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August 2020 | Vol. 17 Iss. 08

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COMMUNITY SHOWS SUPPORT FOR BLACK LIVES MATTER By Zak Sonntag | z.sonntag@mycityjournals.com

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olladay residents gathered at City Hall in June for a “Family Friendly” Black Lives Matter protest to “listen and learn” from Black community leaders who spoke about the impacts of racism, from the ugly usage of epithets to ingrained stereotypes and “microaggressions.” “We are firm and immovable that Black Lives Matter, and not only matter, but inspire—they uplift, they are beautiful, and they are needed,” said Kera Thompson, the MC, who many recognized as the “hype-girl” for the Utah Jazz. “We are going to come together and we are going to share stories. We are going to have open hearts, and have open dialogue, to listen to what’s going on and how we can be—all of us—a part of the change.” Thompson became connected to the community with her marriage to a Skyline Eagle alumna. The event drew a massive and masked crowd, who were overwhelmingly white. “I was really impressed with the Holladay support. I know it’s a predominantly white community and to see so many people show up was impressive. I think it is really important for us to hear [Black perspectives],” said Holladay resident Wendy Bueno, holding a protest sign. The protest’s tone struck a balance between moments of high-spiritedness and solemnity, as speakers chose not to gloss over harsh experiences while still emphasizing the need to build trust and let love prevail. The speakers shed light on many aspects of Black experiences, but a handful of central themes anchored the night. Continued page 7 Kate Wunderli shares her experience growing up Black. (Courtesy DMC Studios)

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GSD hopes higher teacher salary and detailed COVID-19 plans will entice quality applicants By Heather Lawrence | h.lawrence@mycityjournals.com

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Granite School District showed teachers their appreciation with yard signs in the spring. (Heather Lawrence/City Journals)

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he retirement of 19 long-term educators at Holladay area schools leaves a big gap in experienced teachers. Granite School District hopes that their newly approved pay scale will help attract and retain teachers, despite the uncertainty surrounding COVID-19. “In general, we are still seeing far fewer graduates in the state of Utah than we have in the past, which requires us to do a lot of out of state recruiting in order to fill all of our positions,” said Ben Horsley, director of communications for Granite District. “We are fortunately seeing about the same amount of applicants. There have been significant investments made to ensure our salaries are competitive with our surrounding districts, and that has been a great help in attracting high quality applicants,” Horsley said. In a board meeting June 16, GSD presented their annual budget and plans for new teacher salary increases. Mitch Robison, director of budget development, reported a proposed $50,000+ salary for incoming qualified teachers with a bachelor’s degree. There will also be a 5% cost of living adjustment. Teachers needed to quickly learn about distance learning when school went online in March. Horsley feels that the new hires, many of whom are recent college graduates and have likely used distance learning, will be pre-

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pared for the unique challenges that may come this school year. “Our new hires are well versed in distance learning strategies having utilized them for their own learning. Regardless, we provide appropriate new and ongoing professional development for teachers to enhance their digital instruction,” Horsley said. Horsley said the district doesn’t have specific numbers on teachers who chose not to return due to COVID-19 concerns. “I don’t have any detailed figures or numbers on [whether teachers have left due to health concerns] as of yet. It is still too early to see if any resignations or retirements are tied to a return to school this fall.” The Utah Education Association has published several statements on their website as the situation unfolds. “UEA members need to know their rights and job protections. A flowchart was created to provide answers and assist members in getting assistance and advocacy to make decisions about returning to work,” said UEA general counsel Tracey Watson. UEA president Heidi Matthews has made several statements about the safety of schools reopening. “I’m hearing from teachers all around the state who are fearful their school district plans don’t go far enough to protect them and their students. We urge each school district to seek educator input in

their back-to-school plans,” said Matthews in a statement dated July 8. “It’s important for us to get back to in-person learning, but we must make the transition in a way that does not unnecessarily endanger the health of our students and school staff. If we don’t prioritize the health and safety of school staff and properly accommodate high-risk employees, we fear schools may not remain open long,” Matthews said. Matthews also acknowledged that communities of color, which represent large parts of Granite District, were hit “unequally” by the pandemic. This demographic is also statistically underserved in education. Matthews said extra steps must be taken to “close the gaps that were exacerbated” by school closures. The homepage for GSD, www. graniteschools.org, states, “We are working very hard to provide a high quality, individualized learning experience for all of our students.” The site has a link to help teachers with distance learning and a link for a tech support request for families. Horsley said that Granite is taking steps to make sure teachers feel that they are safe at work. “We have and continue to work with our teacher association on a variety of issues and questions regarding what classrooms will look like this fall.” l

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Holladay Business Survey examines the damage of the COVID recession By Zak Sonntag | z.sonntag@mycityjournals.com

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he good thing about recessions is that they don’t last forever. Eventually, economies recover. The bad news, albeit, is that not all companies make it through to the other side. The deeper the recession the higher the number of businesses that go under, and the smaller the business the worse its odds. That’s a troubling reality for a place like Holladay, a small business hotspot where most companies have less than five employees. “I want to see every single business survive through this. But the statistical probability of that is obviously low. There are going to be casualties,” said Jason Woodland, president of the Holladay Chamber of Commerce. City leaders are looking for ways to help local entities in order to ensure the community’s mom-and-pop charm into the future. So they commissioned a survey to find out how they might help. The Holladay Business Survey, released in July, polled 97 local business owners in an attempt to understand the impacts and needs of business in the ongoing economic downturn. The survey shows that the majority of local businesses have been hit by the COVID recession, with 35% of respondents saying they have temporarily “closed completely.” The survey reveals that the biggest challenge facing local businesses is making rent, a struggle faced by 48% of those polled. Almost half of the respondents reported receiving some form of federal aid. Mario Dubon, the owner of the Narra Asian Bistro in southeast Holladay, found himself unable to make monthly rent payments when the economy slowed. “Fortunately, our landlord did not demand rent payment once the pandemic hit. But now they’re demanding that we get caught up and pay that rent back,” he said. Dubon believes that his landlord, the Woodbury Corporation, received federal stimulus aid that it allowed it to postpone

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rent payments. However, it appears their aid is coming to an end, because they’re putting pressure on Narra and other businesses to resume monthly payments. In the nick of time, the bistro qualified for a $12,000 Commercial Rental Assistance lifeline from the Governor’s Office of Economic Development, which will help get the restaurant caught up. Dubon is one of the nearly 50% of survey participants that said they have received some form of federal aid. The majority of aid has come in the form of rent assistance and payroll protection offered in the $2 trillion federal stimulus package known as the CARES Act. But with a $3,500 monthly bill, the business will need to see patronage pick up to ensure its solvency. “We are starting to see some more confidence in customers who are willing to come in and dine, so hopefully that renewed growth will continue,” Dubon said. The survey also indicates that the majority of businesses have suffered reduced patronage and curtailed hours, which has made payroll difficult to meet and can lead to the release of employees. Thais Lassen is the owner of Highland Pets, a dog groomer specializing in smaller breeds, just one of many small companies fighting to stay above water. “Right before the recession hit, I hired a new employee. But then things crashed and we had to close our doors for more than a month. I was able to get some stimulus from the Payroll Protection Program (PPP), but it still wasn’t enough to keep my employee so I had to let her go,” Lassen explained. Highland Pets is one of about half of those polled in the survey who’ve received federal aid. For Lassen, the aid has been critical, but navigating its administrative requirements has proven a challenge of its own. “The loan programs have problems. For instance, I have a small workforce, but my

expenses are high. So a cleaning lady with five employees and very low expenses will benefit from the stimulus more than my company, and I don’t think that’s fair,” she said. Highland Pets’ experience is an example of the way that the coronavirus recession hits some worse than others. Her business has been struck particularly hard due to the demographic of her clientele, who are predominantly older adults with small dogs living in nearby retirement communities. “Because of COVID, they’re not allowed to leave their homes, or their family won’t let them, so we’ve lost a lot of revenue.” Lassen runs the business with her husband, who is unable to work because he is immunocompromised. They applied for a low interest loan to help absorb the losses. However, she was denied for not proving sufficient monetary damage. “I’m risking my health because I have to work. I can’t shut down,” Lassen said. Another big expense has been the additional overhead for hand sanitizer, soaps and cleaning supplies, because companies are compelled to operate under heightened sanitization requirements, driving up costs for 75% of businesses surveyed. “We’ve had to clean like crazy. Our cleaning expenses have gone through the roof,” said David Hogan, proprietor of the Children’s Cottage, a childcare center that is deemed an essential business. “These kids are resilient to the virus. But they can still spread it. So we do deep cleaning constantly. That’s the nature of my business, we have to follow strict protocols,” Hogan said. Hogan has been able to make payroll and keep rent paid despite huge declines in enrollment thanks in large part to federal stimulus. But with that aid drying up quickly, uncertainty remains for the local economy. The City of Holladay has since obtained $906K in

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Narra Bistro chef preps food and hopes for increased patronage (Courtesy Mario Dubon)

additional stimulus it hopes to direct to Holladay companies, although administrative limitations threaten to hinder their ability to help locals. But the survey data gives officials a strong sense of the direction they need to take to best help the community. “If stimulus would keep them in business for six months, that could be the difference that would allow them to stick around long term, after the recession passes. So some of this aid is a game changer. That’s helped with optimism too, because optimism was low [in the business community] in the first 30 days. But I think that survivability ratios look good currently,” said Woodland. For now, locals are doing their best to stay upbeat. “Yesterday, someone new to the area came into the restaurant for the first time, and she was so pleased with the food she came into the kitchen and thanked me and my wife. Little things like that, helps me feel like it’s going to get better,” Dubon said. l

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City of Holladay receives $906K in federal aid By Zak Sonntag | z.sonntag@mycityjournals.com

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he City of Holladay has obtained $906,000 in federal stimulus money to help the local economy fight back against the ongoing coronavirus recession. The funds, administered by Salt Lake County, are part of the national CARES Act, the $2 trillion stimulus bill passed by congress in March. Holladay leaders are predisposed to funnel the new allowance to local businesses; however, the stimulus comes with stipulations, which creates hurdles for the city as it tries to get money to small business most in need. “I’d like to see more money going to small business as grants. But we don’t have the administrative bandwidth to send out applications and vet applications. Also, if we don’t act quickly, then those funds go back to the county,” Mayor Rob Dahle said during a city council work session in July. Adding to the challenge, the city only has a two-month window to find approved uses for the stimulus, with unused funds to be returned at the end of September. The time window ups the urgency for decision makers, but acting too quickly could hurt the city more in the long run, because Holladay assumes liability for improperly distributed resources. “The risk is on us. If there was an audit, and money was expended improperly, the City of Holladay would be on the hook,” said City Manager Gina Chamness, who is overseeing the effort. “The agreement we’ve made with the County is that we will be responsible to ensure that it’s administered correctly.” With only 14 full-time employees, Holladay lacks the administrative capacity to vet aid applicants and administer funds, especially at a time when discoveries of fraud by federal aid recipients has put public officials on high alert. Currently, the city is in negotiations with Salt Lake County over application processing. If the County is willing to process applications on behalf of Holladay, then local businesses could see up to a $200,000 infusion before Oct 1. “As a first priority we’d like to get it to

small businesses. If we had a year to put this together, that’d be one thing. But we’ve got to get the funds back. Our hope is that the County will help us get packages out to our businesses. If they can’t, then I don’t know that we’ll be able to get it out there,” said Dahle, speaking with the Holladay Journal by phone. If the County declines, the city will look at other ways to bolster business, like underwriting the cost of hand sanitizer and facemasks for local entities. Albeit some are discussing another option. Jason Woodland, president of the Holladay Chamber of Commerce, floated the idea of a volunteer board of locals with expertise to administer the application process. “One option is putting together a task force that has business understanding and knows how to determine a businesses survivability,” Woodland said. “But it’s always easier said than done, and I’m reluctant to ask people to dedicate more time because we’re already volunteering on so many levels.”

The Chamber is a volunteer organization. In the meantime, the city has drafted a tentative budget for the stimulus allowance, with portions allocated to cover the cost of Plexiglas installations in City Hall, additional personal protective equipment (PPE), and new technology required to conduct city business remotely. Also included is a parttime bailiff whose job is to enforce mask wearing in City Hall. One of the bigger CARES Act distributions will go toward individuals struggling to make rent and mortgage payments, a problem that industry experts at the U.S. Census Bureau predict to get much worse in the coming months. Fortunately, city officials are partnering with Utah Community Action (UCA), a nonprofit helping connect underserved communities with resources like nutrition, education and housing. UCA will help Holladay residents on the verge of displacement stay in their homes. “The thing that is being feared the most

that is as the [federal] subsidies come to an end as we’re running 11% unemployment, it’s that we’re going to see a lot of evictions or foreclosures, and we have an underserved community [in Holladay],” Dahle said. That partnership takes the administrative burden off the city while still giving local residents a shake at support they may need. The city continues its negotiations with the County in an effort to form a similar administrative partnership that will help Holladay business owners. l

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Holladay City Journal


Continued from front page

Microaggression

What many attendees took away from the event is that racism—like salt—is baked into the culture-cake in subtle ways. Subtle, at least, to certain white majorities. Not so subtle to others. Speakers helped explain how tiny cuts do damage, the forms of prejudice known as “microaggression,” which are small gestures and expressions of implicit bias. Meghan Castleton and Melissa Olsen are twin sisters who grew up in Holladay with the knowledge that their Black father and white mother were unable to be legally married in the city of Provo when they fell in love in the 1970s. Being raised in an interracial household gave the twins a keen antenna to attitudes around race. The sisters explained how microaggressions are often, ironically, lurking in complimentary language. “We had our peers tell us, ‘You guys are beautiful, for being Black.’ Because they don’t see that Black people are beautiful. Or they’d say, ‘We don’t see you as Black because you don’t act like Black people,’” Olsen explained of her upbringing in Holladay. Olsen also talked about the use of disparaging stereotypes, like the “angry Black woman.” “If Meagan expressed a temper, they’d say, ‘You must be the Black twin.’” Another place microaggressions manifest is in professional settings, where Black professionals are often considered anomalies. Richard Ferguson, a doctor, spoke about patients in Salt Lake who’d say, “You’re pretty good for a Black doctor,” indicating low expectations of Black medical professionals. In other states, Ferguson has had patients refuse to be treated by him once learning of the color of his skin. Some microaggressions are unique to Black children raised in white communities. Kate Wunderli, a recent Olympus High School graduate raised by white parents, spoke about coping with the prevalence of the “N-word” amongst her peers. “I’ve heard many people say the N-word. I’m frequently asked for the ‘N-word pass,’” Wunderli said, referring to the practice in which Caucasians and non-Blacks are given a “pass” to use the historic epithet colloquially. “They would think it was OK. If I gave them permission, they wouldn’t feel guilty using it freely.” Wunderli initially gave in to those requests. But the more she reflected, the more it made her uncomfortable. Until finally she asked her peers to stop, explaining in a long social media post that the term was inappropriate “because that word was so offensive

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in the past. It shows that everyone acknowledges the outer appearance rather than the inside, that they’d rather define us by our race.”

Schools

The event was meant to be a chance to “listen and learn.” Yet community leaders argued that solutions require not just an evening of learning, but changes in our institutions of learning. One of the night’s most powerful speakers was Michelle Love-Day, former principal with the Granite School District, and now director of the District’s Educational Equity program. Love-Day, who grew up in the Midwest, came to realize the seriousness of the issue as an administrator when she “experienced the most racist hate [from students] just for doing my job.” Most speakers said they wanted to see changes in the curriculum, particularly as it related to history, where African Americans are not afforded well-rounded portrayals. But a bigger concern was improving student culture to encourage more respectful attitudes, especially as it related to physical boundaries. Love-Day witnessed that Black children in schools are often subjected to uninvited physical contact, particularly with their hair. “I love my hair. But it is not an object. My daughter is going to come to school with different hair, and if you’ve adopted Black children, teach your children that it’s OK to not want to have their hair be touched. Respect our bodies,” she said. “It is your job if you’re raising Black children to give them that voice. It doesn’t always have to be in the form of a confrontation. But if they hear, smell, or see something that is not OK, give them the confidence to say, ‘That makes me uncomfortable, will you please stop.’” This point resonated strongly with Libbi and Wayne Nelson, community members and adoptive parents of a Black son. “It’s hard being Black in a White family,” Wayne said. “You’d think it’s the best of both worlds, but we’re learning that it’s tougher than that. Part of our son doesn’t realize he’s Black. Almost everywhere we are, people are staring at him, and he’s wondering, ‘Why I’m a different person, why are they staring at me?’ And it’s not a totally racist thing, it’s just an environmental thing.” Yet when children lack confidence, parents are stepping in. Meaghan Castleton has pushed administrators to address racist youth behavior more aggressively after learning that her son was the target of name-calling. “I never would have thought I’d

have to tell my son to not [physically] defend himself after being called the worst name over and over and over again. I didn’t think I would have to go to the administration and coaches and ask, ‘Hey, do you have my kid’s back?’ I didn’t think I would have to ask, ‘What is your racial bullying policy?’” said Castleton, Olsen’s twin and a Holladay resident. Though the Wasatch Front has a small minority population, Love-Day believes that shouldn’t prevent policymakers from acting. “You don’t need to have any Black people in your school to have an anti-bias curriculum. Email your principals. Get the conversation started,” she said. Holladay Resident Dylan Chamberlain said he was inspired by LoveDay’s speech. “What I really liked hearing is that we don’t need Black kids in school to advocate for policies that help everyone feel like they belong, that help protect our community [from bias] even if minorities are not represented in our community. That was a new idea that is something I think we can all latch onto,” Chamberlain said.

Families Creating Memories. The Crescent Way.

March

The event concluded with a live performance of gospel music before the crowd took to the streets to march. Protesters pushed their children in strollers. They walked side by side holding signs of support as they made their way down Holladay Boulevard, up 4500 South to 2300 East and back down to City Hall. The march held special meaning for Joshua Chamberlain, an Olympus High graduate and speaker who shared his experience of being profiled here by police on his way home from school one evening. He said the moment was stressful and demoralizing. “This will be one of the things that I will remember always. To have all those people giving their support and walking with me on this same street is incredibly powerful, and all that support is moving,” Joshua said. Before protesters departed, LoveDay emphasized that this movement is not about Black versus white. “You standing here wearing a BLM shirt and holding a BLM sign, does it diminish the fact that you’re white and that your life matters as well? No! But it’s a fact that we’re often treated differently because of the color of our skin. The Titanic was sunk because they didn’t see the rest of the 90% of that iceberg. You need to teach your children and your family members to get to know that 90% of people, because what you see is not what you get.” l

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What’s your legacy?

Coping with COVID-19—How three Holladay residents are getting by By Sona Schmidt-Harris | s.schmidtharris@mycityjournals.com

Paul Fotheringham, a member of the Holladay City Council, and his wife Lisa Fotheringham have a son who is autistic. Most of their focus for coping with COVID-19 has to do with protecting their son. (Photo courtesy Megan Fotheringham)

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W

hen COVID-19 made its appearance, it changed everyone’s life, including, of course, Holladay residents. Three residents discussed their coping methods for getting through this crisis. Paul Fotheringham, a member of the Holladay City Council, and his wife Lisa Fotheringham have a son who is autistic. Most of their focus for coping with COVID-19 has to do with protecting their son. “I just went on a river trip,” Paul said. “So to be safe for Jason’s (the Fotheringhams’ son with autism) sake…I’ve been in isolation down in the basement.” Paul ate his meals out on the backyard deck while Lisa ate her meals on the other side of the deck window. “If he had to be hospitalized and we couldn’t be there with him because of the circumstances—he can’t communicate, can’t understand, he’s nonverbal—that would be the end of our world as we know it. So, we have to be very careful,” Lisa said. Both Lisa and Paul currently work from home. Lisa has frequently worked from home and is comfortable doing so. Paul, who typically worked onsite, is finding that he likes working from home more than he thought he would. Lisa thought that it would be challenging managing staff from home. “But that’s gone really, really well, and even the deadline that we just had this week which was hectic, we managed that all remotely, and it worked,” she said. Paul and Lisa have been trying to make sure that they get exercise. “And we give our-

selves permission to spend an evening watching Netflix and not feel guilty about it,” she said. “I’m spending a lot more time trying to connect daily with my daughter and with my sons who don’t live here, making sure that we’re in contact all the time, making sure everybody’s healthy. Trying to keep track of them, that also makes me feel better,” she said. The Fotheringhams invite their two sons, who live away from the family home, to have dinner out on the deck twice a month. “So that’s why we have all these little tables because we set up one for each of the boys here so they’re distant from each other,” she said. “It’s good to be able to see the boys in person, but everything’s a lot of effort. You know, they can’t just come in the house and sit down at the table,” Lisa added. Paul and Lisa have discovered some happy surprises during COVID-19. “We belong to a country club. Our custom has been to have dinner over there on the weekends, but now we get takeout from there and we have it here on our deck, and we find we like our date nights here as much as going over there,” Paul said. Another resident, Mark Thompson, copes by enjoying the great outdoors. “My everyday plan is to get out of the house, go to a park, and bring a chair with me so that I can read, bring something to eat and then exercise—just to break the monotony.” Thompson added, “If I still drank, I would be drinking a lot. But I’m not.” l

Holladay City Journal


GSD hopes higher teacher salary and detailed COVID-19 plans will entice quality applicants By Heather Lawrence | h.lawrence@mycityjournals.com

T

he retirement of 19 long-term educators at Holladay area schools leaves a big gap in experienced teachers. Granite School District hopes that their newly approved pay scale will help attract and retain teachers, despite the uncertainty surrounding COVID-19. “In general, we are still seeing far fewer graduates in the state of Utah than we have in the past, which requires us to do a lot of out of state recruiting in order to fill all of our positions,” said Ben Horsley, director of communications for Granite District. “We are fortunately seeing about the same amount of applicants. There have been significant investments made to ensure our salaries are competitive with our surrounding districts, and that has been a great help in attracting high quality applicants,” Horsley said. In a board meeting June 16, GSD presented their annual budget and plans for new teacher salary increases. Mitch Robison, director of budget development, reported a proposed $50,000+ salary for incoming qualified teachers with a bachelor’s degree. There will also be a 5% cost of living adjustment. Teachers needed to quickly learn about distance learning when school went online in March. Horsley feels that the new hires,

many of whom are recent college graduates and have likely used distance learning, will be prepared for the unique challenges that may come this school year. “Our new hires are well versed in distance learning strategies having utilized them for their own learning. Regardless, we provide appropriate new and ongoing professional development for teachers to enhance their digital instruction,” Horsley said. Horsley said the district doesn’t have specific numbers on teachers who chose not to return due to COVID-19 concerns. “I don’t have any detailed figures or numbers on [whether teachers have left due to health concerns] as of yet. It is still too early to see if any resignations or retirements are tied to a return to school this fall.” The Utah Education Association has published several statements on their website as the situation unfolds. “UEA members need to know their rights and job protections. A flowchart was created to provide answers and assist members in getting assistance and advocacy to make decisions about returning to work,” said UEA general counsel Tracey Watson. UEA president Heidi Matthews has made several statements about the safety of

schools reopening. “I’m hearing from teachers all around the state who are fearful their school district plans don’t go far enough to protect them and their students. We urge each school district to seek educator input in their back-to-school plans,” said Matthews in a statement dated July 8. “It’s important for us to get back to in-person learning, but we must make the transition in a way that does not unnecessarily endanger the health of our students and school staff. If we don’t prioritize the health and safety of school staff and properly accommodate high-risk employees, we fear schools may not remain open long,” Matthews said. Matthews also acknowledged that communities of color, which represent large parts of Granite District, were hit “unequally” by the pandemic. This demographic is also statistically underserved in education. Matthews said extra steps must be taken to “close the gaps that were exacerbated” by school closures. The homepage for GSD, www.graniteschools.org, states, “We are working very hard to provide a high quality, individualized learning experience for all of our students.” The site has a link to help teachers with dis-

tance learning and a link for a tech support request for families. Horsley said that Granite is taking steps to make sure teachers feel that they are safe at work. “We have and continue to work with our teacher association on a variety of issues and questions regarding what classrooms will look like this fall.” l

Granite School District showed teachers their appreciation with yard signs in the spring. (Heather Lawrence/City Journals)

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August 2020 | Page 9


Children’s exhibit, ‘Everyone’s Story Matters’ opens at Holladay City Hall

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n exhibit of multicultural children’s art and stories will open July 27 at Holladay City Hall, 4580 S. 2300 East. The exhibition, “Everyone’s Story Matters,” has been one step ahead of our current civil unrest crisis; it includes stories from children of Middle Eastern, Black, White and other ethnicities. The brainchild of Emily White, “Everyone’s Story Matters” was inspired in part by Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Malala Yousafzai’s children’s book, “Malala’s Magic Pencil.” Yousafzai emphasizes that someone can change the world with just one pencil. “The exhibit ties together diverse portraits that were written and illustrated by students from Oakwood, Howard R Driggs, Crestview and Lincoln elementary schools. The display features empowering stories that celebrate the courage of parents, grandparents, neighbors, friends and heroes,” White said. Originally scheduled to open at the Holladay Library in April, “Everyone’s Story Matters” was suspended due to COVID-19. However, the Holladay librarians displayed some of the children’s art in the windows to demonstrate the power of every story. “The most prevalent problem that stu-

dents illustrated and tried to solve was bullying,” White said. This was the outcome of the 2017-2018 Malala project, and “Everyone’s Story Matters” was the antidote to promote empathy and connection. One boy, whose father is Iranian, says this in his story, “…When my dad was in battle with the enimy (sic) a person came on my dads (sic) side but instead of killing the young guy he spared his life.” There are wonderful portraits by the children including an intriguing picture of Harriet Tubman by Celeste Pratt. “Storytelling is intuitive for children. Their big letters fill the page and spill into the margins. They thoughtfully observe and draw eyes, hair, wrinkles and glasses to show every detail about the people who matter to them,” White said. The exhibit is funded by the Holladay Arts Council and is in collaboration with Nick Sokoloff Photography, the Humanitarium, Salt Lake County Library and Granite School District. It will be on display through the end of August. l

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Page 10 | August 2020

Holladay City Journal


AUGUST 2020

MAYOR’S MESSAGE Thought it might be a good time to update citizens on the issues raised most frequently with our Council. HOLLADAY HILLS We’ve received quite a few inquiries regarding the old Cottonwood Mall site, now Holladay Hills. I think everyone is aware that Millrock Partners and the Woodbury Corporation acquired the property from Howard Hughes Corporation last September. They are applying under the original Site Development Master Plan (SDMP) from 2008, starting with Block D of the development. Site work started in March, but has recently been held up with a utility issue. We anticipate this should be cleared up in the coming weeks with construction proceeding this fall. FACEMASKS I addressed facemasks in the July issue of The Journal. The County now requires masks be worn in indoor commercial and government establishments, with minor exceptions. You can view these guidelines on the Salt Lake County web site, WWW.SLCO.org. Medical professionals continue to support and encourage the donning of masks as the single most important practice we can follow to reverse the current negative trend in our community. The majority of Holladay residents support and practice the County directive. With few exceptions, the commercial establishments still getting pushback will deliver their goods directly to your car. Simply call in or email your order, pull up and they will bring it to you. These are challenging times. It’s impossible to accommodate the personal views of every individual. This means it’s up to each of us to show some empathy for the friends and neighbors that are simply doing their vey best to deliver goods and services as efficiently and

safely as possible. If you don’t want to wear your mask in to their establishment, please respect their right and obligation to require it. If you can’t/won’t, call ahead and some of the utility details. We hope to have these issues let them bring it to you. We can do this! wrapped up by the end of the year with construction beginning early 2021. We estimate 9 to 12 months to POLICE POLICY The Board of Directors of the Unified Police De- complete the project. To learn more visit cityofholladay. partment (UPD) is continuing our work with staff and com/community/39th-south/3900-south-project/. You community stakeholders to review internal polices and can also email 3900southproject@gmail.com to sign training within UPD. We will update you periodically up for updates. as changes are implemented. Our goal is establishing LEFT TURNS ON HIGHLAND DRIVE policies and training that de-escalate physical engageWe have been working going on three years to inment and eliminate profiling and prejudice of any kind. stall four left-hand turn lanes on Highland Drive. The logistics have been challenging. It appears we may THE COTTON BOTTOM INN The effects of the pandemic have disproportionately be able to put the pieces in place that will allow us to impacted dining establishments. This stalled the antic- begin construction in the spring of 2021. The left-turn ipated closing we previously reported. We’re working locations are northbound at Lakewood Drive and Spring on amendments that will allow the future operators to Lane and southbound at Walker Lane and Fardown adjust the scope of the project over the short-term. It Avenue. Once installed it will substantially de-conflict will include refurbishing the sign, remodeling existing movement along this critical major arterial of our city. buildings, expanding outdoor seating, re- landscaping The end result; a much safer Highland Drive. and completing the connections to the pedestrian access The city continues to operate with limited staff at City trail and to Knudsen Park. I anticipate these details will be finalized by the time this issue of The Journal Hall. This reduces potential exposure to our employis delivered. You can expect to see activity on the site ees and their families. When not at City Hall, most of shortly thereafter. At the same time, Tuscany is com- our employees can operate remotely. City Council and pleting a major outdoor wedding venue renovation to Planning Commission meetings will continue virtually the East of their restaurant---It’s Fabulous!!! The 1-acre until further notice. We do not expect this to hamper Cotton Bottom parcel will complete the 9–acre pocket the processing of licenses, permits or other critical city that includes Tuscany, Franck’s, The Cotton Bottom Inn functions. If you have comments, questions, or concerns, and the newly completed Knudsen Park. It anchors a please do not hesitate to reach to me personally, or to Southeast entry to our city that we can all be proud of. your respective Council representative. Our contact info is published on the city web site, www.cityofholladay. 3900 SOUTH RE-BUILD com and in this issue of The Journal. 3900 South from 2300 East to I-215 will be totally Be Safe, Be Kind! re-constructed, to include curb, gutter, sidewalk, utilities – Rob Dahle, Mayor and bike lane installation. We are currently finalizing

Property Watch Information The Salt Lake County Recorder’s Office is excited to announce the launch of our new public service, Property Watch: • This free service allows users to monitor any recorded changes (documents such as Liens, Deeds, etc.) to their property as soon they are processed. • After signing up for Property Watch will send property owners who register for the service an email alerting them to any newly recorded documents on their property record. • Property owner email addresses will not be distributed and will only be used to communicate Property Watch information. • Signing up is quick and easy, owners just need to follow the link to the Property Watch tab on the Recorder’s Office Home Page and submit a name, email, and home address. • For assistance or any questions, residents can email PropertyWatch@slco.org or call 385-468-8176 for live support.

2020

TREE

GIVEAWAY Sept. 26th

Holladay City Park 9:00am-11:00am 4580 S 2300 E

The Holladay City Tree Committee is giving away FREE trees to residents. Register for a Tree, Donate, or Volunteer for the event.

LEARN MORE at holladaycitytrees.com


AUGUST 2020

CITY INFORMATION

Children and Youth Preparedness By Julie Harvey Municipal Emergency Management Planner As time nears for children to return to school now is the time to make sure they are knowledgeable about being prepared for emergencies and personal safety. Include your children in conversations about preparedness, talking about age appropriate subjects; from what to do if you are caught outside in a lightning storm to how to get out of the house if the normal routes are blocked by fire. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has information for kids, teens, families, and educators. Visit https:// www.ready.gov/kids for games, curriculum, family emergency planning and much more. Discuss personal safety and refresh your children’s memory of your secret code word. If you haven’t developed a code word with you children you should. A code word is a secret word that your children can ask for from someone who says “your parents asked me to pick you up.” Even if it is a friend or relative your children should be taught to NEVER accept a ride from someone who doesn’t know the code word when asked. Make sure your children have their address and parent or guardian’s full name and phone number memorized. It is good to write these thing down and put them in their backpack and

phone, but if they don’t have these items they still need to be able to tell someone where they live and full names and phone numbers of those responsible for their care. Teach your children when and how to call 9-1-1 and how to talk to the 9-1-1 dispatcher. Contact 9-1-1 to: • Save a life • Stop a crime • Report a fire • If someone has been involved in an incident and is injured Note: If you’re in a situation where there are several people at the scene, do not assume someone else is calling 9-1-1 — call yourself. If you are calling from a cellular device, be sure to let the call taker know your location so emergency responders can get to you faster. Talk to your children about preparedness and safety actions often so if the need to know this information arises it is fresh in their memory. Child Safety and Code Words: dss.mo.gov/cd/foster-care/ pdf/safetytip/child-safety-code-words.pdf Emergency? When to call—or text—9-1-1: www.vecc9-1-1.com/emergency-call-text-9-1-1/ Ready Kids! www.ready.gov/kids

Join the Holladay Youth Council Are you in 9th-12th grade? Interested in local government? Want to gain leadership experience, and help plan/ participate in service opportunities? Then the Holladay Youth Council is for you! Students registered in either a private or public school are eligible to join. Applications for 2020-2021 membership will be available after August 3rd at the reception desk at Holladay City Hall – 4580 S. 2300 E. or on the city website. Completed applications are to be returned to the reception desk by September 11. Former members will need to re-apply and fill out the membership application. For more information or questions, call Stephanie Carlson at 801-527-2454 or email scarlson@cityofholladay.com

City Of Holladay • 4580 South 2300 East • 801.272.9450 • www.CityOfHolladay.com

CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS: Rob Dahle, Mayor rdahle@cityofholladay.com 801-580-3056 Sabrina Petersen, District 1 spetersen@cityofholladay.com 801-859-9427 Matt Durham, District 2 mdurham@cityofholladay.com 801-999-0781 Paul Fotheringham, District 3 pfotheringham@cityofholladay.com 801-424-3058 Drew Quinn, District 4 dquinn@cityofholladay.com 801-987-8805 Dan Gibbons, District 5 dgibbons@cityofholladay.com 385-215-0622 Gina Chamness, City Manager gchamness@cityofholladay.com

PUBLIC MEETINGS: City Council – first and third Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. Planning Commission – first and third Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.

CITY OFFICES: Mon-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • 801-272-9450 4580 South 2300 East • Holladay, UT 84117 Community Development Finance Justice Court Code Enforcement

NUMBERS TO KNOW:

801-527-3890 801-527-2455 801-273-9731 801-527-3890

Emergency 911 UPD Dispatch (Police) 801-743-7000 UFA Dispatch (Fire) 801-840-4000 Animal Control 385-468-7387 Garbage/Sanitation 385-468-6325 Holladay Library 801-944-7627 Holladay Lions Club 385-468-1700 Mt. Olympus Sr. Center 385-468-3130 Holladay Post Office 801-278-9947 Cottonwood Post Office 801-453-1991 Holliday Water 801-277-2893 Watermaster - Big Cottonwood Tanner Ditch system - Art Quale 801 867-1247


UPD Changes in Policing With the recent events surrounding the death of George Floyd, police departments across the country are reviewing policies and procedures to ensure that something like that does not happen again. At the Unified Police Department, we are no different. On a daily basis we will review our own major incidents to see how we can respond to calls better in the future. Even though this incident did not occur in Utah, we are looking at our policies to see how we can improve. Our mission statement says “We serve & protect every member of our community. Through integrity, cooperation and understanding we strive to reinforce our core values: Integrity, Equal service for all - Honesty and transparency - Strong ethical and moral principles; Respect, Empathy & commitment - Protect rights and property - Embrace diversity through education; Professionalism, Leadership and resource management - Efficient and effective communication - Progressive training and technology.” At the Unified Police Department, we have brought together a team of our members to review our current policies as they relate to use of force. To date, the committee has made changes to our policies and it will continue to make recommendations and changes into the future. In addition, we are re-evaluating our mandatory training. Officers regularly receive de-escalation training and have received anti-discrimination training. We want to ensure that our policies, procedures and training are the best so we can continually provide the highest level of service to the community. In our continued efforts to be transparent, we are providing information on our policies related to the citizen inquiries about police practices and procedures. Below are several questions and answers that are regularly asked of us: 1. What is UPD’s policy on chokeholds / strangulations holds? The UPD prohibits the use of chokeholds, strangulation holds, or other maneuvers that place pressure on the neck or throat unless it is necessary to prevent serious bodily injury or death. (UPD Policy 300.3.3)

By Chief Justin Hoyal, UPD Holladay Precinct

6. Ban shooting at moving vehicles The safety of officers and the public is our top priority. UPD Policy and Utah Administrative Code provide detailed guidelines for use of force against a moving vehicle. These guidelines are part of our regular trainings. “Decisions to discharge a firearm at or from a vehicle are governed by this Use of Deadly Force policy and are prohibited if they present an unreasonable risk to the member or others. These decisions shall first be authorized when reasonably possible by a supervisor.” (UAC R728-503-7) “Officers should move out of the path of an approaching vehicle instead of discharging their firearm at the vehicle or any of its occupants. An officer should only discharge a firearm at a moving vehicle or its occupants when the officer reasonably believes there are no other reasonable means available to avert the threat of the vehicle, or if deadly force other than the vehicle is directed at the officer or others.” (UPD Policy 300.4.1) 7. Does UPD require use of a force continuum? UPD employs a force options approach, training officers to adapt use of force to the situation and promoting de-escalation. If force is necessary, “Officers must use only the amount of force that is necessary and proportionate to the circumstances” (UPD Policy 300.6). In the field, officers encounter a wide range of situations. Both policy and training require officers to place the sanctity of human life at the heart of every decision and to determine whether force is appropriate and what amount is proportionate. When faced with a situation where force cannot be avoided through de-escalation or other techniques, officers must not use more force than is proportionate to the circumstances. “Consistent with training, some of the key factors that officers should consider when determining how much force to use include:

2. Does UPD require officers to take de-escalation training? The UPD provides de-escalation training for all officers. De-escalation strategies have been incorporated into many areas of our training; preparing officers to de-escalate volatile situations, minimizing uses of force and maximizing public safety. “Whenever feasible, officers should attempt to de-escalate confrontations with the goal of resolving encounters without force. Officers may only use force that is objectively reasonable, necessary and as a last resort.” (UPD Policy 300.2) Also, refer to UPD Policy 421.6.

a. The risk of harm presented by the person;

3. Are officers required to issue a warning before shooting? UPD trains officers to use verbal warnings before the use of any force. Use of deadly force is governed by UPD Policy and Utah State Code which says, “If feasible, a verbal warning should be given by the officer prior to any use of deadly force under Subsection (1)(b) or (1)(c).” (UPD Policy 300.4; Utah Code Annotated 76-2-404)

g. Whether there are other exigent/emergency circumstances.

4. Are all alternatives exhausted before shooting? UPD officers train to exhaust all alternatives before using deadly force. “Strict requirements must be met before an officer may use deadly force. As discussed in this policy, when feasible, officers should attempt to de-escalate situations, issue verbal warnings, or use non-lethal force with the goal of resolving encounters without using deadly force. There are however, occasions when deadly force is necessary to protect officers or other persons. An officer may use deadly force only when the officer reasonably believes such action is immediately necessary to protect the officer or another person from imminent danger of death or serious bodily harm.” (UPD Policy 300.4) 5. Does UPD require its officers to intervene to prevent excessive force? Through training, policy, and a culture of accountability, officers are directed to intervene if another officer is using unreasonable force. “Any officer present and observing another officer, regardless of rank, using force that is clearly beyond that which is objectively reasonable under the circumstances shall, when in a position to do so, intercede to prevent the use of unreasonable force. An officer who observes another officer use force that exceeds the degree of force permitted by law shall promptly report these observations to a supervisor.” (UPD policy 300.2.1)

b. The risk of harm to the officer or others by using force; c. The seriousness of the crime at issue; d. Whether further de-escalation techniques are feasible, including the time available to an officer to make a decision, and whether additional time could be gained through tactical means; e. If there is a practical, less harmful alternative available to the officer; f. Mental or physical disability, medical condition, and other physical and mental characteristics; and As a situation changes, officers must reevaluate the circumstances and continue to respond proportionately. Over the course of an encounter, the circumstances and threats an officer faces may change. Consistent with training and the decision-making process, while using force, officers must continually assess the effectiveness, proportionality, and necessity of their actions.” (UPD Policy 300.7) 8. Does UPD require comprehensive report writing? All use of force incidents are documented in a police report, immediately reported to a supervisor, and reviewed by the member’s division command. “Any incident involving Use of Force (beyond routine handcuffing of a compliant subject) by any UPD officer will be documented in a General Offense or supplemental report, as appropriate. Reports will be submitted before the end of the shift the incident occurred or as otherwise directed. The Use of Force Template contained in RMS shall be submitted by the end of shift in which the incident occurred by any involved officer and will include all the information prompted by the template, if applicable. The reporting officer will notify dispatch to add the secondary NCIC Code 5399-4. “Officers involved in a Use of Force incident will promptly notify the On-duty Supervisor. The On-duty Supervisor will notify the Watch Commander and the officers’ respective Division Commander(s) and Executive Officer(s) by email. Watch Commanders will note any Use of Force incident in the Watch Command log by indicating only the Case number, Date and time, and address of the incident on the daily log.” (UPD policy 300.7) For questions or comments, please contact Chief Hoyal at 385-468-9920.


AUGUST 2020

Good Dog Campaign! Win Treats for Your Pup! Are you walking your dog more while you work from home? If so, you may have seen an alarming trend in your neighborhood or on the trails, more dogs are being walked off-leash and more dog poop is being left on the trails. Be part of our GOOD DOG Campaign! Salt Lake County Animal Services is launching this new public awareness program to help build a better community of dog owners who keep their dogs on leash and pick up their poop. We will be putting up signs at various parks across the valley and letting the public know where they are on our Facebook and Instagram pages. WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP: 1. Find the sign at the park. 2. Be sure to use the Hash Tag: #SLCOGoodDog

3. Take a photo of your pup by the sign and tag us on Facebook or Instagram: @Salt Lake County Animal Services. 4. Can’t find the sign, but your pup is such a good dog and on-leash? Still tag us like mentioned above! (We can’t say no to GOOD DOGs on-leash!) Once you post this, we will enter your name in to win a HUGE basket full of treats for your GOOD DOG! We will pull the name of the winner after Labor Day and announce it on social media. Thank you for helping us make our community a better place! If you want to know more about leash and waste ordinances in your area go to AdoptUtahPets.org and visit our “LAWS” section. Need to contact an officer to report an off-leash dog? Call Dispatch at 801-743-7000 or email animalcontrol@slco.org.

The regional emergency system (ENS) is a type of “Reverse 9-1-1” sysem. Traditional landline telephone numbers are automatically entered into the system but cellular numbers are not. Ensure you get notifications when they are pushed out by the Salt Lake Valley Emergency Communications Center (VECC) by registering your cell phone number to your address in Salt Lake County. Register your cell phone at: www.vecc9-1-1.com/voip-registration/ If you see “0000000000” on your Caller ID, you should answer the phone because that will be VECC calling with imprortant information.

CITY PARKS RESERVATIONS:

Because we are still in the YELLOW phase of COVID 19, the City of Holladay WILL NOT be taking any reservations for room rentals and the park pavilion until we advance to the green phase. You are welcome to use the parks and playgrounds at your own risk. PLEASE NOTE that they are: • Not routinely disinfected • Social distancing is required • No more than 50 allowed at one time in any given area. HAND SANITIZER - If you are headed out to with City Hall Park or Knudsen Park PLEASE bring your own hand sanitizer.


Holladay showing its teeth at short term rentals By Zak Sonntag | z.sonntag@mycityjournals.com

T

he City of Holladay is going after Short Term Rental (STR) operators with a new law that exacts a punishing fine on rentals operating without a permit. The ordinance, which passed the council in May by unanimous vote, increases the penalty to “a minimum fine of not less than $1,000” for each day of violation, which is the maximum amount allowable for Class B misdemeanors under state law. Additionally, the law requires violators to repay illicit rental income, while also including the prospect of jail time. “I’ve looked at many Short Term Rental statutes, and I don’t think there is a more aggressive statue in the state. So I’m very happy,” said Councilmember Dan Gibbons, who has weathered earfuls of constituent complaints regarding the boisterous activities of an implacable rental in the Canyon Cove area of District 5. “The purpose is to give people a double or triple pause. I don’t think the judge would actually throw someone in jail, but just the specter may be enough to make them think twice before operating [STR’s],” Gibbons said. Weather the new law will chasten STR operators remains to be seen, however, because this category of landlords are notori-

ously hard to pin with convictions. State law prohibits cities from using online postings on rental websites, like Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway, for example, as evidence in court. Instead, they must compile a preponderance of neighbor-based complaints. Furthermore, municipalities have shied away from cracking the whip due to logistical and enforcement concerns. Despite intense discontent amongst residents, the cities of Sandy, Riverton and Murray, for instance, have minced around the issue because there is little appetite to hire new staff and expend more city resources enforcing STRs. “If we regulate these, that means we have to enforce our regulations. We do not enforce regulations to the degree that they need to be done [at the existing level],” said Murray Planning Commissioner Phil Markham. But the pressure on Holladay representatives builds as the constituent complaints pour in about homes that “morph into a boarding house in the middle of a neighborhood zoned for single-family occupancy,” said Holladay resident Mailei Bucher, in a letter to the city council, in which she accused a neighbor of allowing “rent for up to 10 unrelated renters at a time.” Surrounding homeowners complain about noise, excessive cars and trash, pre-

dominantly, but they also just want to know and trust their neighbors, which is difficult with the revolving-door style of occupancy seen with STRs. This small erosion in the community’s quality of life is what economists call a “negative externality,” which happens when someone incurs a cost for a transaction they had no part in. One Holladay resident complained in a letter to the council that a neighbor had “likely lost $50,000 in the sale of their home due to illegal rental operation” that degraded the neighborhood’s appeal, although the resident provided no evidence for the claim. Still, the worry is real, and cities are going to need to step up to arbitrate the issue between residents. “Without serious financial penalties imposed, collected, and legal actions pursued, the landlords will not be discouraged from continuing their practices. To them, it is just the cost of doing business, and they get away with it,” said Susan Pohlman, Holladay resident, in a letter to the city council. “Their rentals are too lucrative to stop.” Although in a culture with a vaunted respect for private property and generous deference to property owners, there is a sense held by some that property owners rights are being treated unduly by STR opponents. On the one hand, the popularity of STRs tells

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Airbnb and other STR sites have transformed the rental market. (Public Domain/City Journals)

us something about a natural preference for homes to hotels. The marketplace has responded—this year, Airbnb was valued by Forbes at $38 billion. The financial power of the industry makes for a daunting foe in many cities who, like New Orleans, have seen pushback from companies like Airbnb in the requirement that it remove listings which violate STR regulations. As the popularity of Utah’s outdoor recreation viability spreads and the Wasatch Front attracts more visitors, the need for clear, smart STR policy—and enforcement—becomes imperative. Now that the City of Holladay has made its intentions known, the next phase is working out the enforcement side. Time will tell if this dog’s bark comes with a bite. l

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August 2020 | Page 15


Holladay resident wins Mrs. Utah title and uses platform to fight human trafficking By Heather Lawrence | h.lawrence@myityjournals.com

P

aris Morris, who was crowned Mrs. Utah America July 11, knows that people have preconceived notions of what a pageant is like. She had them herself as a teen, before her mom encouraged her to enter the Miss Teen Utah competition. “My mom was the one who got me started. She wanted me to get out of my shell and develop some interview and people skills. She said I had to do it once, just for the growing experience. So, I did it, and I fell in love with it,” Morris said. Morris’s mother, Cherie Fisher knew about pageants. She had won the Mrs. Utah America pageant title in 2002. Morris learned a lot from her mother’s win. “When she won, I remember how happy she made people when she volunteered, with me right by her side. Now I can’t wait to serve our state with my own 14-month-old daughter Lottie by my side,” Morris said. For Morris, it’s fitting that her child should be a part of her time as Mrs. Utah. “The most important part of this pageant is your platform, the cause you want to bring attention to during your year as Mrs. Utah. And mine is to fight human trafficking, especially of children,” Morris said. Morris teamed up with Operation Underground Railroad, a nonprofit with offices

in California and Cedar City. OUR works with governments all over the world to rescue victims and arrest human traffickers. “Before I entered the pageant, I watched a documentary, ‘Operation Toussaint’ about an OUR rescue in Haiti. It was so good, but so hard to watch. I saw one of their missions and how they rescue children,” Morris said. OUR lists statistics of missions on their website, and another thing that made an impact on Morris was the number 58. “That’s how many victims have been rescued this year in Utah. Trafficking happens everywhere, even here in our state. So, I wanted to use my platform to volunteer, fundraise and bring attention to their organization,” Morris said. The pageant was held at an outdoor venue in Ogden and the audience was limited by COVID-19 restrictions. The event started at her daughter’s bedtime, so Morris and her husband William left Lottie with her grandparents, who watched on the live stream. “My parents knew how important the on-stage question portion was—it’s 50% of your total score. There is evening gown and swimsuit and a costume portion, too. I won the on-stage question (interview) and evening gown portion. When I talked to my parents they told me they were so emotional

“This pageant is so community service based. There’s so much more to it than dressing up and parading around stage in a swimsuit,” said Mrs. Utah winner Paris Morris of Salt Lake. (Veronica Benson Photography)

after that because they knew I would win. “It was actually really beautiful to compete outdoors, looking at the mountains. I’ve done these for several years; I won Miss Teen Utah in 2007 and competed for Miss Utah for four years before I got married,” Morris said.

Morris loved that after she got married, there was still a way for her to compete. She enjoyed the pageant’s focus on service and meeting the other contestants. “This pageant is so community service based. There’s so much more to it than dressing

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up and parading around stage in a swimsuit. It was great to meet other women, hear what they’re passionate about and how they’re trying to make our state a better place,” Morris said. She also likes the diversity. “It’s more about being healthy than skinny. It’s about being the best you are for your body type. There are diverse body shapes, including plus size and curvy. The judges care more about what you’re going to do with your year than if you wear size zero,” Morris said. Morris, who attended Churchill Jr. High and graduated from Skyline in 2010, is eager to represent Utah in the October competition. Each state winner will compete in Las Vegas in October for the Mrs. America title. That winner will go to Sri Lanka in November to compete for the Mrs. World title. As Mrs. Utah America, Morris has organized her first fundraiser through Burg Pediatric Dentistry, where she works part time. “July 30 is a worldwide Day Against Human Trafficking. All our profits that day from all our offices will be donated to OUR. People can also donate online on their website. My goal is to raise $50,000 which will rescue 20 children,” Morris said. Morris said the pageant is a way that she takes time for herself and things that are important to her, even at this busy stage in her life. “As a married woman and mother you’re still able to celebrate yourself and maximize your potential. It’s easy as a mom to get lost in taking care of everyone else’s needs. But you have these little eyes watching you, and you have to take care of yourself. You have to live your dreams,” Morris said. l

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“As a woman, you need to celebrate yourself. It’s so easy, especially when you’re a mom, to get lost in everyone else’s needs,” said Mrs. Utah winner Paris Morris of Salt Lake. (Photo by Mia Fisher)

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August 2020 | Page 17


Olympus boys soccer players get final chance to compete together By Josh McFadden | j.mcfadden@mycityjournals.com

T

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hough the coronavirus wiped out the 2020 high school sports season, it didn’t ultimately erase one last opportunity for the Olympus boys soccer team. Thanks to the Last Chance Soccer Tournament, the Titans got back on the field a few more times after all. A local club soccer director organized the tournament, where 28 teams from around the state participated. Held June 8 through June 13 at the Legacy Events Center in Farmington, the tournament was not a Utah High School Activities Association-sanctioned event. So, though the games won’t appear on any official UHSAA records or stat sheets, the games held significant meaning for the players. Olympus seniors were especially grateful for the chance to lace up their cleats again. The Titans’ season was only three games old when the UHSAA suspended spring play. Officials later extended the postponement to May 1, followed by an outright cancellation. Olympus’ 10 seniors had finished their high school careers—sort of. The Titans were invited to be among the participants in the “pomp” division of the Last Chance Tournament (a second division in the tournament was called the “circumstance” division). Though the team only lasted two games in the tournament, the players were thrilled to shake off the rust and get back into action.

On June 8, however, the Titans showed little effects of a two-month layoff. The team blasted Pleasant Grove 5-1 in the tournament opener. The offense was in full gear, as Olympus matched its point total in the threegame official 2020 season. The following day, the Titans drew Westlake. Olympus had trouble stopping Westlake’s attack, falling 3-1. Despite not advancing in the tournament, it was a nice way for the Titans to regain some semblance of a normal season after such an abbreviated slate. Olympus was 1-2 during the regular season, falling to Farmington 2-0 on March 3 and to Lone Peak 3-0 on March 6. On March 10, the Titans blanked Cottonwood 5-0 behind a pair of goals from senior Alec Foulger. Grant Richards didn’t allow any goals past him in the net. Teammates Jake Lewis, Kevin Jara and Noah Johnson added goals. The Titans were looking forward to defending their Region 6 title. Olympus went 8-1-1 in the league a year ago and advanced to the Class 5A state title. The Titans fell there to Brighton, 3-2. Olympus could be a force in 2021. The team returns 28 underclassmen from this past season’s roster, including Richards, Jara and Johnson. l

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Sophomore Kevin Jara slaloms through the defense to score the Titans lone goal on the day. (Travis Barton/ City Journals)

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August 2020 | Page 19


Beloved Holladay teachers who retired ‘will be sorely missed’ By Heather Lawrence | h.lawrence@mycityjournals.com

G

ranite School District wished many teachers a happy retirement in spring 2020. Among them were 19 teachers from eight Holladay area schools. Combined, these educators had more than 565 years of education experience.

“It’s hard to comprehend the impact of talented teachers and the lives they touch. Two of our tremendous teachers Nancy Hansen and Wendy Wagstaff retired at the end of this year. Both had endorsements in Gifted/ Talented Education, and made sure advanced

learners were challenged,” said Kayla MacKay, principal at Cottonwood Elementary. Cottonwood Elementary had a retirement party for Hansen in January, but couldn’t have one in the spring for Wagstaff due to the school closure. Instead, staff from Cottonwood decorated Wagstaff’s front yard with signs and gifts to celebrate her legacy at Cottonwood. “These women dedicated their lives to teaching children, and for that, we will be forever grateful. Their combined influence was felt by 1,300 to 1,500 students! They will be sorely missed,” MacKay said. Rosemary Jacklin, a history teacher of 35 years, retired this spring from Bonneville Jr. High. Principal Rocky Lambourne praised her career and impact. “Dr. Jacklin was a phenomenal teacher and a tremendous asset to the school and community. She created relationships with the students that will last a lifetime. She cared deeply about each one of them and tried to find a way to make each of them successful in her class,” Lambourne said. Like many school plans affected by the COVID-19 closure, Lambourne wasn’t able to give Jacklin a traditional retirement party. So he had to get creative. Olympus teacher Ray Barton was a grand marshal at the 2020 graduation parade; Barton retired after fol“[Jacklin] wanted something simple for lowing his father George’s footsteps, teaching math and Chinese for 39 years. (Danielle Ontiveros/Olympus her retirement considering the situation. In a High School) year-end Zoom meeting, we honored her and

Olympus math teacher Denice Smith, who retired after a 35-year career, was a grand marshal at the 2020 graduation parade. (Danielle Ontiveros/Olympus High School)

the other retirees with individual presentations given by other faculty members with whom they were close. They shared special moments and tried to highlight the [retirees’] careers as much as possible,” Lambourne said. The Bonneville staff also surprised Jack-

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Olympus science and Japanese teacher and former swim coach Brad Goffe retired after a 36-year career; he was honored as one of the grand marshals of the 2020 graduation parade. (Danielle Ontiveros/Olympus High School)

Fans of sixth grade teacher Wendy Wagstaff decorated her yard to celebrate her retirement. Wagstaff worked in Granite District for more than 31 years. (Photo courtesy Wendy Wagstaff)

lin with an in-person gift delivery during the online meeting. “It turned out to be a very special surprise moment. Each retiree had a gift delivered in person during the Zoom meeting. In [Jacklin’s] case, we had a former Bonneville teacher and close friend, Katherine Petersen, deliver her gift. It was a very special moment,” Lambourne said. Lambourne expressed the feeling of so

said principal’s secretary Danette Ontiveros. Math teacher Denice Smith spent her entire 35-year career teaching math at Olympus. Brad Goffe taught science and Japanese at Olympus for 26 of his 36-year career. Early on he was also the swim coach. Ray Barton retired after teaching math and Chinese at Olympus for 38 of his 39 years. His career was a family affair: his father George Barton, who passed away in 2003, also

many students and staff about the teachers who retired this year. “Bonneville was lucky to have Dr. Jacklin for so many years. She will surely be missed,” Lambourne said. Olympus High found a way to honor their three retiring teachers, who taught for a combined 110 years. “We had a graduation parade for our seniors and made our retiring teachers the grand marshals. They started the parade, and it was a fun way to acknowledge them,”

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taught math at Olympus High for 26 years. “These teachers are amazing. Everyone liked them. We lose part of our school identity when long-term teachers retire. We have swimming trophies from the time Goffe was the coach, Smith has been a part of our culture for a long time and Barton was a beloved AP math teacher. He had the highest passing rate, and everyone wanted to be in his class,” Ontiveros said. l

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August 2020 | Page 21


Finding the calm in a heart

Aimee Winder Newton Salt Lake County Council | District 3

I have always loved the Fourth of July. Our family activities over the years have ranged from driving up the canyon to the Brighton Breakfast or riding parades. In the evening, we’ve had the tradition of lighting fireworks with our neighbors. I love to celebrate America and appreciate the incredible and miraculous history of our country. This year our family enjoyed watching, “Hamilton” and gained an even greater appreciation for our Founding Fathers. As I reflected on our celebration of America, I’ve thought a lot about the creation of our country, as well as the issues facing our country today. I have no doubt that the events that transpired during the Revolutionary War, the incredible feat of developing our country’s Constitution, and many other events during this time were truly miracles. So let’s talk about modern times. This year was interesting. Besides a pandemic, earthquake, and fires, we have civil unrest that has escalated in our own cities. Without getting into details of these highly emotional and often politicized specifics, I think it’s safe to say that most of us have seen the incredible divide in our society. No longer can we share a political viewpoint without others going on the attack. Social media has become a civil war of sorts where people seem to have lost all civility and respect for their fellow humans.

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This Fourth of July was interesting for me. As an elected official, I wanted to post something on my public Facebook page to honor the day, but I even found myself scratching my head… not sure how to post something that wouldn’t create drama, or could be politicized. I’m finding more and more that posting about puppies seems to be the only safe play on social media. I am grateful for our country. I know that America is an incredible place and we all have much to be grateful for. But right now some have their anxiety on high alert as we continually see news reports of riots, Covid cases on the rise, racial divide, earthquakes, and other crazy 2020 issues. So how do we find peace in 2020? When I was decorating my family room a few years ago I ran into an awesome sale at Bed, Bath and Beyond. I found a giant wood wall hanging with colors that matched perfectly for only $19.99 and I bought it. The words were nice. But never before have these words been needed more than this year. It says, “Peace is not about silence. It is not a place without trouble or fear. Peace is standing in the middle of chaos and finding the calm in your heart.” Whether upset by destruction during downtown riots, a crazy busy governor’s race, or other family issues, I’ve needed to remember where peace really comes from

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and how to find that calm in my heart. In the past I’ve struggled with anxiety - an ailment that seems to run in my family. Being able to look at things with a pragmatic viewpoint, relying on my faith to help me through, and getting enough sleep at night are some of the things I’ve learned to do to help me have that calm in my heart. It’s not easy, and there are many things that are out of our control, but relying on my higher power, keeping my friend and family relationships strong, and taking care of myself are things that seem to help. As we continue through this crazy year, my best wishes to you and your family to find that calm in your heart.

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Holladay City Journal


Take It Outside

Life

Laughter D ND AN A by by

PERI KINDER PERI KINDER

For the last five months, we’ve been locked up with our families for 17 years. Each day is another long, hot trek to bedtime. Parents break their brains thinking up creative ways to entertain their kids during this “summer vacation” that started in March and threatens to continue through fall. The phrase “Families Can Be Together Forever” is now a terrifying prophecy. Here’s what we’ve learned: Sometimes video games ARE the answer. Celebrities share Tik Tok videos about being “stranded” in their $6.5 million log cabins where everyone has their own TV, floor, masseuse, trampoline and personal chef. I’m not belittling their suffering, I’m just . . . well, I guess I am. For common folk, trampolines are as hard to find as Lysol wipes. Puzzles, board games and sidewalk chalk are valuable commodities on the black market (along with livers, since we’ve been day- drinking for

months). Everyone is heading outside to escape. Extended families stretch the “No large gathering” rules to the max because COVID wouldn’t ruin the annual family reunion, right? Lakes, canyons, national parks and camp sites are packed with people who thought they were the only ones who needed a break from looking at the same dirty carpeting for one more day. I’ve been on several hikes this summer, sometimes with the puppy, sometimes with the grandkids. Not necessarily relaxing, but at least we take the fight to a different location. My latest hike was tackling Bell’s Canyon with my daughter and three of my grandkids, including a 3- and 4-year-old. If that sounds like something out of a Stephen King novel, you are correct. Before we even started up the trail the complaining began. “I’m so hot.” “The trail is too steep.”

“The dirt is too dirty.” “I’m so thirsty.” My daughter told me to shut up and set a better example, but it was too late. The littles were soon echoing my whines at super-high decibel levels. I ended up confiscating water bottles after a good portion was dumped onto the trail to make mud. I explained to the toddlers what happens when you dehydrate. They didn’t care. It took roughly five days to make our way to the reservoir where the kids splashed in the cool water, tossed wet sand at each other, threw crackers at the ducks, slipped on the rocks and screamed at the dragonflies. I considered calling in a rescue helicopter, figuring the expense was worth not having to walk back down the trail. Instead, we bribed the kids with McDonald’s, promising processed chicken parts if they’d walk faster than a drugged porcupine. We made it back to the car exhausted, sunburned and

grumpy – just like a normal summer hike! Backyards are also being used to their fullest. Our luxurious backyard pool (a 6’ wading pool from Walmart) is usually a weird shade of green and full of dead bugs, but that doesn’t stop us from soaking in the probably dangerous water, eating popsicles. If I don’t get sick from COVID, malaria might be another option. The grandkids set up a tent a couple of weeks ago, hoping to have a backyard campout. They roasted marshmallows over the grill and climbed into their sleeping bags only to be shaken awake two hours later by a microburst that threatened to carry them to Oz. Everyone was safe, but traumatized, which seems to be the status quo in these crazy times. Returning to school is the big debate right now, followed by what should be a strange Halloween and holiday season. Sure makes eternity feel like a really long time. l

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Holladay City Journal | August 2020  

Holladay City Journal | August 2020