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March 2020 | Vol. 17 Iss. 03

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INTERSECTION OF CULINARY DIVERSITY:

COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS AREA REVITALIZED WITH NEW EATERIES By Joshua Wood | j.wood@mycityjournals.com

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busy area near the heart of Cottonwood Heights has undergone a transition that can be described as a culinary revitalization. The intersection of 2600 East and Bengal Boulevard has exchanged a gas station and an old café in need of a makeover for three new eateries that have the neighborhood buzzing. Their international flavor adds a degree of diversity that should give foodies heartburn trying to decide which to choose on a night out.

AUTHENTIC MIDDLE EASTERN EXPERIENCE

Sumac Café is a Persian restaurant that has undergone a makeover over the past year. Until January 2019, it was the Bengal Café coffee shop. Now its owners serve the Persian dishes they love from back home in Tehran. “My partner is an extremely good chef with Persian food, so she decided the main talent that she has is cooking, and so we did that,” Sumac owner Mosen Panah said. “She has contact with Tehran, and if anything becomes popular there, she learns about it and tries it.” The food at Sumac Café celebrates the food Panah and the Persian community in the area enjoyed with their families in Iran. The restaurant’s offerings can be grouped into two main categories — kabobs and sauces — each served with a good helping of saffron-infused basmati rice. “It is original, authentic Persian food,” Panah said. “If you are eating here, or if you go to Tehran, it is the same thing. Everything is homemade. There’s no other way to do it.” The restaurant’s interior enhances the Persian cuisine. From a painting depicting Persian markets hundreds of years Sicilia Mia brings Old World Italian flavor to Cottonwood Heights. (Joshua Wood/City Journals) ago to Middle Eastern pillows, Continued page 5

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Cottonwood Heights City Journal


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March 2020 | Page 3


City honors those who make community events possible: Volunteers By Joshua Wood | j.wood@mycityjournals.com

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n January 2020, the City of Cottonwood Heights held a dinner to celebrate the efforts of its many volunteer committees. Each committee is made up of dedicated volunteers who donate many hours to help the city carry out some of its most popular functions. From the city’s most widely known events like Butlerville Days to initiatives like planning future parks and open spaces, these committees are a force in the community that help make Cottonwood Heights a great place to live and work.

One of the most celebrated efforts of Cottonwood Heights volunteer committees is the events committee. The keystone event each year is, of course, Butlerville Days. A celebration of everything Cottonwood Heights, Butlerville Days requires countless hours of work from city staff and dedicated volunteers. Planning starts in January each year and intensifies right through the celebration in late July. Work on the event includes planning and arranging activities, filling the tents with ven-

dors, feeding the masses with festive summer snacks and lining up the entertainment. Local volunteer Jamie Jackson has worked on the Butlerville Days committee for years now and is in charge of entertainment. Her efforts start early in the year with helping to plan the schedule and lining up acts for the stage. “I spend about 60-plus hours working on Butlerville Days each year,” Jackson said. Jackson’s work on Butlerville Days has helped shape the event and how it unfolds

Volunteers like Jamie Jackson help make events like Butlerville Days possible. (Photo courtesy of Cottonwood Heights)

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each year. Her professional work coordinating events and entertainment prepared her well for her volunteer role. Instead of being paid, her reward is dedicating herself to the community she loves. “That’s hard work,” said Ann Eatchel, culture manager for Cottonwood Heights. “Getting people signed up for Butlerville Days and setting up the stage. She coordinates with public works, she’s constantly going, making sure all the acts are in place and ready to go.” Jackson volunteers her time each month leading up to the festival, and then helps make sure it goes off without a hitch when the big event arrives. She even shuttles entertainers and their gear to and from the stage in a golf cart, a necessary means of transport once the fields are full of tents and festival goers. “She has been very much involved in getting Butlerville Days to where it is today,” Eatchel said. Jackson also serves on the committee for other city events like the annual Bark in the Park event. She views it as a fun event and as somewhat of a relief that it’s on a much smaller scale than Butlerville Days. “We have been doing it for so long now, we just do it,” Eatchel said. “The volunteers just love it. They started as helpers, and have just kept doing it. I couldn’t do it without them.” Jackson has lived in Cottonwood Heights for nine years and has found a home serving her city. Her work on the 2020 edition of Butlerville Days has already gotten underway. The hard work ahead will once again be rewarded by a celebration of the city. “I really love our community,” Jackson said. “We work hard to get everything to come together. It’s nice to celebrate our community.”. l

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Continued from front page

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Root’d Café celebrates its Utah and Cottonwood Heights roots. (Joshua Wood/City Journals)

music, and of course, sumac flowers, the entire package whisks guests away for a truly international experience. The neighborhood has responded well to Panah’s conversion from coffee shop to authentic Persian cuisine, from five-star online reviews to its popularity with locals. “We are very fortunate that we get good support from the community.”

OLD WORLD FLAVOR

From the family kitchens of Palermo to their new home in Cottonwood Heights, the Mirenda family has opened six Sicilia Mia restaurants in just four years, including its location next door to Sumac Café in Cottonwood Heights. Old World traditions and classic Italian recipes match the festive Sicilian décor. “The neighborhood is very happy we are here and have been very supportive,” said manager Jerry Bermudez. “This is a family-style restaurant. We have been in Utah for four years, and for the past three years, we have won the best Italian restaurant in Utah.” Sicilia Mia encourages a leisurely dining experience. Guests can enjoy classic Sicilian appetizers and handcrafted cocktails, sip wine with their meal, and then enjoy a casual cappuccino with their tiramisu. While enjoying the hearty food, guests can take in the Old World interior that includes traditional checkered tablecloths, Mediterranean walls and portraits of Italian greats. “Our main dish is the carbonara. We toast the pasta inside a cheese wheel over fire,” said Sicilia Mia owner Giuseppe Mirenda. “We are Italian family–owned with authentic Italian, Sicilian food with European-style serving.”

ROOT’D HEIGHTS

IN

COTTONWOOD

Across the street from Sumac and Si-

CottonwoodHeightsJournal .com

cilia Mia is a building on the north side of Bengal Boulevard that has housed a number of Cottonwood Heights eateries over the years. Now it houses the newest addition to the area, Root’d Café. The restaurant just opened in early February and received a warm welcome to the neighborhood. “We didn’t announce it, we just opened and took down the parchment paper, and we’ve had very consistent traffic,” said Jess Donald, general manager and part owner. “We had over a thousand guests in the four days of that opening weekend. We were not prepared for such a positive response.” One day, not long ago, Donald was approached by friends Sean and Allison Steinman about a new project, and they wanted her on board. “They grew up here and they met here,” Donald said. “When the café here shut down, they just said, let’s save it.” With Donald and two additional partners on board, they did just that, remodeling and opening Root’d in a matter of weeks. Like its predecessors in the building, Root’d Café has already become a weekend breakfast and brunch hotspot. Unlike the others, though, Root’d is also open for lunch and dinner and offers wine and beer with its eclectic menu of American favorites. “We want you to come and enjoy, have a bottle of wine, share those small plates and enjoy the dessert that we’re making daily and putting in the case,” Donald said. The interior was made over by the team to celebrate Utah, Cottonwood Heights, and the outdoor recreation that make them home. The Root’d team plans to open its patio for additional seating this spring. They also hope to expand its outside area to accommodate live music in the summer. “We want it to be the spot where every-

one in the community knows to come and hang out and have a personal experience,” Donald said. “That’s why we’re called Root’d. We want to be rooted in the community and rooted with the people.”

ADDING FLAVOR TO THE AREA

The new culinary additions to Cottonwood Heights have helped add life to the neighborhood and greater diversity to the local cuisine. While the offerings of the three establishments are diverse, they share a commitment to authenticity. “What they have is original Sicilian food, and what we have is original Persian food,” said Panah of Sicilia Mia and Sumac Café. “What we have is authentic.” Locals have responded by filling tables

and spreading the word. As early as 5 p.m. on a Saturday in February, the parking lots on both sides of Bengal at 2600 South began to fill. The energy each owner and manager uses to talk about their food is returned by eager guests. “I’ve never been welcomed to a neighborhood more often than here,” Donald said. “Everyone has said, ‘I live down the street’ or ‘I live around the corner, and we’re so glad you’re finally here.’ I wasn’t expecting this much of a response, but it’s been awesome.” l

The interior of Sumac Café celebrates its Persian roots. (Joshua Wood/City Journals)

March 2020 | Page 5


Sex equality: Council considers resolution for Equal Rights Amendment By Cassie Goff | c.goff@mycityjournals.com

The ERA was first introduced in 1923, but never passed. (Photo courtesy of Florida Memory/Public Domain)

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tah could put the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) on the Constitution of the United States. A bill has been proposed in the Utah State Legislature to ratify the amendment. While the legislators deliberate, bill sponsor Rep. Karen Kwan has asked local municipalities to pass resolutions of support. “I am proud to live in one of the 25 states that guarantees equal rates of sex,” said Kwan in her request to local municipalities. H.J.R. 7 — Joint Resolution Ratifying an Amendment to the United States Constitution “ratifies the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.” “Most residents are shocked to find out that the ERA never did pass,” said Cottonwood Heights City Councilmember Tali Bruce. The ERA consists of one primary sentence: “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.” The enforcement of appropriate legislation is also included within the amendment. “This sends a powerful message to women and girls: they are valued,” Bruce said. The ERA was first introduced to the United States Congress in 1923, and “they borrowed language from our Utah Consti-

Page 6 | March 2020

tution,” Bruce reported. Specifically from Article IV, Section 1 of the Utah State Constitution. For any amendment to become part of the Constitution, 38 out of 50 states need to ratify it. Since 1972, when the ERA passed both the United States Senate and House of Representatives, 38 states have not been able to come together. To further complicate the situation, five states have rescinded their ratifications (Nebraska in 1973, Tennessee in 1974, Idaho in 1977, Kentucky in 1978 and South Dakota in 1979). This year, ratification bills have been proposed in Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, Virginia and Utah. As of publication, Utah’s bill has been proposed and remains in deliberation. Many municipalities around the valley have been showing their support. Bruce asked that the Cottonwood Heights City

Cottonwood Heights Councilmember Tali Bruce hopes ratifying the ERA will send a message to women and girls that they are valued. (Photo courtesy of Councilmember Tali Bruce)

Counc i l show their support by passing a resolution. On Feb. 4, Cottonwood Heights City Manager Tim Tingey provided the above background information, with some additional pros/cons, to the city council. One of the potential pros Tingey discussed was “reducing issues with workplace conflict that already exist.” However, one of the cons was indicative of the ERA being crafted over 40 years ago. “It would not protect non-binary residents,” said Tingey. “Gender is not a protected class

like race and ethnicity when it comes to laws and governmental actions.” Bruce provided additional information to the council about the implications of the ERA amendment. “Women are not constitutionally equal. When a female is discriminated against, she is held to a higher judicial standard. The ERA would ensure that equal treatment cannot be walked back.” Councilmember Scott Bracken questioned the local level to which this conversation has trickled down. “It’s not a municipal issue,” he said. “I was 10 years old before a woman could have a credit card in her own name. It’s not our grandparents’ issue, it’s still well lived,” Bruce said. Salt Lake County Councilmember Ann Granato spoke to the Cottonwood Heights City Council. “Equality can only be achieved by raising rights. Without the ERA, the statues and state laws that have made advances over the last few years are vulnerable. That’s not acceptable.” In addition, many members of the League of Women Votes and the ERA Coalition have attended city council meetings to voice their support and urge the council to do the same. l

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Budget priorities for Cottonwood Heights By Cassie Goff | c.goff@mycityjournals.com

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very year, the Cottonwood City Council attends a day-long budget retreat. The purpose of this retreat is to establish priorities for the upcoming fiscal year’s budget, review policies and procedures, analyze city expenditures and categorize funding opportunities. This year, the budget retreat was held on Jan. 22. Regularly, the biggest expenditure and impact on the city budget are the employees. Roughly 40% of city expenditures are for city staff’s wages and benefits. Every year, the city council analyzes an adjustment to that expenditure based on COLA (cost of living adjustment) and merit. For the upcoming 2020–2021 fiscal year, Finance Director Scott Jurges recommends increasing that expenditure by $477,000. Frequent conversations around the city’s storm water drain system over the past year influenced the potential of developing a storm drain water fee. Over $23 million of storm drain projects have been identified within the capital facilities plan. One of the more significant projects is to survey and clean all the storm drains within the city, which would cost around $900,000. In order to fund some of these projects, city staff members provided some preliminary research for potentially implementing a storm drain water fee. Salt Lake City, Layton and over 10 other cities charge a storm drain water fee anywhere from $3 to $17. The suggestion for this fee would be to charge it with residents’ power bills once a quarter. Beyond the possibility of a storm drain water fee, the Cottonwood Heights City Council has preliminarily decided not to consider increasing any other fees or taxes. For the 2020–2021 fiscal year, the city will not be increasing property taxes. Besides the already mentioned expenditures and routine expenditures such as road maintenance, the city council discussed oth-

er potential expenditures, including building new public works facilities, editing the city’s general plan, opening a dog park, developing bike lane barriers along Bengal Boulevard, land acquisition for the Bonneville Shoreline Trail, solar panels for City Hall and electric vehicle chargers. The Cottonwood Heights General Plan was adopted in 2005. City staff members believe it’s time to re-do that plan, since the anticipated lifespan of a general plan document is about 10 years. In addition, there have been multiple suggestions for edits over the past few years. If the city does not receive a grant to help fund that venture, it will be a potential expenditure from the city’s budget. City Manager Tim Tingey suggested looking into creating separated bike lanes along Bengal Boulevard. Cost estimates for bike lane barriers range between $8,000 and $35,000. However, Tingey suggested the possibility of finding some grant money to help fund that project. Residents have been requesting a dog park for years. With some research from the Parks, Trails and Open Space Committee, and a recommendation to fence off a section of Mountview Park for an off-leash dog park, council members are hoping to put some money toward a dog park this fiscal year. Some additional expenditures that have not yet made the council’s top priorities include: implementing more cameras and WiFi in public parks, trail alignment behind Target (7025 Park Center Drive) to the Santa Fe apartments (1550 Fort Union Boulevard), restoring the Old Mill site, replacing signs for the Ferguson Canyon Trail (7721 Timberline Drive), sidewalk revisions and landscaping and weed work for trailheads. Lastly, some suggestions for the City Council to consider that are relatively lowcost or no-cost include: sustainability initiatives, revising chapter 2 of the city code

City Manager Tim Tingey would like to see separated bike lanes along Bengal Boulevard. (Cassie Goff/City Journals)

One of the priorities for the City Council this upcoming year is to establish a dog park. (Cassie Goff/City Journals)

(“Governance and Administration”), revising the planned development district (PDD), revising an ordinance concerning private property, enforcing no-idling, discussing term limits, reassessing Columbus Day, pro-

hibiting puppy mills, developing policies for employee conflicts of interest, giving more decision-making power to the planning commission and passing a resolution for the ERA. l

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March 2020 | Page 7


Snowplows seeking shelter as city eyes public works budget By Cassie Goff | c.goff@mycityjournals.com

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uring the Cottonwood Heights City Council budget retreat discussed in an adjacent article, the council requested to get more information about the proposed public works building. On Feb. 4, Public Works Director Matt Shipp and Finance Director Scott Jurges presented that information. Currently, the Cottonwood Heights Public Works site (6579 South 3000 East) is only partially developed. There is a trailer that houses the public works crew break area, bathrooms and offices; there are also some storage facilities, used primarily for salt storage. Plans for the remaining facilities for the public works site were previously drafted but have been waiting for funding. The plans for facilities include equipment bays (primarily for the snowplows), additional storage sheds and an office building. “The priority would be the bays,” said Shipp. The bays would fit most of the main equipment, but not all of it, which is where the additional storage sheds come in. “We need to get the equipment in a controlled environment,” Shipp said. The public works crew members face problems when equipment is left out in the elements. Already they have experienced some issues, such as complications with an air brake, but they an-

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ticipate many more — shorter battery lives due to Utah’s cold cycle, shorter tire life and faster degradation of the overall exterior conditions, to name a few. For the current public works facilities plan, the total budget is around $5 million. The construction total estimate is $4,739,601.83. For shop and storage, the estimate is $1,974,375. For office, the estimate is $1,689,120 with $132,192 in furnishings. And the yard is estimated to cost $850,411.50. The total estimated project cost is $5,119,349.28. During the budget discussion for the proposed public works facilities, Mayor Mike Peterson reminded the council of the history of the city’s public works department. When the city was incorporated, public works was with the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT). Eventually, direct costs for public works were expected to double under UDOT. At the time, the city leadership did not want to absorb that; so they tried to work with Salt Lake County, hoping they would mitigate some of their concerns. Upon learning that they would not, the city began looking at contracting with outside providers. They decided to contract with Terracare, which was a company from Colorado. “That was a mess,” Peterson said.

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Plans for new public works facilities would store the majority of equipment, but additional storage sheds will be needed to protect all the equipment from Utah’s weather cycles. (Cottonwood Heights)

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You were just in a car accident, now what? 1. Have an emergency kit in your car. While this step comes before the accident occurs, it’s essential to be prepared. Whatever you kit entails, make sure it has a first-aid kit, flashlight, reflective triangles and a small (and simple) camera in case there’s been damage to your phone. We’re typically frustrated or frazzled after an accident and not inclined to rational thinking. Being prepared limits the possibility of forgetfulness. 2. Take a deep breath. Accidents are traumatic experiences. Taking a breath will shift focus from what just happened to what needs to be done next. 3. Get a status check on everyone in the car. Check with each passenger to see if they are OK. Have someone call 911 immediately if someone is injured or unresponsive. 4. Move to a safe location. Most insurance companies recommend relocating the vehicle to the sidewalk or shoulder of the road as soon as possible after the accident. If the damage to the car is minor, this should be relatively easy. But if there are major injuries or questions about the safety of the car, leave it where it is, even if its blocking traffic. 5. Increase your visibility. Turn on your hazard lights and set out your attention items from the emergency kit—flares, orange cones, reflective triangles, etc. One accident should not lead to another. 6. Stay calm. It is very easy to lose your temper in this situation, it’s human nature. Keeping your cool will keep the situation

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nless you’re one of the few anomalies in the world, we’ve all been in an accident. We’ve experienced that sickening feeling when your car makes unwanted contact with another vehicle. We’re frustrated and disheartened. While we may want to crawl into a hole, we can’t. There are things to do and we’ve given you 10 to be aware of.

from getting worse. If it wasn’t your fault, it’s easy to want to let your emotions loose on the other driver. This will cloud your judgment and may lead to something that does not help the situation. You still need to exchange information. 7. Exchange insurance information. This is imperative. If you are to file a claim on your car, you will need the other driver’s information. Most likely, after an accident you are feeling jumpy or stressed. It means when you try to write down their information your handwriting will look like ancient hieroglyphics and, unless you are a cryptographer, will be unable to read it later. We live in the 21st century, take a photo of their information and take photos of the damage done to both cars. 8. Don’t admit guilt. Every insurance company will tell you to do this. Even if you are at fault and it was you to blame. This could drive your premium up or even lead to you being sued. Let the police and insurance companies determine this. 9. Call the police. While some minor accidents don’t require a report to be filed, it’s up to the discretion of the drivers in the accident to call the police. Law enforcement can take statements, get information on injuries and property damage. Be sure to ask for a copy of the accident report. If there is a dispute, the officer will be an important testimony. 10. See a doctor. Depending on the injuries suffered or not, it is easy to skip this. A large financial situation has just happened with the car accident, you don’t want another one by seeing the doctor and jacking up your health costs. It’s important to consider it, or possibly speak with one. Adrenaline can be pumping after the accident and one might not notice the amount of whiplash to your neck. Symptoms can take 24 hours to appear. The warning signs include neck pain, stiffness, loss of motion in the neck, headaches, fatigue, dizziness and pain in the shoulders or upper back. It can be better to be safe than sorry.

Decade long zoning error left this property with limited options By Cassie Goff | c.goff@mycityjournals.com

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he owner of the building located at 2540 Bengal Boulevard requested a rezone for the building’s zoning designation. As city staff members researched his request, they noticed the zoning was changed without any legislative action from the Cottonwood Heights City Council. This minor color change on a map had major implications for the building owner. The sub-leased office building has been a part of the city since its incorporation. When the request to change the zoning was made, the building was zoned R-1-8 (single-family residential) which made “everything about this building nonconforming,” said Community and Economic Development Director Michael Johnson. Since the building was nonconforming according to the city’s zoning ordinances, leasing out the space was very difficult for the building owner. He recounted losing money because of the nonconforming zoning.  All of the city staff’s research suggests the building should have been zoned NC (neighborhood commercial) all along. Salt Lake County had it zoned as NC before Cottonwood Heights was incorporated.

CottonwoodHeightsJournal .com

The city’s original zoning document from 2005 shows the intent of having the building zoned as NC. On the zoning map, all of the adjacent buildings were zoned neighborhood commercial. When analyzing the building, city staff determined that the long use of the building should be neighborhood commercial, as it would comply more with the city’s general plan. However, in September 2009, the zoning changed from NC to R-1-8. “There’s no reason why that should have happened,” said Johnson. When taken to the Cottonwood Heights Planning Commission, some of the commissioners were concerned about some uses such as tattoo parlors, tobacco/vape shops, marijuana pharmacies, CBD shops, private clubs and check cashing or loan businesses. However, they ultimately recommend approval of the rezone.  On Feb. 4, Ordinance 339-A, amending the building for a rezone from residential single family to neighborhood commercial was approved by the Cottonwood Heights City Council unanimously.. l

The owner of this building has had difficulty leasing as per zoning noncompliance. (Cassie Goff/City Journals)

March 2020 | Page 9


Middle school students like the challenge in math program By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

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hile many people may just shake their heads when faced with the problem to find what value of x yields a minimum value of the sum (x-20) + (x-21) + (x-22) + (x-23) + (x-210), 83 Canyons School District middle school students tackled that problem at the Jan. 28 district’s annual MATHCOUNTS competition. Since 1985, local middle school students have participated in the MATHCOUNTS program to promote middle school mathematics. The program is offered in every U.S. state and territory. At the district competition, students had four rounds: a 30-question sprint round, a target round with four sets of two problems, a team competition where students work together on 10 questions and an oral countdown round. The top 14 students, plus their teams, competed Feb. 8 at the chapter level, which included Jordan School District. Canyons School District students regularly advance to state, and even nationals. While the math enrichment program is optional, District Instructional Specialist Rachel Marshall encourages participation in MATHCOUNTS. “A lot of students want extra challenging math,” she said. “It’s problem-solving. It’s not everyday math they do at school.”

More than 80 Canyons School District middle school students tackled challenging problems Jan. 28 at the district’s annual MATHCOUNTS competition. (Julie Slama/City Journals)

Most of the students learn how to identify and solve problems and understand concepts with their peers either before or after school. They prepare for the MATHCOUNTS competitions by studying previous years’ exams. “We were teaching sixth graders Pythag-

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

orean Theory for fun. We review what they learned and for some, learning new material,” Draper Park Coach Patricia Stirling said, citing work in probability, simplifying radicals, solving equations by substitution series, and quadratic formula. Draper Park parent Jody Rowser sup-

ports her sixth-grade daughter, Mary, and her teammates. “They’re learning something new and they’re having fun. It sounds like an oxymoron that they’re having fun while doing math, but they’re joking, drinking pop and getting to know other people with similar interests,” Rowser said. At Butler Middle School, coach Amy Giles brought 14 students, the most in recent years. “We invited our honors students, but we also announced if you enjoy math, please come to MATHCOUNTS,” she said. “These are kids who enjoy a higher level of math. My favorite part is when they go head-to-head to solve problems. Some have the answers before many have even read and processed it.” While MATHCOUNTS practices may be limited to the school year, Giles said some of her students participate in summer math camps. However, all her students benefit from mini-tutorials as they write and solve equations from story problems and learn different strategies to solve problems and take tests. “These students have a knack for math and are here just to learn more,” she said. “This will prepare them for skills they will need in high school, but right now, they’re just having fun competing as a team.” . l

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olladay continues to grow with new improvements from the Solstice Development Group. Their newest addition, The Station, will be a multi-story residential building 2240 East Laney Ave, just southeast of the Holladay Blvd. and Murray Holladay Road intersection.

Driven by extraordinary location, great design, and simplified living, The Station will be a four-story building (three levels of housing units with a parking garage underneath). The Station has been designed with security in mind. Residents will be able to take advantage of a safe and secured, climate controlled, parking garage; without an addition of a maintenance fee. “We have created a worry-free environment,” said Laura Johnson of Solstice Homes. “We joke that when you move into The Station, the only thing you will have to worry about is changing your air filter!” Solstice Homes will be implementing a Lock and Leave ideology so that residents can feel safe and secure. “By living in a lock and leave environment, you can now invest in the people and experiences that truly matter,” said Johnson. Two-bedroom and three-bedroom

Page 10 | March 2020

residences will be available at the Station beginning in Fall 2020. Depending on size, units range from 1,474 square feet to 1,996 square feet. In addition, units can be personalized for individual residents—as tenants have the options of picking from a modern elegance or traditional luxury interior design aesthetic; as well as either of the color schemes of traditional beige or traditional white. “With expertise from an award-winning design team, Doran Taylor, these designs cater to each resident’s style,” said Johnson. Each residence will have a private balcony with a linked sliding door; upscale appliances including KitchenAid stainless steel hood cover range, gas range, drawer microwave, and dishwasher; 9+ foot ceilings and oversized windows; a gas fireplace with a material surround and ledge; 5 inch baseboards; a fiberglass stained door entryway with window gas fireplaces; television jacks above the fireplaces; and elevated plugs in the bedrooms. Residents will also have the opportunity to utilize The Station’s private rooftop which will contain expansive patios, fire

pits, and open planters. When atop the rooftop, visitors will be able to take in the majestic view of Mount Olympus and the surrounding Wasatch Front. “We saw the demand for upscale residential living, so we designed condominiums that boast quality and convenience,” said Johnson. Surrounding the in-progress residential building site is a handful of parks and cafes, amenities, recreational opportunities (like the Holladay Historic Walking Trail) and social events; all within walking distance. In fact, The Station has earned a 66 walkability score, meaning that some errands can be accomplished on foot; a 36 transit score, meaning there are a few nearby public transportation options; and a 64 bikeable score, meaning there is some bike infrastructure. “You will be steps away from specialty grocery stores, award-winning restaurants, parks, entertainment, and fitness centers,” said Johnson. The Station will offer a complete living

experience. The design and construction teams were inspired by Holladay’s desire to create an inviting and livable downtown area, which will help to build the community. Solstice Homes is partnering with Think Architecture, Doran Taylor Interior Design, United Real Estate, Think, and Intercap Lending for construction, design, and sales. The Station is scheduled to be completed and opened in 2020. Sales offices are now open at 2340 Phylden Dr.(number104) in Holladay. Interested parties can also call at (385) 237-5536 or visit holladaystation.com.

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Tips to help children learn second language skills By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

At a recent Canyons School District dual immersion night, parents were given tips from district dual language staff, including Spanish Coordinator Ofelia Wade, to help support their children. (Julie Slama/City Journals)

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idgecrest Elementary parent Andrea Knight knows some basics in Mandarin, but she isn’t fluent, and wants to support her third-grade daughter, Maeli, who is in the school’s dual immersion program. “I want to learn more how to help her,” Knight said at Canyons School District’s recent dual immersion program parent night. Parents who do not know the target language can successfully support their children’s language learning, said Ofelia Wade, dual language immersion Spanish coordinator. “When we approach language learning, many people think of it the same way as math, with specific skill set,” Wade said. “With language, it develops the same way as the child’s first language, with constant exposure, hearing it in context, and eventually, generating a response we understand. Being exposed to the target language in a contextual way is the best opportunity to learn.” Wade, who recently was honored by the Spanish government for her DLI (dual language immersion) work, offered tips for those parents who want to support their children’s learning, but do not know the target language in the dual immersion program. • Watch a movie or television show in the target language. “If they’re already familiar with the show or sport, such as soccer, then they’ll already have an understanding and will begin to learn the language as it applies to the rules, conversation, culture,” Wade said, adding that most movies watched at home can change the track to the target language. • Play an online game or listen to the radio or audiobook. If an audiobook isn’t available, contact a nearby college or university and ask to have a contact of an international student and pay that student to record the book. “In one community, the dual immersion parents created a summer book reading club so their students could listen to the books, then speak in the targeted language to each other about them,” Wade said.

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• Encourage other dual immersion children to get together for a play date, whether it’s to create crafts related to the language’s culture or holiday, or to converse with each other. Wade also said often an international college student would welcome being immersed into local culture and may be willing to take part in an activity or having conversations with the children on a regular basis. She also suggested to talk to native-speaking teachers who have their children here and invite their children to take part alongside those who are learning the language. • Go to local restaurants and stores and have the children interact with servers or grocery store clerks. “I’ve taken my grandchildren who are learning French and will have them order in the language,” Wade said, adding that she will slip the server the order in English just to ensure it’s accurate. “It’s very powerful for the children to be able to communicate and have that opportunity.” She said if parents make it a habit to go to a market weekly and have students ask for regular items the family may buy, such as milk, it will tremendously support the child’s ability in the target language. • Arrange to have the child exchange emails, telephone calls, FaceTime or other ways to communicate on a weekly basis with those who are fluent in the language. “This will especially be helpful for middle school and high school students as the AP test they take in ninth or 10th grades will have a similar section, so this is a perfect way to support their learning,” Wade said. Wade also said that when parents set time for the child to practice, reinforce that practice (similar to attending a recital for piano or a game for a sport) and acknowledge their successes, they will be supportive to students learning their target languages. “Parents are capable of supporting their children learning the language even if they don’t speak it,” she said. “By doing this, it will empower children to feel like they can do more and be successful.” l

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Seven years without a cold? By Priscilla Schnarr

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More and more people are saying they just don’t get colds anymore. They are using a new device made of pure copper, which scientists say kills cold and flu viruses. Doug Cornell invented the device in 2012. “I haven’t had a single cold since then,” he says. People were skeptical but New research: Copper stops colds if used early. EPA and university studies Businesswoman Rosaleen says when demonstrate repeatedly that viruses and bacteria die almost instantly when people are sick around her she uses CopperZap morning and night. “It saved me touched by copper. That’s why ancient Greeks and Egyp- last holidays,” she said. “The kids had tians used copper to purify water and colds going around, but not me.” Some users say it also helps with heal wounds. They didn’t know about sinuses. Attorney Donna Blight had a viruses and bacteria, but now we do. Scientists say the high conductance 2-day sinus headache. When her Copperof copper disrupts the electrical balance Zap arrived, she tried it. “I am shocked!” in a microbe cell and destroys the cell in she said. “My head cleared, no more headache, no more congestion.” seconds. Some users say copper stops nightSo some hospitals tried copper touch surfaces like faucets and doorknobs. time stuffiness if used before bed. One This cut the spread of MRSA and other man said, “Best sleep I’ve had in years.” Copper can also stop flu if used earillnesses by over half, and saved lives. Colds start after cold viruses get in ly and for several days. Lab technicians your nose, so the vast body of research placed 25 million live flu viruses on a gave Cornell an idea. When he next CopperZap. No viruses were found alive felt a cold about to start, he fashioned a soon after. Dr. Bill Keevil led one of the teams smooth copper probe and rubbed it genconfirming the discovery. He placed miltly in his nose for 60 seconds. “It worked!” he exclaimed. “The cold lions of disease germs on copper. “They never got going.” It worked again every started to die literally as soon as they touched the surface,” he said. time. The handle is curved and finely texHe asked relatives and friends to try it. They said it worked for them, too, so tured to improve contact. It kills germs he patented CopperZap™ and put it on picked up on fingers and hands to protect you and your family. the market. Copper even kills deadly germs that Now tens of thousands of people have tried it. Nearly 100% of feedback have become resistant to antibiotics. If said the copper stops colds if used within you are near sick people, a moment of 3 hours after the first sign. Even up to 2 handling it may keep serious infection days, if they still get the cold it is milder away. The EPA says copper still works even than usual and they feel better. Pat McAllister, age 70, received one when tarnished. It kills hundreds of diffor Christmas and called it “one of the ferent disease germs so it can prevent sebest presents ever. This little jewel real- rious or even fatal illness. CopperZap is made in America of ly works.” Now thousands of users have pure copper. It has a 90-day full money simply stopped getting colds. People often use CopperZap preven- back guarantee. It is $69.95. Get $10 off each CopperZap with tively. Frequent flier Karen Gauci used to get colds after crowded flights. Though code UTCJ11. Go to www.CopperZap.com or call skeptical, she tried it several times a day on travel days for 2 months. “Sixteen toll-free 1-888-411-6114. Buy once, use forever. flights and not a sniffle!” she exclaimed. advertorial

Page 12 | March 2020

Cottonwood High students christen new black box theater with Shakespeare By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

Cottonwood High theater students rehearse in their newly remodeled black box theater, which will allow them more possibilities with performances, said school theater director Adam Wilcox. (Abbie Tuckness/Cottonwood High)

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hen patrons come to Cottonwood High’s black box theater to see William Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer’s Night Dream,” they will be transported to the 1930s and 1940s in New Orleans. That’s because with a newly renovated black box theater, theater director Adam Wilcox said his students are able to create more than before. “With this brand new space, we can create a set with a water feature like a bayou, with plants and life that we couldn’t do in our old space,” he said. “It’s bigger than life; it’s a magical swamp that will be intriguing.” The comedic show, directed by Wilcox, with costumes by Maddiey Howell, will take place at 7 p.m., March 10–12 and at noon and 7 p.m. on March 14. General admission tickets are $8 and are available at cwoodtheatre. com. “It’s chock-full with a ton of kids and parts, and will be the first show opening in the new black box,” he said. “We’re christening it with Shakespeare.” Wilcox has wanted his students to perform this play for a number of years, but only recently got the idea of tying it to the South after a trip to Disneyland where he and his wife spent time in New Orleans Square. “This is a story about magic, and we’re now able to do that with voodoo, fairies, Southern creole accents, beautiful Southern debutants and everything inspired by New Orleans. Shakespeare’s been around for 500 years, but what keeps it fresh is the accessibility in the story of love, the story of chance meeting, the story about our actors.” Renovation on the black box theater

began last fall and was complete in early January. It includes new lighting and sound, patron seating, a raised ceiling, new paint, larger area for actors and “revamping of a classroom into a wonderful space that is incredible. It truly is a black box theater now,” Wilcox said. “It feels like a new house when you move in, but it doesn’t quite feel like yours yet.” Wilcox’s students are also preparing “When She Had Wings” for the regional competition, which will be held in March. In April is the state theater competition, which the drama team has competed in every year since the school opened in 1970, he said. Recently, his students saw “Every Brilliant Thing,” a production on tour traveling around the state from the Utah Shakespeare Festival. It was part of the opening session of the Utah Theatre Association (UTA) annual conference, hosted at Cottonwood High, in January. “It’s a huge endeavor to invite and host 2,000 junior high and high school students from across the state, and Cottonwood is one of the few places that has a big enough auditorium,” said Wilcox, who is the UTA president. “It’s a beautiful show that is meaningful and impactful.” While some students’ questions were answered after the performance, some seniors took the opportunity to attend breakout sessions held at the University of Utah. “Students were able to listen to professionals from LA and New York, learn about professional theater and talk to each another,” Wilcox said. “It’s a great opportunity.” l

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Augmented reality helps teach students about famous historical figures By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

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Bella Vista third grader Sarah Van Wagoner shared what she learned about Susan B. Anthony on her poster, in a booklet and through her augmented reality video. (Julie Slama/City Journal)

self and not let things bring me down, to do whatever I can to fix things that aren’t right.” In her video, Sarah, dressed in a black dress with a lace collar made from a doily and a silhouette on the broach, stood in front of a projected image of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s home. “It was the home of her close friend, and just down from there, Susan B. Anthony spoke at the first women’s convention,” she said. “She believed everybody has equal rights and so do I. She made an amazing impact on the world.” Sarah’s mother, Jessica, said her daughter has learned more than research and preparation for the wax museum. “The students’ skills sets, in these four weeks doing one project, has taught them so many skills from start to finish, from learning about their person to performing on video; it has been amazing,” she said, acknowledging the changes in the program since when she was Sacagawea during her wax museum school days. “It’s been a big confidence-booster. They have a sense of accom-

plishment, dedication and commitment.” Allen said students also have become empowered and want to learn more. “They’ve learned about each others’ famous person, listened to their classmates, watched their videos,” she said. “Now, they’re wanting to read about their people and learn more about the impacts they made.” l

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ella Vista Elementary’s twist on the traditional wax museum is a hit with students and parents alike. A common third- or fourth-grade assignment across the Salt Lake Valley is to participate in a wax museum. Traditionally this means students learn about someone famous who has made an impact on society, then they write reports, create posters and dress up as the characters, ready to recite their story. But Bella Vista third-grade teachers have added a spark to this established approach. “We wanted to take them there, where this person who was famous met challenges and overcame them so they could understand more about that moment in history,” thirdgrade teacher Rebecca Allen said. “We added a piece of technology where students create a video in front of a green screen and using HP Reveal, they are able to trigger their image into augmented reality. It’s been cool to see the students at a factory, a battlefield, standing up somewhere, fighting for what was important.” These videos are seen by holding an iPad up to the students’ images on their display boards. Parents who came to see the wax museum could watch the augmented reality that included sounds, graphics and pictures to enhance the experience, Allen said. Students also shared in-person about their famous person’s life. They researched, created a timeline and a booklet about the person. On the poster boards, students included their person’s portrait they created during their art time. “They could choose who they wanted, but it had to be someone in the ‘Who Was’ books from our classroom library as all the work was done at school,” Allen said about the monthlong project. “It’s been so much fun to integrate all the different areas — history, research, writing, communication, art, technology — as they learned about that person’s culture and impact.” Third-grader Zinnia Bell said she liked not only making the movie, but also sharing what she had learned about Jane Goodall through the portrait and booklet. “She picked Jane Goodall because she loved animals,” her mother, Ciara, said. “But by doing this, she became motivated to learn more about her. She would tell me things she learned about her; she became more passionate.” Zinnia’s classmate Sarah Van Wagoner knew Susan B. Anthony was on a dollar coin, but Sarah learned more than the facts about Susan B. Anthony’s life through this experience. “I learned she made the world a better place,” she said. “She stood for women’s rights, against slavery, for colored people’s rights. I learned I need to stand up for my-

March 2020 | Page 13


Deep senior class, coaching staff rocketing expectations for Bengal lacrosse By Travis Barton | travis.b@thecityjournals.com

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n Melissa Nash’s first season as head coach of the Brighton girls lacrosse team, the team won one game. Last season, her second year, the team completed a massive turnaround, finishing 9-5 and reaching the quarterfinals. Just imagine what year three could bring. “I really do think this could be a really powerful year for us,” Nash said. She has high expectations for this season, and with good reason. Starting with a large senior class filled with talented players, all of whom Nash has coached for six years when she first joined the Brighton program. They were eighth graders then. Now they are “strong, senior leaders,” Nash said. Midfielder Paige Sieverts is one of those seniors, and shares the enthusiasm of her coach. “All of us (seniors) would always talk about how great we’re going to be our senior year,” Sieverts said. “We all just love the sport, we play year-round, we play club in the summer and play with each other all the time. We’ve been really excited for this year, and I’m pretty sure it’s going to be our year.” The senior class meshes well, Sieverts said, adding their close bond allows them to better assess team morale and individual players.

Also their love of the sport and familial feeling, according to Nash, trickles down to the rest of the team. “Their energy, enthusiasm and work ethic translates to everything,” she said. During the moratorium before the season, seniors were running practices. But it’s not just the senior class that gives Nash confidence. “I think we’ll be one of the most powerful teams because of our senior leadership, our coaching staff and the younger girls that are coming up,” Nash said. Nash attributed much of the team’s progress last year to her coaching staff. All but one have returned this year. “We have the best coaching staff in the state,” she said. Made up of two Brighton alums —Chelsea Owens and Courtney McCabe — and two Bingham alums — Rachel (Quigs) Muller and Annie Van Valkenburg (Nash played at Olympus) — the entire staff played in college, giving an extra edge of expertise. “It’s really unique to have such a powerful coaching staff,” Nash said. “Because a lot of schools have dads that have never played before or girls that have played, but not necessarily at the college level.” Owens runs the offense while Muller coaches the midfield and defense. Van Valkenburg coaches the goalies and McCabe

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Senior midfielder Paige Sieverts was named second team All-State last year after recording 17 goals and three assists during the regular season. (Photo courtesy Brighton lacrosse)

is in charge of the JV team. There is also a volunteer coach. Nash oversees everything and said coaches are there every day. Having that quality of coaching is a credit to the area, Nash said, noting Brighton lacrosse is a desired location, for both boys and girls, due to the players and parents. “We have such a great coaching staff,” Sieverts said. “They all play different positions, (but also) know every part of the field, how to play every position. So if you’re struggling with a certain defense, you know what coach to ask for help.” The new season is not without challenges. The Bengals lost talented attacker Hannah Gebauer for the season with a torn ACL, four contributors to graduation and another few to boundary changes under rules from the Utah High School Athletics Association (lacrosse is undergoing its first season as a UHSAA-sanctioned sport). The team will need someone to compensate for Gebauer’s absence as well as a new draw girl to win faceoffs. Sieverts, a second team All-State performer a year ago, is regaining full fitness herself after her own torn ACL seven months ago. But with its whole midfield line back, including Sieverts, and two defensive stalwarts in Sam Heugly and Baylee Bruce, Nash said the team needs players to “step up into their roles and have the passion for it” to meet expectations. Nash has watched Sieverts, who plans to play at Southern Virginia University

next year, along with all the seniors grow in front her eyes. For Sieverts, Nash said she’s watched her develop and start to love the sport having first picked up the stick in eighth grade. “(Sieverts) is seriously an incredible athlete,” Nash said. “And not only is she a great athlete and lacrosse player, but it’s the stuff she does outside of that. It’s her attitude, work ethic, being a good teammate, being coachable, respectful. In every way, in every aspect of the game she shows up to do her best and as a student she does the same thing.” “I think that’s why she’s been so successful in lacrosse and also why she’s going to be so great at SVU,” Nash said. That connection extends to all the seniors, Nash said. “I don’t know any other coach who has had the same girls for six years. I just love them.” From a one-win season where the team was “young and intimidated” being on the field against older girls, Nash said, to now being the oldest, will make “a huge difference with their mental capacity and their passion for wanting to win.” “We turned it around last year and we’re just continuing to move forward,” she said. “Our progress hasn’t stopped yet.” The Bengals kick off the season at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, March 10 at home. Due to construction at the school, home games will be played at Butler Park (7500 South 2700 East) next to the tennis courts. l

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March 2020 | Page 15


Defending champs ready to defend title

Perennial championship contenders return for boys lacrosse

Photo by Justin Adams

By Travis Barton | travis.b@thecityjournals.com

Josh Nydegger, seen here from last season, is one of the returning attackers for a potent Brighton offense this season. He finished with 46 goals and 28 assists a year ago. (Photo by Dani Johnson) Jax Vance (pictured here) is among the key players returning from last year’s championship squad along with Cameron Neely, London Botelho, Jackson McKeon, Chandler Turpin and Walker Schwendiman. The Bengals went 18-1 last year en route to a 3-2 state championship overtime victory over nearby Olympus. It was a season that saw them finish with a +46 goal differential scoring at least three goals in 14 of their 19 games.

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ay 2015. Almost five years ago. That’s the last time the Brighton High boys lacrosse team wasn’t playing in the championship game, losing that year in the semifinals. The ensuing four seasons saw the Bengals reach the championship game, winning in 2016 before losing the last three championship games. All by one goal, including last season’s 8-7 loss to Park City. “Anytime you make it that far, one of the last two teams it’s always a successful year,” said head coach Chris O’Donnell. “To lose by one for the third year in a row is heartbreaking for the kids. That’s a really good Park City team whose only getting better. In a one game series, there’s no room for errors, you make a couple and that’s all it takes in lacrosse.” O’Donnell, entering his third year on the coaching staff and first as head coach, made it clear the team won’t dwell on it, leaving the past behind and focusing on what works for the new team. “You gotta put it behind you and work to make sure it doesn’t happen again,” he said. Of course, in a talent-rich program, the Bengals have several returners — basically the entire offense — that O’Donnell expects to contribute. “Defense is where we lost most of our people, but we got a big number of returners. That always helps,” he said. While the team will break in a new varsity goalie and two defensemen, its offense will return all-state performers such as Blake Yates, Kyler Kehl, Josh Nydegger and Carter Budge. It also returns All-American long stick middie Matthew (MJ) Cirillo. Perhaps one of the biggest challenges

facing Brighton won’t be on the field. Kind of. Due to construction at the school, the varsity team will be forced to play home games at nearby Hillcrest High School, who doesn’t have a team. “More so I feel bad for the senior class that doesn’t get to play any senior games there,” O’Donnell said O’Donnell, a Virginia native, remembered when his high school switched from grass to turf and that team was forced to play its season with all road games. “So we still get a home game relatively close and we’re going to treat it as such,” he said. “But we’re also going to take care of their stadium, not going to trash it and make sure we respect Hillcrest for allowing us to play our games there.” “We’re going to make it our home away from home, our den over there,” he added. As for expectations this season, for O’Donnell, it’s simple. “At Brighton lacrosse it’s the same expectations every year, be one of the final two, make it there and give yourself a chance because anything can happen in those games,” he said, adding they have a region championship to aim for now that the sport was sanctioned by the Utah High School Athletics Association. O’Donnell also pointed out the support he’s gotten from the school and parents with the switchover with the coaching staff and the sanctioning. “The fact that they’re so involved is always a great thing for our program,” he said. The Bengals’ first game is at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 6 at Hillcrest High School against a team from Pebble Beach, California. l

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Brighton boys swim team finish runner-up, girls eighth at state Photos by Travis Barton

Junior Sophie Miyagishima swims the 100-yard butterfly during the 5A state swimming championships in Provo.

Senior Aaron Samms finished runner-up in both the 100-yard butterfly and the 100-yard backstroke to help the Bengals to a second-place finish

Brighton High coaches, notably head coach Todd Etherington in his blonde mohawk, look on during the state meet. Etherington was voted the 5A Coach of the Year by his fellow coaches.

CottonwoodHeightsJournal .com

March 2020 | Page 17


Let’s learn about UHSAA’s newest sport: Lacrosse By Catherine Garrett | c.garrett@mycityjournals.com

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tah high schools are welcoming boys and girls lacrosse to their sanctioned sports this spring season. This traditionally “East Coast” sport is not as familiar to sports fans here so we thought we’d ask some experts in the area to give us all a “Lacrosse for Dummies” lesson. The sport itself has plenty of differences between the boys and girls games so let’s look first at this individually.

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BOYS LACROSSE

We asked Collin Madsen, boys program coordinator for Intermountain Lacrosse, to help explain the sport from the high school boys perspective. • There are 10 players on each side of the field – three attackers, three midfielders, three defenders and one goalie. • Among its midfielders, teams can use a faceoff specialist, who may come right to the sidelines after faceoffs, and a long stick midfielder, who plays with a longer stick. • Faceoffs, where one player from each team crouch down and fight for control of the ball, start all quarters and also happen after each goal is scored. • Lacrosse sticks are allowed to be deeper for the boys than the girls and the string can be mesh or traditional leather. • During play, the attackers need to stay on the offensive side of the field while the defenders stay on the defensive side. The midfielders can be mobile all over the field. • Players can body-check another player that has the ball with referees allowing body contact from the shoulders down to the waist. Boys are required to wear full protective gear, including helmets, shoulder pads, elbow pads, rib pads, gloves and mouth guards. • Fields measure 110 yards long by 60 yards wide – that is marked with a midfield line, two restraining boxes and two creases around the goal. • High school games are four 12-minute stopped time quarters. Madsen said approximately 5,500 boys play lacrosse in Utah with 2,000 of those of high school age. “I’d hope and expect both of those numbers to increase slightly this year with sanctioning and definitely see a sizeable amount of growth at both youth and high school over the next three to five years and beyond,” he said.

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT GIRLS LACROSSE

Maddie Ferguson, the girls program director for Intermountain Lacrosse helped us understand the differences between the high school girls game and the boys. • There are 12 players on each side of the field – three attackers, five midfielders, three defenders and one goalie. • Games are started with a draw where centers from each team stand facing each other with the ball being placed between the

Page 18 | March 2020

heads of both player’s sticks. At the whistle, both players try and push or pull the ball high enough in the air that it clears the shoulders of both players. After a “fair” start, they can either get the ball from the air or the ground. The other midfielders are waiting outside the center circle until the draw is clear or a penalty is assessed and possession is given to the other team. Draws are used after each goal as well as at the beginning of the second half. • Lacrosse sticks have a traditional pocket and the material of that pocket can be different. • During play, no more than seven players can be below the restraining line on their offensive side of the field. On the defensive side, eight are allowed including the goalkeeper. • The top of the ball must be above the sidewall when it’s in the pocket. • No body-to-body or stick-to-body contact is allowed. An immediate yellow card is assessed if a player’s stick hits another player above the shoulders and a two-minute non-replaceable penalty is given (like the hockey penalty box). Two yellow cards equal a red card and players are subject to automatic removal from the game. Players are only allowed to make contact with their stick when the ball carrier is holding their stick below their shoulder. Girls are required to wear a mouth guard and goggles. • Goalies remain in the goal circle, or defensive area. The three defenders are in their restraining area and typically use a square or diamond setup while the three attackers do the same in their restraining area. The five midfielders are the only players that can be in the center section of the field for the draw with the center midfielder designated to take the draw. • Typically, players use a tight cradle motion between the ear and the shoulder when possessing the ball. • Fields measure 120 yards long by 70 yards wide and contain a midfield line, two creases, an arc at eight meters and an arc at 12 meters. • High school games are two 25-minute halves. “The growth here has been amazing,” Ferguson, a New Jersey native, said. “There are more girls high school teams than ever and it’s growing at a massive pace.” She noted that nearly 40 teams have been added since UHSAA’s announcement that the sport would be sanctioned. Also, Utah now has its own U17 national team where previously they had been combined with Idaho and Montana and with that increased presence, more All-American players are being recognized from the state and moving on to play collegiately.

Boys and girls lacrosse have now become the 18th and 19th sports sanctioned by the UHSAA with competition beginning this spring. (Photos courtesy Steve Crandall)

goal, possession is awarded to the team that is closest to the ball when and where it exits the field of play. So the offense can take multiple shots in a possession that miss the goal, and still retain possession. • An offsides penalty is assessed when too many field players are over the restraining line. The maximum is seven. • Only goalies are allowed in the crease or goal circle unless the goalie is not in that area. In that case, a field player can run through to pick up the ball, but no defense can be made against shots on goal since they are not wearing the appropriate gear. • A rule of “shooting space” protects players to ensure safe play. When players are on the attack and typically around the goal area, defenders must come in from an angle – not head on – to align their bodies to defend safely. “Shooting space” penalties result in an 8-meter shot (think penalty kicks in soccer). The “dangerous propel” rule puts the responsibility on an attacking player to refrain from shooting if a defender comes at them head on until the official makes the “shooting space” call. Otherwise, the penalties offset. “Those two rules are super, super complicated to observe as they are happening, to administrate as an official, and to put into action as a player,” Collins said. “So, I would say that shooting space is one of the most common penalties in the game and generally the least understood.” • Yellow and red cards typically are handed out for safety and sportsmanship violations and other penalties result in change of possessions or penalty shots, depending on where on the field the fouls occurred. • Whether it’s boys or girls lacrosse, the most basic movement on the field is a cradle which keeps the ball securely in a player’s WHERE THE BOYS AND GIRLS net. The use of an effective cradle leads to GAMES ARE THE SAME the best possible scenarios for a shot attempt • When a team shoots and misses the or a pass.

• When the ball is scooped off the ground, it’s called a ground ball. In a battle for that ball, players cannot hit the other’s stick if they don’t have possession of the ball. That is called an empty check and is basically a turnover, handing possession to the other team. • Defensemen use “d-pole” long sticks which are six feet long and designed for players to try and check and dislodge the ball from attackers from a distance. (Teams are only allowed to use up to four long poles on the field at one time while the other six players have a standard lacrosse stick that is required to be between 40-42 inches in length. These sticks allow for easier movement and protection. • Goalies wear full protective gear and have sticks with a much larger head than the field sticks. “The inclusion of lacrosse as a UHSAA-sanctioned sport is huge for the sport,” Madsen said. “I think that overall it is going to have a massive impact on the sport here in the state. It is something that the Utah lacrosse community has been talking about and hoping would happen for many years, and it has finally come to fruition. I think it brings additional credibility, awareness and interest to the sport that will continue in growing the sport both in participation and performance.” “Lacrosse is an amazing sport and it’s also an extremely different sport than many others,” Ferguson said. “Oftentimes there is a quick love for the game because there is a spot on the field for every kind of athlete. It’s also an amazing off-season training sport for other sports, so anyone focused on basketball has the footwork to be an amazing defender, if you love to run, well, you’re a great midfielder and football players get the physical aspect of men’s lacrosse.” l

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Don’t burn out By Cassie Goff | c.goff@mycityjournals.com

Take the ElevateHERTM Challenge

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ental health is ridiculously important. If we experience burnout (a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress: synonyms include overwhelm, fatigue, exhaustion, collapse), we can’t function to our usual standards. Luckily, we are beginning to take mental health seriously. We are talking about it more, leading to policies being implemented that place emphasis on mental health, more focus being paid to the individual and less stigmatization of diagnoses. I’m grateful to live in a time where my boss and colleagues understand if I need to take a mental health day. But…(you knew this was coming, right?) I don’t support the perpetuation of normalized self-care stereotypes. For those frequently on social media, common tropes can be found weaving through tags like #selfcaresunday and #mentalhealthmonday. Within the first long scroll, users will view pictures of female legs emerging from bubbly bath water, potentially from a bath bomb, with an assortment of accessories like a wooden caddy holding a book, lit candles, flower petals, and/or a glass of wine. In addition, users come across posts endorsing skin cream, face wash and other beauty products. These posts perpetuate the idea that self-care is wrapped up with beauty. (While there are positive emotions associated with the confidence of looking and feeling beautiful, which can influence one’s mental health) I believe that self-care should not be solely dependent on beauty. I should be able to take care of my mental health without glowing skin or radiant makeup. As Beyoncé says, pretty hurts. Instead, I whole-heartedly support perpetuating individuation – finding something to do for your mental health that works for you; something that supports your mental health, something that allows you to practice self-care, something that releases those dopamine neurotransmitters. For example, music makes me happy. A self-care ritual I routinely engage in is driving along I-15 and singing (and dancing) to the steering wheel. Additionally, I will always, always recommend therapy as an important and frequent practice to take care of your mental health (mostly anyone with psychology training will). If therapy is an option for you and your financial situation, please consider it. Just remember to stick with it – therapy sessions don’t begin to become beneficial until after the first few visits. Therapists need the opportunity to get to know their patient beyond just a single hour. However, many patients will drop therapy after their first session because they don’t feel that it’s immediately helpful. Don’t do that. “Therapy doesn’t work for me,” one of my friends told me last month. My immediate thought was that the therapist and patient

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weren’t a match, which happens. Sometimes you just need to find your therapist. However, this experience left my friend totally dismissive of therapy altogether. “That’s okay,” I told them, “let’s find a therapy that works for you.” What I meant by that was, let’s find your self-care ritual. After asking them a variety of questions trying to narrow down what contributes positively to their mental health, we figured out that their therapy needed to be prayer. After that conversation, he attempted to engage in prayer more often, and that self-reportedly helped his mental state. Back to the main point: mental health is important. Self-care is important. Find a selfcare activity that works for you, and practice it frequently. Make that activity a ritual. Maybe taking a bath does help your mental state (because you’ve figured out that works for you, not because of the conditioning of that ritual). Maybe that’s going on a drive and singing your heart out (I’ll see you on the freeway). Maybe that’s spending time outdoors. Maybe that’s exercising. Maybe that’s engaging in #selfcaresunday by going to church. Maybe that’s meditating. Maybe that’s eating ice cream. Maybe that’s snuggling with your pet. It doesn’t matter what the ritual is, as long as you’re making time for you and your mental health. l

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March 2020 | Page 19


Tips to help children learn second language skills By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

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idgecrest Elementary parent Andrea Knight knows some basics in Mandarin, but she isn’t fluent, and wants to support her third-grade daughter, Maeli, who is in the school’s dual immersion program. “I want to learn more how to help her,” Knight said at Canyons School District’s recent dual immersion program parent night. Parents who do not know the target language can successfully support their children’s language learning, said Ofelia Wade, dual language immersion Spanish coordinator. “When we approach language learning, many people think of it the same way as math, with specific skill set,” Wade said. “With language, it develops the same way as the child’s first language, with constant exposure, hearing it in context, and eventually, generating a response we understand. Being exposed to the target language in a contextual way is the best opportunity to learn.” Wade, who recently was honored by the Spanish government for her DLI (dual language immersion) work, offered tips for those parents who want to support their children’s learning, but do not know the target language in the dual immersion program. • Watch a movie or television show in the target language. “If they’re already familiar with the show or sport, such as soccer, then they’ll already have an understanding

and will begin to learn the language as it applies to the rules, conversation, culture,” Wade said, adding that most movies watched at home can change the track to the target language. • Play an online game or listen to the radio or audiobook. If an audiobook isn’t available, contact a nearby college or university and ask to have a contact of an international student and pay that student to record the book. “In one community, the dual immersion parents created a summer book reading club so their students could listen to the books, then speak in the targeted language to each other about them,” Wade said. • Encourage other dual immersion children to get together for a play date, whether it’s to create crafts related to the language’s culture or holiday, or to converse with each other. Wade also said often an international college student would welcome being immersed into local culture and may be willing to take part in an activity or having conversations with the children on a regular basis. She also suggested to talk to native-speaking teachers who have their children here and invite their children to take part alongside those who are learning the language. • Go to local restaurants and stores and have the children interact with servers or grocery store clerks. “I’ve taken my grandchildren who are learning French and will

At a recent Canyons School District dual immersion night, parents were given tips from district dual language staff, including Spanish Coordinator Ofelia Wade, to help support their children. (Julie Slama/City Journals)

have them order in the language,” Wade said, adding that she will slip the server the order in English just to ensure it’s accurate. “It’s very powerful for the children to be able to communicate and have that opportunity.” She said if parents make it a habit to go to a market weekly and have students ask for regular items the family may buy, such as milk, it will tremendously support the child’s ability in the target language. • Arrange to have the child exchange emails, telephone calls, FaceTime or other ways to communicate on a weekly basis with those who are fluent in the language. “This will especially be helpful for middle school

and high school students as the AP test they take in ninth or 10th grades will have a similar section, so this is a perfect way to support their learning,” Wade said. Wade also said that when parents set time for the child to practice, reinforce that practice (similar to attending a recital for piano or a game for a sport) and acknowledge their successes, they will be supportive to students learning their target languages. “Parents are capable of supporting their children learning the language even if they don’t speak it,” she said. “By doing this, it will empower children to feel like they can do more and be successful.” l

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City Journals presents:

FOOD & LOCAL DINING A publication covering local Food and Dining

Enterprising foodies By Linnea Lundgren | l.charnholm@mycityjournals.com

Uncle Bob’s Butter Country pancake syrups

Saturday pancake breakfasts have been a staple in the Smith household for decades. But the crowning glory has always been dad Bob’s homemade buttermilk syrup. “One day we were out of buttermilk, but we had an old container of Log Cabin (syrup),” Bob recalled. When the pancakes were served without dad’s buttermilk syrup, his children boycotted the pancakes. His oldest son asked incredulously, “Do you really expect us to eat this syrup?” “Right then, I knew the buttermilk syrup was something special,” Bob recalled. Special might be right. There have been few innovations in pancake syrups. “It’s been basically maple forever, some artificial syrups and low sugar ones, which nobody likes, and some fruit syrups,” Bob said. So buttermilk syrup — a favorite of home cooks — was ready to sweeten up the market. The Smith family dove in. After obtaining a cottage food certificate (an approval by the State), things started slowly. In their Cottonwood Heights’ kitchen, the eight Smith children plus parents made 250 bottles of syrup. It was a tricky business managing three gallon-sized pots, temperamental frothing syrup, and bottling. They sold the final product, Uncle Bob’s Butter Country syrup, at local farmers markets. It wasn’t until a few years later when Bob’s son Jared returned from his church mission and began attending BYU that things got going. “I knew that if we didn’t make and market this, someone else would,” Jared said, adding that once people taste buttermilk syrup, there’s no going back to artificial maple syrup. Jared set about experimenting, making hundreds of bottles, and consulting

CottonwoodHeightsJournal .com

food scientists, including his brother-inlaw, Cameron Smith, a recent food science graduate at the time. It took about 18 months to verify that Uncle Bob’s syrup was shelf-stable, because it is made with real buttermilk and cream. Getting the product to market proved to be another challenge. Eventually Harmons took them on and later, Associated Foods. Butter Country is now in 170 stores. Jared described the syrups as on par with premium maple syrup, but with new flavors, a creamy texture, and no artificial additives. For traditionalists, they have a butter-infused maple flavor. The original buttermilk flavor makes a good base for fruit toppings. New flavors include harvest spice and coconut cream. Bob said he hopes these syrups bring people back to the simple delights of a pancake breakfast. “It’s about making memories,” he said. Jared agreed. “The syrup reminds me of big, hardy pancake breakfasts with my family.” www.buttercountry.com

black market trading company’s chili-Pepper infused free range fudge

One autumn day, Rick Black was pureeing his varieties of homegrown chili peppers to freeze, when he had a fiery vision. “I wondered what the essence of the chilis would be like in a good quality hot fudge,” he recalled. “That is, literally, how the idea came.” With his favorite Dutch processed cocoa, he experimented extensively until he invented a chili-infused hot fudge sauce that, he said, “amazed” people, including his brother in Texas, who became his first

The original Uncle Bob’s Butter Country Syrup is made with real buttermilk and cream. (Photo courtesy Jared Smith)

The chili-infused Peppermint Free Range Fudge, which tastes like a warm, spicy, ooey-gooey Junior Mint. (Photo courtesy Marli Black)

investor. Black’s goal was to make a premium product with a unique twist. He sought sensations that brought the palate to life — a smoothness and sweetness from chocolate combined with the “essence” of chilis to bring out notes of heat and flavor. Black, a scientist by profession, got seven tasting groups together in his Sandy neighborhood. He’d test different types of chocolate, cocoas and combinations of chili varieties, then asked participants to fill out questionnaires. “Even if people didn’t like spicy foods, they all said it’s the best hot fudge they’d ever had,” he said. After perfecting his “proprietary blend” of seven varieties of chili peppers and finding the best cocoa, he leased a commercial kitchen, and with a humorous poke at our label-conscious culture, named his spicy creation Free Range Fudge. Popular flavors include original, extra spicy, milk chocolate and peppermint fudge, which Black’s daughters say is “like a warm, spicy, ooey-gooey Junior Mint.” New flavors for holiday offerings are in the test kitchen now.

Donning chili-patterned pants and wearing an aspirator and goggles while pureeing the chilis, Black makes his fudge in small batches, selling them through his website, www.blackmarkettradingcompany.com and at local stores. His family, including wife Jill, help cook and bottle the fudge. They work quickly, the beneficial result of Black’s production-efficiency studies. Daughter Marli does the photography, while daughter Kalen manages social media. Soon, he hopes to have his own commercial kitchen in order to work on transitioning from small-batch to large-batch production for distribution to grocery stores. “This is a passion,” Black said, and one that’s challenging to do while working full-time. But he’s having fun zooming around town in his Honda hybrid with a bold graphic of the Free Range Fudge mascot — a cartoonish chili pepper wearing a cowboy hat. On the rear window is written his favorite quote, “We don’t pen up our peppers.” “Happy peppers make happy fudge,” he quipped.

March 2020 | Page 21


SweetAffs Cakes and Cookies

mas for her creativity. Her work ethic and determination comes from her dad, who passed away three years ago. And her love of cake making? She credits that to the TV show, “Cake Boss” and the inspiration of star baker Buddy Valastro. So, 12 years ago, the West Jordan resident started educating herself through YouTube videos, cake blogs, and “a lot of trial and error.” Soon, she developed recipes and learned techniques that gave her confidence to make cakes and cookies for Swensen is more than just head baker friends and family. They, in turn, encouraged her to start and cake/cookie decorator for her busian Instagram account (@sweetaffs), which ness. She’s also the janitor, finance direc“just took off,” she said. Now, she books tor, photographer, videographer, teacher, researcher, social media whiz, and inven- three months in advance for orders and has expanded into teaching cake and cookie tory clerk. “You have to wear so many different classes, which often book out in a day. As a self-described social butterfly, hats,” she said, referring to food entrepreneurship. “You have so much that you end Swensen loves teaching others as much as she loves baking. “Sometimes we sell ourup learning along the way.” Swensen credits her mom and grand- selves short and think we can’t do something,” she said. When her students have

On the long counter of Afton Swensen’s commercial-grade kitchen sits flour, sugar, butter and M&M’s, ready to be made into Valentine’s Day cookies. Besides custom cookies, Swensen’s home-based company, SweetAffs, creates specialty cakes — her most requested flavor is Biscoff cookie batter and her most popular cake is a four-layer colorful unicorn creation.

that “I can do this” moment, she is joyful. Time restraints have honed her designs (think “simply elegant” or “colorfully fun”) and baking work. “Baking has created a whole new sleep schedule for me,” she said. With a 2-year-old, a part-time job, and a small farm she runs with her husband, she works late most nights. “It’s been a learning process of what I can handle and what I can take on,” she said. “I do things in stages.” She’s hoping to add more classes, including online classes for her out-of-state fan base. One day, she wants to operate SweetAffs full time. Until then, she’ll work late into the night baking and decorating the dozens of cookies and several cakes she makes each week. “I am grateful that I am in a place to make this a reality,” she said. “I try to be grateful for it and for everything I have.” The four-layer unicorn cake is most often requested www.sweetaffs.com and on Instagram for kids’ birthdays says SweetAffs’ owner Afton Sw@sweetaffs ensen. (Photo courtesy Afton Swensen)

Food competitions take the cake By Jet Burnham | j.burnham@mycityjournals.com Eight teams of students and teachers emerged from the dust of flour and sugar with creations such as panda-faced red velvet cupcakes and apple cinnamon cupcakes with apple cider buttercream and a last-minute caramel drizzle. The latter was named winner of Fort Herriman Middle School’s second annual Cupcake Wars held Jan. 22.

A passion for cooking, the thrill of competition and bragging rights, motivates many teens to enter cooking competitions. “It lets them be creative in a way that school doesn’t always let kids be creative,” said Madison Heist, teacher and judge at FHMS. All seventh graders learn basic cooking skills. Older students take Foods and Nutrition classes as electives. The most serious high school students take two years of ProStart classes to prepare for food service industry jobs. But—it’s the contests that really take the cake. Competitive cooking is a popular TV trend that has influenced many foods instructors to incorporate contests into their curriculum—who can create the best smoothie or ice cream sandwich? Others host afterschool competitions for any student who thinks they can craft the best pizza, burger or cupcake. For more intense competition, the Family Career and Consumers Leaders of America (FCCLA) offers student competitions in Baking and Pastry and Culinary Arts events. ProStart hosts region, state and national competitions requiring teams to create and execute a three-course meal. Jordan High foods instructor Shauna

Page 22 | March 2020

Young said competitions provide learning opportunities students can’t get in a classroom. “In the classroom, they have a limited amount of time and oftentimes a limited amount of resources,” Young said. “Having students compete teaches them to try new things, expand their comfort zone, build confidence, and do hard things that they didn’t think they could do.” JHS junior Jordan Castaneda likes that competitions allow him to be more creative. For the ProStart competition later this month, his team will make shrimp nigiri, stir fry chicken in a noodle nest, and layered mocha Chantilly cake. They will have just one hour and two gas burners to execute their menu and will be judged on taste, presentation, technique, time management, knife safety, sanitation, food cost, menu planning and business plan. During competitions, students are expected to problem-solve on the fly. As a FCCLA event judge, Kristy Yeschick watches for how well students respond to problems under pressure. “In the classroom they have that safety net,” she said. “If they mess up, it’s OK, they can do it again. Whereas in the competition, you’ve got to be at your top game.” Copper Hills High School foods instructor Megan Maxfield said competitions teach teamwork, problem-solving, time management, and leadership skills. When CHHS teams competed in the FCCLA regional Baking and Pastry event, problem-solving began weeks before the competition. The recipes they were given recipes for chocolate chip cookies and

Fort Herriman Middle students put finishing details on their cupcakes. (Jet Burnham/City Journals)

garlic bread knots had errors, said senior Brooklyn Gutierrez. Measurements and cooking times had to be adjusted through trial and error during several practice runs. At competition, the team had to adapt to even more complications: Their cookie dough got too cold, the kitchen equipment was unfamiliar, and humid weather affected their recipes. FHMS teacher Kayla Martin, whose team has won cupcake wars both years, said skills gained through competitions benefit everyone, not just those interested in highly competitive culinary careers. “Everybody works a fast food job at some point in their life,” she said. “So it’s good practice for working in a kitchen or a high stress job.” Many students love the thrill of the stressful environment of competition.

“I like the pressure,” JHS senior Mia Conham said. “I think it’s fun and I get really competitive.” JHS senior Holly Tang said when they are prepared, they can enjoy the competition. “We always have a ton of fun,” she said. “We’re always laughing and joking with each other.” Emma Powell, a competitor in FHMS’s Cupcake Wars, said it’s easy to forget about the pressure when doing something you enjoy. “It has a competitive aspect to it but you also have fun in the moment,” she said. “Then you realize there’s 10 minutes left. There are people you have to beat. So you put more effort than you think you can put into it.”

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


It’s a life of learning for this wine educator By Linnea Lundgren | l.charnholm@mycityjournals.com All during this winter, Sheral Schowe’s mind was focused on sunny Spain. Not for vacation planning (she wishes), but rather to study Spain’s 17 autonomous wine regions and the dozens of unique appellations. There were thousands of wine facts to know, maps to memorize and soil conditions to understand. For 6 to 8 hours each day, Schowe sat at her desk studying for the Wine Scholar Guilds’ rigorous Spanish Wine Scholar certification program. “It’s the hardest test I’ve ever taken, and I have a master’s degree,” joked the Sandy resident. But such diligent study is all in a day’s work for Schowe, the first female wine educator in the state who started Utah’s first official wine school, Wasatch Academy of Wine, decades ago. Wine has always played a central role in Schowe’s life. She grew up near California’s wine country, where wine was appreciated and served with dinner and visits to wineries were regular events. So, when she moved to Utah in the ’70s, she said, “I anticipated a change in the wine culture.” But, when she found herself at a Provo restaurant and the waiter poured her “wine,” which turned out to be a disguised bottle of Welch’s grape juice, she thought, “What kind of bizarre place am I in?” Utah, she decided, was ripe for a proper wine school. But that would come a bit later. Instead, Schowe, who had just received a master’s in education administration, found herself developing Utah’s first community education program serving children and adults with disabilities. Granite School District told her if it was going to succeed, she’d have to fundraise for the participants’ enrollment fees. “I thought, ‘How incredible, I got a master’s degree just to do bake sales and car washes,’” she said. Then her thoughts turned from tedious cake baking to the joys of wine tasting. She enlisted Utah chefs to donate food for a tax write-off and then gathered every oenophile (connoisseurs of wines) she knew to make a donation, bring a bottle, and learn about it. “The [District] was impressed with my fundraising, but I never told them it started with wine,” she said. Enough money was raised to open several programs in the District that addressed the academic needs of adults with cerebral palsy, gave children access to wheelchair basketball, and created programs for developmentally disabled adults to learn independent living skills.

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“And it all was originally started by wine education,” she said. Several years later, in 1991, she started Wasatch Academy of Wine. For Schowe, the appreciation and study of wine is a gateway to many stimulating experiences in life. Besides new tastes, aromas and textures, an education in wine opens up new worlds — the geology of a grape-growing region, its society, art, history and culinary expressions. “You can become intellectually and experientially connected to the world through wine,” she said. While academic study is necessary, she values learning through experiences, especially through travel and meeting winemakers. “Last year I was in Europe for two months. The purpose was to meet with winemakers, to walk through their vineyards, to watch them make wine, to visit cellars, to taste wine with their families and experience their food traditions,” she said. “I bring those stories home and it greatly enhances the presentation in all my classes... it gives a deeper meaning.” Schowe focuses on European wines, while other teachers at the Academy cover New World wines. Her life’s goal is to taste every wine from every appellation in France, Italy and Spain and, while she’s tasted many, there are hundreds she hasn’t. “It is like a treasure hunt,” she said. Her students today have increasingly sophisticated palates, Schowe said, so the Academy has expanded to include Wine Scholar Guild classes, wine dinner clubs, and popular food and wine pairings. She’s delighted to now see local restaurants with well-researched wine lists and knowledgeable staff. And diner’s tastes have ventured beyond just wanting to know what the best Cabernet is, she said. People want to explore wines in detail, such as dry sherries from Andalusia, the southernmost region of Spain. That’s something she’s excited to teach now that she’s spent all winter studying Spanish wines. “I look forward to planning new and creative ways for wine enthusiasts of Utah to learn about wine, where and how it is made, and connecting them with the hard working and caring people who make it,” she said. Visit www.wasatchacademyofwine. com or on Instagram @utahwineschool.

Sheral Schowe has been teaching wine education courses through her school, Wasatch Academy of Wine, since the ’90s. (Photo courtesy Sheral Schowe)

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Meatless doesn’t mean tasteless By Alison Brimley | a.brimley@mycityjournals.com

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If one of your goals in 2020 is to eat less meat, you’re in luck. 2019 saw the widespread introduction of meatless meal options, even in fast food restaurants like Del Taco and Burger King. Of course, many people go meat-free for the sake of animals. But eliminating animal products is also one of the best ways to reduce your carbon footprint. Even just cutting down on meat can have an impact.

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Hires Veggie H, made with a delicious house-made veggie patty, can be topped with grilled onions, jalapenos and mushrooms. (Alison Brimley/City Journals)

You might say meatless burgers are having a moment. Meat-free patties come in two basic categories: those designed to imitate meat and those that embrace their veggie essence. Of the meat imitators, the Impossible Burger (made largely of soy protein) and Beyond Burger (made of pea protein) reign supreme. They’re very similar to real meat in taste, texture and even macronutrient content. Veggie patties are usually made from a blend of vegetables, grains and seeds, and their macronutrient content reflects that. Overall — especially when prepared with all the fixin’s — meatless options aren’t necessarily healthier than their animal-based counterparts. But we’re just talking taste here. If you venture downtown, plant-based eateries and meatless options are easier to find. But restaurants in the south Salt Lake Valley have some tempting offerings as well. Here’s a roundup of the best meatless burgers. 1. Ice Haüs’s Kein Fleisch Burger (Murray) Ice Haüs, a bar and restaurant, offers one of the more extensive vegan menus you’re likely to find at a place for omnivores. Their Kein Fleisch (German for “no meat”) burger does not disappoint. Ice Haüs uses Beyond patties, but they certainly put their own spin on the burger, which is topped with vegan kielbasa and cheese, beer-caramelized onions, sautéed mushrooms, sauerkraut, and spicy mustard. It’s heavy, flavorful and satisfying. If you’re looking for a big, juicy meatless burger you probably won’t notice it’s meatless, this is the one to try.

2. Hires Veggie H (Midvale) Unlike many burger joints that source their meatless patties from outside companies, the patty at the center of Hires Veggie H is house-made. The patty is a blend of carrots, broccoli, onions, green peppers, celery, mushrooms, rice, wheat, rye, oats, barley, seeds and spices that tastes a lot better than it sounds. It’s also topped with a soft bun, cheese and fry sauce. It’s not meant to imitate meat—the veggie patty is its own thing—but it might be as close to the greasy deliciousness of a classic Hires Burger as you can get without involving a cow. Plus, almost any of the burgers on Hires’ menu can be made with a veggie patty instead of beef patty, so there are plenty of options for meat-free eaters. 3. Dog Haus’s Impossible Burger (Sandy) Dog Haus is known for their hot dogs and sausages, but they do have a fair selection of plant-based options. Their Impossible Burger isn’t large, but it does have everything Utahns love in a cheeseburger: pickles, iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, cheese and fry sauce. The sweet King’s Hawaiian roll that serves a bun completes the sandwich. I dare you to tell the difference between this and a beef burger. 4. Crown Burger’s Garden Hamburger (Sandy) Crown Burger doesn’t make its meatless option easy to spot on a menu. But the Garden Hamburger is, in fact, vegetarian. There’s not much to it except for a tasty bun, fry sauce, fresh toppings and a Gardenburger patty (made from mushrooms, oats, cheese and spices). And while it’s not meant to fool you into thinking it’s made of meat, it is a pretty delicious sandwich. 5. Fueled Kitchen’s Black Bean Veggie Burger (Draper) Fueled Kitchen offers one of the most popular meat alternatives: a black bean burger. Their black bean burger has a subtle spiciness, accentuated by the tomatillo spread that tops the patty. The whole wheat bun is soft and the sandwich feels substantial, but it lacks the greasiness many crave in a burger.

The Kein Fleisch burger at Ice Haüs is completely vegan, though you wouldn’t guess by the look (or taste) of it. Ice Haüs has an extensive vegan menu. (Alison Brimley/City Journals)

Cottonwood Heights City Journal


Middle school students like the challenge in math program By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

W

hile many people may just shake their heads when faced with the problem to find what value of x yields a minimum value of the sum (x-20) + (x-21) + (x-22) + (x-23) + (x-210), 83 Canyons School District middle school students tackled that problem at the Jan. 28 district’s annual MATHCOUNTS competition. Since 1985, local middle school students have participated in the MATHCOUNTS program to promote middle school mathematics. The program is offered in every U.S. state and territory. At the district competition, students had four rounds: a 30-question sprint round, a target round with four sets of two problems, a team competition where students work together on 10 questions and an oral countdown round. The top 14 students, plus their teams, competed Feb. 8 at the chapter level, which included Jordan School District. Canyons School District students regularly advance to state, and even nationals. While the math enrichment program is optional, District Instructional Specialist Rachel Marshall encourages participation in MATHCOUNTS. “A lot of students want extra challenging math,” she said. “It’s problem-solving. It’s not everyday math they do at school.” Most of the students learn how to identify and solve problems and understand concepts with their peers either before or after school.

They prepare for the MATHCOUNTS competitions by studying previous years’ exams. “We were teaching sixth graders Pythagorean Theory for fun. We review what they learned and for some, learning new material,” Draper Park Coach Patricia Stirling said, citing work in probability, simplifying radicals, solving equations by substitution series, and quadratic formula. Draper Park parent Jody Rowser supports her sixth-grade daughter, Mary, and her teammates. “They’re learning something new and they’re having fun. It sounds like an oxymoron that they’re having fun while doing math, but they’re joking, drinking pop and getting to know other people with similar interests,” Rowser said. At Butler Middle School, coach Amy Giles brought 14 students, the most in recent years. “We invited our honors students, but we also announced if you enjoy math, please come to MATHCOUNTS,” she said. “These are kids who enjoy a higher level of math. My favorite part is when they go head-to-head to solve problems. Some have the answers before many have even read and processed it.” While MATHCOUNTS practices may be limited to the school year, Giles said some of her students participate in summer math camps. However, all her students benefit from mini-tutorials as they write and solve equations

More than 80 Canyons School District middle school students tackled challenging problems Jan. 28 at the district’s annual MATHCOUNTS competition. (Julie Slama/City Journals)

from story problems and learn different strategies to solve problems and take tests. “These students have a knack for math and are here just to learn more,” she said. “This

will prepare them for skills they will need in high school, but right now, they’re just having fun competing as a team.” l

Student filmmakers say no to vaping, e-cigarettes By Julie Slama | j.slama@mycityjournals.com

M

iddle-schoolers and high schoolers across the Salt Lake County will have the opportunity to share their short films addressing the dangers of vaping and e-cigarettes at the third annual Kick Ash Film Festival. After working on their 30- to 60-second films and submitting them into the film festival, the top films are to be shown at 6:30 p.m., March 19 at the Leona Wagner Black Box at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center in Salt Lake City. The public is invited to attend the free event. “Vaping amongst Salt Lake County youth has increased 500 percent since 2011,” said Julia Glade, Salt Lake County health educator and film festival coordinator. “Yet, 56 percent of high school seniors say e-cigarettes are harmful. We want to change that perception.” Glade put together the film festival as a way for youth to share with their peers and community the means to communicate tobacco prevention and cessation. “Teens tend to use their phones and are very savvy using technology, so this way, they can create films about prevention and their peers are more apt to listen more,” she said.

CottonwoodHeightsJournal .com

Teens also are involved in supporting the film festival. The Salt Lake County Healthy Teen Advisory Board suggested this year’s theme: “Huff, Puff, Hooked” and some of the judges are students. Before the red carpet event, the judges will select their top middle school winners (seventh through ninth grades) and their top high school winners (10th through 12th grades). First place will receive $350; second place, $250; and third, $100. There also will be audience choice awards and the school which has the most entries will be awarded $100. Prizes and monetary awards were donated by sponsors, including University of Utah Health Plans, Primary Children’s Hospital, Intermountain Health Care and R.C. Willey, Glade said. In addition, this year’s winners as well as past film winners will have their films posted on the Salt Lake County YouTube channel. More than 50 entries were expected to be entered by the Feb. 27 deadline, Glade said. The first year, students submitted 29 entries. “Each year, there is more interest,” she said. “We already have sponsors wanting to Last year, Draper Park Middle Sc hool’s Ryan White received $400 as the middle school level Kick Ash Film Festival winner. (Julie Slama/City Journals) be a part of it next year.” l

March 2020 | Page 25


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I’m about to pass a milestone, the second year of my husband’s passing. We were married for 37 years, created a beautiful family and seemed to be living an enchanted life, being thankful for what we had and working hard to achieve our goals. While our life together would seem nothing extraordinary to Hollywood, to us we had made magic. Our frugal lifestyle had allowed us to retire early in anticipation of travel, we created healthy and happy children, and had a good home. In spite of our challenges we had made it. Then we got the tragic news and a late cancer diagnosis left us stunned and floundering. Our own private Hollywood fairytale was over, my husband had precious few months left to live. He would spend the next 2 months giving last pieces of advice to his children, catching up with long lost friends, visiting with family and friends, tinkering around the house taking care of little things that were lingering on his to do list and giving me a plethora of instructions. These included the little things, like who to take the car to when it needed fixing and remembering to leave a check under the mat for the lawn mowing man, to the much larger pieces of financial matters. His mind so

full of making sure I would be okay that these instructions would sometimes come in the middle of night and he’d wake me urgently to make sure I would remember that garbage day is on Thursday. Then one morning he hit with a big one, he’d been thinking about his funeral service, or lack of, and announced to me that he did not want a memorial service, stating that they were a waste of money. “Do not have a funeral for me, go traveling somewhere instead and tell our friends to get outside and make a good memory in my honor. Tell them, time is shorter than you think and don’t waste any more of it.” When a loved one dies, we gather to celebrate their life. When we don’t do that it can leave us feeling empty and possibly a little guilty. If you opt to forgo the traditional funeral here are some things, I found helpful, to honor my husband. 1. Post a tribute on social media: Hit the photo albums and post a photo collage. Ask friends to share memories on the post. 2. Have a gravesite friends and family reunion on their birthday or other special occasion. Set up chairs or have a picnic, laugh and share memories. 3. Create a new tradition. The process of creating a tradition can alone be very meaningful. Set a date to volunteer in

memory of your loved or create an annual family dinner in your loved one’s honor. 4. Go somewhere meaningful. Travel to a place you shared special memories or a place they didn’t make it to, this can be especially heartwarming if done with special family and friends. If you opted for cremation you might scatter a few ashes. I leave a pinch of my hubby’s ashes when I travel to destinations we had planned to go together. 5. Plant something and watch it grow. It could be a tree or a special flower that was special to your loved one. My hubby loved pumpkins, so I plant one in my yard each year to honor him. 6. Hold an anniversary memorial. You may have skipped a funeral, but this doesn’t mean you can never have a memorial. If you are feeling a lack of resolution, pick another meaningful day to have a memorial. This could be as simple as a memorial BBQ or dinner party to a full formal memorial service. Your family and friends will be there to support you no matter how you choose to close your loved one’s life. Honoring a loved one in a most personalized remembrance is absolutely beautiful no matter how you choose to do it. l

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Carry a Tune About the time the peasants started to revolt, I was done with Cinderella. Yes, I was tired and grumpy (it was Tuesday after all) but the musical had gone on way too long and it just. needed. to. end. I’ve read the book and watched the Disney cartoon a gajillion times – and I KNOW there are no rioting peasants in Cinderella. But this musical not only had an uprising, it had a side story about the stepsisters and an idiot king being duped by his advisor. #FacePalm Turning fairy tales and Disney cartoons into live musical extravaganzas has become a thing; a thing that’s trying my (depleted) patience. Broadway writers take a perfectly-fine 90-minute animated movie and transform it into a two-hour (or more) event with NEW SONGS that no one cares about. The audience is just thinking, shouldn’t this be over? I usually love musicals. I hum songs from Rodgers and Hammerstein productions, I adore Stephen Sondheim’s lyrical wordplay and Lin-Manuel Miranda redefined musical production. But lately, I’ve found myself irritated with songs that seem unnecessary, boring or just meh. Do cast members have to break into song when someone goes to the barber, or the grocery store, or the high school library? When a character walks out of the bathroom and violins soar as he sings about his love for toilet paper, I’m ready to throw my Jordan almonds to the floor and storm out of the theater. Songs should never stop the action. The

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lyrics should continue the story without torturing the audience with a nonsensical waste of time. If you can take a song out of a musical and it doesn’t affect the story, it isn’t necessary! In fact, I suggest limiting musicals to two or three really good tunes. You only remember a few songs, anyway. Love songs are the worst. We get it. The two main characters have a love/hate relationship. At this point in the musical, we love/hate them, too. I hear a piano chord and my shoulders tense, waiting to hear a song about how love is a disaster. (One hour later, they’ll sing a song about how love is glorious.) There are big production numbers, infinite costume changes and (inevitably) someone jumps on the coffee table and tap dances while singing about the weather. If I jumped on my coffee table, it would explode into thousands of toothpicks. There’s also a list of musicals that make you wonder if the idea didn’t come from a two-day drinking bender, followed by a concussion and a small bout of the flu. Carrie should never have been a musical, in fact, let’s take all Stephen King novels off the list for future productions. King Kong on Broadway?? Where do songs fit into that disaster? And NO ONE has given me any good reason why Mamma Mia hasn’t been banned worldwide. Don’t get me started with Cats. Sports musicals are always iffy because who’s the audience? Sports fans? Wife: But it’s a musical about the New York Yankees!

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Husband: Why don’t we just go to a Yankees game? Wife: Well, that’s just stupid. So what makes a good musical? Hamilton’s multicultural version of Founding Fathers’ history changed the game with its rap lyrics, imperfect hero and breeches. Wicked has a twisted backstory and amazing vocals. I’m just sayin’, let’s not make musicals just because the movie/cartoon/book or Geico ad was super popular. Otherwise, the peasants might revolt and storm out of the theater.

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WEST COVINA FOUNTAIN VALLEY OXNARD 22705 Savi Ranch Pkwy SAN MARCOS LOS Across ANGELES from the AV Mall of Montclair Plaza 39626 10th St West S. Montclair Plaza Ln Located in the Just East of 405 5055 Fwy Located inYorba theLinda, CA 92887 1050 Los Vallecitos Blvd of the 10, 714-363-9900 Palmdale, CA 93551 facebook.com/AshleyHSHawthorne facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaAna Montclair, CA 91763 South 661-225-9410 facebook.com/AshleyHSYorbaLinda SALT LAKE CITYCenter 7000 E Mayo Blvd 8515 SEastland Emerald Drive DRAPER LAYTON OREM LAGUNA HILLS SANTA CLARITA Shopping 18060 Euclid St 909-625-4420 Market Place at Oxnard San Marcos, CA 92069 Exit Convention Center facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmdale 6233facebook.com/AshleyHSMontclair E Southern Ave Just North of Center Point Market Place (the Family Center760-539-4663 at Orem) 17732753 SAZ 300 W E85284 Eastland Ctr Dr #2050 Fountain 92708 Shopping Center 13177Hills S Valley, 135 1070 N Main St 1810 PALM S Broadway 11, Follow Ste.usA Tempe, the Laguna Mall W CA Across From Sam’s ClubBldg. and DESERT MURRIETA EMERALD DR. at 24001 El Toro Rd Super Walmart Desert Gateway Plaza 25125 Madison Ave AZ 85206 Covina, CA 91791 714-549-3200 1721 EPhoenix, Ventura@AshelyHomeStoreWest Blvd40 Los Angeles, CA E Universityfacebook.com/AshleyHSSanMarcos Parkway SaltWest Lake City, UT 84115 Draper, UTMesa, 84020 Layton, UT 84041 Laguna Hills, CA 92653 26520 Carl Boyer Dr 34740 Monterey Ave 90015 Murrieta, CA 92562 AZ 85054 480-562-5900 949-461-0829 Santa Clarita, CA 91350 Palm Desert, CA 92211 951-894-7988 7 DAYS A WEEK: 626-938-1480 CAOPEN 93036 facebook.com/AshleyHSFountainValley 480-222-4663 213-745-2980 Orem, UT 84058 801-433-4663 385-234-4663 801-939-4663661-284-7200 Oxnard, facebook.com/AshleyHSTempe 760-202-3052 SANTA ANA facebook.com/AshleyHSLagunaHills facebook.com/AshleyHSMurrieta 480-812-4663 Monday - Sunday 10am - 9pm facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmDesert facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaClarita 805-981-0284 facebook.com/AshleyHSWestCovina facebook.com/AshleyHSMesa facebook.com/AshleyHSLosAngeles WARNER RD. NORTHRIDGE LONG BEACH HAWTHORNE 801-921-7595 Located in E.the

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SCOTTSDALE

. ST EL EW S. J

Get it Today! BAKERSFIELD 8915 it Rosedale Hwy NOW Get Bakersfield, CA 93312 Today! No Credit661-588-7953 HIRING! No Credit N Sales Needed! BURBANK Needed! East of the 5

facebook.com/AshleyHSFountainValley

PONY EXPRESS RD.

BURBANK East of the 5 Exit Burbank Blvd 401 N. 1st St Burbank, CA 91502 818-840-5620

LOS ANGELES South of the 10, Exit Convention Center 1810 S Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90015 213-745-2980

AVONDALE

1479 N Dysart Rd Avondale, AZ 85323 OXNARD SAN MARCOS Located in the 1050 Los Vallecitos Blvd 623-931-4663 Market Place at Oxnard San Marcos, CA 92069

TEMPE

“Se Habla Español” facebook.com/AshleyHSScottsdale VICTORVILLE SAN DIEGO Just East of the West of the 605 in Long facebook.com/AshleyHSOxnard North of Victor Valley Mall 7770 Miramar Road Northridge Mall Beach Towne Center Rosecrans East of 405, Exit Exit Burbank Blvd Westfield MainPlace Mall YORBA LINDA MONTCLAIR 12704 Amargosa Rd San Diego, CA 92126 facebook.com/AshleyHSColton 9301 Tampa Ave, Ste 1401 7410 Carson Blvd 14600 Ave CA 91324 Located Just North of Fwy 91 401 N. 1st St 2800 N Main St., #2100 Victorville, CA PALMDALE 92392 858-408-1701 South Northridge, Long Beach,Ocean CA 90808 Gate www.AshleyHomeStore.com 760-261-5386 facebook.com/AshleyHSSanDiego 562-766-2050 A WEEK: Monday - Saturday - 92705 9pm • Sunday 10am 6pm Hawthorne, CA 90250 22705 -Savi Ranch Pkwy Across from the AV Mall Santa 10am Ana, CA of Montclair Plaza 7 DAYS facebook.com/AshleyHSVictorville “Se Habla Español”Burbank, OPENCA 7 91502 DAYS A WEEK: Monday - 818-717-1740 Sunday 10am - 9pm OPEN @AshelyHomeStoreWest www.AshleyHomeStore.com facebook.com/AshleyHSNorthridge facebook.com/AshleyHSLongBeach 310-349-2083 Yorba Linda, CA 92887 39626 10th St West 818-840-5620 714-558-5300 5055 S. Montclair Plaza Ln Sales Associates Montclair, CA 91763 www.AshleyHomeStore.com 714-363-9900 Palmdale, CA “Se93551 Habla Español” facebook.com/AshleyHSBurbank facebook.com/AshleyHSHawthorne facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaAna **Offer applies only to single-receipt qualifyingPARK purchases. Ashley HomeStore does not require a down payment, however, sales tax and delivery charges are due at time of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™facebook.com/AshleyHSYorbaLinda Credit Card. No interest 661-225-9410 909-625-4420 LAGUNA HILLS SANTA CLARITA CANOGA will be charged on the promo purchase if you pay it off, in full, within the promo period. If you do not, interest will be charged on the promo purchase from the purchase date. The required minimum monthly payments may or may not pay off the promo purchase facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmdale facebook.com/AshleyHSMontclair Just North of Center Point Market Place 21301 Victory Blvd. by the end of the promo period. Regular account terms apply to non promo purchases and, after promo period ends, to the remaining promo balance. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.99%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see the Laguna Hills Mall Across Sam’s Club and purchases. Ashley HomeStore Canoga Park, CAPromotional 91303 PALM DESERT their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. purchases of merchandise will be chargedMURRIETA to account when merchandise is delivered. Subject to credit approval. *Offer applies onlyFrom to single-receipt qualifying Followareusrequired at does not require a down payment,747-226-6026 however, sales tax and delivery charges are due timeRd of purchase if the purchase is made with your Ashley Advantage™ Credit Card. NoPlaza interest will be charged promo purchase and equal monthly payments 24001 El at Toro SuperonWalmart Desert Gateway 25125 Madison Ave @AshelyHomeStoreWest equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by the numberLaguna of months in promo period until promo is paid inCA full. The equal monthly payment willMonterey be roundedAve to the next highest wholeCarl dollarBoyer and may payment that Hills, CA 92653 26520 Drbe higher than the minimum 34740 facebook.com/AshleyHSCanogaPark Murrieta, 92562 would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR CA is 29.99%; Charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card 949-461-0829 Santa Clarita, CA 91350 Palm Desert, 92211Minimum Interest OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: COLTON agreement for their applicable terms. Promotional purchases of merchandise will be charged to account when951-894-7988 merchandise is delivered. Subject to credit approval. ‡Monthly payment shown is equal to the purchase price, excluding taxes and delivery, divided 661-284-7200 760-202-3052 facebook.com/AshleyHSLagunaHills facebook.com/AshleyHSMurrieta by the number of months in the promo period, rounded to the next highest whole dollar, and only applies to the selected financing option shown. If you make your payments by the due date each month, the monthly payment shown should allow to pay 10am - 9pm Exit Mt. Vernon Ave. Monday - you Sunday facebook.com/AshleyHSPalmDesert facebook.com/AshleyHSSantaClarita off this purchase within the promo855 period if this balance on your account during the promoNORTHRIDGE period. If you have other balances on your account, this monthly payment will be added to the minimum payment applicable to those balances. Ashley Way is the only balance LONG BEACH “Se Habla Español” Colton, CA 92324 VICTORVILLE SAN DIEGO Just East of the West of the 605 in Long §Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See store for Center details. 909-433-5303 North of Victor Valley Mall 7770 Miramar Road Northridge Mall Beach Towne Amargosa Rd Hot Buys, floor models, clearance items, San& Diego, facebook.com/AshleyHSColton Ste 1401 Stearns 7410 CarsonorBlvd ‡‡Previous purchases excluded. Cannot be combined with any other promotion discount. Discount 9301 offersTampa excludeAve, Tempur-Pedic®, Foster® CA and 92126 Sealy Posturepedic12704 Hybrid™ mattress sets, Victorville, CA 92392 858-408-1701 Northridge, 91324 Long Beach, CAAdvertised 90808 Special sales tax, furniture protection plans, warranty, delivery fee, Manager’s Special pricing, pricing andCA 14 Piece Packages, cannot be combined with financing specials. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Southwest Furniture LLC., many www.AshleyHomeStore.com times has multiple offers, promotions, discounts and financing specials occurring at the same time; these are allowed to only be used either/or and not both or combined with each other. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or 760-261-5386 facebook.com/AshleyHSSanDiego 818-717-1740 562-766-2050 specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Picture may not represent item exactly as shown, advertised items may not be on display at all locations. Some restrictions may apply. Available only at participating facebook.com/AshleyHSVictorville facebook.com/AshleyHSNorthridge facebook.com/AshleyHSLongBeach locations. Ashley HomeStores are independently owned and operated. ©2020 Ashley HomeStores, Ltd. Promotional Start Date: March 10, 2020. Expires: March 17, 2020.

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Cottonwood Heights Journal | March 2020  

Cottonwood Heights Journal | March 2020