COVID-19, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, John Hopkins University and others are finding the trends that escalate the spread of the virus. What about handshakes and hugs? They are being discouraged in exchange for elbow bumps and foot shakes. Government officials aren’t the only ones taking precautionary measures to help stop the spread of the virus. As the predominant religion in Utah, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is suspending public gatherings for members in Utah as well

as the more than 16 million church members worldwide “until further notice.” Just as important as knowing how to avoid contracting the virus, is knowing how to identify its symptoms and keeping it from spreading further. The symptoms, presented by the virus described by the CDC, are: • dry cough • fever • emergency warning signs include difficulty breathing/shortness of breath, persistent pain or pressure in chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, and bluish lips or face. If you haven’t already done so, sign up for the Riverton Text Message Alerts on the city’s website, www.rivertonutah.gov If you or a family member are ill with respiratory symptoms, don’t visit a hospital or clinic without calling first. If you are healthy but have questions or concerns, do not visit a health care facility. “Worried well” individuals are flooding healthcare providers with COVID-19 concerns and exhausting health care resources for those who are truly in need. Instead, call 1-800-4567707. l

We’re Expecting! We are excited to announce the renovations of our Women’s Center! A child’s birth is a special experience. Our goal is to provide a comfortable, tranquil atmosphere for women and families to celebrate this joyous occasion. The project, completed in two phases, will transform and modernize our Women’s Center. The first phase involves our postpartum unit and started January 6, 2020. We are expected to complete the project Summer 2020.

A Riverton City Council meeting just a few weeks ago before all were suspended to slow the spread of COVID-19. (Kirk Bradford/City Journals)

RivertonJournal.com

In Partnership with Physician Owners.

April 2020 | Page 7


What’s your legacy?

Serving Local Families Since 1885 COMPASSIONATE FUNERAL PLANNERS

During one of life’s most difficult moments, you deserve the utmost respect, kindness, care, and guidance. Six generations of Larkins have been devoted to serving Utah families in their time of need, and that unique experience enables us to guide you in preparing services for your loved one with consideration and respect. 4 LOCATIONS ACROSS THE WASATCH FRONT Larkin Mortuary 260 East South Temple Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801) 363-5781

Larkin Sunset Lawn 2350 East 1300 South Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (801) 582-1582

Larkin Sunset Gardens 1950 East Dimple Dell Road (10600 S.) • Sandy, UT 84092 (801) 571-2771

Larkin Mortuary Riverton 3688 West 12600 South Riverton, UT 84065 (801) 254-4850

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

HE WILL PERSONALLY Find you the best Car, SUV or Truck for your family!

www.LarkinCares.com Page 8 | April 2020

Riverton City Journal


Lim ited Tim eO ffer !

Wash All You Want

Valid at this location only!

We are Farmers,

FIRST MONTH FREE*

bum ba dum bum bum bum bum

UNLIMITED BEST WASH Membership

WE KNOW A THING OR TWO WE KNOW A THING OR TWO BECUASE SEEN THINGOR ORTWO TWO BECAUSE WE’VE SEEN THING WE KNOWWE’VE A THING ORAATWO Knowledgeable, highly agents BECAUSE WE’VE SEEN A THING OR TWO Serving Utah for 20trained years. Coverage you can tailor to best fit your needs

*$1 activation fee

Union Park Ave. 20417610 West 12600 South Midvale, UT 84047 Riverton, UT 84065 (Across from Asian Star Restaurant

to Proshop) and(Next Zion Bank Union Heights)

 

Call or email Terry Lee  highly trained  Knowledgeable, Helping you protect your assetsagents and your future  youService can tailor to best fit your needs  Coverage 24/7 Claims for a quote today.  Helping you protect your assets and your future

 24/7 Claims Serving Utah Service for 20 years. Call or email for a quote today.

385-236-0496 801.446.1481

Serving Utah for 20 years.

Charles C Su Agency

Your Local Agent 801.446.1481 Charles C Su Agency 12569 S 2700 STEAgency B100 Charles CWSu Utah,Local UT 84065 Your Agent 12569 S 2700 W ste B100 CSU@FARMERSAGENT.COM 12569 S 2700 W STE B100 說中文請撥 CSU@FARMERSAGENT.COM Utah, UT 84065 385-224-4489

DontDriveDirty.com

Terry Lee

@ QuickQuackUtah

888-772-2792

†Life insurance issued by Farmers New World Life Insurance Company, 3120 139th Ave. SE, Ste. 300, Bellevue, WA 98005.

Securities offered through Farmers Financial Solutions, LLC. 30801 Agoura Road, Bldg 1, Agoura Hills, CA 91301-2054. Member FINRA & SIPC. CSU@FARMERSAGENT.COM †Life insurance issued by Farmers New World Life Insurance Company, 3120 139th Ave. SE, Ste. 300, Bellevue, WA 98005. Securities offered through Farmers Financial Solutions, LLC. 30801 Agoura Road, Bldg 1, Agoura Hills, CA 91301-2054. Member FINRA & SIPC.

QQ_509_BestSpecial_AD_5.1563x5.1563_FINAL.indd 1

URGENT AND PRIMARY CARE:

Only $10 A Visit!

12/14/18 10:53 AM

A positive Experience We engage concerns to make coming to the dentist enjoyable.

WITH MEMBERSHIP

Medallus Medical Membership is a simple membership program to all of our 8 clinics. Members can receive discounted medical services at $10/visit flat fee in exchange for a monthly membership fee: • $50 / month (1 member) • $75 / month (party of 2) • $100 / month (family of 3) • $120 / month (family of 4 to 6) *$25 additional per person (family of 7 to 12)

$20 registration fee – 12-month contract

801-810-7058

arlissf@medallus.com AfterHoursMedical.com RivertonJournal.com

2364 West 12600 South, Suite F Riverton, UT 84065 (801) 446-5050 kevinyeagerdds.com

April 2020 | Page 9


SPRING AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALS

AIR DUCT CLEANING CORONAVIRUS CONCERNS?

UV Purifier & Reme Halo Can Reduce Your Risk of Infection! Ask for Details*

$49

SPRING CLEAN OUT SPECIAL Sinus Problems? Allergies? Asthma? Headaches? Excessive Dust? High Energy Bills? Bad Odors?

If it’s in your ducts, it’s in your lungs. Air duct cleaning is one of the best ways to fight symptoms of asthma and allergies. WE CAN SANITIZE YOUR VENTS TO HELP STRENGTHEN YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

Helps Support a Healthy Immune System

Page 10 | April 2020

10 VENTS 1 RETURN 1 MAIN

FREE system analysis/inspection. Call for details. Additional vents priced separately. We service all areas. Offer expires 4/30/2020.

FREE

HOSPITAL GRADE SANITIZER

Helps with germs & bacteria With purchase of complete ductwork cleaning. Offer expires 4/30/2020.

We Will Beat Any Price With Superior Quality 100% Guarantee

801-618-4649

SERVICE

theapexcleanair.com Riverton City Journal


Carnival immerses families in Brazilian culture By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

Two-year old Jalen Archuleta joins the drumming circle of Brazilian rhythms. (Jet Burnham/City Journals)

T

he Bluffdale Elementary School PTA hosted a Brazilian culture night as exciting as a carnival you’d find in the streets of Rio de Janeiro, with Brazilian music, dancing and food. “It’s just fun to be able to have the whole student body learn about a different culture in an interactive way, where everyone can be immersed by that culture,” said Roquel Lubbers, who planned the event held Feb. 24. Bluffdale Elementary is the home of Jordan District’s Portuguese Dual Language Immersion program. The last time the school hosted a Brazilian cultural event was to introduce the DLI program. Those initial first graders are now in middle school. “It’s a whole new population since then,” Lubbers said. “It’s time we do another event to share different cultures for all the families to enjoy, regardless if they’re involved in the program or not.” First grader Noel Lewis talks a lot about what she learns in her DLI classes. Her mother, Kara Angelos, said their family enjoyed learning about Brazilian culture to better understand what Noel is learning but that the family night was a good experience for all students, not just those in the program, to learn about the culture. “It’s more exciting to see everyone be a part of it,” she said. Brazilian performance groups added to the immersive experience with performances and interactive mini classes. Children joined in a traditional dance with Aquarela do Brasil, tried their hand at drumming with

RivertonJournal.com

Samba Fogo and experienced capoeira—an Afro-Brazilian martial art with dance and music—with Utah Valley Capoeira. “So many times, we get to see performances, which is really awesome,” Lubbers said. “But kids, especially elementary kids, are just at that age where they’re willing to take risks. They’re willing to get up and dance and try to sing. They don’t have that embarrassment that older people tend to get as they age. So, I just thought, let’s take advantage of that adventurous spirit that the elementary kids have—not just have them watch something but participate in something.” There were also hands-on crafting projects for children to make drums, tambourines, shakers and hats out of recycled materials. Attendees also got a taste authentic food catered by Tushar Brazilian Express. Their free samples of Brazilian cheese bread, Pão de Queijo, drew long lines. Because they have two children learning Portuguese, the Sirrine family eats at Brazilian restaurants often. They have even tried to make some authentic dishes. “We tried to make coxinhas—deep-fried dough with chicken inside—but it didn’t taste right,” said fifth grader Mary Sirrine. Her mother, Janine Sirrine, believes her children benefit from the exposure to new languages and cultural experiences a DLI program provides. Lubbers, who was born in Brazil, said it was important to her that her children spoke and understood Portuguese. She drives her kids from their home in South Jordan to participate in the Portuguese program. She was thrilled to plan the culture night. “I will help in any way I can to bring the culture and do anything to enhance that part of the education that the kids get,” she said. Jennifer Tolman is also from Brazil with a first and third grader in the program. She volunteers in their classrooms regularly and has conversations with the curious Portuguese-speaking students that she said are open-minded and capable of deep discussions. Her husband, Josh Tolman, said his children get excited to learn about new people and cultures and that as they gain an understanding of an expanded world, they are willing to try new things. Bluffdale Elementary has celebrated other cultures with a variety of family activity nights in years past. Tolman said he supports all of them and is interested to see what they have planned for next year. “I would love to go to something like this for Indian culture or any of the many European or Asian cultures,” he said.l

DON’T SETTLE FOR AVERAGE. Debbie Telling | 385.500.6504 | www.DebbieTellingRealtor.com

Ask about special cash back options at home closing!

April 2020 | Page 11


ALL OF OUR PROVIDERS

ARE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS. Same day and next day appointments are available.

Tina Goldsmith, MSNP

Jeffrey Quinn, MD

David Matthews, MD

Sue Anders, MD

Robert Merrill, DO, MD

Diane Heubusch, CNM, FNP

INSURANCES ACCEPTED: Select Med & Med Plus Select Value Select Care & Care Plus Select Shared Select Advantage Select Choice Select Community Care Blue Cross Blue Shield PEHP United Health Care Aetna Altius Tricare Educators Mutual And Many More

Utah’s Best Full Service Flooring Boutique Since 2004 Come into our huge showroom and find carpet, tile, hardwood, laminate, ceramic tile, luxury vinyl, and window coverings at the lowest prices. We take the mystery out of flooring. South Valley Floors Offers A Financing Program for Every Budget! No Interest for up to 12 Months*

Call for a Free Estimate 801-501-9210 | 12896 S Pony Express #100 Draper

Funeral arrangements are a deeply personal choice. Preplanning provides you with the time needed to make practical, detailed decisions that reflect your standards, lifestyle, taste and budget. And we assure you and your family that the choices you make will be carried out as planned.

Angela Judd, MD

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT:

(801)-285-4800

801-285-4800 | www.westerngynob.com 3723 West 12600 South, Suite 350 • Riverton, Utah 84065 Page 12 | April 2020

Plan Ahead

We’ll take the first step with you. Questions? Call us (801) 254-3389

Riverton City Journal


APRIL 2020

RIVERTON REVIEW Official Newsletter of the Riverton, Utah City Government MAYOR’S MESSAGE

Salt Lake County Ignores Local Opposition; Approves Olympia Hills By Mayor Trent Staggs

that will be directly affected by this high-density development. There are many flaws with the current Olympia Hills development plan that will directly affect Riverton, including:

Over the last two years the Southwest 1. Community General Plan: Mayors In 2008, the County’s Southwest Coalition made up of Bluffdale, Cop- General Plan was amended and perton, Herriman, Riverton, South allowed for 3-5 units per acre. With Jordan, and West Jordan have been this amendment, cities including very vocal about our opposition to Riverton have used those numbers the Olympia Hills development projto appropriately plan for our own ect. There is an uncanny opinion by infrastructure needs. The approved some of our county officials that the density is almost 40% greater than southwest region needs to absorb the upper limit of the county’s genermore of the growth that is coming. al plan. Coincidentally, this opinion largely coincides with individuals who don’t 2. Density Studies: The Southwest live in our area, don’t understand Vision Study is currently ongoing the needs of our and is planned to residents or what be completed by planning decisions the end of this year. “It is unfortunate that have already been The county spent the county officials who $100,000 of taxpaymade. er money to fund voted for this change Last month, the this study which was ignored the thousands of meant to help procounty council votresidents who voiced their actively plan for the ed 6-3 to approve zoning changes that opposition to the project.” future of the southallow for Olymwest region. The pia Hills to move approval of Olympia forward with their Hills ultimately ne933-acre development. It is unforgates the effectiveness of that study tunate that the county officials who and negatively impacts the planning voted for this change ignored the efforts for this region. thousands of residents who voiced their opposition to the project, along 3. Infrastructure Impact: The imwith the six mayors from the cities pact to existing municipal infrastruc-

RIVERTON REVIEW

| APRIL 2020

ture is estimated to cost the surrounding cities at least $40 million. Even more troublesome is the fact that there are no funding mechanisms in place to pay for current roadway infrastructure needs along Mt. View Corridor and Bangerter Highway, let alone funds available to pay for the additional infrastructure needed to support this project. 4. Inadequate Water Supplies: The Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District (JVWCD) has estimated that this development, which is approximately 10% the size of Riverton’s footprint, would use the equivalent amount of water that our entire city would use. It would also push JVWCD’s planning timeline forward ten years, which jeopardizes their ability to deliver water supplies moving forward. I want to reiterate that Riverton and our surrounding cities are not scared of growth. In fact, the southwest region has accounted for over 70% of the population growth since 2000. We simply believe in smart responsible growth accompanied by infrastructure that won’t diminish our quality of life. Although a majority of county leadership has completely disregarded the “people’s voice,” I want to reassure you that you are my priority and I will continue to listen and fight for the needs of this great city.

Take The Census Today! The 2020 U.S. Census is in full swing. You should have received your official census information in the mail. Please take a few minutes to complete it. It is vital that every person living in Riverton be counted. The Census is critical to: • Measure Riverton’s growth • Determine political representation • Plan for the city’s future • Ensure federal and state resources are appropriately allocated For more information, visit: rivertonutah.gov/census

PAGE 1


PUBLIC SAFETY MESSAGE

Minimize Your Burglary Risk MAYOR Trent Staggs tstaggs@rivertonutah.gov 801-208-3129

CITY COUNCIL Sheldon Stewart - District 1 sstewart@rivertonutah.gov 801-953-5672 Troy McDougal - District 2 tmcdougal@rivertonutah.gov 801-931-9933 Tawnee McCay - District 3 tmccay@rivertonutah.gov 801-634-7692 Tish Buroker - District 4 tburoker@rivertonutah.gov 801-673-6103 Claude Wells - District 5 cwells@rivertonutah.gov 801-875-0116

CITY MANAGER Interim City Manager Ryan Carter rcarter@rivertonutah.gov 801-208-3171

CITY OFFICES

City Hall............................... Cemetery............................ Animal Control.................... Building............................... Code Enforcement.............. Fire Dispatch (UFA)............. Justice Court....................... Parks & Recreation............. Planning & Zoning.............. Police.................................. Public Works....................... Recorder.............................. Utility Billing........................ Water...................................

801-254-0704 801-208-3128 801-208-3108 801-208-3127 801-208-3174 801-743-7200 801-208-3131 801-208-3101 801-208-3138 385-281-2455 801-208-3162 801-208-3128 801-208-3133 801-208-3164

By Riverton Police Chief Don Hutson

are inclined to victimize others by stealing their property Spring has or burglarsprung and izing their Riverton is alive homes, take with the beauty advantage we associate of the milder with this wontemperatures. derful time of year. Flowers are Criminals are blooming and the young, as well as aware we are the young at heart, are spending approaching much more time outside enjoying vacation seathe warmer weather and longer son and they days. are always looking for an Pedestrian traffic and bicycle riding opportunity to Criminals are aware we are approaching vacation season and they increase dramatically for obvious break into an are always looking for an opportunity to break into an empty house or reasons, and motorcycle riding is empty house far more enjoyable and prevalent. or business. It business. These changes in the traffic dynam- is also easier ic on our roadways make visibility for them to hide or avoid us tracking leaving town, let your neighbors more of a challenge them with additional know who should or should not be and cause us confoliage and no snow at your home so they can keep an cern as public safety to leave footprints. eye out for suspicious vehicles. officers. It is importsomeone retrieve your mail “Have someone For these reasons, it Have ant for all of us to be and ensure papers or flyers don’t aware of this changis a good time for all accumulate on your porch. retrieve your ing traffic landscape of us to assess the mail and ensure security of our prop- As always, please don’t hesitate and be more vigilant in identifying potenpapers or flyers erty and be reminded to call the Riverton Police Departtial hazards as we how to minimize ment at 801-840-4000 if you see don’t accumulate of travel on our streets. risk. First, always lock something suspicious. Stay safe on your porch.” your doors and keep and enjoy our beautiful city as we Additionally, some in your external lights transition from soggy spring to hot our community, who on at night. If you are summer.

SECONDARY WATER

RIVERTONUTAH.GOV/WATER/SECONDARY

Riverton’s secondary water system will be available for use begining May 1, 2020.

FIND US ONLINE! @rivertonutahgov www.rivertonutah.gov PAGE 2

RIVERTON REVIEW

| APRIL 2020


COUNCIL MESSAGE

Census & COVID-19 Update By Councilman Claude Wells As a resident of Riverton City you should have received the 2020 U.S. Census reminder in mid-March in the mail. The Census count is critical for Riverton’s future and it’s important to remember that you matter, your children matter, and our community matters…so make sure you get counted! Census data is used for planning and accurate allocation of funds for roads and infrastructure, education funding, school planning and political representation. It only takes about 10 minutes, but accuracy is important. The recent COVID-19 virus outbreak is a reminder to us how important it is to be prepared but stay calm understanding that we have a grocery supply chain in place to allow us to get are basic everyday needs and a little more if we have to stay self-quarantined for a few weeks. Fear based buying for things we don’t need causes panic for everyone. Empty shelves leave uncertainty and especially for those that don’t prepare at all. It’s a domino effect that left shortages for more critical items that are not needed for

the COVID-19 Virus. This resulted in shortages for things like distilled water needed for CPAP and other medical devices and products needed to protect medical providers and disinfectant and sanitation products we could all use to help stay safe. Hopefully we can all take away some things we learned from this time period to better prepare us Census data is used for planning and accurate allocation of funds for the next challenge for roads and infrastructure, education funding, school planning that is not a natural and political representation. It only takes about 10 minutes, but disaster. We will accuracy is important. all get through this together if we take My experience serving on the City a deep breath, work together and Council has taught me a lot. For keep calm. everything you think you know you need to learn even more to get Our city leaders and public offidifferent perspectives, learn facts cials are all required to take FEMA based on research to be able to classes through Homeland Security. make the best possible decisions as Because of this training the leaders a member of the council. You have have a good understanding of certo put in the work to stay on top of tain protocols of both federal, state, the issues and challenges of the and local agencies when declaring city. It really is a full-time position national emergencies. This helps to continuously learn as much as release needed funding to help fight you can. I am honored to serve with the COVID-19 outbreak and get such great city leaders, employees help for each state. We are in good and other state and county reprehands! sentatives!

APRIL 2020

Arbor Day Tree Planting Workshop

Attend Riverton City’s annual Arbor Day Tree Planting Workshop. Learn how to properly plant a tree and your questions answered by Riverton’s own certified arborist. To help prevent COVID-19 spreading, we ask that healthy attendees practice responsible social distancing at this outdoor event.

Saturday, April 25 9 a.m. Centennial Park 13000 S 2700 W Riverton, Utah

For more information, visit: rivertonutah.gov/beautiful

RIVERTON REVIEW

| APRIL 2020

PAGE 3


COVID-19 VISIT RIVERTONUTAH.GOV/COVID19 • COVID-19 Hotline & Symptoms Information • Vulnerable Populations & Service Opportunities • Price Gouging Reporting • City Issued Updates • Community Facility / Business Closures • Community Event & Meeting Updates

Stay Connected and Informed EMAIL NOTIFICATIONS

Get the latest city updates, e-newsletters, event information and other news delivered right to your inbox

rivertonutah.gov/subscribe

GET TEXT MESSAGE ALERTS

Get emergency alerts and notifications on important city updates on your cell phone 3-4 times per month.

rivertonutah.gov/alerts

CONNECT ON SOCIAL MEDIA

We Are at City Hall Working For You In order to accommodate “social distancing” we strongly encourage citizens to conduct all city hall business by phone or online.

Main Reception 801-254-0704 Attorney’s Office Animal Control Building Code Enforcement Finance/Accounting Human Resources

801-208-3140 801-208-3108 801-208-3127 801-208-3174 801-208-3107 801-208-3135

Justice Court Parks & Recreation Planning Purchasing Recorder/Cemetery Utility Billing

Connect with Riverton City to get quick updates, essential information, event details and more on the platforms you use.

@rivertonutahgov 801-208-3131 801-208-3145 801-208-3138 801-208-3175 801-208-3128 801-208-3133

conduct business online at rivertonutah.gov

RIVERTON CONNECT APP

Report a problem, see the city calendar, get directions to parks and city facilities, and find city information right from your mobile device

rivertonutah.gov/app

UPCOMING RIVERTON CITY EVENTS With the rapidly changing events due to the COVID-19 virus, we recommend you regularly visit rivertonutah.gov to find the most recent event and meeting information. PAGE 4

RIVERTON REVIEW

| APRIL 2020


Letter From The Publisher By Bryan Scott | bryan.s@thecityjournals.com The best way to describe this past month is weird. Like many of you, we here at the City Journals watched as the story unfolded in front of our eyes, first China, then the spread, the cruise ships, then the United States, then the state of Utah and Rudy Gobert, it became ever so clear that it was going to bear a heavy toll on local businesses and economy. And it has, with restaurants, gyms, theaters and dentist offices being closed and events being canceled. The pandemic along with the earthquake has taken a heavy toll on the local business, including the City Journals. The City Journals are dependent on local businesses to advertise in the Journals. This is how the Journals have printed newspapers for over 29 years. It wasn’t long after Rudy that we here at the Journals started getting calls from local businesses needing to pause their advertising and people’s attention turned towards dreams of massive stacks of toilet paper in their storage room. We soon realized that being completely dependent on advertising may not be the best way to fund the operations of the Journal. We started brainstorming ways to balance our funding between the two parties that use us, the readers who read the Journals and the advertisers who advertise in them. We knew that we did not want to charge people to visit our websites, we knew we did not want to

have a subscription to the paper, so we decided to just ask our readers for help. To help alleviate this pain we decided we would start by asking our readers to make donations to the paper. Please visit our website (donate.TheCityJournals.com) to donate to the City Journals. We know that many in the community are feeling the same pain as us right now and donating will not be an option. That is OK. You will continue to receive your Journal. For those that can spare a few dollars, we would appreciate it. That said, the best way to help us and the other businesses in the community as well as many of your neighbors would be to maintain your social distance to fight the spread of this pandemic as well as continuing to shop with your local businesses to keep our economy healthy. And remember to help those around you in any way you can, we are all in this together. However, there already seems to be a light glowing on the horizon. The Governor and State have issued a detailed thoughtful plan, the President and the Federal Government have started the flow of economic aid, manybusinesses are still functioning with not much more interruption than an annoyance. Together the residents of Utah will prevail. Sincerely, Bryan Scott

Readers like you keep us printing!

Connecting communities along the wasatch front

Be a part of your community news by donating to City Journals today! Name: Phone:

$150 Support Local!

City:

State:

One time Donation: $

Monthly Donation: $

Credit Card Number:

Zip:

Exp Date:

Mail to: City Journals at 9500 South 500 West, Suite 205, Sandy, UT 84070 For security reasons, if you would rather contact City Journals directly, call (385)557-1010 or email: accounting@mycityjournals.com

Thank you for your support

J

BLUE 55 GALLON WATER STORAGE TANK $189 MADE IN UTAH

Address:

C

Emergency Water Storage Made Simple

Journals C I T Y

Y O U R C O M M U N I T Y N E W S PA P E R S

RivertonJournal.com

801-254-5974

VALLEYJOURNALS.COM

55 Gallons Dimensions: 22”x28”x30” Large Cap For Easy Filling Stackable to Save Space BPA FREE FDA Food Grade Materials

385-393-1566

UTAHWATERVAULT.COM April 2020 | Page 17


When screen time is a good thing By Alison Brimley | a.brimley@mycityjournals.com

U

tah Film Festival’s ninth annual Tumbleweeds Film Festival is geared entirely toward children. This year’s event was scheduled March 6-8 and 13-15 (though the second weekend was postponed for public health concerns), with showings at the City Library. But Tumbleweeds also expands its audience beyond downtown Salt Lake City with field trips that bring the film to schoolchildren. One such field trip took place March 9 at the Viridian Event Center. More than 300 students from Hayden Peak Elementary in West Jordan, Neil Armstrong Academy in West Valley and Riverton Elementary filled the Viridian’s auditorium. They watched a series of international short films, interspersed with discussion moderated by professional animator Jarom Neumann. “How many of you know how to read?” Neumann asked the auditorium of students, who ranged from third to sixth grade. Almost every hand went up. “Did you know how to read right away?” he followed. Except for a few class clowns who shouted that they did, everyone shook their heads. Neumann then explained that his purpose was to teach the students to read a film. Michelle Walker, education manager for the film center, echoed his sentiment.

“I want kids to watch film almost as text,” she said. While screen time is derided as at best a waste of time and at worst a brain-drain, some may question the wisdom of a field trip whose purpose is to let kids watch movies. But Walker emphasized that the focus of Tumbleweeds is media literacy, not just media consumption. Before and after each short film shown during the field trip, Neumann asked students to focus on things such as how the color scheme of a scene made them feel, what a central object in a film might symbolize, why a certain scene made them laugh or who the protagonist and antagonist of a film were. The films shown were all international animated shorts, many with no dialogue at all. The films chosen were diverse in their style, sound and country of origin. They aim to “give kids access to films that they’re never going to see in a Megaplex or on Netflix,” Walker said. Walker spent years as a high school English teacher before coming to the Film Center. As a teacher, she realized that she relied more and more on films to teach an idea. “Film is where all the art forms converge,” she said. It’s sound, it’s movement, it’s dance, it’s photography, it’s painting. Ev- Jarom Neumann speaks to students at a March 9 field trip screening presented by the Tumbleweeds Film Festival. (Alison Brimley/City Journals) erything comes together in that.”

How much should you pay for checking? Zero, Zip, Zilch, Nada, Nothing, Ever.

FREE BUSINESS CHECKING is the ideal account for businesses, like yours, that average fewer than 100 transactions per month. Need to deposit cash? No problem – we won’t charge you for coin and currency deposits. • • • • •

Unlimited deposits and Visa debit 100 ACH debits and checks per month No minimum balance requirement Free internet and Mobile Banking FDIC-insured to the legal maximum for peace of mind

Let us help you switch your business accounts today!

801.308.2265

firstutahbank.com Page 18 | April 2020

Riverton City Journal


Her time in the classroom showed her that kids are already on their screens all the time. The goal is to teach them to “engage, analyze and apply” what they’re seeing. “Kids more than ever, learn in images, it is our responsibility to help them read image. They’re going to be constant consumers of media, but can we teach them to be better discerners of media?” In total, Tumbleweeds reaches more than 3,100 students through field trips, with hundreds more attending public screenings on the weekends. The Viridian’s screening filled up this year, and film center staff members hope to add more showings in coming years. Tumbleweeds is well-known downtown, but officials hope to increase its presence in the southern end of the valley and into Utah County. While the film center promoted Tumbleweeds field trips by reaching out to principals of hundreds of schools, teachers primarily learn about it through word of mouth. Walker conducts educational workshops in classrooms throughout the year, which allows her to make a personal connection with teachers and spread the word about Tumbleweeds. Sometimes, parents will attend one of the public screenings or workshops and reach out to their child’s teacher. Tumbleweeds uses its donor funding to cover all or most of the busing costs for field trips. If there’s one thing Walker wants people to know about Tumbleweeds, it’s how care-

fully curated it is. “I respect so much that a lot of families and parents are really careful about what they put their kids in front of,” she said. “I know I could walk any of my nieces or nephews into any screening. You’re going to see really awesome film that’s going to be different than anything you’ve seen, but it’s going to be family-friendly.”

Your Family • Our Family • His Family LIFE AND DEATH

ARE AT STAKE

HOLY WEEK

THE MOST IMPORTANT WEEK IN HISTORY. THE MOST IMPORTANT WEEK IN YOUR LIFE...

HE IS RISEN

ITS IS A MATTER OF DEATH AND LIFE. HIS. FOR YOU.

Holy Week Services

3285 W. 12600 S. Riverton, UT 84065

801-446-9766

Guaranteed Auto Body Repairs For ANY Insurance Company

Tough Times: How To Skip 2 Mortgage Payments

With these uncertain times and all-time low interest rates, now is one if the best times in history to refinance your home. In most cases, you can miss up to 2 month’s mortgage payments & receive up to $2,000 in cash. Currently, the federal government is incentivizing homeowners with low interest rates to help boost the economy. Lenders are being overloaded with refinance requests, so now is the time to look and see if this would benefit you and your family. Rates will not be this low for very long as the panic and pandemic subsides in the world. Please see the excerpt from Experian.com in the article below.

Maundy Thursday: April 9 @ 6:30pm Dine Service Good Friday Special Services: April 10 Tre Ore (Three Hour) @ Noon April 10 @ 6:30 Easter Sunrise Divine Service II: April 12 @ 6:30am Easter Divine Service II: April 12 @ 9:00am 13249 S Redwood Rd, Riverton concordialearningcenter.holytrinityut.org | holytrinityut.org

Miss 2 Mortgage Payments! Receive up to $2,000 Cash! www.houser.com

Promo Code CITYJOURNALS

801-718-4170

To get your no-cost evaluation on your mortgage, go to www.houser.com and use promo code CITYJOURNALS, or call 801-718-4170

When Is It a Good Idea to Refinance Quickly?

• Eliminated private mortgage insurance (PMI): Conventional mortgages typically require PMI if you

put down less than 20% of the loan amount at closing. If, however, the value of your home increased quickly or you’ve made a large payment and qualify to get rid of it, refinancing could save you money. Also, some government-insured loans charge mortgage insurance, and refinancing one into a conventional loan could get rid of it.

• Change in interest rate structure: Borrowers can choose a fixed- or adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM). While an ARM can save you money upfront with a lower fixed interest rate for a set period, it becomes variable once that period ends. If you notice that interest rates are rising and want to lock in a low fixed interest rate to avoid taking on too much risk, refinancing can allow you to do that.

• Equity cash-out: If you need cash fast and want to avoid high-cost loans, doing a cash-out refinance will give you access to some of the equity in your home at the cost of the new mortgage loan.

To get your no-cost evaluation on your mortgage, go to www.houser.com and use promo code CITYJOURNALS, or call 801-718-4170

RivertonJournal.com

houser

TM

The better way home.

April 2020 | Page 19


Actors play around with ‘Potter’ spoof By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com

The Puffs are a happy and friendly bunch. (Photo courtesy Malia Warden)

L Available today, and every day at Peterson’s…

SMILES & GRATITUDE! Some of our shelves may be empty, but our hearts are full. The entire Peterson’s Team would like to say THANK YOU to our community for your support and patience during these challenging times. A big THANK YOU also goes out to our store team for their tireless efforts to keep shelves full, lines moving and customers happy! Finally, a huge shout out to our truck drivers and warehouse workers that keep the product coming through our back doors! Together we have accomplished so much!

THANK YOU! Page 20 | April 2020

uke Gonzalez sometimes feels like a Puff—unimportant, destined for failure and resigned to last place. “There have been times in my life where I’ve always wanted to do something big or be known as the hero, but I wasn’t able to because someone else had been able to do that—and more,” he said. This is the experience of Wayne Hopkins, the character Gonzalez played in Riverton High School’s performance of “Puffs.” Wayne is determined to become a hero when he discovers he has magical powers and is invited to attend a school of magic. Instead of glory, Wayne finds himself constantly overshadowed by a boy named Harry (played by senior Ari Curtis), the headmaster’s favorite student who always swoops in to save the day. Sound familiar? The Off-Broadway hit, “Puffs or Seven Increasingly Eventful Years at a Certain School of Magic and Magic,” written by Matt Cox is an unauthorized spoof of J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” story with creative work-around to alter characters and events just enough to avoid copyright infringement. “There’s lots of familiar characters, just with slightly different names,” said senior Annabelle Durham who played A Certain Potions Teacher, The Second Headmaster and Real Mr. Moody. RHS theater teacher and play director Erin McGuire said there were strict instructions when referring to a certain character. “You can’t say Harry or Potter in the same sentence,” she said. “So, it’s ‘Mr. Potter’ or ‘Harry.’” Nevertheless, fans in the audience easily caught the allusions to Potterverse characters and key events from the books and movies, which were shown from the perspective of the students sorted into Puffs, a house known for finishing last in everything. The play was well-received by the community during the four performances Feb. 20–24. Some of the humor was only obvious to true Potterheads, many of whom arrived in costume. However, even those less familiar

with the details of the original story, which included most of the cast, enjoyed the witty script and physical comedy of the show. “It doesn’t matter how much knowledge you have specifically about the universe of the show, you can still enjoy it,” said senior Sioteke Wolfgramm, who played several creatures in the show. “But there are a lot of really funny jokes that appeal for this fandom specifically. And it’s just a lot of fun.” What made the show even more fun to perform for actors was that the scriptwriter allowed flexibility with some of the lines. “They gave us a bunch of different options,” said Emma Otis, a junior who played Hermeoone, Rowena and the Runes Teacher. “There was a monologue, and then you’d have 12 other things that you could say to choose from.” Junior Ethan Smith, who played Zack Smith, the sports captain of the Puffs, played around with a scene in which he tried to pump-up his team for their inevitable lastplace finish. Smith gave a different pep talk at each performance of the show. And even cast members were never quite prepared for what senior Sam Cooper, playing the villain Mr. Voldy, would do or say as he improvised lines into a toy megaphone each night. The scriptwriter also encouraged the cast to alter lines to include local cities and the names of RHS teachers. McGuire said the actors had fun with such a flexible script—almost too much fun. “I had to tell them they had to pass all of the improvised bits past me,” she said. The flexibility and the audience’s reactions kept the show fresh for the actors. “It’s hard to rehearse comedies after a while; they kind of get old to you,” Durnham said. “Then you have an audience, and it’s like, ‘Oh, yeah, this is why it’s funny.’” RHS is the first school in Jordan District to perform “Puffs,” which McGuire saw performed in New York. “I just knew that it’s the show that is right for this group of people right now,” McGuire said. l

Riverton City Journal


BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

First Utah Bank

Business Spotlights are a service offered to our advertisers to help them inform our readers about their businesses. For information on scheduling a Spotlight, please call us at 801-254-5974 or email us at ryan.c@thecityjournals.com

T

hose who support “Shop Local” initiatives may want to Bank Local as well. Within Utah, there are a handful of regional banks and credit unions, but First Utah Bank is the only true community bank. First Utah Bank has been locally owned and operated in the Salt Lake valley for over 40 years. “We have great products for consumers,” said Vice President Jean John. Such products include a full range of business and personal financial services, including checking and savings accounts, debit and credit cards, check depositing, business lending, banking from offices, automated systems, wire transfers, corporate credit cards, merchant services, and treasury management.   First Utah Bank routinely implements many services to help customers feel at ease with their banking. At the top of the list is their readily available customer service. Customers can pick up the phone and call at any time, including outside of business hours. A human will pick up the phone any time a customer needs to call. In addition, “all day-to-day banking can be done online,” said John. First Utah Bank is extremely technologically savvy, as their Chief Information Officer and IT department works hard to make online banking easy and

secure. First Utah Bank offers the latest technology in online banking, including iOS and Android Apps so that customers can make remote deposits with their mobile devices. “We take cybersecurity very seriously,” said John, who stresses that keeping First Utah Bank’s customers’ information safe is their primary focus. “We really know our customers. If we see something unusual, we stop and ask. We will pick up the phone and call.” When encountering a less individualized concern, First Utah Bank informs their customers of that concern through their website and social media accounts. “We work to keep customers informed,” reported John. For example, the most recent notice on their website stated, “It has come to our attention that individuals are being contacted by a person posing as a First Utah Bank employ-

ee. The Bank is not making these calls – do not provide personal information to any such caller.” The majority of First Utah Bank’s customer base are business owners within the Salt Lake Valley, even though they do lend across the country. Working with a community bank has proven to be beneficial for business owners. “We can look at the structure of the company and figure out what type of loan is needed,” said John. “We can tweak things to meet the needs of the business owners, including looking at different options for collateral and payments.” First Utah Bank can lend up to eight million dollars to business owners. They can also participate the loan with other banks if a business owner requires a bigger loan. “We work with people,” said John. As a community bank, First Utah Bank takes their commitment to their communi-

ty seriously. “We support the communities where we live and work,” said John. “We give back as much as possible.” For example, First Utah Bank employees volunteer for Reality Towns (a mock reality day where middle-school aged students get to learn about mortgages, buying a car, budgeting, taxes, etc.) They have also partnered with the Discover Gateway Children’s Museum. There is a children’s branch inside the museum, complete with a drive-up window, ATM, coin sorter, shredded money wind tube, and vault door. In addition, First Utah Bank is a major sponsor for the Greek Festival which occurs annually in September. “We encourage all of our employees to sit on nonprofit boards,” said John. First Utah Bank will allow their employees to take time off to do charitable work, and the bank will make donations to those nonprofits. For more information on First Utah Bank, visit one of their six locations within the Salt Lake Valley (soon to be seven as one will be opening in Lehi). Or visit their website (www.firstutahbank.com) or social media (First Utah Bank on Twitter and Facebook).

You Matter to God. You Matter to Us.

OquirrhMountain CountryChurch

OMCC

Join us Sundays at 6pm

www.omcchurch.org

email: info@omcchurch.org

RivertonJournal.com

meeting at Project Dance 13198 S. 5600 W., Herriman

VisitingAngels.com At-Home

Personal Care Bathing Assistance Companionship • Errands Meal Preparation Dressing Assistance Respite Care for Families Shopping • Grooming Medication Reminders Light Housekeeping Fexible Hourly Care

801-820-0684 April 2020 | Page 21


Easy Recipe Ideas from the Pantry

Cathy Taylor

ies, taco seasoning, cumin, chili powder, rice, or corn.

Chili can be eaten alone, or spiced up with toppings like shredded cheese, sour cream, onions, olives, and peppers. You can use it as a smother for chicken, on Navajo tacos, for chili dogs, in a baked potato bar, over French fries, or mix it into macaroni and cheese.  It also makes a delicious dip when mixed with cream cheese.  Trying to eat less meat?  They make vegetarian chili too – and it tastes great!

4 – Potatoes

1 – Canned chili

2 – Canned refried beans

These can be used in all sorts of Mexican inspired dishes: tacos, tostadas, burritos, taco salads, nachos, quesadillas, etc. You can change up the flavor by mixing in other items as well, such as salsa, enchilada sauce, canned black beans, ground beef, diced chil-

$10 OFF 00

Any Oil Change

BUY ONE SMOOTHIE, RECEIVE THE SECOND SMOOTHIE OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR $1 VALID AT RIVERTON AND HERRIMAN LOCATIONS ONLY

Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon. Expires 4/30/20

Available Service(s)

3- Pasta

Pastas like rigatoni, macaroni, fettucine, linguini, cheese stuffed tortellini, and penne are great to break up the monotony of regular old spaghetti noodles.   And the toppings for pasta can be just as varied: marinara, Alfredo, meat sauce, sautéed vegetables, butter and seasonings, parmesan, salad dressings, olive and other flavored oils, or vinaigrettes. While these probably aren’t considered a pantry item, I love to include them because they are so versatile, and pair well with most anything.  They can be fried with onion, grated into hash browns, boiled and mashed, used in soup, roasted with olive oil and a variety of seasonings, baked and topped with veggies, chili, cheese, cream soups, salsa, sour cream, etc.  You can even bake them the night before and keep them in the fridge for later use.

5 – Bottled sauces, dressings and marinades

Slow cookers are a busy family’s best friend – and there are few things easier than putting a few frozen chicken breasts in the Worlds Best Thick Shakes & Onion Rings

by

I was once asked to write down some easy recipes for the husband of a woman who is a quadriplegic. He wanted dinner ideas that were quick and inexpensive, and easy enough for someone with little cooking experience.  After some thought, I decided that instead of writing down each individual recipe, I could share a list of pantry items that, if he kept on hand, could provide him with a variety of meal ideas.  This list has since been shared with newly-weds, college students, and wonderfully enough, my own teenagers who are taking on more cooking responsibilities.  

slow cooker, pouring in a bottle of sauce, and putting on the lid. (Don’t forget to turn it on too!)  Salad dressings like Italian, Catalina, vinaigrettes, and honey mustard are great over chicken.  You can also use BBQ sauces, salsas, spaghetti sauce, marinades, and Indian simmer sauces.  Then serve with pasta, rice or potatoes and you’re good to go!  Dressings can of course top your salads, but they can also add a delicious kick to sandwiches, wraps and pasta. Now, these aren’t by any means gourmet meals. What they are, is a solution for the reality of having our lives displaced. While we love having the whole world of cuisine right at our fingertips the reality of making do with what’s on the pantry shelf can spark our inner chef.

BUY 2 SHAKES

GET A THIRD FREE!

FREE KIDS MEAL!

WHEN YOU BUY AN ADULT COMBO MEAL Adult meal must be at full price. Not valid with other offers. Expires 4/30/20

Free shake will be the least expensive of the three. Not valid with other coupons or offers. Expires 4/30/20

5049 W 13400 S, Riverton Ut 84096

• Alignments • Batteries • Belts & Hoses • Brake Repair • Engine Repair • Engine Diagnostics • Flat Repair • Fluid Inspection • Tune Up / Oil Changes • Other Services SCHEDULE A SERVICE APPOINTMENT

TODAY

M-F 8AM-6PM | SAT 8AM-5PM | CLOSED SUNDAY’S

3901 W INNOVATION DRIVE, RIVERTON, UT 84065 801-446-4465 | RIVERTONTUNEX.COM

Page 22 | April 2020

$5 0FF $25 Or More Limit 1 per table. Expires 4/30/20.

801-446-6644 www.tusharexpress.com 1078 West 10400 South • South Jordan, UT 84095

Riverton City Journal


A Woman’s Place As the mother of four daughters, and grandma to several granddaughters, I’m frequently asked (okay, twice) what advice I’d give to young women. Women are stronger than ever before, yet many men try to drag us back to the Victorian Era. Men keep gettin’ up in our bizness, drafting regulations about our bodies, creating rules about everything from prom wear to breastfeeding, and making sure we’re slutshamed if we behave out-of-line. We’re called hysterical. We’re labeled as trouble-makers. We’re branded as unreasonable. We’re given a warm glass of milk, a pat on the head and sent to the kids’ table. Men have had thousands of years to run the world – and I’m not impressed. Maybe it’s time they step aside and let women do the heavy lifting. (Which we can totally do.) Here’s what young women (of every age) should know:

Life

Laughter AND

by

PERI KINDER

Own your voice.

Don’t waste time explaining yourself and don’t apologize for being a smart, confident, breath of fresh air. Shout your brilliance from the rooftops and ignore those grumpy old men who slam their windows to block out the noise.

Live an authentic life.

Travel. Get educated. Eat what you want. Drink what you want. Wear what you want. If a man’s morals are compromised because he caught a glimpse of your shoulders (or ankles, or earlobes) – not your problem. Instead of adding layers to our wardrobes,

RIVERTON

PROFESSIONALS

Value Brick and Masonry Work

Brick and Block Work Insurance Repair Chimney and Mailbox Repair

Call Grant at 801-455-8689 Landscape Yard and flower bed clean up and planting Tree Planting & Removal Mulch & Soil

Call Holly for a FREE Estimate

801-548-3539 FLOORING

South Valley Floors

Utah’s Full Service Flooring Boutique

Carpet, tile, hardwood, laminate, ceramic tile, luxury vinyl & window coverings. FREE Estimate 801-501-9210 12896 S Pony Express #100, Draper

RivertonJournal.com

PLACEAN ANAD: AD: PLACE

801-254-5974 801-254-5974

Call Call

LAWNCARE SERVICES Lawn Care Service 30 Years Experience

Spring Yeard Clean Up Mowing, Trimming, Edging, Aeration, Aeration & Power Raking, Sprinker Repair Reasonable Prices! We also accept Venmo. Ask for Bernie 801-916-5463

VEHICLES WANTED

We’ll buy your running & non-running, wrecked or broken car, truck or van.

(801) 506-6098 CarSoldForCash.com A Local Utah Company

YARD SERVICES

Affordable Yard Care / Tree Trimming & Removal Flower Beds, Hedges, Railroad Ties, Mulching, Sod, Mowing, Concrete Senior Discounts

Call Dan:

801-518-7365

how about men get their minds out of the damn gutter?

Raise your standards.

Life’s too short to be with someone who doesn’t appreciate your greatness. If your partner is fighting with you instead of for you, time to show them the door.

Think big.

When you’re being pushed aside, refuse to budge. There are generations of women who fought for your right to stand tall, raise your voice and share your truth. They’re cheering you on. You can feel their energy, right?

Embrace your goddess self.

Remember that amazing idea you had? Remember how you set it aside because you thought you had to be something else? Dust that idea off. Shower it with love and attention. Don’t be afraid of big ideas. The world needs your creativity.

Plant yourself at the table.

We’re tired of being dismissed. We’re sick to death of being talked down to (mansplaining, anyone?). We’re capable, functioning adults and we have something to say. Ladies, don’t back away when you’re described as “shrill” or “harsh” or “bitchy” or any other words men use to slap us down.

Give yourself permission to be human.

We’re not robots who smile 24/7, tidy up after meetings and schedule luncheons. Don’t feel self-conscious if your expression isn’t “happy” enough. Look serious. Who cares? Men certainly aren’t smiling, cheerful androids.

Stand your ground.

LANDSCAPE MATERIALS

REPLENISH LANDSCAPE

Barks, Colored Mulch, Compost, Soil Blends, Playground Chips, Sand-Gravel, Landscape Fabric & More

801-218-2617

4660 S 200 W Murray

SPRINKLERS

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

Installation & Repair Call Today

Residential and Light Commercial

Quality Sprinklers

SUGARHOUSE HEATING & AIR SERVICE & REPAIR

Call Jeff at 801-347-1150 LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Mention this ad for 10% Off

336-620-1345

24 Hour Emergency: 801-484-0506 www.sugarhousehvac.com

Electric

Automotive Services

LAWN MOWING

HARVEY’S ELECTRIC 801-833-0998

All types of electrical work. Residential and Commercial. Over 10 years in business Licensed and Insured.

Call and ask about Breaker Box Labeling!

TREE SERVICES

INTERMOUNTAIN TREE EXPERTS

Removals . Trimming . Pruning Licensed and Insured / 15 Yrs Experience

801-244-3542 FREE ESTIMATES

ROOFING

801-272-2700

All types of roofs

$650 OFF any reroof over 2,000 sq. ft.

Randy’s Tire and Muffler

Complete Auto Repair & Service Manager Owned and Operated Serving Bluffdale/South Valley for 3 Generations 14250 S Redwood Rd 801.254.9971

RandysTireAndMuffler.com FLAT ROOF SPECIALISTS

OLYMPUS ROOFING

801.887.7663 SERVING WASATCH FRONT SINCE 1973

CONCRETE WORK

Reasonable Prices, Quality Work, Prompt Service Flat work, Driveways, Patios, RV Pads, Sidwalks, Etc.

Call Dan:

801.518.7365

Mr. Mow It All Weekly Mowing - Edging - Trimming 20+ Years Experience

Call or Text Gary TODAY for your Free Estimate

801-860-2260

Tile and Flooring Powell Tile and Laminate Flooring Tile, Back Splashes, and Bathrooms Laminate Flooring, Finish Work, and Services Call Chris for a free estimate 801.708.1123

LAWN MAINTENANCE

PRO LAWN MAINTENANCE IN BUSINESS 39 YEARS!

Spring Aerations, Weekly Lawn Maintenance

Spring Clean-ups

FREE Estimates

801-550-6813 or 801-347-1238

April 2020 | Page 23


FREE DELIVERY with any purchase

As seen on

One soda drink per coupon. Not valid with any other offer. Coupon good at any Curry Pizza location. Expires 4/30/2020

2927 S 5600 W West Valley

125 N SR 24 Bicknell, UT

801-890-0415

435-425-2500

NEW LOCATION!

1086 W South Jordan Pkwy South Jordan

801-302-0777

Does your water cooler have ICE?

Ours Does! MOST WATER COOLERS COME UP SHORT Our office coolers and ice machines employ a nine-stage purification process that cleans the water for your office far beyond the capabilities of our competitors’ equipment!

Call today to get your free home or office trial!

801-997-6164

24/7 ER Care Board-Certified Physicians Short ER Wait Times Text “ER” to 32222 for current ER wait times.

11800 S State St, Draper HydrateYourOffice.com


April 2020 | Vol. 30 Iss. 04

FREE

Our #1 Priority is

The Health of Your Pets NEW CLIENTS:

$25 EXAM

10% OFF

With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 4/30/20

With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 4/30/20

for your first pet!

RIVERTON CHURCH MEMBERS COLLECT, DELIVER ESSENTIALS TO ELDERLY TRAPPED INSIDE BECAUSE OF COVID-19

EXISTING CLIENTS:

any services!

1381 W. Stone Ridge Lane • Riverton

BOOK TODAY:

801-254-4840

By Stephanie Yrungaray | s.yrungaray@mycityjournals.com

T

he uncertainty of COVID-19 sent people scrambling for supplies and left grocery store shelves empty of many essentials. While many people worked to fill their own cupboards, two members of a Riverton church looked beyond their own needs and set up a plan to encourage helping and hope. Paul Fulks, a member of the Gospel Hope Church in Riverton was talking to a fellow parishioner Nick Peterson after seeing posts on Facebook about seniors struggling to get groceries. “The elderly don’t need to be out in public,” Fulks said. “We see grocery stores are empty of nonperishable food items and cleaning supplies. We need to be able to get supplies to them.” Fulks and Peterson got permission to designate Gospel Hope Church (11869 South 2700 West in Riverton) as a donation center, setting up hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day of the week to accept donations of “nonperishable food, cleaning supplies, and personal hygiene items” that they can then turn around and give to elderly and at-risk residents. They are calling the campaign, “Hope and Help for our City.” “People [in need] can call, come to the church, or contact us through social media,” Fulks said. “We are able to deliver to them if they need that as well.” Two days after the start of Hope and Help for our City,

around 300 items had been donated. Needs have been filled including distilled water for a grandmother’s CPAP (sleep apnea) machine, and several items delivered to homebound residents. Fulks said they are also reaching out to local nursing homes and hope to deliver donated items that are needed. In this time of fear and self-isolation, their campaign is showing that people can and want to do better. “We hope that this will serve as a reminder that in times

like these, it is much better to give and share than to hoard,” Fulks said. “We just hope that our neighbors will see the love of Jesus that has transformed the lives of the people in our church.” If you are interested in donating nonperishables or know someone in need, you can contact Gospel Hope Church at @gospelhopechurch on Instagram, @gospelhoperiverton on Facebook, or at 801-254-2147. l

Some of the supplies that have been donated to the Hope and Help for our City campaign being run by Gospel Hope Church in Riverton. (Photo courtesy of Paul Fulks)

The Gospel Hope Church in Riverton is seeking donations of nonperishable items to help the elderly and immune compromised who can’t get supplies at the store because of the COVID-19 scare. (Photo courtesy of Paul Fulks)

Mention this Ad

for 10% off Expires 4/30/2020

801-938-4345

• Stump Grinding • 24/7 Emergency Services • Powerline Trimming • Land Clearing • Demolition Options Available • Organic Mulch Products - Delivery Available

Contact us at 801-938-4345 or DiamondTreeExperts.com Local Postal Customer ECRWSS Scan Here: Interactive online edition with more photos.

g! rin + H i 0K w $8 No 35$

TREE TRIMMING & REMOVAL

Full Benefits & Bonuses Call 801-262-1596 or email trent@diamondtreeexperts.com

Thank You to our Community Sponsors for supporting City Journals

Presort Std U.S. Postage PAID Ogden, UT Permit #190

Profile for The City Journals

Riverton City Journal | April 2020  

Riverton City Journal | April 2020