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November 2019 | Vol. 01 Iss. 11

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THIS NONPROFIT ADDS A BIT OF SPARKLE TO MILLCREEK By Hannah LaFond | h.lafond@mycityjournals.com

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urrent Millcreek resident Ciara Mosquito was 16 when she first had the idea for the Shimmer Sparkle Shine Project, or SSSP, a nonprofit she founded. SSSP’s mission statement is “To help girls and women develop and enhance their sense of self-worth.” Mosquito was inspired to create this project after being severely bullied throughout middle school. During this time her sense of worth was very low. She was able to build herself back up during high school where she attended a new school. “The summer of when I was 16 I thought back to my struggles in middle school and I decided I wanted to help girls not feel the same way I did about myself at that age,” Mosquito said. She’s been working on SSSP ever since. After starting in 2011, SSSP hosted its first workshop in 2012. That day showed Mosquito what her idea could really become. She said it was the best day of her life until she got married. Now, SSSP operates by hosting workshops and classes based on five keys: personality, healthy living, comfort in your own skin, good friends versus bad friends and making your mark. These workshops are for girls ages 8 to 13. Girls are encouraged to start volunteering with the program at age 14. “The struggle of self-worth doesn’t end in the 8 to 13 age bracket. So, we try to have the volunteers learn the same message as our girls, but through the teaching and mentoring perspective,” Mosquito said. Mosquito shares a story from one of SSSP’s workshops. Continued page 5 Girls work on a craft with a volunteer from the Shimmer Sparkle Shine Project. (Photo courtesy of Ciara Mosquito)

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Skyline crisis team urges parents and students to reach out to keep kids safe By Heather Lawrence | heather.lawrence@mycityjournals.com

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kyline High held a resilience meeting for parents on Oct. 14. The purpose was to teach parents to help their students get through hard times, and ultimately avoid attempts at self-harm. “If there’s just one thing you take away from this tonight, it’s to reach out,” said Victoria Hatton, school psychologist at Skyline. Hatton conducted most of the evening, starting with a presentation. She covered resilience and signs that students may think of harming themselves. “Resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress,” Hatton said, quoting the definition from the American Psychological Association. The presentation was similar to the one given to the student body in the past weeks. To reach as many students as possible, Hatton said they gave the presentation during social studies classes. In addition, resiliency will be worked into the English department’s curriculum. It will be presented through social/emotional learning lessons. Hatton is at Skyline full time this year, thanks in part to the community council. They purchased part of her contract so she could work full time there. The time then opened up for a panelist Q&A session. On the panel were Hatton, Skyline Principal Doug Bingham, Suicide Prevention Coordinator Leah Colburn, University of Utah psychiatrist and professor Dr. Doug Gray, USBE Suicide Prevention Specialist Cathy Davis, emergency pediatrician Dr. Chuck Pruitt and Safe UT app representative Denia-Marie Ollerton. The panel took questions written by parents on notecards. One asked how kids are responding to using the Safe UT app. “Skyline is in the top three users of the Safe UT app, and that’s a good thing. Talk

Journals

A group of panelists spoke to Skyline parents Oct. 14 about resilience and preventing self-harm. (Heather Lawrence/City Journals)

about the app with your kids. It’s confidential, anonymous and anyone can use it. There is a two minutes or less response time and it’s as easy as sending a text,” Ollerton said. Another question addresses the stigma of getting help for mental health concerns. “If your child resists or refuses seeking help from a counselor, ask them, ‘Why don’t you want to go? What are you afraid of?’ and then listen,” Gray said. “I’ve been working in this field for over 25 years. More has happened in the last five years to prevent suicide and reduce the stigma of getting help than in the 20 before then. So we’re seeing improvements,” Gray said. One parent asked about the protocol the school follows when the death of a student has been reported. “First we verify. We have Resource Officer Ricci to help with that. We don’t want to put out any misinformation.” Bingham said the next step is to notify the student body, but they have changed the way they do that. “We don’t make a general announcement anymore. We send people, counselors and other staff to every classroom and tell the students in person that one of their classmates has passed away,” Bingham said.

After that, the school informs the parents of the student body, contacts the district, creates a crisis team and focuses on the needs of the “kids who are still here.” They respect the wishes of the family in choosing what information to share. One parent read a text message question from her daughter who asked about missing homework and getting behind in class due to the grieving process. Hatton and Bingham said that when that happens, students should speak with teachers or with administrators. “They can come tell me, and most teachers would help them get caught up,” Bingham said. Other questions addressed what to do if kids are joking about suicide. Hatton said that she herself realized she was using language that was inappropriate. “You need to model the correct behavior. I don’t say things like ‘Kill me now’ when I’m stressed out anymore.” Other panelists discussed the logistics of keeping kids safe. “If you have pills, if you have guns or ammunition, go home tonight and do what you need to do to keep them out of the hands of your kids. I can’t stress that

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enough,” Colburn said. Two points focused on what has proven to work, and what hasn’t. The first is asking the question outright: “Are you thinking of killing yourself?” “The Mayo Clinic produced this video, and it discusses asking this question. It has been shown that this question itself doesn’t raise the risk of suicide. It opens the door to a conversation. But it’s a hard question to ask,” Hatton said. Hatton and Gray both said that whatever the answer is, just listen. When you do reply, make sure what you say is validating and empathetic. And then reach out if appropriate. “There are some secrets you don’t keep,” Gray said. One thing that is avoided is reporting by the media. “We know that when the media reports a suicide, then more occur. We don’t want it to become a cluster of suicides. So schools have a tightrope to walk between getting out information and keeping kids safe,” Gray said. The panel all said that parents can model resilience behaviors for kids. “They need to see you reach out for help. They need to know that no one does it alone. They need to see you fall and then get back up again,” Hatton said. The meeting was well-attended, but could have accommodated hundreds more parents. Someone asked, “How do we engage the parents who aren’t here tonight?” Hatton echoed her theme to reach out. “Post something on social media that you learned tonight, talk to other parents the next time you see them. Don’t just reach out when things are wrong, reach out when you learned something.” The Safe UT app is available for phones and also as a website at safeut.med.utah.edu. The National Suicide Prevention line and chat is available 24 hours a day at 1-800-2738255. l

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Continued from front page When they were talking about the fourth key, “good friends versus bad friends,” one girl at the workshop started talking to the group about feeling like she had no friends. Mosquito and the rest of the group did their best to comfort her and talk through it. “By the end, she said, ‘Well, I have friends in you guys, but that doesn’t even matter because the best type of friend I need is a friend in myself.’” Mosquito said watching girls come to this kind of realization is the most impactful part of her job. According to Mosquito, SSSP has gone through a lot of growth as well as trial and error to get to the point it is today. She’s had to learn the ins and outs of running a nonprofit on the go. Since moving to Utah after graduating from college, she’s been able to dedicate more time to expanding the project. “It’s all about asking for help and letting people help you with their strengths and being savvy with your resources,” Mosquito said. Though SSSP has grown a lot, Mosquito has no plans to slow down. She has several goals for the near future, such as moving away from the workshops, which are a onetime four-hour event, and hosting more class series, which are once-a-week hour-long classes for six weeks. Mosquito said they prefer the class series because “it allows us to get to know our girls more and to have a longer time getting

Ciara Mosquito (back left) and girls at her workshop pose for a photo for the Shimmer Sparkle Shine Project. (Photo courtesy of Ciara Mosquito)

to share our message with them.” Mosquito also hopes to start hosting activities throughout the year that girls can come back to after they’ve taken the workshops and classes. And she hopes to strengthen their volunteer program so there are more

trained volunteers to host classes and in different areas. SSSP wants to get as many girls involved as they can, to provide them with tools for their future. As Mosquito puts it, “Self-worth is not a one-time cure. It’s some-

thing that I’ve always battled with too. There are times when I feel worse about myself. But then I have to remember what I’ve taught the girls and it brings it full circle.” l

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November 2019 | Page 5


Deaf Awareness Week and the 20th anniversary of the Jean Massieu School of the Deaf By Kirk Bradford | k.bradford@mycityjournals.com

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id you know deaf individuals do not like it when people call or refer to them as “hearing impaired?” Did you know when speaking to a deaf person while using an ASL interpreter, you should be focused and looking at the deaf person, not the interpreter? The same goes for speaking — you look at the person you are speaking to and they can transition back and forth between their interpreter and reading your lips and body language. The purpose of Deaf Awareness Week is to educate about and address matters just like this. The last week of September is International Deaf Awareness Week. During this period, organizations all over the world hosted events to provide an opportunity for approximately 70 million people who are deaf. The event allows deaf individuals to reflect on their collaborative efforts and promote positive aspects of deafness, encourage social inclusion and raise awareness of organizations that can support the deaf. All over the country it was celebrated in different ways. The American Sign Language division of Central Michigan College even set up simulation material to allow people to experience what it is really like to be deaf or blind for 45 minutes. The Jean Massieu School (JMS) of the Deaf celebrated its 20th anniversary. JMS alumni, staff and friends in the deaf community came to the event to celebrate its milestone with dinner, awards and a play. The City Journals connected with Jean Massieu School Program Director Aimee Breinholt to learn more of the basics people may not know. “Using the term hearing impaired is considered very rude in the deaf community,” she said. “This term indicates that something is wrong with the individual and that they are less than a ‘hearing’ person. Please use the terms ‘deaf’ and ‘hard-of-hearing’ when referring to our students…The deaf community has very strong feelings in regard to these terms.” The Millcreek City Council celebrated deaf awareness at its Sept. 23 meeting. The council and those who viewed the meeting experienced the Pledge of Allegiance performed in ASL by the Girl Scout troop of the JMS. During the meeting, the council issued a proclamation recognizing the 20th anniversary of JMS. The proclamation states, “The Jean Massieu School is committed to promoting and fostering a fully accessible learning environment with the goal of being proficient in both languages — American Sign Language and English — and the mayor and city council of Millcreek do hereby recognize the Jean Massieu School of the Deaf as a Valued Community Partner.” JMS was founded in August 1999 and named after its first deaf teacher. In 2001,

Page 6 | November 2019

City council presenting the proclamation recognizing the 20th anniversary of the JMS School with Program Director Aimee Breinholt and the school’s Girl Scouts. (Kirk Bradford/City Journals)

the school adopted the yellow jacket as their mascot. Yellowjackets show persistence defending the hive. The students felt it accurately depicted their own sense of determination to fight against all odds, never giving up. In 2008, after 10 years of requesting funding, the Utah State Legislature provided it and the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind established their building downtown. During the winter break of 2010, JMS moved into their permanent home now in Millcreek. Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind (USDB) students rank No. 1 in the United States for high school graduation and USDB serves as a model across the country and around the world. The schools support approximately 1,800 students across Utah. Including USDB’s Educational Support Services, the number of children served statewide is over 3,900. In the Salt Lake City area, 120 students attend the Jean Massieu School for the Deaf and the C. Mark Openshaw Education Center. Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind elementary students are on campus in Millcreek, Utah. As for the difficulties Breinholt sees her students face? “Access is always a concern. This is not something that most people deal with. Not many people think about what is happening around them and who has access

to that. A lot of learning comes through incidental learning. For our deaf students that use ASL and do not have access to spoken language, they often get left out of that incidental learning.” Last month, the Utah Shakespearean Festival received a lawsuit in federal court for refusing to provide American Sign Language interpreters to the students of JMS and USDB. The schools were there for a performance of “Hamlet.” In the suit the schools alleged that the Shakespeare Festival; its executive producer, Frank Mack; and Southern Utah University violated the Americans with Disabilities Act because the school’s students were “denied equal protection of the laws when they refused to provide effective communication” in the form of ASL interpreters for the show. The lawsuit came about after a Sept. 20 meeting, when the schools asserted at the time that Mack “was adamant that … captioning was sufficient” for audience members who are deaf. According to a summary of the lawsuit, Mack “encouraged” Michelle Tanner, the associate superintendent of the deaf at USDB, “to sue him” if she disagreed about things. The Utah School for the Deaf and Blind website provides many tips. One of the most important is when you find yourself in a sit-

uation where you are communicating with someone who is deaf or hard of hearing, get the person’s attention before you start to speak. Look directly at them while you speak and key them into the topic of discussion. Speak slowly and clearly but do not yell, exaggerate or over pronounce words (This can distort speech-reading). By being cognizant of your body language and facial cues, you can deliver your message. Breinholt offered some advice: “It’s always best to talk with deaf individuals. If you would like to reach out to any of our deaf staff, I’d love to help connect up with them…The deaf community is a wonderful community with a beautiful language. We love having others learn more!” In addition to more access, Breinholt said she “would love to have others realize that deaf students are just like everyone else. They can do what everyone else can do, just in another language.” Breinholt has been Utah’s runner up for Teacher of the Year and taught for 15 years. If you would like to learn more about the deaf community or about sensitivities when addressing someone hard of hearing, you can watch a short video by searching “How to talk with the Deaf” on YouTube. It’s located on the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind YouTube channel. l

Millcreek City Journal


50,000 words or bust for aspiring novelists this November By Joshua Wood | joshw@mycityjournals.com

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ver 80% of Americans think they have a book in them. They also think they should write it, according to writer Joseph Epstein. For many, the dream of writing a novel remains that, just a dream. However, for those who are ready to finally write their story, some extra motivation comes along every November in the form of National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo. NaNoWriMo writers share a common goal of reaching 50,000 words in just 30 days each November. That adds up to a 200-page novel draft in just one month. To help writers stay on track, and to find a group of like-minded novelists to be around while cranking out those pages, the Salt Lake County Library offers write-in events at several of its locations. “People can come to a branch hosting a write-in,” said Liesl Seborg of Salt Lake County Library. “There will often be treats, prizes, word sprints, a little social interaction.” This will be the sixth year of large participation in write-in events at Salt Lake County Libraries. Five locations will host write-in events during November, including the Whitmore, Millcreek, Taylorsville, West Valley and Bingham Creek branches. Writeins will be held in at least one library each Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday throughout November. Event schedules can be found on the library’s website. “Our main function is to provide a comfortable space where writers can work and meet other writers engaged in the same challenge,” said Daniel Berube of Whitmore Library. “It’s also helpful for writers to have a set time blocked off for writing. We usually have a mix of writing veterans and people that are curious about what NaNoWriMo is.” While dozens of people typically participate in the write-in events each November, Seborg estimates that around 1,000 people in Salt Lake County will sit down to write as part of NaNoWriMo. Statistics from the national organization showed participation increasing from fewer than 200 in its first year in 2000 to over 200,000 10 years later. The

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Writers at work during a NaNoWriMo event. (Joshua Wood/City Journals)

number of participants has continued to grow from there. The draw of NaNoWriMo comes from something that many aspiring novelists share deep down. “Everybody ultimately wants to write a book,” Seborg said. “I think the appeal is that there are many stories to be told, and this is a way to push themselves to write what’s in their mind, what’s in their heart of hearts.” Write-in events held all over the world offer something else. While the act of writing tends to be a solitary task, writers themselves help push each other. “You’ve got other people who are also struggling,” Seborg said. “They can share the good days and the bad days.” Throughout November, new and experienced writers in Salt Lake County and beyond can find a quiet place near them to write. They also find a group of people who share similar aspirations. Each write-in event ranges from silent to raucous. Writers will all quietly type or scribble away at their stories, then take time at the end of the session to talk

Writers can attend a NaNoWriMo event at Whitmore Library each Wednesday in November. (Joshua Wood/City Journals)

about their experiences. They celebrate each other’s breakthroughs and laugh off their challenges. Write-ins are typically led by people affiliated with the national NaNoWriMo organization. These municipal liaisons offer experienced words of encouragement as well as structure for the events. If a community liai-

son is not available, local library staff step in. Some library staff even participate in NaNoWriMo as writers, including Seborg, who intends to aim for her own 50,000 words this November. “I write fantasy/science fiction and focus on dystopian novels,” Seborg said. “I like to put my nightmares on paper so I can control them.” l

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November 2019 | Page 7


A few things you should know about the Stars

Judge MeMorial

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By Greg James | gregj@mycityjournals.com

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he Salt Lake City Stars, the G League affiliate of the Utah Jazz, enjoyed their most successful season last year. As the 2019–20 season approaches, there are a few things you should know about this team. This is the fourth season for the Stars in Taylorsville at Bruin Arena on the campus of Salt Lake Community College. They were previously the Idaho Stampede before they moved to their current home. Last season, the Stars earned a playoff berth for the first time since the team moved here. They were eliminated in the first round by the Oklahoma City Blue. The home opener is scheduled for Fri-

day, Nov. 15 against the defending G League champion Rio Grande Vipers, the Houston Rockets affiliate. The Stars beat them three times last season. On the schedule this season are 24 home games; 13 of those fall on a Friday or Saturday night. Home games include a kid zone and autograph sessions. Single-game, group packages and season tickets are now available and range in pricing. The Stars’ roster has begun to take shape. On Sept. 21 (after press deadline) they held an open tryout. Also securing spots on the roster are Jazz draftees Jarrell Brantley and Justin Wright-Foreman. In July, they signed

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two-way contracts with the Jazz and will split time between the Stars and Jazz. League rosters are made up of 12 players; two of those are NBA players (Brantley and Wright-Foreman). The remaining players are signed to league contracts and assigned to teams throughout the league by drafts and as allocation players (a player with a local tie, like a University of Utah player to the Stars). One player from each local tryout could also be assigned to the roster. The minimum age to play in the G League is 18, which different from the NBA minimum of 19. The base annual salary is $35,000 plus housing and insurance benefits. If a player is picked up by an NBA team, they can earn a bonus plus a new contract. Martin Schiller is returning for his third season as the team’s head coach. He spent his summer coaching during the Jazz summer league and with the German National Team in the FIBA World Cup. Several players have G League experience on NBA rosters, including Jazz players Rudy Gobert and Royce O’Neal, and Jazz head coach Quinn Snyder. The League is also a proving ground for front office personnel and officials. The NBA has also experimented with rule changes to help grow its game in the G League. l

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Former Stars player Naz Mitrou-Long signed two 10-day contracts with the Jazz last season before signing this summer with the Indiana Pacers. (Photo courtesy of NBAE)

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November 2019 | Page 9


Millcreek gets to work at the job fair By Hannah LaFond | h.lafond@mycityjournals.com

T

he Millcreek Business Council hosted its second job fair of the year at Millcreek City Hall on Oct. 3. Their primary goal was to connect Millcreek businesses with employable locals. As Suzanne Sands, the chair of the Millcreek Workforce Committee, said, “Finding a job close to home can ease transportation and childcare expenses by eliminating a long commute.” Having employees who work close to their business also benefits the employer. That is probably why Sands said she was approached by job seekers and employers alike throughout the fair, who thanked her for helping them make those valuable connections. She said hopeful job seekers told her that “the opportunity to find a job close to their home is something they haven’t seen in other communities.” Sands was especially excited to help because she has experience with how important it can be, especially for families, to work locally. “I was able to connect my sister with a job close to her house. Since she has a little boy who is in school, commuting and childcare are big concerns for her,” Sands said. “Now she works close to home and to where her son attends school.”

A representative from Right at Home speaks to a potential employee at Millcreek’s summer job fair. (Photo courtesy of Nicole Chidester)

Before the October fair, there was also one hosted in the summer. Nichole Chidester, assistant to the economic development director, spoke to the Millcreek Journal about the summer fair as they prepared for October’s event. “Last job fair, one of our participating businesses hired three people because of the

job fair! We have many businesses who participated in the summer who have signed up to participate again,” Chidester said. “With those two examples in mind, I would say this job fair is highly successful.” Of course, even with that optimism in mind, Chidester was surprised on the morning of Oct. 3 to find many job seekers arrived

at City Hall before the doors opened. Some also stayed after the event ended at 2 p.m. The great turnout may have been due in part to the organizers reaching out to local high schools to invite students to the event, as many might be interested in summer or part-time jobs. About the attendees of the summer job fair, Chidester said, “The job seekers were highly diverse in education, age and skill. We invite all to participate.” And just like in the summer it was important for this fall fair to welcome and benefit anyone interested. Some of the businesses participating this year were Life Care Center of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City Corporation, Western Governor’s University, Willow Wood Care Center, Right at Home of Salt Lake and Roots Café, along with several others. And as Chidester did, many of these employers also participated in the summer event. She pointed to this fact as a good sign the employers are finding value from the job fair along with the job seekers. After hosting two successful job fairs, the Millcreek Business Council is hoping to continue the tradition with two job fairs each year going forward to connect more residents to local jobs. l

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5 common medical misconceptions cleared up by professionals By Hannah LaFond | h.lafond@mycityjournals.com

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he Christ United Methodist Church in Millcreek hosts an annual community health fair, where anyone is welcome to meet with doctors and other health professionals. This year’s fair took place on Oct. 6. Upon entering attendees were greeted by a welcoming community and booths full of information and services. They could get flu shots, take a bone density test, get their blood pressure tested and have an eye screening. They were also able to ask questions and have conversations with health-care professionals in a more comfortable setting than a doctor’s office. Experts at the event were happy to help answer any questions and clear up any confusion or misconceptions The Women’s and Children’s Services stand at Christ United Methodist about their field. If you couldn’t make it to the health fair Church’s Fall Health Fair. (Hannah LaFond) here are some common misconceptions: Stewart as well as David Wetzel, a physical therapist, BMI might not be the best indicator of health. recommended exercising in a pool as a great way for elderly Diann Stewart ran a booth measuring people’s BMI and patients to build strength and muscle. percent body fat. She also offered advice on exercise and You should get your teeth fixed before they hurt. healthy living to convert body fat into muscle. Dr. Rich Fisher, a dentist who has attended the health BMI stands for Body Mass Index. It is an international fair the last five years, talked about the importance of getting scale that takes into account weight and height to gauge if teeth fillings sooner rather than later. a person is underweight, overweight or healthy. But accord“Some people think I don’t have to get a tooth worked ing to Stewart, this measurement doesn’t work for everyone. Some people have a bigger bone structure and may have a on until it hurts. But that’s where things like X-rays can help higher BMI, but still be healthy. On the flip side, she said to discover things before they cause you pain.” According to Fisher, that’s the best time to get a tooth some people, especially the elderly, weigh very little, giving filled. If you wait until the tooth is hurting there will be more them a low BMI, but they have almost no muscle. Because of this Stewart believes measuring percent damage, which will only lead to more expensive procedures. body fat is much more telling of someone’s overall health Start thinking about advance directives early. than the BMI alone. Advance directives are written statements of someone’s

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Never call pills candy.

Elizabeth Hiol and Nosheen Hamid, with poison control at the University of Utah, said many parents call vitamins or other medication “candy” to convince their child to take them. However, this understandably confuses the child. It often leads to children taking medication they shouldn’t or take too much of their own thinking it is candy. Hiol and Hamid even had a visual aid with side-by-side pictures of candy and medications that looked similar. They asked people to guess which was which to show how easily a child would get the two mixed up.

You don’t need a prescription for Naloxone.

Naloxone is used as an antidote for opioid overdoses. According to Hiol and Hamid, many people think you need a prescription, but you can get it over the counter at a pharmacy. “Our concern is that if people are on multiple opioids or multiple pain medications they should have Naloxone,” Hamid said. l

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This nonprofit adds a bit of sparkle to Millcreek | COVER STORY Group photo taken from a Shimmer Sparkle Shine workshop. (Photo courtesy of Ciara Mosquito) FACEBOOK.COM/ THECITYJOURNALS

wishes regarding medical treatment. They are made to ensure their directives are followed even if they are in a state unable to communicate. Often people may not think of these until they are much older, but Wes Wilde, who answered questions on the subject, said he would advise starting the process in your mid-thirties. Obviously it’s something you hope not to use, but Wilde said it’s important to know what the patient wants to do if the worst should happen knowing, which absolves the family of guilt and indecision.

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Meet the City Journals Team Mieka Sawatzki | Account Executive email | Mieka.s@thecityjournals.com I love working with great Utah businesses and enjoy helping them grow by reaching local readers.

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November 2019 | Page 11


Millcreek officer helps return stolen Native American antiquities By Kirk Bradford | K.Bradford@mycityjournals.com

D

uring a September city council meeting, a bright light was shined upon Detective Gary Evans of the Unified Police Department. Evans has had some lows on the job not many officers face. In July 2016, he was called to the scene of a domestic violence situation that quickly escalated. Evans and his partner were forced to deal with a man with a shotgun. After being targeted and shot at by the suspect, they were forced to use deadly force. After two long months, Evans was cleared by Salt Lake District Attorney Sim Gill who in his statement said, “Officer Evans’ and Officer Franchow’s belief that deadly force was necessary to prevent their death or serious bodily injury was reasonable.” In 2016, Evans was part of a Multi-Division Team Citation Award from the City of Taylorsville. It was explained that on July 15, 2016, officers responded to a shooting in Taylorsville. Chief Tracy Wyant described a pursuit and subsequent activities that resulted in the apprehension of two suspects and the recovery of weapons. Wyant commended the teamwork and unity displayed. In September, Evans was awarded Millcreek’s Officer of the Month for August. Deputy Chief Steve Debry of the Unified Police Department presented the award. He read the citation, explaining, “It’s difficult at times to

The City Council, Chief Dubry, Detective Gary Evans and his wife following the presentation of the award. (Kirk Bradford/City Journals)

pick just one officer because there’s so many of them who do good things. So it’s tough, but the cream rises every month and it’s my pleasure to recognize Detective Gary Evans at this time.” Evans was recently assigned to follow up on a stolen vehicle case. The victim’s vehicle was stolen and contained Native American antiquities and firearms. They estimated the property loss over $15,000 but many of the stolen items were irreplaceable. The department assigned Evans the case on

the last day of his work week with only a few hours left in his shift. Evans discovered an arrest was made by an outside agency on the case and the suspect was incarcerated. The known suspect was arrested in the victim’s vehicle but none of the missing property was located. Evans promptly responded to the Salt Lake County jail and interviewed the suspect. During the interview, Evans established a rapport and explained the significance of

the stolen items to the suspect. They denied seeing or having any direct knowledge of the stolen property but did provide names on who provided the stolen car and the identity of the storage location used. Evans continued his investigation and with the assistance of other detectives, a warrant was served and the storage facility searched. Nearly all the stolen property was recovered, documented and returned to the victim. Of the four firearms stolen, one was recovered, and two more are currently being tracked down out of state. Debry praised Evans, saying, “This case highlights Detective Evans’s strong work ethic, attention to detail, customer service and desire to track down all leads. When Detective Evans was assigned this case, the suspect was in custody for possessing a stolen vehicle, but it was the items stolen from the vehicle which upset the victim the most. The victim was in disbelief when he learned his property had been recovered and expressed how greatly he was impressed and specifically mentioned Detective Evans’s skill and customer service. Because of Detective Evans’s tenacity and willingness to go the extra mile in this investigation, he is awarded the MillCreek Officer of the Month for August.” l

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Millcreek approves interlocal agreement with Salt Lake City over Brickyard boundary disputes By Kirk Bradford | K.Bradford@mycityjournals.com

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alt Lake City and Millcreek have resolved their dispute over the area in which a border is shared. The agreement reached will now give Millcreek control of 4.85 acres of commercial property that is located between 1300 East and Highland Drive and Woodland and Miller Avenues. It also includes their control over the highway roundabout located at the 2300 East exit off of I-80. Millcreek has also agreed to pay Salt Lake City roughly $61,000 annually over the next 10 years to allow Salt Lake to recoup what would be the estimated property and sales taxes generated by the commercial property it is receiving. The commercial property includes Highland Square Shopping Center and five other lots. The leaders in SLC agreed to give Millcreek two plots of property so the redevelopment of a new downtown spot can begin and will enhance the visual look of one of the city’s main travel routes into town. The compromise can finally begin the healing process ignited by some of the tension between the two cities who started feuding earlier this year over the Brickyard Plaza. In exchange for the area, Millcreek leaders will also agree to “forever cede any claim to” the rest of Brickyard to Salt Lake City and not seek legislation or other further boundary adjustments,” said Millcreek Mayor Jeff Silvestrini. “Nobody gets everything they want in a compromise, but given the roulette game if we went to legislator, it was a good compromise on both sides,” said Silvestrini. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski said, “I’m very

SLC Chair Charlie Luke and Millcreek City Council following the resolution ppproval. (Photo courtesy of Millcreek Government)

grateful the state wasn’t involved and that we could just get together and figure out what was really needed.” She expressed her gratitude over the compromise and how it came together and also added that her city would continue to provide key services to the ceded neighborhoods, including water delivery. “Residents and businesses can be assured that

Salt Lake City isn’t just walking away. This truly is a partnership and one that will last a lifetime.” Resolution 19-32 Interlocal Agreement between Millcreek and Salt Lake County was voted and approved at the regularly scheduled Millcreek City Council meeting on Sept. 23. l

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Millcreek Library celebrates diversity with Welcoming Week

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uring the second week of September, the Millcreek Community Library participated in Salt Lake County’s Welcoming Week through music and stories. County Library Public Relations Coordinator Tavin Stucki explained the week as, “Salt Lake County’s annual celebration that brings together people and local events to celebrate the contributions of immigrants and refugees throughout the community.” Events were held in all 16 branches of Salt Lake County’s libraries so more people could participate. The Salt Lake City Public Library System also created two booklists, one for children, “Immigration Experience,” and one for adults, “Immigrant Narratives.” Both offer many books to relate to and learn from. Annie Eastmond, who’s worked in the Salt Lake County Library System for over 15 years, was excited to organize events around this theme for the Millcreek Community Library. For Eastmond, the theme of welcoming everyone was completely natural for a library. She said it’s already one of the first places people feel at home when they arrive in the U.S. “We are a welcoming community with friendly faces ready to answer questions and

By Hannah LaFond | h.lafond@mycityjournals.com help people,” Eastmond told the Millcreek Journal. “Our resources are free — you can borrow books, movies, music, magazines … use computers and attend programs that entertain and educate. New Americans feel comfortable here first.” To celebrate this openness and to communicate the message to children, Eastmond planned “Be a Friend to Everyone.” During the week of Sept. 14–21 (Welcoming Week) all the story times at the Millcreek Library were centered on the theme of kindness. She called this program “Be a Friend to Everyone” because she wanted something that explained accepting everyone regardless of background that a child would understand. And as Eastmond put it, “It’s never too early to start teaching these basic kindnesses.” Eastmond is also a talented musician. She and her husband Dan Eastmond are cochairs of the Utah Storytelling Guild Olympus (Salt Lake Valley) chapter. Through her love for music and stories, she planned the event Tales and Tunes at the library on Sept. 16. During the program, Annie and Dan Eastmond told stories and sang songs from different cultures to celebrate our differences, as well as our many similarities. “Music and stories are a natural universal connection for all people,” Annie said.

Annie and Dan Eastmond sing and tell stories for Tales and Tunes at the Millcreek Community Library. (Photo courtesy of Annie Eastmond)

Page 14 | November 2019

And she seemed to be right. The event on Sept. 16 had a great turnout. Families from different cultures arrived at the Millcreek Community Library to participate in Tales and Tunes. For their final song Dan and Annie Eastmond performed “This Land Is Your Land, This Land Is My Land,” but they weren’t alone. A family of children jumped up to sing

the song with them. It was a beautiful and spontaneous moment that embodied the purpose of the evening and the whole Welcoming Week. Annie couldn’t have been happier to have the children’s accompaniment. “This is what it’s all about. This is awesome,” she said. “They felt very much at home and welcome and it was a fun end to our program.” l

Annie Eastmond stands with a family who participated in Millcreek Community Library’s Tales and Tunes event. (Photo courtesy of Annie Eastmond)

A group of children are curious about Annie Eastmond’s mandolin at the Tales and Tunes event. (Photo courtesy of Annie Eastmond)

Millcreek City Journal


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More and more people are saying they just don’t get colds anymore. They are using a new device made of pure copper, which scientists say kills cold and flu viruses. Doug Cornell invented the device in 2012. “I haven’t had a single cold since then,” he says. People were skeptical but EPA and university studies demonstrate repeatedly that viruses and New research: Copper stops colds if used early. bacteria die almost instantly when people are sick around her she uses Coptouched by copper. perZap morning and night. “It saved me That’s why ancient Greeks and Egyp- last holidays,” she said. “The kids had tians used copper to purify water and heal colds going round and round, but not wounds. They didn’t know about viruses me.” Some users say it also helps with and bacteria, but now we do. Scientists say the high conductance sinuses. Attorney Donna Blight had a of copper disrupts the electrical balance 2-day sinus headache. When her Copperin a microbe cell and destroys the cell in Zap arrived, she tried it. “I am shocked!” she said. “My head cleared, no more seconds. So some hospitals tried copper touch headache, no more congestion.” Some users say copper stops nightsurfaces like faucets and doorknobs. This cut the spread of MRSA and other illness- time stuffiness if used before bed. One man said, “Best sleep I’ve had in years.” es by over half, and saved lives. Copper can also stop flu if used earColds start after cold viruses get in your nose, so the vast body of research ly and for several days. Lab technicians gave Cornell an idea. When he next felt a placed 25 million live flu viruses on a cold about to start, he fashioned a smooth CopperZap. No viruses were found alive copper probe and rubbed it gently in his soon after. Dr. Bill Keevil led one of the teams nose for 60 seconds. “It worked!” he exclaimed. “The cold confirming the discovery. He placed milnever got going.” It worked again every lions of disease germs on copper. “They started to die literally as soon as they time. He asked relatives and friends to try it. touched the surface,” he said. The handle is curved and finely texThey said it worked for them, too, so he patented CopperZap™ and put it on the tured to improve contact. It kills germs picked up on fingers and hands to protect market. Now tens of thousands of people have you and your family. Copper even kills deadly germs that tried it. Nearly 100% of feedback said the copper stops colds if used within 3 hours have become resistant to antibiotics. If after the first sign. Even up to 2 days, if you are near sick people, a moment of they still get the cold it is milder than usu- handling it may keep serious infection away. al and they feel better. The EPA says copper still works even Pat McAllister, age 70, received one for Christmas and called it “one of the when tarnished. It kills hundreds of difbest presents ever. This little jewel real- ferent disease germs so it can prevent sely works.” Now thousands of users have rious or even fatal illness. CopperZap is made in America of simply stopped getting colds. People often use CopperZap preven- pure copper. It has a 90-day full money tively. Frequent flier Karen Gauci used to back guarantee. It is $69.95. Get $10 off each CopperZap with get colds after crowded flights. Though skeptical, she tried it several times a day code UTCJ7. Go to www.CopperZap.com or call on travel days for 2 months. “Sixteen toll-free 1-888-411-6114. flights and not a sniffle!” she exclaimed. Buy once, use forever. Businesswoman Rosaleen says when advertorial

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November 2019 | Page 15


Try the GetOutPass for giving the gift of experience By Christy Jepson | christy@mycityjournals.com

W

ith the holidays approaching, are you wondering what to get your kids that doesn’t require batteries or USB cords? What about investing in something that guarantees family fun time? What about instead of buying toys that usually last 12 days, you buy something that lasts 12 months? The GetOutPass might be your perfect solution for a new holiday gift this year. The GetOutPass is a fairly new entertainment pass which offers pass holders the opportunity to visit 17 venues in the Salt Lake Valley, 20 venues in Utah County, 13 in Davis/Weber Area, seven in the Logan area, and four venues in the St. George area. You also get a one-time yearly admission to their featured venues: Lagoon, Cowabunga Bay, Brighton Resort, and one Cherry Peak concert ticket. According to their website, some of the venues allow weekly visits, some monthly visits, some quarterly visits and some you visit just once during the 12-month period. The GetOutPass was created in 2017 by three friends: Charles Belliston, TC Krueger and Taggart Krueger. “Our goal was to get

more families out doing more things together. We all felt that too many people were just spending days and evenings at home watching Netflix and playing Fortnite. We decided we needed to come up with a solution, we wanted people out doing things together and creating memories,” said Belliston, one of the cofounders. So, with this goal in mind, the three of them created a statewide pass that allows families the chance to spend more time together while offering more opportunities to visit places they normally wouldn’t visit. They can see their hard work paying off because of the success of the pass since it started two years ago. Utah is not the only place where you can get a GetOutPass. The company has expanded and now offers passes in Idaho, Washington, Colorado and the Sacramento, California area. Although each pass has a different price and offers different attractions and venues, the pass works the same way. “The GetOutPass really is an awesome thing for both families and venues. That’s why it’s such a growing success,” Belliston said.

The Utah GetOutPass is $149.95 per person and includes almost $3,000 in free admissions all year. Some of the Salt Lake area attractions include Cowabunga Bay, Fat Cats, Jump Around Utah, Bazooka Ball, Brighton Ski Resort, Chaos Escape Rooms and more. “We are constantly adding new places for our members to get out and enjoy making memories. Every time a new venue is added, it’s simply a bonus for our members, we never charge anything to our existing members, they simply get the new offers for free,” Belliston said. The up-front cost might seem a little

pricey in comparison to other local passes, but the pass pays for itself if you just go to the four featured venues: Lagoon, Cowabunga Bay, Brighton Resort and Cherry Hill. Then all the other 65 attractions statewide are just an extra bonus while building memories, going to new places and having fun for 12 months. For a list of all the attractions and venues on the Utah GetOutPass and for more information visit getoutpass.com. The pass is good for 12 consecutive months from the date of purchase. l

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74 54-59 2 1 0 8 The GetOutPass offers over 65 attractions statewide, including Lagoon. (Photo courtesy GetOutPass)

Page 16 | November 2019

August

ge 7

2019 | Pa

Millcreek City Journal


City invests $600K in contract to upgrade city planning and support software By Kirk Bradford | k.bradford@mycityjournals.com

130 Years

OF TRUST Taking Care of

YOUR FAMILY’S NEEDS

EVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

L

ast month Millcreek’s city council voted and approved to amend their contract with Tyler Technologies. They’re known for their top-of-the-line government support software programs, one of which is coming to Millcreek. The software, EnerGov, will help the city with planning software and support. It will overhaul Millcreek’s outdated and sometimes frustrating system. It comes with a list of performance upgrades and features, and will automate much of the work that is done manually with the current system. It is projected to eliminate the need for two, possibly three, employees to manually address all of the city’s planning and support paperwork. The current system requires employees to do a large amount of the paperwork individually and requires opening multiple programs to enter and transfer information. For citizens, the upgrade will allow online access and eliminate the need for a trip to the government building in lieu of a technology/software processing fee. The fee hasn’t been disclosed yet; however, in other cities running the EnerGov platform there are some small enough, there isn’t one. Some charge a flat fee of a few dollars and others a percentage of the overall project total in fees. The initial software price will be $131,000 for the first year. This covers the software, training and needed licenses. The

next five years have an anticipated cost of around $95,000 per year. This breaks down to costing a little over $2 each year per citizen without including any fees associated when the services are used. It updates the old system, allowing Millcreek to be fully streamlined with regards to government planning, documentation, work management, city codes, building and planning. All now accessible with modern technological advances and simplification for everyone. In addition to streamlining communications, the EnerGov software also comes with mobile applications. This will allow residents to have a user-friendly interface that automatically sends the transferring request into the appropriate spot: work management, code enforcement, building or planning. Requests can be answered directly without the need for additional manual entry of forms to be delivered downtown. The entire process starting at the very beginning of secure website portal will allow applicants to view the status of their application instantly. Overall, Planning Department Director Jim Hardy said, “Having a system that automates many processes will help staff work and communicate more efficiently and effectively. This will reduce the need for additional staff while maintaining a high level of service to all.” l

Here is a look at the contracts and costs in comparison to other cities who signed a contract with Tyler Technologies to get the Energov software started. At a time when emotions are tender, receiving guidance by someone who has been around and understands your needs can help you find the perfect service.

Larkin Mortuary 260 East South Temple Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801) 363-5781

Larkin Sunset Lawn 2350 East 1300 South Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (801) 582-1582

Larkin Sunset Gardens 1950 East Dimple Dell Road (10600 S.) • Sandy, UT 84092 (801) 571-2771

Larkin Mortuary Riverton 3688 West 12600 South Riverton, UT 84065 (801) 254-4850

Prince George, VA (Pop. 37,809)

Contract costs initially $179,095 plus $19,660 per year for maintenance

Total cost roughly $4.73 year per citizen, then $0.52 a year each year after.

Software fee—no fee listed

Whatcom, WA (Pop 221,404)

Contract costs initially $1,080,239 plus $121,765 per year for maintenance.

Total cost roughly $4.87 year per citizen, then $0.54 a year each year after.

Software fee—3% of total

Millcreek, UT (Pop 60,192)

Contract costs initially $131,000 Plus $95,000 per year for maintenance.

Total cost roughly $2.17 per citizen, then $1.57 a year, each year after.

Software fee has not been disclosed yet.

LarkinMortuary.com MillcreekJournal .com

November 2019 | Page 17


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hanksgiving, aka Turkey Day, is rarely about the turkey anymore, as the percentage of herbivores continues to rise. Thanksgiving isn’t as common anymore either, it seems that “Friendsgiving” is much more prominent. Just as the traditional food and holiday is favoring alternatives, you might need some alternatives for the holiday cooking as well. Since it’s rumored (dare I say, proven?) that the price of turkey spikes for the holiday, let’s find a cheaper alternative for that. Don’t worry, if you’re a diehard carnivore, there’s still meat alternatives for you: which may include stew meat, ham, chicken or fish. Fantastic vegetarian and vegan alternatives exist for everything Thanksgiving. Alternatives to turkey include: cauliflower steaks, pot pie, mushroom Wellington, cauliflower alfredo, gobi musallam (whole roasted cauliflower) and lasagna soup. Alternatives to gravy include: soup, mushroom gravy and onion gravy. Alternatives to stuffing include: stuffed acorn squash or bell peppers, mushroom croissant stuffing and carrot soufflés. Alternatives to mashed potatoes include cauliflower gratin, mac and cheese (preferably topped with bread crumbs), sweet potatoes and scalloped corn casserole. And well, as long as you’re not tossing milk and meat into everything you’re cooking, you won’t need to alter your favorite recipe for green bean casserole, dinner rolls,

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cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. Luckily, there are many dishes that can appease both the carnivores and herbivores. Sometimes, you just need to split the batch of whatever you’re cooking in half; leaving half for the vegetarians and vegans and half for the carnivores. Pizza, pasta, rice bowls and mashed potatoes all work great for compromise dishes. (Please be mindful of the kitchenware you’re using when cooking these dishes as some vegetarians have nightmares about cross-contamination.) Make sure not to forget the salad! Thanksgiving is a great time to get crazy with salads. Go fruity with a grape salad, a Honeycrisp apple salad, a pear salad, pomegranate salad or a mango-berry salad. Throw some fruit on top of your leafy greens, and you can’t go wrong. Or get rid of those leafy greens altogether and make a “fluffs” or Jell-O salad. If you go this route though, read the ingredients on the package—some fluff’s and Jell-O’s are not vegan friendly. Now, if you haven’t jumped onboard with Friendsgiving yet, consider this your formal invitation. It’s a holiday-themed event centered around fantastic food and friends that doesn’t involve the risk of (politically-charged) arguments with the relatives. If you are hosting or attending a Friendsgiving, you have more options. Since Friendsgiving usually functions more like a potluck, the more extravagant you get with

your food choice(s), the better. Everyone will think about bringing a salad, or potatoes or a pie. Don’t be the person to bring another replica side dish. To avoid duplicates, start a Google doc, or other shareable document, with your friends in advance. You might want to plot out the desired courses in advance: appetizers, mains, sides, drinks, desserts, etc. Then, everyone can play to their strengths. The friend that is strictly carnivore can bring the meat options. And the friend that is strictly vegan can bring the vegan options. The friend that has a dessert Instagram account can bring their homemade cake. And the bartender friend can bring the drinks. When utilizing the Google doc, make sure to note any allergies or other dietary restrictions anyone might have. No one wants to spend their holiday worrying about the availability of an EpiPen. In addition, if there’s going to be a good mix of carnivores, vegetarians and vegans, cookers might want to consider dividing their batches in half, one to include meat and one to exclude any meat or dairy, as mentioned above. And remember folks, whether you’re attending a traditional Thanksgiving or alternative Friendsgiving, please remember to be a good guest. Ask the host what they need help with when you arrive, make sure to help clean up before you leave and, last but not least, express your thanks.

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Millcreek City Journal


Don’t Forget November

S

andwiched between October and December, November is the bologna of months. Everyone pulls it out, gives it a sniff, then tosses it in the trash. Once Halloween is over, we blast into a frenzy of Christmas shopping and decorating, forgetting all about this beautiful month full of autumn leaves, crisp apples and carb overload. We need a marketing team to change the perception of November from “Brownish month when we count our blessings” to “A kaleidoscope of excitement. And pie.” Okay, maybe “kaleidoscope” is overkill, and it’s hard to spell, but you get the idea. Thanksgiving continues its reign as the best holiday between Halloween and Christmas but even the cherished turkey day has its opponents. It’s almost impossible to tell the origin story of Thanksgiving without pissing someone off. Let’s just say people living in America (probably not its original name) in the 1600s created the first Chuck-A-Rama, minus the carrot-filled Jell-O. In the U.S., any holiday that has the tagline “An Attitude of Gratitude” is doomed from the start but what if we created a terrifying mascot? People like threats and merchandising. What if Gerta the Ghoulishly Grateful Goose (sold as a freakish Beanie Babies stuffed animal) flies into your bedroom on Thanksgiving Eve to make sure you’re being thankful. Not enough gratitude? She pecks your forehead and flies off with your pumpkin pies. Instead of Elf on the Shelf, how about

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Goose on the Loose? You read it here first, people. What else happens in November . . . ? Election Day! The first Tuesday after the first Monday when the moon is full and pythons are mating, is set aside for foreign nations to measure success by screwing up election results with fake social media content. As opposed, to genuine social media content. Consider this year a dry-run for the 2020 Apocalyptic Election to End all Elections. Black Friday is also in November. What if we protest Black Friday sales and refuse to shop or decorate for Christmas until, call me crazy, December 1? Christmas is sneaky. Once you allow Christmas tree lots to set up in November, it’s an easy slide into year-round Christmas where everyone is miserable and broke. Charles Dickens could (posthumously) pen a story where we learn Ebenezer Scrooge was right all along, perhaps titled, “A Christmas Peril.” Movember is also a thing where men are encouraged to grow moustaches to raise awareness for the importance of shaving – and men’s health issues. A group of women have also sworn to stop shaving for the month. That group is called Europe. The first Wednesday in November is Stress Awareness Day, created by parents who realize Christmas is weeks away and their children are reaching frenetic levels of idiocy. Maybe November needs its own alcoholic beverage that we start drinking on this day.

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How about a mulled cider with a tequila chaser called the No No November? Veteran’s Day is cool. World Kindness Day is super nice. But let’s tackle the real meaning of November. Pie. Pie is the reason for November. With harvest foods like apples and pumpkins and peaches and pears and banana cream, pie in November is as necessary as breathing, especially if breathing is slathered in homemade whipped cream or served a la mode. So instead of treating November like it’s some type of disgusting mystery meat, can we agree it’s at least hamburger, maybe even a sirloin? Who knows, if we keep slapping Christmas back to its own month we might even enjoy the leaves, the apples – and the pie. Always the pie.

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$

ITEM 63878/63991 64005/69567/60566 63601/67227 shown

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/1/20 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

NOW

• 1.4mm tip included

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/1/20*

SAVE $ 44%

13

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/1/20*

900 WATT MAX. STARTING 20 OZ. GRAVITY FEED 2 CYCLE GAS POWERED AIR SPRAY GUN Customer Rating GENERATOR Customer Rating

SAVE $ 16

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

PERFORMANCE $ 52 MODEL: W2364 TOOL

*76850567 * 76850567

SUPER COUPON

• 5 hour run time @ 50% capacity

$

COMPARE TO

ITEM 62234/61917 shown

Item 56387, 64096, 56386 56392, 56393, 56394

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/1/20*

COMPARE TO

• Fits up to 32" x 9" tires

99

MODEL: KRBC10TBPC

WITH ANY PURCHASE

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT

NOW

YOUR CHOICE OF 6 COLORS

20% OFF

FREE

• Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3 - AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

1250 LB. VEHICLE POSITIONING DOLLY

• 12,600 cu. in. of storage • 580 lb. capacity Customer Rating

99 $139

SUPER BRIGHT LED /SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

Millcreek 167950

SUPER COUPON

SALT LAKE CITY (801) 484-9556 3470 South State Street

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

10/16/19 10:43 AM

Profile for The City Journals

MIllcreek City Journal NOV 2019  

Millcreek City Journal NOV 2019

MIllcreek City Journal NOV 2019  

Millcreek City Journal NOV 2019

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