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November 2020 | Vol. 20 Iss. 11

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BACKYARD MIDVALE HAUNT JOINS FORCES WITH KUWAHARA’S PUMPKIN PATCH IN DRAPER By Sarah Morton Taggart | s.taggart@mycityjournals.com

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ome Midvale residents might remember a backyard haunted house called Scared Haunt that began in October 2010 and went on hiatus after 2016. This year the renamed Thriller Manor frightened young and old alike at a new location at Kuwahara’s Pumpkin Patch and Thriller Park in Draper. After retiring from designing sets and co-owning a professional haunted house, Max Burton’s daughter talked him into setting up a small haunt in her yard. The following year he bought a house across the street and expanded the haunt. Spencer Mears, a neighbor, offered to help with puppets, lighting, sound effects and security. The show was wildly popular, with new rooms and special effects each year. The haunt was featured in local radio and television news programs, but also raised concerns among neighbors. After six years, the haunt had grown to 4,500 square feet and attracted as many as 5,000 visitors per season. The show had outgrown Burton’s yard on Princeton Avenue and he couldn’t find a more suitable location. After an unsuccessful Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign and other attempts to raise funds to lease a building, Burton decided to put the show up for sale. But two days before he was planning to post the listing, Burton met Alex Kuwahara and suddenly there was a feasible way to keep his haunted house running. “My son-in-law came out for an interview to work in the nursery on Aug. 8,” Burton said. “I saw them starting to set up the pumpkin patch and we got to talking. It was just a chance meeting. They say that sometimes God wakes up and smiles at someone. Well, that day he smiled and pointed at me and Alex.”

“We heard people say after going through that they could tell who the real people were because they were wearing masks,” said Autumn Burton. “So we put masks on the dummies.” (Sarah Morton Taggart/City Journals)

Burton began setting up on Sept. 1 and opened the show on Sept. 25. Kuwahara and his family have been operating Kuwahara’s Pumpkin Patch and Thriller Park at their farm at 12153 S. 700 West in Draper for years. The annual tradition includes

live performances, paintball, food trucks, activities for kids and more. “This year we partnered with Scared Haunt to make our haunted house portion of our fall fest even better,” said a Facebook post by Kuwahara Wholesale. “Some of the proceeds go Continued page 7

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Volunteers pick up trash during informal cleanup day in Midvale By Sarah Morton Taggart | s.taggart@mycityjournals.com

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arret Casey walked past trash every day on his way to work or to buy groceries. He kept noticing litter hot spots all around Midvale. It kept on bugging him, so he picked a day and invited other residents to help him clean it up. Casey created a Facebook event called “Midvale Trash Cleanup” and posted it to the Midvale Residents’ Facebook group. The invite said to meet in the parking lot behind the Midvale Performing Arts Center on Sept. 20 at 8 a.m. More than 70 people expressed interest, and 11 of them showed up ready to help. Lindsey Doe brought her 4-year-old son to help with the cleanup. “We’re doing preschool at home, so I was excited for a chance to do service,” Doe said. “I want to teach him to take pride in where we live.” Doe had also noticed the trash accumulating around Midvale. “I see it when I drive, but I keep driving,” Doe said. “Then I see it again and keep driving. This was the push I needed to stop and do something.” Casey had never organized an event like this before, so he asked his mother, Mary Casey of Ogden, to help. She used to arrange community projects when she worked for UPS. She set up refreshments and asked that everyone sign a release form before starting. The mother and son handed out gloves, brooms and trash bags and divided the volunteers into groups. One group started at the Jordan River trailhead at 7800 South and ended up on Bingham Junction Blvd. One group worked its way down Center Street from Main Street to Grant Street, and Doe’s group tackled State Street at 7800 South. “We covered one block of State Street on both sides and filled up three trash bags,” Doe said. “Lots of people stopped to say thank you. It makes me want to do this all

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the time.” Casey spent around $60 on gloves, masks, trash bags and refreshments for the volunteers. “It was totally worth it,” Casey said. “And there’s a lot left over for next time.” After working for more than two hours, the volunteers returned to the parking lot and pooled the bags of trash they had collected to

be disposed in a private dumpster Casey had access to. Casey has only lived in Midvale since December 2019, but he already feels a strong affection for the city. “The charm of it reminds me of Ogden,” Casey said. “I love how it’s centrally located, and you’ve got two TRAX lines.” Casey plans to do future cleanup days,

A group of Midvale residents gather to pick up litter on Sept. 20. (Sarah Morton Taggart/City Journals)

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The Midvale City Journal is a monthly publication distributed directly to residents via the USPS as well as locations throughout Midvale. For information about distribution please email brad.c@thecityjournals.com or call our offices. Rack locations are also available on our website. The views and opinions expressed in display advertisements do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Loyal Perch Media or the City Journals. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the owner. © 2019 Loyal Perch Media, Inc.

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including another one this fall. He hopes to gather more participants in order to cover more areas of the city. Anyone wishing to join can check the Midvale Residents’ Facebook group for details. “I’m heartened by the commitment of everyone who showed up to beautify the area,” Casey said. “Even such seemingly small efforts can really add up.” l

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Tokyo Teriyaki 7121 S. Bingham Jct Blvd Suite 102, Midvale, UT

Business Spotlights are a service offered to our advertisers to help them inform our readers about their businesses. For information on scheduling a Spotlight, please call us at 801-254-5974 or email us at ryan.c@thecityjournals.com

Between living in three different countries and just as many states, Raymond Wang never lost sight of what was important to him: family. Over the past 40 years, Wang has utilized his passion for cooking to provide a life for his family within Utah. Tokyo Teriyaki is a local family owned eatery. The restaurant offers a causal modern version of Japanese far, serving authentic rice and noodle bowls. The dishes are the culmination of over fifty years in the restaurant industry. Wang was originally born in Taiwan but moved to France where he worked for as a server for many years. As soon as he could, he moved across the world. He worked in restaurants in New York while becoming accustomed to the new country. Then, he moved to Los Angeles and worked in local restaurants there. When considering retirement, he decided that Utah would be a good place to pass on the chef’s hat. “He built the American dream for his family,” said Tom Cobb, Wang’s son-in-law. “He’s a genuine good person.” Cobb expressed how important family is to Wang as he hopes the restaurants will help his family thrive. And indeed, his family does as well. “His legacy is key,” said Cobb during a brief moment between cooking multiple orders. Closing his laptop where he works on his own career during downtime, Cobb explained “his legacy is for the grandkids. He wants this to benefit the future generations of the family.” Wang previously owned Kowloon Café in West Valley. However, when considering retirement he realized that Kowloon Café was much too big of an operation and decided to shift to smaller, more manageable, restaurants. Kowloon Café closed in spring of 2019. Tokyo Teriyaki takes on casual theme of dining. All of the dishes, including rice and noodle bowls, are cooked to order with high-

grade cut meat, vegetables, and noodles. Customers can choose between brown rice, fried rice, white rice, yakisoba noodes or all veggies with no carbs. All of the sauces are made in-house as well. “We cook real yakisoba noodles fresh. We don’t use generic spaghetti noodles.” This elevates the quality of the food in the dish. “It takes a little longer to cook, but the quality of the food is better,” said Cobb. The chicken teriyaki bowl is the staple dish for Tokyo Teriyaki. However, Cobb recommends the steak and shrimp bowl. “The protein is cooked in a light batter so there’s a crispy texture.” “The potsitckers (gyoza) are my favorite. I usually eat at least two per day,” said Cobb. Admittedly, he said he could eat six each day and it’s a constant fight. Don’t worry vegetarians! Tokyo Teriyaki has options for you too! There are many varieties of tofu bowls to construct. The tofu Tokyo Teriyaki uses is non-gmo and an American-based product. “We cook fresh for every bowl. We don’t re-prep cooked product,” said Cobb. Tokyo Teriyaki is always thinking about how to improve their menu. In the future, they plan to bring tayaki, a donut pastry, to their menu. In addition, they offer many flavors of boba, including thai tea and viet iced coffee. “We are thinking about adding one of Kowloon’s cult favorite items, egg foo young with brown gravy,” explained Connie Wang. Tokyo Teriyaki is emphasizing quality, safety, and consistency. As many local businesses are suffering from the pandemic, the Tokyo Teriyaki team “hopes that the public is able to support local businesses through these trying times.” Tokyo Teriyaki is a locally owned and operated business emphasizing quality, safety, and consistency. “We don’t have corporate

backing; we don’t have big conglomerators paying without the local public,” Cobb explained. Despite these challenging times, Wang and Cobb’s family are determined to persist, mentioning how many family members might go without regular paychecks. Staying safe during the pandemic has been of top priority. Tokyo Teriyaki ahs been implementing safe procedures such as masking, gloving, and sanitizing. Whether the preference is to dine-in, pick-up, or get delivery through Door Dash or Grub Hub, Tokyo Teriyaki has made each of those options as safe as possible. “Everyone is being cautious.” “We are trying to keep it going,” he said as he mentioned how he and his wife work without regular paychecks. To learn more about Tokyo Teriyaki or order delivery, visit their website at www.tokyoteriyakiutah.com For business information and weekly promotional deals, visit their Facebook page at Tokyo Teriyaki.

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UPD, Midvale resume budget talks By Erin Dixon | e.dixon@mycityjournals.com

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019 and 2020 were rocky years between Midvale and Unified Police Department (UPD). Midvale joined UPD in 2012 to cut costs from providing their own police force. In the springs of 2019 and 2020, UPD increased its membership fee for all participating cities it serves. The increased costs sparked a long discussion in Midvale City Council whether it might be cheaper to fund their own police force again. For more information about past discussions between Midvale and UPD, see articles below. 2019: https://www.midvalejournal. com/2019/06/13/201700/midvale-city-budget-increases-and-continuation-with-unified-police, https://www.midvalejournal. com/2019/05/20/200124/midvale-contemplates-funding-their-own-police-force. 2020: https://www.midvalejournal. com/2020/06/11/317964/midvale-grapples-with-police-cost, https://www.midvalejournal.com/2020/06/29/319634/ midvale-police-chief-residents-sharethoughts-on-state-of-police-work-inthe-city, https://www.midvalejournal. com/2020/07/27/323130/midvale-to-staywith-upd-but-concerns-remain. UPD Chief Jason Mazuran said the board and the financial officers have been working to improve their processes this year so member cities won’t be blindsided by

Midvale UPD update: UPD attempts to clarify budgets in hopes in response to Midvale City Council concerns over budget transparency. (Photo courtesy Unified Police Department of Greater Salt Lake)

cost increases. “The big thing we’re working on is making sure our budget numbers are understandable, clear and highly transparent. Now that we’ve been able to recreate the budget in a document that we like, we’re going to get those budget numbers out, with direction from the UPD board, in the December and January time frame...so other entities can start planning their budgets,” Mazuran said. Councilmember Justin Gettel was pleased to see the budget changes. “I think it

looks great. I appreciate the look at the numbers. Hopefully, we can do this on a regular basis so it doesn’t come up to crisis level like last year.” “Most of the change was to make it really organized to open up a budget book and say it’s right there,” Mazuran said. Previous budgets were prepared and presented by different financial officers, which may explain the change in budget process. Brittany Karzen, director of communications for the Salt Lake County Sher-

iff’s Office said, “Lisa Dudley became the new CFO of UPD in August of 2018. Her diligent efforts and approach to accounting has resulted in the new budget format that is easier to understand.” One cause of increasing costs is fueled by many new officers leaving for other private entity jobs. Recently, careers for police officers are higher risk and lower pay. UPD wants to give active officers incentive to stay. Chief Financial Officer Lisa Dudley said, “The UPD board’s goal is to get officers pay up into the top one-third of the [local] market in a three- to five-year period. “Most of our neighboring agencies did not give hourly increases [because of COVID] to their officers. UPD officers have been given 2% so that helped us in reaching that goal,” Dudley said. Though budgets have always been publicly available through the Utah State Auditor’s website (https://reporting.auditor. utah.gov/searchreport), it was hard to track where each dollar was being spent. Prior to fiscal year 2020, the budget was presented to the UPD Board in a summary format. “We need to show the importance and relationship of shared services to the patrol functions that we do. It’s a symbiotic relationship where what happens to shared services happens to the precinct operations and vice versa,” Mazuran said. l

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Continued from front page toward benefitting Shriners Hospitals for Children in Salt Lake.” In addition to sharing space, Burton and Kuwahara shared people and skills. “When I got out here we grew into a big family,” Burton said. “We trade actors when we need help. I build for him, he builds for me. We combined the two shows.” Thriller Manor featured a series of semi-enclosed outdoor rooms and hallways plus a spooky walk through a corn maze. At one point participants passed through a mausoleum built of foam bricks that was once the entrance to the Scared Haunt in Midvale. Terrifying dummies alternated with actors who would jump out. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, all actors wore masks to cover their nose and mouth. “We heard people say after going through that they could tell who the real people were because they were wearing masks,” said Autumn Burton, Max Burton’s daughter. “So we put masks on the dummies.” A section of the corn stalks had to be reinforced after frightened guests tried to crash through it to get away from a particularly scary actor. Thriller Manor also let kids of all ages who aren’t quite as brave tour the show from 5 to 7 p.m. “We don’t jump out at them,” Burton said. “The lights are on and the kids can just look at the props. I tell them the only thing that’s real is my beard.” With the move to Kuwahara Farms, Burton was able to start charging $10 per ticket. The show also operates seven days a week through the end of October, which is a lot to coordinate when it requires 30 to 40 actors each night. All actors began as volunteers, but the show was successful enough in the early weeks to pay some of them. Burton hopes to pay all of the actors next year and have them work on a set schedule. “I’d say that two-thirds of our staff are family members,” Burton said. “My cousins, who are real old-timers, come out and we are terrifying. We come at you from everywhere. I don’t need screams in my soundtrack. When you hear someone scream, that’s real.” The age of actors in the original show ranged in age from 2 to 82. This year, the actors included four generations of one family. “The 4-year-old buries barbie dolls in the dirt,” Burton said. “Her mom, great-grandma and grandpa are all in the show.” The original haunt was not able to charge money due to its location in a residential area, so instead they asked for donations of food or cash. Mears estimated that the show collected thousands of pounds of food for a local food pantry and over $1,000 for Shriners Hospitals. The haunt was also a haven for kids that didn’t fit in anywhere else. “A cousin’s daughters were dropping out of high school,” Burton said. “They were done. They were teased for being goth girls. But when classmates saw them in the show, they were suddenly cool. Now one is in the FBI, the

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other is an attorney and the other wants to be a public defender.” Burton also invited children from the neighborhood to volunteer as actors. “We had low-income kids working the show and bringing in food for their families,” Burton said. “We do this as a family and treat all the kids like our own.” Mears echoed that sentiment in a Facebook post. “In the haunted house we put on, we took at-risk youth…We gave them a safe place to be able to make friends and feel accepted. I’m so glad to hear that doing something fun for the community had resulted in helping some of our local youth turn their lives around and be in a better place than they started.” Burton also scared people as a teenager, if in a somewhat less organized way. “I’ve been scaring my whole life,” Burton said. “Back in the ’60s at the Fort Union Cemetery I had a grave hollowed out that I would play in.” He also claims to be a prankster behind the urban legends of the haunted Old Mill near Big Cottonwood Canyon. Burton grew up just outside Midvale in what is now Cottonwood Heights and began working for his father and brother. “I’ve had a crazy career,” Burton said. “Same boss, 30 different jobs.” The jobs ranged from collecting rare bird eggs to building highend custom houses. Along the way, Burton raised three daughters. “My two older daughters joined haunted houses as volunteers,” he said. “That’s how I got started in haunting. I started hanging around, started building things. My daughters grew up, went to school, and I stayed.” His youngest daughter, Autumn, who lives in Riverton is now owner of Scared Haunt. She attended the Academy of Art in San Francisco and uses her skills to build props and design backgrounds. One of her specialties is creating elaborate corpse sculptures. She starts with a cheap plastic skeleton from a Halloween-theme store and builds layers of toilet paper, latex and painter’s plastic to create what looks like rotting flesh. “We’re here every day,” Burton said. “We get here at 11 in the morning and get home at 11 at night. But I live for this. I’ll be so exhausted I can’t even open my eyes. But that first person of the night that I scare…the adrenaline. I’m good for the month.” Even with the hard work and long hours, Burton wouldn’t have it any other way. “You’ll find me on Christmas morning in the basement building coffins.”l

Staff from Kuwahara Farms carved tombstones used in Thriller Manor. (Sarah Morton Taggart/City Journals)

November 2020 | Page 7


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Hillcrest Adaptive PE class provides equality for all students By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

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STEP STEP 1 STEP 1 1 STEP 1 STEP 1 STEP 1 STEP 1 antibodies Obtain from those whowho Obtain Obtain antibodies antibodies from those from those who An adoptive PE class at Hillcrest High will have both students and their peers practicing sports together, similar to how the school’s unified basketball program works, as seen here in January 2019. (Julie Slama/ City Journals)

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his spring, Hillcrest High will hold an adaptive PE class for both students with special needs and for their peers, playing side-by-side. “It will be similar to unified sports, with our students in the same class,” said teacher Shannon Hurst, who pushed for and designed the course. “Other schools have an adaptive PE class, so I pushed to have the same.” The course will introduce team sports such as volleyball, basketball and soccer— and possibly some racquet sports and even Frisbee or bowling—with modified equipment she already is purchasing. “We may use a beach ball instead of a volleyball or a smaller soccer ball or women’s basketball and learn the basic skills and practice those together,” she said. “Any time we work on skills, if we aren’t oneto-one, we’d have a partner for every one to three athletes. After we learn the skills and rules first, my vision is that we’d play a modified game together.” Hurst said that by having the unified sports team members in the class, it would help with practices as it can be difficult for students to stay afterschool. She still would hold practices once per week afterschool so others could participate as the class would be optional and carry an elective credit. Hillcrest currently offers unified coed

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Human bloodHuman can beblood broken can down be broken into many down parts intolike many liquid parts plasma, like liquid which plasma, which Human blood Human can be broken blood can down be into broken many down parts into like many liquid parts plasma, like liquid which plasma, which contains antibodies. When the body becomes infected a virus, the containsHuman antibodies. contains When antibodies. body When becomes the body infected becomes with infected awith virus, the with a virus, blood can bethe broken down into many parts like liquid which thewhich Human blood can be broken down into many parts likeplasma, liquid plasma, contains antibodies. contains When antibodies. the body When becomes the body infected becomes with a infected virus, the with a virus, the antibodies learn from the disease, then evolve toit.beat it. When someone antibodies learn antibodies from the learn disease, from then the disease, evolve to then beat evolve When to beat someone it. When someone contains antibodies. When the body becomes infected with a virus, the contains antibodies. When bodytobecomes infected with a virus, the antibodies learn antibodies from thelearn disease, from then thethe evolve disease, then beatevolve it. When to beat someone it. When someone recovers from COVID-19, they will have the antibodies inplasma their plasma to fight recoversantibodies fromrecovers COVID-19, from they COVID-19, will have they the will antibodies have the inbeat antibodies their in their to fight plasma to fight learn from the disease, then evolve to it. When antibodies learn from disease, then evolve to beat it.someone When someone recovers from recovers COVID-19, from they COVID-19, willthe have they the antibodies will have the in their antibodies plasma into their fight plasma to fight off the virus. recovers fromvirus. COVID-19, they will have the antibodies in their plasma to fight off the virus. off the recovers from COVID-19, they will have the antibodies in their plasma to fight off the virus. off the virus. You must off theprovide virus. a valid photo ID, proof of your current address and your Social the virus.card to donate. Must be 18 years of age or older to donate. Immigration Security oroff

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basketball during the winter and unified EXPIRES 11/30/2020 coed soccer in the spring to its athletes and partners. Hurst coaches those as well as as- STEP 2 STEP 2 sists with the cross country team in theSTEP fall. 2STEP STEP 2 2 Separate convalescent plasma STEP 2 Separate STEPconvalescent 2 Separate convalescent plasma plasma “We’ll incorporate some running as Separate convalescent plasma Separate convalescent plasma into its components part of the warm up and make the into class Separate Separate convalescent convalescent plasma plasma its into components its components intointo its components its components and games fun and competitive,” Hurst into its into components itsis similar components Plasma donation to giving blood, except the blood is cycled through a said, adding a lot of it will have to “goPlasma with donation Plasma is similar donation to giving is similar blood, toofgiving except blood, the blood except is cycled the blood through isthe cycled a through a special machine that some the plasma before returning blood Plasma Plasma donation is similar topulls giving blood, except theout blood is cycled through a donation is similar to giving blood, except the blood is cycled through a special that machine pulls some that of pulls the plasma some ofout the before plasma returning out before thereturning blood blood a the flow” this year as she introduces themachine cellsspecial back the body. there, we can use special technology to separate Plasma donation Plasma isto similar donation to giving isFrom similar blood, to giving except blood, the blood except is the cycled blood through isthe cycled athethrough special machine that pulls some of the plasma out before returning the blood special machine that pulls some of the plasma out before returning blood cells back to cells the body. back From to the there, body. we From can there, use special we can technology use special to technology separate to separate theto plasma into different components, one of which is the antibodies that can special machine special pulls some that of pulls the some plasma ofcan out the before plasma returning out before the returning blood the blood new concepts and is uncertain in January, cells back tomachine the body. From there, use special technology to separate cells back thethat body. From there, we canwe use special technology to separate the plasma into different plasma into components, different components, one which one is the of antibodies which is the that antibodies can toyears that can defeat the virus. Plasma donation isof aof well-established process with cells back tothe cells the body. back From the body. there, From we can there, use special weof can use special to technology separate separate the plasma intoto different components, one which the antibodies that can the plasma into different components, one which istechnology the is antibodies thatmany can what guidelines will be in place with the defeat theofvirus. defeat Plasma the regarding virus. donation Plasma is a donation well-established is a well-established with many years with many knowledge safety for donors. the plasma into thethe plasma different into components, different components, one ofwell-established which one isprocess the of which antibodies is process the that antibodies can that years can defeat virus. Plasma donation isthe a process with many years defeat the virus. Plasma donation is a well-established process with many years COVID-19 pandemic. ofdefeat knowledge of regarding knowledge safety regarding for the safety donors. for is the donors. the virus. defeat Plasma theregarding virus. donation Plasma a donation well-established a well-established process withprocess many years with many years of knowledge safety for the donors. of knowledge regarding safety foristhe donors. Hurst began pushing for the class in of knowledge of regarding knowledge safety regarding for the safety donors. for the donors. spring 2018 after observing students with STEP 3 special needs using the music hallway 20 STEP STEP 3 3 3into a medicine to to 30 minutes once per week as a space for Convert STEP 3 STEP STEPConvert 3 Convert STEP 3 into a amedicine PE. a medicine treat patients Convert Convert into ainto medicine into medicine toto toto “They deserve equal space,” she said. Convert Convert into a into medicine a medicine to to treat patients treat patients treat patients treat patients “Inclusion is a big thing with our unified We can purify and concentrate the antibodies collected from donated plasma treat patients treat patients Your local Grifols plasma Donor Center is NOW accepting to develop a special medicine for still sick with COVID-19 or possibly program and with our school. We need to We can and concentrate thethose antibodies collected from donated plasma plasma Wepurify can purify and concentrate the antibodies collected from donated We can purifythose We andcan concentrate purify and the concentrate antibodies the collected antibodies from collected donated from plasma donated plasma protect who have not been infected. With this medicine, doctors will to develop a special medicine for those still sickstill with COVID-19 or possibly to develop a special medicine for those sick with COVID-19 or possibly push for and provide equality.” We canhave purify We and can concentrate purify and concentrate the antibodies the collected antibodies from collected donated from plasma donated plasma from people who have recovered from COVID-19. to develop a special to develop medicine a special for those medicine still sick for those with COVID-19 still sick with or possibly COVID-19 or possibly a consistent precise dosing of theWith antibodies that candoctors fight COVID-19 protect those those whoand have not been infected. this medicine, will protect who have not been infected. With this medicine, doctors will to develop a to special develop medicine a special for medicine those still for sick those with still COVID-19 sick with or COVID-19 possibly or possibly Parent Julie Cluff said she has seen the protect those protect who have those not who been have infected. not been With infected. this medicine, With this doctors medicine, will doctors will to possibly help them get back to lifeof faster or serve asthat a temporary defense have a consistent and precise dosing the antibodies can fight COVID-19 have a consistent and precise dosing of the antibodies that will candoctors fight COVID-19 protect those protect who have those not who been have infected. not been With infected. this medicine, With this doctors medicine, haveCOVID-19, auntil consistent haveand aisconsistent precise dosing and precise of the antibodies dosing of the that antibodies canare fight that COVID-19 can fight will COVID-19 a vaccine developed. students using the hallway by the auditoriIf you don't have your plasma donations still to possibly help them get back to life faster or serve as a temporary defense to possibly help them get of back to life of fasterthat or serve as that a temporary have a consistent have a and consistent precise and dosing the dosing antibodies can fight fightdefense COVID-19 to possibly help to them possibly help back them toprecise life get faster back ortoserve life the faster as antibodies a temporary or serve asCOVID-19 defense a can temporary defense until auntil vaccine is get developed. um and music hall for PE. a vaccine is them developed. needed to treat ais to multitude of illnesses. to possibly help to until possibly get help back get life faster back to orlife serve faster as aortemporary serve as adefense temporary defense until a patients vaccine isthem developed. a with vaccine developed. “It’s sad,” she said. “This is a step foruntil a vaccine until is a developed. vaccine is developed. ward. She (Hurst) has done a great job with basketball and soccer the last few years. New donors visit www.grifolsplasma.com to She really understands the kids. I’m hoping This medicine is thethe This This isis the it will be more of PE class in the gym, with find a Grifols Donation center near Thismedicine medicine Thismedicine medicine theisis the you. This medicine This medicine is the is the their peers next to them, helping them. This kind of PE class has never happened here before.” l Tomore find out donating in our COVID-19 Convalescent For infomore visit -about WWW.GRIFOLSPLASMA.COM/EN/ENDCV19 Program call (866) 363-2819.

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Midvale City Journal


In The Middle of Everything City Hall – 7505 South Holden Street • Midvale, UT 84047

The Heart of the Matter

MIDVALE CITY DIRECTORY City Hall Finance/Utilities Court City Attorney’s Office City Recorder/Human Resources Community Development Public Works Ace Disposal/Recycling City Museum Midvale Senior Center SL County Animal Services Police Dispatch Unified Fire Authority Fire Dispatch Communications

801-567-7200 801-567-7200 801-567-7265 801-567-7250 801-567-7228 801-567-7211 801-567-7235 801-363-9995 801-569-8040 385-468-3350 385-468-7387 801-743-7000 801-743-7200 801-840-4000 801-567-7230

MIDVALE CITY ELECTED OFFICIALS MAYOR Robert Hale Email: Rhale@midvale.com

801-567-7204

CITY COUNCIL District 1 - Quinn Sperry Email: qsperry@midvale.com District 2 - Paul Glover Email: pglover@midvale.com District 3 - Heidi Robinson Email: Hrobinson@midvale.com District 4 - Bryant Brown Email: bbrown@midvale.com District 5 - Dustin Gettel Email: dgettel@midvale.com

I hope you were apprised of the commendation appearance of Hillcrest High School students, faculty and parents in the editorial, “Students catch the vision”, of the Deseret News, 10 October 2020. I could have “burst my buttons” in pride that the success and maturity of the student body of Hillcrest were recognized by a widely circulated regional newspaper. Huskies: You are doing hard things by simple methods! Congratulations! A look back over the last nine months to the arrival of COVID-19 on our shores and in the lives of our State, is an interesting display of how human nature intertwines with this parasitic virus. A leech and a freeloader, COVID-19 requires a willing host. Without access to the host, the virus succumbs to a quick death, usually within a few hours. With access to the ultimate host – a human being – it seeks to puncture into susceptible cells where it quickly multiplies by the millions, literally killing the host organ and the human body defenses sent to eradicate the invader. Much like what happens in a variety of the video games that have been popular among our youth for the last twenty years, without sufficient “good guys” to fight back, the “bad guys” overwhelm wholesome defenses and we falter in our health. Not good! In Midvale, our initial collective fear, or consciousness, or patience, or trust that this pandemic would be short-lived has begun to wear thin. Some individuals, families and groups are becoming impatient. Our little itty-bitty enemy, COVID-19, has been on a re-

By Mayor Robert Hale

Election Day Vote Centers (Voting in person) Vote Centers will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Voters who are eligible to vote in the election may vote at ANY of the Vote Centers listed on the website below on Election Day. Valid Identification is required. WWW.MidvaleCity.org/Vote2020

801-567-7200 801-567-7202 801-567-7202 801-567-7212 801-567-7207 801-567-7265 801-567-7202 801-567-7213 801-567-7246 801-567-7235 801-256-2575 801-567-7231 801-567-7208 801-567-7228 385-468-9769

EMERGENCY OR DISASTER CONTACT Public Works Fire Dispatch – Unified Fire Authority Midvale Police Precinct or Police Dispatch Unified Police Department EMERGENCY

CITY NEWSLETTER

bound because some of our youth and their parents have relaxed their guard and their standards. Perhaps some of us feel that if we haven’t become infected by now, we must be microbiologically strong enough that we are immune to COVID-19. Not so! We are sending nearly ten new cases for medical treatment per day. That’s too many! We have been blessed in one measurement: through the 10th of October, there have been only four COVID-19-related deaths of our citizens. Four families which need much comforting! We have about 25 individuals that are currently hospitalized from the effects of the virus. That is serious! Youth and athletes who fall victim to this virus will forever have to wonder in their future if a common cold, or a more serious lung or heart problem was a result of latent effects of the virus. Not a pleasant vision. With the holidays upon us now, I want to warn and forewarn you individually and as families: Wash your hands regularly; Wear a mask when you associate with others beside immediate family outside of your home; Stay at a safe 6 feet distance from others and wear a mask. These preventatives are so simple and effective. My challenge to this City: Let us do these simple things! (1) Wear a mask, (2) Maintain social distancing, (3) Wash our hands frequently. We will come to the end of these particular trying times. It will not come before the end of 2020. It will come later in this decade. If we do our parts, it won’t matter quite as much whether others are or are not doing their parts to preserve community health. We can, nonetheless, determine to individually manage our own health. Let’s do it!

WHO TO CALL FOR… Water Bills Ordering A New Trash Can Reserving the Bowery Permits GRAMA requests Court Paying For Traffic School Business Licensing Property Questions Cemetery Water Line Breaks Planning and Zoning Code Enforcement Building inspections Graffiti

NOVEMBER 2020

801-567-7235 801-840-4000 385-468-9350 801-743-7000

911

VOTE-BY-MAIL DROP OFF BALLOTS Your ballot must be Voters may drop off their vote-by-mail ballot at an official Drop Box where ballots can be deposited postmarked by November 2, 2020. 24/7 until 8:00 p.m. on Election Night. Voters may also drop off their vote-by-mail ballot at a Vote Center during polling hours (7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.). Voters don't need to wait in line to deposit their vote-by-mail ballot at an Election Day Vote Center.

Midvale City Hall is an official Vote Center. There is an official Drop Box located on the west side of City Hall. Questions? Call the Salt Lake County Election Division at 385-got-vote (385-468-8683)


In The Middle of Everything

WWW . MIDVALECITY . ORG

Winter Weather Response – Midvale City Snow Crews are ready for Winter! Midvale City snow crews are dedicated to clearing the streets of snow and ice. They work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, nonstop during a storm or ice event to ensure the safety of the traveling public, to provide access to businesses so that commerce is as uninterrupted as possible, to open emergency routes to hospitals, fire stations, to help school buses arrive on time and safely, for trash collection services to be continued, and to allow all of us the freedom to accomplish many other daily activities. Each winter storm is slightly different and requires different approaches as it relates to snow and ice management. Midvale City’s Public Works has a Snow Plan which can be modified before and during the storm. Basic policies are set forth with approval from staff and council. The snow and ice management process is dependent on the type of precipitation; depth of snow, sleet or ice; temperature of air and pavement; and timing of winter weather events. Snow and ice control operations are expensive and involve the use of limited personnel and equipment. During a snow event, snow removal becomes a 24/7 operation until all priority streets, collectors, and arterials are cleared. For snowstorms lasting longer than 24 hours, personnel are divided into crews working alternating 12-hour schedules depending on the shift that they are assigned.

PRIORITIES

Snow plowing does not begin until after 2 inches of snow has accumulated. The Public Works snow crews plow top priority and high-volume roadways first, followed by collector streets and residential through streets. Once conditions have been stabilized on first- and second-priority routes, crews will begin to clear City owned parking areas, cul-de-sacs and dead-end roads (there are currently 125 cul-de-sacs/dead-ends in Midvale City). In the event of continual snowfall, it may take longer than normal for plows to reach third-priority streets as first- and second-priority streets will require additional attention. Be assured that once it snows, Midvale snow crews work around the clock until all the roads are safe and drivable. Please remain patient until our crews can treat and plow your neighborhood. Winter storms resulting in accumulations of 6 inches or more are not considered normal for this area. This will increase the snow clearing time in these cases. In addition, abandoned vehicles, improperly parked cars, traffic congestion, garbage cans, etc. may limit snow and ice control efforts on some City streets. Priority 1: Mains and arterial roads Priority 2: Collector and residential through streets Priority 3: City owned parking areas, cul-de-sacs and dead-end roads*

KEEP THEM CLEAR If there is a fire hydrant near your house, please do your part to keep it accessible this winter. Clear-Away Zone Remove any snow and ice. Clear a wide enough perimeter around the hydrant for firefighters to work (about 3 feet). Clear a path from hydrant to street. Fires can happen anytime of the year. Please do NOT cover your fire hydrant with snow when plowing or shoveling your driveway.

View interactive map to determine plowing priorities within your area. Please note, there are several streets and properties that are maintained by the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT), Salt Lake County (SLCo) or Utah Transit Authority (UTA). Therefore, Midvale City does not plow or treat the following streets and properties. • UDOT is responsible to for 900 E., State St., 7200 S. (from State to Jordan River) • SLCo is responsible for 700 W. (7200 S. to 6800 S.), 6960 S. (County Shop Rd.), northbound Union Park Ave. • UTA is responsible for all public transit parking lots and associated properties

RESIDENTS RESPONSIBILITES Winter On-Street Parking If there are cars parked on the streets, plows can’t fully clear the roads and run the risk of hitting parked vehicles. Residents are not permitted to park any vehicle on city streets where one inch of snow has accumulated. The parking prohibition shall remain in effect for 24 hours after snow has ceased to fall, or until such time as the snow has been removed from the street. (Midvale Municipal Code Section 10.16.120). Residents should be mindful of the weather and make arrangements to park off the streets when snow is forecasted. Sidewalks Property owners are responsible for keeping all sidewalks along their property clear and free of snow and ice. City crews are responsible for clearing sidewalks at public facilities such as City Hall. Snow Blowing and Shoveling State law prohibits residents, business owners, and/or contractors from depositing snow into public roads. Snow removed from sidewalks and driveways should be placed on lawn areas or on private property and NOT on public roads. This practice is dangerous and impedes the City’s snow removal efforts. Blocked Driveways Snow accumulated on the plow blade has no place to go but in the road right-of-way, which includes driveway approaches. Many times, snowplowing forms snowdrifts across driveway approaches, which may create hardships for some residents. Unfortunately, the City possesses neither the personnel nor the equipment to clear the thousands of driveway approaches within the City; therefore, snow removal of driveway approaches is the resident’s responsibility. When clearing driveways, snow should be placed on the lawn or park strips, (do not cover fire hydrants). This will minimize snow accumulation in drive approach areas during snowplowing operations. Putting snow in the street can cause delays in snow removal as well as damage to personal property. Fire Hydrants During the winter season, it is very important to remove the snow from around a fire hydrant. If there is a fire hydrant in front of a resident’s home, it is their responsibility to keep it clear of all snow. Driving • Please do not pull out in front of or attempt to pass a snowplow. • Never tailgate a snowplow truck. Stay at least 200 feet away from plows at all times. If you can’t see the mirrors on the struck, they can’t see you. • Be alert and drive with caution. Remember that winter storms create slick road conditions. Maintain safe distances between vehicles and decrease your normal driving speeds to allow for additional time to stop.


NOVEMBER 2020 CITY NEWSLETTER WWW . MIDVALECITY . ORG

Healthy at Home – Weekly Webinar Series Salt Lake County Aging & Adult Services is hosting a weekly webinar series every Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. Visit https://slco.webex.com/meet/healthy at 2:00 p.m. on the day of the webinar to join the webinar. Or register by calling 385-468-3299. November 3, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. Taught by Paige Corley, Health Educator, SLCo Aging & Adult Services Stop Treating Yourself Like You are Old! Challenge Yourself When You Exercise. November 10, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. Taught by Kathy Nelson, Salt Lake County Caregiver Support Program Family Caregiver Fundamentals November is National Family Caregiver Month! Come learn the basics and get some great resources and tips.

Midvale City Hall, Public Works and Justice Court will be closed on Thursday, November 26 and Friday, November 27 in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday.

November 17, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. Taught by Lisa Schainker, Utah State University Extension Health Benefits of Gratitude Learn how gratitude and a positive attitude can improve your health! November 24, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. Taught in Spanish by Erika Thompson, SLCo Aging & Adult Services La Mala Memoria Reconozca Cuando Debe de Pedir Ayuda

7200 S. LANE ADDITION I-15 SOUTHBOUND PROJECT

7200 SOUTH CLOSURES: OVERVIEW AND BENEFITS Construction is underway on 7200 South in Midvale to add a lane and improve mobility between I-15 and Bingham Junction Blvd. Crews must reconstruct the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) bridge over 7200 South to provide enough width for the widening work. The 7200 South eastbound and westbound road closures (see below) will allow work that would have lasted into Spring 2021 to be completed in two months, allowing the project team to open the additional lanes to traffic by the end of the year.

N

Westbound 7200 South Closure • I-15 to 700 West • Mid-October to Mid-November 700 W.

These full directional closures will include necessary ramp closures at the interchange.

7200 S.

Eastbound 7200 South Closure • 700 West to I-15 • Mid-November to Mid-December

PROJECT TIMELINE

2018

2020

2019 Start of Construction New I-15 Lane Open - Spring 2018 (7800 S. to 12300 S.) - End of 2018

Design Builder Selection Ralph L. Wadsworth Selected as Contractor

i15southbound.udot.utah.gov

New I-15 Lane Open (S.R. 201 to 7800 S.) - Spring 2020

2021 Anticipated I-15 Completion - Winter 2020

I-15 Construction UPRR bridge and 7200 South roadway work* *New lanes open end of 2020. Project completion early 2021.

ALL UTA SERVICES WILL BE FREE ON ELECTION DAY, NOVEMBER 3 The Utah Transportation Authority (UTA) is offering free fares on Election Day. The purpose for this free fare day is to ensure unrestricted public access to polling locations across UTA’s service area. All UTA services will be free on Election Day, November 3, 2020. Paratransit Services, Park City Transit, and UTA’s On Demand by Via microtransit services are included in this free fare’s promotion.


Canyons partnership with Comcast allows students new way to connect, bridge digital divide By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

T

his past spring, Canyons School District’s partnership with T-Mobile allowed students to connect their devices with hot spots during the soft closure of schools in response to COVID-19 pandemic. “During COVID, during our soft dismal, we bought an additional 250 more so we actually delivered up to 800 hot spots to our families,” said District director of information technology Scot McCombs. Running parallel to those hot spots, Canyons School District recently partnered with Utah State Board of Education and with the help of Canyons Education Foundation, there will be a roll out of Comcast’s internet essentials program that will allow students a wired connection for a faster-speed internet service. McCombs said that the Comcast partnership will provide service at 25 meg per second at a cost to the District of $10 per month. For the T-Mobile hot spots, it’s 15 meg per second at $20 per month. He estimates that about 1,200 students can take advantage of this service. It has yet to be decided if the service will be available during summer months.

“We’re going to add this Comcast internet essentials as another option. It will be for those who can prove financial need, and then the hot spots will be our filler. So, if a kiddo is traveling between Mom’s and Dad’s house…we’re not going to be able to get Comcast to both homes so a hot spot may be the better case,” he said. “We’re trying to put the right tool in place for the family.” While both are serving students and their families who are in financial need, McCombs said that T-Mobile allows the district or principals to define what financial need is while Comcast requires proof, such as families who qualify for free and reduced lunch. “With the hot spots, the families don’t have to bring a W-2. The principals, based on the relationships they have with the students, can determine the need,” McCombs said, adding that “Is the financial need now based on the family being out of work based on COVID and that may not show up on a W-2.” Last year, McCombs met with every principal in the district to decide how to bridge the digital divide. About 550 devices were then distributed to be used as a home

Chromebooks are often the device Canyons School District students use to connect with teachers online. (Julie Slama/City Journals)

computer for those with economic needs. Brighton Principal Tom Sherwood recently received a shipment of Chromebooks to enable his school to check out a device to every student.

“Should students have access to the internet at home?” he questioned. “I think it’s unfair to those who don’t have it and we need to provide the device that can give them access to bridge the achievement gap. l

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Page 16 | November 2020

Midvale City Journal


BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

OUTLAW DISTILLERY 552 W. 8360 South, Midvale, UT

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There’s no compromise on the practice “from grain to glass” at Outlaw Distillery. Kirk and Denise Sedgwick, co-founders of Outlaw Distillery, are passionate about ensuring the best quality products for their customers. All of their spirits are hand crafted in Midvale and are made from natural, local, quality ingredients. In order to create Outlaw Distillery’s line of handcrafted spirits including Rum, Spiced Rum, Coffee Rum, White Whiskey, Bourbon Whiskey and Moonshine, Kirk and Denise partner with local companies to include only the highest grade of raw natural materials in their distillery. The majority of these materials, like corn, wheat, oats, rye and barley, are all produced by Utah farmers. Any materials the Sedgwick’s can’t obtain locally, they’ll purchase from U.S.-based companies exclusively. As an example of raw natural quality ingredients, Outlaw Distillery only uses fancy molasses. “That’s what the industry calls their finest batches,” clarified Kirk, as many people have questioned the term “fancy.” (That’s in comparison to blackstrap molasses, which is the lowest-quality molasses, Kirk explained.) Denise and Kirk are strict about pulling all of their flavors from the natural ingredients themselves, not adding artificial flavoring or sweeteners. For example, Outlaw Distillery’s coffee rum is made from a unique partnership with a local coffee company, Bad Ass Coffee, and the strong

coffee notes the product has become known for comes from the coffee beans directly. Kirk described the process as similar to how cold brew coffee is steeped and made at artisanal coffee shops. He takes these coffee beans and throws them in with the other ingredients needed to distil rum. After the coffee rum has acquired the desired flavor, Kirk will filter out the coffee beans. Kirk has built an incredible reputation within the distilling industry and shared that many of the local distillers are friends, so he doesn’t see any of them as competition. Outlaw Distillery’s products can take anywhere from two weeks to two years to distill. Kirk can distill a barrel of moonshine or white whiskey in as little as two weeks. However, a barrel of rum and/or bourbon will need to age for at least two years. Growing up in Utah, Kirk has always been fascinated by the infamous history of the state. He always loved reading about Butch Cassidy, who was born in Beaver, and the Outlaw Trail which ran through Utah. These two widely known bits of history helped inspire the creation of Outlaw Distillery, hence the “Outlaw” portion of the name. Outlaw Distillery is completely locally owned and operated. Denise and Kirk do all their own distilling, with their family and friends helping out when needed. Kirk, a master at all these mechanical, designed and built all the equipment

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needed to run the distillery. In addition to their liquor products, Outlaw Distillery hosts tours and tastings. During this 90-minute tour, Kirk educates attendees on an assortment of information relative to distilling. Kirk teaches attendees how to read the labels on liquor bottles in order to ensure they’re getting the best product and he walks attendees through the entire process of distilling, truly from grain to glass. “You could go home and make your own liquor after my tour,” he says with a laugh.  

Tours, tastings, and products can all be purchased from their store in Midvale (552 W. 8360 South). Outlaw Distillery is licensed as a liquor retailer, so customers can stop by on their way home from work to pick up their favorite liquor. “You don’t have to hassle with the lines at the state liquor store, so we invite you to come by any time.” Kirk says. For more information on Outlaw Distillery, visit their website at OutlawDistillery.com or visit them on Facebook at Outlaw Distillery.

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Midvale City Journal


Life

Laughter AND

by

PERI KINDER

Falling Apart

Well, 2020 finally broke me. I’m overwhelmed, worried about COVID, stressed about the election, climate change, immigration and poverty, and disillusioned to learn Ellen DeGeneres is an actress. It feels like someone shook Pandora’s Box 2.0 like a maraca, releasing sadness, greed and hubris. I started this column dozens of times, but it feels like my funny is numb. I’d begin writing but devolve into an angry rant where I’m pounding the keyboard like a furious Elton John. I’ve gone feral. During yoga, I asked my students for advice on how to find my funny. They suggested sharing recipes for Doomsday Survival beverages like Meltdown Mimosas and Disaster Daquiris. I’m afraid if I start researching drinks, I’d sober up around Groundhog Day. (If there is a Groundhog Day in 2021.) I’m run through a gamut of feelings, enough emotions to create a second or third generation of Snow White’s Seven Dwarfs. I start each day with Hangry then work my way through Weepy, Lonely, Screamy, Worry, Panic and Gloomy. My husband never knows which Peri he’ll bump into when we pass in the hall. It makes everyday discussions a bit wobbly. Hubbie: What sounds good for dinner? Me: We’re on a spinning planet, slowly moving toward the sun where we’ll be consumed like a fly in a bug zapper. Hubbie: So . . . enchiladas? Americans are resilient, right? We’ve been through tough times, right? We’ll come together and make the best decisions for our country . . . oh, who am I kidding? I started screaming at the moon every night like some kind of demon weredog. I’m sure my neighbors are terrified. (Sidenote: I hope someone who’s been living in a bunker since Y2K finally emerged this year to see if it’s safe to come out. Joke’s on them.) My meditation practice has become a slow descent into madness. But then. I zoom in close and watch my grandkids teach a disinterested dog to roll over. I see myriad kindnesses in my life like chocolate, warm blankets and Disaster Daquiris. I zoom out and witness this beautiful world with its billions of people just doing the best they can. Compassion is abundant. I talk to the trees (literally). I smell pumpkin spice (everywhere). I hike through gorgeous canyons, watching leaves release their grip on branches and freefall to the ground. The stillness settles my thoughts.

I don’t know if you’ll read this before or after the election. I don’t know if we’re facing martial law, a presidential coup or (finally) an alien invasion. But I know optimism feels better than despair. We can continue to Catastrophe Scroll though vile social media posts, created by friendless trolls with no sense of humor and a serious case of ringworm, or we can turn off our phones and relearn what “community” means. One day soon, we’ll have to acknowledge the friendships we’ve lost, the unnecessary arguments we waged and the times we refused to back down. It will be a political hangover of epic proportions, especially if you’ve been drinking Calamity Cosmopolitans. Those who follow my social media platforms know where I stand politically, and it’s easy to look at the rage in the world and point fingers at The Other Side. I can stop the blame game, but I won’t stop calling for equality, justice and inclusion in places it doesn’t exist. We must remember that Hope remained in Pandora’s Box. It’s our job to nurture it.

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November 2020 | Vol. 20 Iss. 11

FREE

BACKYARD MIDVALE HAUNT JOINS FORCES WITH KUWAHARA’S PUMPKIN PATCH IN DRAPER By Sarah Morton Taggart | s.taggart@mycityjournals.com

S

ome Midvale residents might remember a backyard haunted house called Scared Haunt that began in October 2010 and went on hiatus after 2016. This year the renamed Thriller Manor frightened young and old alike at a new location at Kuwahara’s Pumpkin Patch and Thriller Park in Draper. After retiring from designing sets and co-owning a professional haunted house, Max Burton’s daughter talked him into setting up a small haunt in her yard. The following year he bought a house across the street and expanded the haunt. Spencer Mears, a neighbor, offered to help with puppets, lighting, sound effects and security. The show was wildly popular, with new rooms and special effects each year. The haunt was featured in local radio and television news programs, but also raised concerns among neighbors. After six years, the haunt had grown to 4,500 square feet and attracted as many as 5,000 visitors per season. The show had outgrown Burton’s yard on Princeton Avenue and he couldn’t find a more suitable location. After an unsuccessful Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign and other attempts to raise funds to lease a building, Burton decided to put the show up for sale. But two days before he was planning to post the listing, Burton met Alex Kuwahara and suddenly there was a feasible way to keep his haunted house running. “My son-in-law came out for an interview to work in the nursery on Aug. 8,” Burton said. “I saw them starting to set up the pumpkin patch and we got to talking. It was just a chance meeting. They say that sometimes God wakes up and smiles at someone. Well, that day he smiled and pointed at me and Alex.”

“We heard people say after going through that they could tell who the real people were because they were wearing masks,” said Autumn Burton. “So we put masks on the dummies.” (Sarah Morton Taggart/City Journals)

Burton began setting up on Sept. 1 and opened the show on Sept. 25. Kuwahara and his family have been operating Kuwahara’s Pumpkin Patch and Thriller Park at their farm at 12153 S. 700 West in Draper for years. The annual tradition includes

live performances, paintball, food trucks, activities for kids and more. “This year we partnered with Scared Haunt to make our haunted house portion of our fall fest even better,” said a Facebook post by Kuwahara Wholesale. “Some of the proceeds go Continued page 7

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Midvale City Journal | November 2020  

Midvale City Journal | November 2020